Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Former

Former Quotes (137 quotes)

... I left Caen, where I was living, to go on a geologic excursion under the auspices of the School of Mines. The incidents of the travel made me forget my mathematical work. Having reached Coutances, we entered an omnibus to go to some place or other. At the moment when I put my foot on the step, the idea came to me, without anything in my former thoughts seeming to have paved the way for it, that the transformations I had used to define the Fuchsian functions were identical with those of non-Eudidean geometry. I did not verify the idea; I should not have had time, as upon taking my seat in the omnibus, I went on with a conversation already commenced, but I felt a perfect certainty. On my return to Caen, for convenience sake, I verified the result at my leisure.
Quoted in Sir Roger Penrose, The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (1990), 541. Science and Method (1908) 51-52, 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Enter (141)  |  Excursion (11)  |  Forget (115)  |  Function (228)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Living (491)  |  Mine (76)  |  Moment (253)  |  Non-Euclidian (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Sake (58)  |  School (219)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Travel (114)  |  Verify (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Ihm in vollem Maaße das Schicksal werde, welches in jeder Erkenntniß, … allezeit der Wahrheit zu Theil ward, der nur ein kurzes Siegesfest beschieden ist, zwischen den beiden langen Zeiträumen, wo sie als parador verdammt und als trivial geringgeschätzt wird.
[It] has always fallen to the lot of truth in every branch of knowledge, … [that] to truth only a brief celebration of victory is allowed between the two long periods during which it is condemned as paradoxical, or disparaged as trivial. The author of truth also usually meets with the former fate.
Conclusion for Preface, written at Dresden in August 1818, first German edition, Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung, 4 Bücher nebst einem Anhange der die Kritik der Kentischen Philosophie (1819), xvi. As translated by E.F.J. Payne in The World as Will and Representation (1958, 1969), Vol. 1, xvii. In the preface, Schopenhauer is writing his hope that what he has written in the book will be accepted by those it reaches. Notice the statement of three stages of truth: condemnation; acceptance; trivializing. It may be the source of a condensed quote attributed (wrongly?) to Schopenhauer—seen in this collection as the quote that begins, “All truth passes through three stages…”
Science quotes on:  |  Allowed (3)  |  Author (167)  |  Branch (150)  |  Brief (36)  |  Celebration (7)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemned (5)  |  Disparage (5)  |  Fate (72)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Lot (151)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Period (198)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Victory (39)  |  Ward (7)

Wer kann was Dummes, wer was Kluges denken, Das nicht die Vorwelt schon gedacht?
What is there, wise or foolish, one can think, That former ages have not thought before?
Words of Mephistopheles written in Faust, Pt. 2, Act 2. As quoted and translated by the editor in in William Francis Henry King (ed.), Classical and Foreign Quotations: A Polyglot Manual of Historical (1904), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wise (131)

[Concerning the former belief that there were no genetic connections among species:] This view, as a rounded whole and in all its essential elements, has very recently disappeared from science. It died a royal death with Agassiz.
Asa Gray
From lecture 'Scientific Beliefs', as published in Natural Science and Religion: Two Lectures delivered to the Theological School of Yale College (1880), Vol. 3, Lecture 1, 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Louis Agassiz (42)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Connection (162)  |  Death (388)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Element (310)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Royal (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

[Of the Laputans:] They have likewise discovered two lesser stars, or satellites, which revolve about Mars, whereof the innermost is distant from the centre of the primary planet exactly three of his diameters, and the outermost five; the former revolves in the space of ten hours, and the latter in twenty one and a half.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 3, 213.
Science quotes on:  |  Diameter (28)  |  Discover (553)  |  Hour (186)  |  Mars (44)  |  Moon (237)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Planet (356)  |  Primary (80)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Two (937)

[Pechblende] einer eigenthümlichen, selbstständigen metallischen Substanz bestehe. Es fallen folglich auch deren bisherige Benennungen, als: Ресhblende Eisenpecherz, hinweg, welche nun durch einen neuen ausschliessend bezeichnenden Namen zu ersetzen sind. Ich habe dazu den Namen: Uranerz (Uranium) erwählt; zu einigem Andenken, dass die chemische Ausfindung dieses neuen Metallkörpers in die Epoche der astronomischen. Entdeckung des Planeten Uranus gefallen sei.
[Pitchblende] consists of a peculiar, distinct, metallic substance. Therefore its former denominations, pitch-blende, pitch-iron-ore, &c. are no longer applicable, and must be supplied by another more appropriate name.—I have chosen that of uranite, (Uranium), as a kind of memorial, that the chemical discovery of this new metal happened in the period of the astronomical discovery of the new planet Uranus.
In original German edition, Beiträge Zur Chemischen Kenntniss Der Mineralkörper (1797), Vol. 2, 215. English edition, translator not named, Analytical Essays Towards Promoting the Chemical Knowledge of Mineral Substances (1801), 491. The new planet was discovered on 13 Mar 1781 by William Herschel, who originally named it Georgium Sidus (George's Star) to honour King George III.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Choice (110)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Consist (223)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Element (310)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Sir William Herschel (14)  |  Iron (96)  |  Kind (557)  |  Memorial (3)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Ore (12)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Period (198)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Planet (356)  |  Substance (248)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Uranus (4)

A closer look at the course followed by developing theory reveals for a start that it is by no means as continuous as one might expect, but full of breaks and at least apparently not along the shortest logical path. Certain methods often afforded the most handsome results only the other day, and many might well have thought that the development of science to infinity would consist in no more than their constant application. Instead, on the contrary, they suddenly reveal themselves as exhausted and the attempt is made to find other quite disparate methods. In that event there may develop a struggle between the followers of the old methods and those of the newer ones. The former's point of view will be termed by their opponents as out-dated and outworn, while its holders in turn belittle the innovators as corrupters of true classical science.
In 'On the Development of the Methods of Theoretical Physics in Recent Times', Populäre Schriften, Essay 14. Address (22 Sep 1899) to the Meeting of Natural Scientists at Munich. Collected in Brian McGuinness (ed.), Ludwig Boltzmann: Theoretical Physics and Philosophical Problems, Selected Writings (1974), 79.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Application (242)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Break (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Classical (45)  |  Closer (43)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Handsome (4)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Look (582)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Old (481)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Start (221)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

A great department of thought must have its own inner life, however transcendent may be the importance of its relations to the outside. No department of science, least of all one requiring so high a degree of mental concentration as Mathematics, can be developed entirely, or even mainly, with a view to applications outside its own range. The increased complexity and specialisation of all branches of knowledge makes it true in the present, however it may have been in former times, that important advances in such a department as Mathematics can be expected only from men who are interested in the subject for its own sake, and who, whilst keeping an open mind for suggestions from outside, allow their thought to range freely in those lines of advance which are indicated by the present state of their subject, untrammelled by any preoccupation as to applications to other departments of science. Even with a view to applications, if Mathematics is to be adequately equipped for the purpose of coping with the intricate problems which will be presented to it in the future by Physics, Chemistry and other branches of physical science, many of these problems probably of a character which we cannot at present forecast, it is essential that Mathematics should be allowed to develop freely on its own lines.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Application (242)  |  Branch (150)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Cope (6)  |  Degree (276)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Equip (5)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Essential (199)  |  Expect (200)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Freely (13)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Important (209)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Least (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physics (533)  |  Preoccupation (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Range (99)  |  Relation (157)  |  Require (219)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Specialize (3)  |  State (491)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transcendent (2)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

Sigmund Freud quote: A layman will no doubt find it hard to understand how pathological disorders of the body and mind can be el
A layman will no doubt find it hard to understand how pathological disorders of the body and mind can be eliminated by 'mere' words. He will feel that he is being asked to believe in magic. And he will not be so very wrong, for the words which we use in our everyday speech are nothing other than watered-down magic. But we shall have to follow a roundabout path in order to explain how science sets about restoring to words a part at least of their former magical power.
Psychical (or Mental) Treatment (1905), In James Strachey (ed.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (1953), Vol. 7, 283.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Down (456)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Explain (322)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hard (243)  |  Layman (21)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Power (746)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Speech (61)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

According to this view of the matter, there is nothing casual in the formation of Metamorphic Rocks. All strata, once buried deep enough, (and due TIME allowed!!!) must assume that state,—none can escape. All records of former worlds must ultimately perish.
Letter to Mr Murchison, In explanation of the views expressed in his previous letter to Mr Lyell, 15 Nov 1836. Quoted in the Appendix to Charles Babbage, The Ninth Bridgewater Treatise: A Fragment (1838), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Deep (233)  |  Due (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Escape (80)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geology (220)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perish (50)  |  Record (154)  |  Rock (161)  |  State (491)  |  Strata (35)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

Alas, your dear friend and servant is totally blind. Henceforth this heaven, this universe, which by wonderful observations I had enlarged by a hundred and a thousand times beyond the conception of former ages, is shrunk for me into the narrow space which I myself fill in it. So it pleases God; it shall therefore please me also.
In Letter, as quoted in Sir Oliver Lodge, Pioneers of Science (1905), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Conception (154)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Friend (168)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Myself (212)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Observation (555)  |  Please (65)  |  Servant (39)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wonderful (149)

All the species recognized by Botanists came forth from the Almighty Creator's hand, and the number of these is now and always will be exactly the same, while every day new and different florists' species arise from the true species so-called by Botanists, and when they have arisen they finally revert to the original forms. Accordingly to the former have been assigned by Nature fixed limits, beyond which they cannot go: while the latter display without end the infinite sport of Nature.
Philosophia Botanica (1751), aphorism 310. Trans. Frans A. Stafleu, Linnaeus and the Linnaeans: The Spreading of their Ideas in Systematic Botany, 1735-1789 (1971), 90.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Creator (91)  |  Different (577)  |  Display (56)  |  End (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Species (401)  |  Sport (22)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Corner (57)  |  Defense (23)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Disrespect (3)  |  Drive (55)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Failure (161)  |  Full (66)  |  Help (105)  |  House (140)  |  Imply (17)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Local (19)  |  Location (15)  |  Material (353)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Range (99)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rich (62)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (58)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (326)  |  Spot (17)  |  Stem (31)  |  Struggle (105)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tide (34)  |  Tough (19)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Variation (90)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vary (27)

Art and science coincide insofar as both aim to improve the lives of men and women. The latter normally concerns itself with profit, the former with pleasure. In the coming age, art will fashion our entertainment out of new means of productivity in ways that will simultaneously enhance our profit and maximize our pleasure.
Brecht’s positive vision of theater in the coming age of technology, expressed in Little Organon for the Theater (1949). In The Columbia World of Quotations (1996).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Art (657)  |  Both (493)  |  Coming (114)  |  Concern (228)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  New (1216)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Profit (52)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

As geologists, we learn that it is not only the present condition of the globe that has been suited to the accommodation of myriads of living creatures, but that many former states also have been equally adapted to the organization and habits of prior races of beings. The disposition of the seas, continents, and islands, and the climates have varied; so it appears that the species have been changed, and yet they have all been so modelled, on types analogous to those of existing plants and animals, as to indicate throughout a perfect harmony of design and unity of purpose. To assume that the evidence of the beginning or end of so vast a scheme lies within the reach of our philosophical inquiries, or even of our speculations, appears to us inconsistent with a just estimate of the relations which subsist between the finite powers of man and the attributes of an Infinite and Eternal Being.
Concluding remark, Principles of Geology(1833), Vol. 3, 384-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Disposition (42)  |  End (590)  |  Equally (130)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Finite (59)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Organization (114)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Sea (308)  |  Species (401)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (167)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vast (177)

At first he who invented any art that went beyond the common perceptions of man was naturally admired by men, not only because there was something useful in the inventions, but because he was thought wise and superior to the rest. But as more arts were invented, and some were directed to the necessities of life, others to its recreation, the inventors of the latter were always regarded as wiser than the inventors of the former, because their branches of knowledge did not aim at utility.
Aristotle
Metaphysics, 981b, 13-20. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 2, 1553.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Art (657)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Common (436)  |  Direct (225)  |  First (1283)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Something (719)  |  Superior (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Wise (131)

Basic research is not the same as development. A crash program for the latter may be successful; but for the former it is like trying to make nine women pregnant at once in the hope of getting a baby in a month’s time.
In New Scientist, November 18, 1976.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Baby (28)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Hope (299)  |  Month (88)  |  Research (664)  |  Successful (123)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)

Because a fact seems strange to you, you conclude that it is not one. ... All science, however, commences by being strange. Science is successive. It goes from one wonder to another. It mounts by a ladder. The science of to-day would seem extravagant to the science of a former time. Ptolemy would believe Newton mad.
In Victor Hugo and Lorenzo O'Rourke (trans.) Victor Hugo's Intellectual Autobiography: (Postscriptum de ma vie) (1907), 322.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Mount (42)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Progress (465)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strange (157)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Wonder (236)

Both religion and natural science require a belief in God for their activities, to the former He is the starting point, and to the latter the goal of every thought process. To the former He is the foundation, to the latter, the crown of the edifice of every generalized world view.
Lecture, 'Religion and Natural Science' (1937) In Max Planck and Frank Gaynor (trans.), Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (1949), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Crown (38)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Point (580)  |  Process (423)  |  Religion (361)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Start (221)  |  Thought (953)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

But, because my private lectures and domestic pupils are a great hinderance and interruption of my studies, I wish to live entirely exempt from the former, and in great measure from the latter. … in short, I should wish to gain my bread from my writings.
Reply upon being offered a professorship. Quoted in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei (1832), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Bread (39)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Gain (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interruption (5)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Live (628)  |  Measure (232)  |  Money (170)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Research (664)  |  Short (197)  |  Wish (212)  |  Writing (189)

By considering the embryological structure of man - the homologies which he presents with the lower animals - the rudiments which he retains - and the reversions to which he is liable, we can partly recall in imagination the former condition of our early progenitors; and we can approximately place them in their proper position in the zoological series. We thus learnt that man is descended from a hairy quadruped, furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in its habit, and an inhabitant of the Old World. This creature, if its whole structure had been examined by a naturalist, would have been classed among the Quadrumana, as surely as would be the common and still more ancient progenitor of the Old and New World monkeys.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 389.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Ear (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Habit (168)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Old World (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Proper (144)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Series (149)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surely (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Correct is to recognize what diseases are and whence they come; which are long and which are short; which are mortal and which are not; which are in the process of changing into others; which are increasing and which are diminishing; which are major and which are minor; to treat the diseases that can be treated, but to recognize the ones that cannot be, and to know why they cannot be; by treating patients with the former, to give them the benefit of treatment as far as it is possible.
Diseases, in Hippocrates, trans. P. Potter (1988), Vol. 5, 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Major (84)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Short (197)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Why (491)

Don’t confuse hypothesis and theory. The former is a possible explanation; the latter, the correct one. The establishment of theory is the very purpose of science.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Confusion (57)  |  Correct (86)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)

Even more difficult to explain, than the breaking-up of a single mass into fragments, and the drifting apart of these blocks to form the foundations of the present-day continents, is the explanation of the original production of the single mass, or PANGAEA, by the concentration of the former holosphere of granitic sial into a hemisphere of compressed and crushed gneisses and schists. Creep and the effects of compression, due to shrinking or other causes, have been appealed to but this is hardly a satisfactory explanation. The earth could no more shrug itself out of its outer rock-shell unaided, than an animal could shrug itself out of its hide, or a man wriggle out of his skin, or even out of his closely buttoned coat, without assistance either of his own hands or those of others.
The Rhythm of Ages (1940), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Cause (541)  |  Compression (6)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creep (15)  |  Crush (18)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Due (141)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Hide (69)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shell (63)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)

Louis Pasteur quote: Every chemical substance, whether natural or artificial, falls into one of two major categories, according
Every chemical substance, whether natural or artificial, falls into one of two major categories, according to the spatial characteristic of its form. The distinction is between those substances that have a plane of symmetry and those that do not. The former belong to the mineral, the latter to the living world.
Pasteur Vallery-Radot (ed.), Oeuvres de Pasteur (1922-1939), Vol. I, 331. Quoted in Patrice Debré, Louis Pasteur, trans. Elborg Forster (1994), 261.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Belong (162)  |  Category (18)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fall (230)  |  Form (959)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Major (84)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Natural (796)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Plane (20)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Substance (248)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Two (937)  |  World (1774)

Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God.
In Pensées (1670), Section 10, 11. As translated in Blaise Pascal and W.F. Trotter (trans.), 'Thoughts', No. 248, collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics (1910), Vol. 48, 92. From the original French, “La foi est différente de la preuve: l’une est humaine, l’autre est un don de Dieu,” in Ernest Havet (ed.), Pensées de Pascal (1892), 276.
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  Faith (203)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Human (1468)  |  Latter (21)  |  Proof (287)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Framework (31)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (23)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proper (144)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rigid (24)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Solid (116)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (300)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Swing (11)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Transition (26)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

For even they who compose treatises of medicine or natural philosophy in verse are denominated Poets: yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common except their metre; the former, therefore, justly merits the name of the Poet; while the other should rather be called a Physiologist than a Poet.
Aristotle
Aristotle’s Treatise on Poetry, I:2, trans. Thomas Twining (1957), 103
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Empedocles (10)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Merit (50)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Verse (11)

For nature is a perpetuall circulatory worker, generating fluids out of solids, and solids out of fluids, fixed things out of volatile, & volatile out of fixed, subtile out of gross, & gross out of subtile, Some things to ascend & make the upper terrestriall juices, Rivers and the Atmosphere; & by consequence others to descend for a Requitall to the former. And as the Earth, so perhaps may the Sun imbibe this spirit copiously to conserve his Shineing, & keep the Planets from recedeing further from him. And they that will, may also suppose, that this Spirit affords or carryes with it thither the solary fewell & materiall Principle of Light; And that the vast aethereall Spaces between us, & the stars are for a sufficient repository for this food of the Sunn and Planets.
Letter to Oldenburg (7 Dec 1675). In H. W. Turnbull (ed.), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1661-1675 (1959), Vol. 1, 366.
Science quotes on:  |  Aether (13)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Circulatory (2)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Descend (47)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Imbibed (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  River (119)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)

For the holy Bible and the phenomena of nature proceed alike from the divine Word, the former as the dictate of the Holy Ghost and the latter as the observant executrix of God's commands. It is necessary for the Bible, in order to be accommodated to the understanding of every man, to speak many things which appear to differ from the absolute truth so far as the bare meaning of the words is concerned. But Nature, on the other hand, is inexorable and immutable; she never transgresses the laws imposed upon her, or cares a whit whether her abstruse reasons and methods of operation are understandable to men. For that reason it appears that nothing physical which sense-experience sets before our eyes, or which necessary demonstrations prove to us, ought to be called in question (much less condemned) upon the testimony of biblical passages which may have some different meaning beneath their words.
Letter to Madame Christina of Lorraine, Grand Duchess of Tuscany: Concerning the Use of Biblical Quotations in Matters of Science (1615), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 182-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Alike (60)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Call (769)  |  Care (186)  |  Command (58)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Differ (85)  |  Different (577)  |  Divine (112)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Ghost (36)  |  God (757)  |  Holy (34)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Prove (250)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Word (619)

Former arbiters of taste must have felt (as so many apostles of ‘traditional values’ and other highminded tags for restriction and conformity do today) that maintaining the social order required a concept of unalloyed heroism. Human beings so designated as role models had to embody all virtues of the paragon–which meant, of course, that they could not be described in their truly human and ineluctably faulted form.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apostle (3)  |  Arbiter (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Course (409)  |  Describe (128)  |  Designation (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embody (16)  |  Fault (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Role (86)  |  Role Model (7)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Taste (90)  |  Today (314)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Truly (116)  |  Value (365)  |  Virtue (109)

Geology is intimately related to almost all the physical sciences, as is history to the moral. An historian should, if possible, be at once profoundly acquainted with ethics, politics, jurisprudence, the military art, theology; in a word, with all branches of knowledge, whereby any insight into human affairs, or into the moral and intellectual nature of man, can be obtained. It would be no less desirable that a geologist should be well versed in chemistry, natural philosophy, mineralogy, zoology, comparative anatomy, botany; in short, in every science relating to organic and inorganic nature. With these accomplishments the historian and geologist would rarely fail to draw correct and philosophical conclusions from the various monuments transmitted to them of former occurrences.
Principles of Geology (1830-3), Vol. 1, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Art (657)  |  Botany (57)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Draw (137)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Fail (185)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Military (40)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Monument (45)  |  Moral (195)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Man (8)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organic (158)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Theology (52)  |  Various (200)  |  Word (619)  |  Zoology (36)

Geometric writings are not rare in which one would seek in vain for an idea at all novel, for a result which sooner or later might be of service, for anything in fact which might be destined to survive in the science; and one finds instead treatises on trivial problems or investigations on special forms which have absolutely no use, no importance, which have their origin not in the science itself but in the caprice of the author; or one finds applications of known methods which have already been made thousands of times; or generalizations from known results which are so easily made that the knowledge of the latter suffices to give at once the former. Now such work is not merely useless; it is actually harmful because it produces a real incumbrance in the science and an embarrassment for the more serious investigators; and because often it crowds out certain lines of thought which might well have deserved to be studied.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Author (167)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Destined (42)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Latter (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Novel (32)  |  Origin (239)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serious (91)  |  Service (110)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vain (83)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Accept (191)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Century (310)  |  Character (243)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (97)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consistently (8)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Course (409)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Functional (10)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Granite (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Open (274)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Process (423)  |  Raise (35)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (157)  |  Rock (161)  |  Romanticist (2)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sea (308)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Various (200)  |  Abraham Werner (5)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Working (20)

Hardly a pure science, history is closer to animal husbandry than it is to mathematics, in that it involves selective breeding. The principal difference between the husbandryman and the historian is that the former breeds sheep or cows or such, and the latter breeds (assumed) facts. The husbandryman uses his skills to enrich the future; the historian uses his to enrich the past. Both are usually up to their ankles in bullshit.
Another Roadside Attraction (1990), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Both (493)  |  Breed (24)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Bullshit (2)  |  Closer (43)  |  Cow (39)  |  Difference (337)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Future (429)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Involve (90)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Past (337)  |  Principal (63)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selective (19)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Skill (109)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)

I am an old man now, and when I die and go to heaven, there are two matters on which I hope for enlightenment. One is quantum electrodynamics and the other is the turbulent motion of fluids. About the former, I am really rather optimistic.
In Address to the British Society for the Advancement of Science (1932). As cited by Tom Mullin in 'Turbulent Times For FLuids', New Science (11 Nov 1989), 52. Werner Heisenberg is also reported, sometimes called apocryphal, to have expressed a similar sentiment, but Webmaster has found no specific citation.
Science quotes on:  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Old (481)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Turbulent (4)  |  Two (937)

I cannot find anything showing early aptitude for acquiring languages; but that he [Clifford] had it and was fond of exercising it in later life is certain. One practical reason for it was the desire of being able to read mathematical papers in foreign journals; but this would not account for his taking up Spanish, of which he acquired a competent knowledge in the course of a tour to the Pyrenees. When he was at Algiers in 1876 he began Arabic, and made progress enough to follow in a general way a course of lessons given in that language. He read modern Greek fluently, and at one time he was furious about Sanskrit. He even spent some time on hieroglyphics. A new language is a riddle before it is conquered, a power in the hand afterwards: to Clifford every riddle was a challenge, and every chance of new power a divine opportunity to be seized. Hence he was likewise interested in the various modes of conveying and expressing language invented for special purposes, such as the Morse alphabet and shorthand. … I have forgotten to mention his command of French and German, the former of which he knew very well, and the latter quite sufficiently; …
In paper, 'William Kingdon Clifford', The Fortnightly Review (1879), 31, 671. Published in advance of Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Clifford’s Lectures and Essays (1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 9. The 'Introduction' was written by Pollock.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Arabic (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Command (58)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Course (409)  |  Desire (204)  |  Divine (112)  |  Early (185)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  French (20)  |  General (511)  |  German (36)  |  Greek (107)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  Interest (386)  |  Journal (30)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Modern (385)  |  New (1216)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progress (465)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Shorthand (5)  |  Special (184)  |  Spent (85)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tour (2)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)

I have been driven to assume for some time, especially in relation to the gases, a sort of conducting power for magnetism. Mere space is Zero. One substance being made to occupy a given portion of space will cause more lines of force to pass through that space than before, and another substance will cause less to pass. The former I now call Paramagnetic & the latter are the diamagnetic. The former need not of necessity assume a polarity of particles such as iron has with magnetic, and the latter do not assume any such polarity either direct or reverse. I do not say more to you just now because my own thoughts are only in the act of formation, but this I may say: that the atmosphere has an extraordinary magnetic constitution, & I hope & expect to find in it the cause of the annual & diurnal variations, but keep this to yourself until I have time to see what harvest will spring from my growing ideas.
Letter to William Whewell, 22 Aug 1850. In L. Pearce Williams (ed.), The Selected Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1971), Vol. 2, 589.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Growing (98)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Iron (96)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pass (238)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Portion (84)  |  Power (746)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Spring (133)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

I have procured some of the mice mentioned in my former letters, a young one and a female with young, both of which I have preserved in brandy. From the colour, shape, size, and manner of nesting, I make no doubt but that the species is nondescript [not known to science]. They are much smaller and more slender than the mus domesticus medius of Ray; and have more of the squirrel or dormouse colour ... They never enter into houses; are carried into ricks and barns with the sheaves; abound in harvest, and build their nests amidst the straws of the corn above the ground, and sometimes in thistles.
[Part of his observations on the harvest mouse, which he was the first to describe as a new species.]
Letter XII (4 Nov 1767) in The Natural History of Selborne (1789, 1899), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Barn (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Brandy (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Corn (19)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enter (141)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Harvest (27)  |  House (140)  |  Known (454)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Nest (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Ray (114)  |  John Ray (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sheaf (2)  |  Species (401)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Straw (7)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Young (227)

I have sold more books on physics than Madonna has on sex.
[Hawking adopted this statement from a remark made to him by his former post-doc, Nathan Myhrvold.]
The Illustrated A Brief History of Time, Updated and Expanded Edition (1996), Foreward.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  More (2559)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Sex (69)  |  Statement (142)

I purpose, in return for the honour you do us by coming to see what are our proceedings here, to bring before you, in the course of these lectures, the Chemical History of a Candle. I have taken this subject on a former occasion; and were it left to my own will, I should prefer to repeat it almost every year—so abundant is the interest that attaches itself to the subject, so wonderful are the varieties of outlet which it offers into the various departments of philosophy. There is not a law under which any part of this universe is governed which does not come into play, and is touched upon in these phenomena. There is no better, there is no more open door by which you can enter the study of natural philosophy, than by considering the physical phenomena of a candle.
A Course of Six Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (1861), 13-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Better (486)  |  Candle (30)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coming (114)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Enter (141)  |  Govern (64)  |  History (673)  |  Honour (56)  |  Interest (386)  |  Law (894)  |  Lecture (105)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Return (124)  |  See (1081)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

I shall no doubt be blamed by certain scientists, and, I am afraid, by some philosophers, for having taken serious account of the alleged facts which are investigated by Psychical Researchers. I am wholly impenitent about this. The scientists in question seem to me to confuse the Author of Nature with the Editor of Nature; or at any rate to suppose that there can be no productions of the former which would not be accepted for publication by the latter. And I see no reason to believe this.
The Mind and its Place in Nature (1925), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Account (192)  |  Author (167)  |  Certain (550)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Production (183)  |  Psychical Research (2)  |  Publication (101)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Serious (91)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Wholly (88)

I took a good clear piece of Cork and with a Pen-knife sharpen'd as keen as a Razor, I cut a piece of it off, and thereby left the surface of it exceeding smooth, then examining it very diligently with a Microscope, me thought I could perceive it to appear a little porous; but I could not so plainly distinguish them, as to be sure that they were pores, much less what Figure they were of: But judging from the lightness and yielding quality of the Cork, that certainly the texture could not be so curious, but that possibly, if I could use some further diligence, I might find it to be discernable with a Microscope, I with the same sharp Penknife, cut off from the former smooth surface an exceeding thin piece of it with a deep plano-convex Glass, I could exceedingly plainly perceive it to be all perforated and porous, much like a Honey-comb, but that the pores of it were not regular; yet it was not unlike a Honey-comb in these particulars.
First, in that it had a very little solid substance, in comparison of the empty cavity that was contain'd between, ... for the Interstitia or walls (as I may so call them) or partitions of those pores were neer as thin in proportion to their pores as those thin films of Wax in a Honey-comb (which enclose and constitute the sexangular cells) are to theirs.
Next, in that these pores, or cells, were not very deep, but constituted of a great many little Boxes, separated out of one continued long pore, by certain Diaphragms...
I no sooner discerned these (which were indeed the first microscopical pores I ever saw, and perhaps, that were ever seen, for I had not met with any Writer or Person, that had made any mention of them before this) but me thought I had with the discovery of them, presently hinted to me the true and intelligible reason of all the Phænomena of Cork.
Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries thereupon (1665), 112-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cavity (8)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Convex (6)  |  Cork (2)  |  Curious (91)  |  Cut (114)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hint (21)  |  Honey (15)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Knife (23)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Mention (82)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Next (236)  |  Pen (20)  |  Person (363)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quality (135)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Solid (116)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thought (953)  |  Use (766)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wax (13)  |  Writer (86)

I will not now discuss the Controversie betwixt some of the Modern Atomists, and the Cartesians; the former of whom think, that betwixt the Earth and the Stars, and betwixt these themselves there are vast Tracts of Space that are empty, save where the beams of Light do pass through them; and the later of whom tell us, that the Intervals betwixt the Stars and Planets (among which the Earth may perhaps be reckon'd) are perfectly fill'd, but by a Matter far subtiler than our Air, which some call Celestial, and others Æther. I shall not, I say, engage in this controversie, but thus much seems evident, That If there be such a Celestial Matter, it must ' make up far the Greatest part of the Universe known to us. For the Interstellar part of the world (If I may so stile it) bears so very great a proportion to the Globes, and their Atmospheres too, (If other Stars have any as well as the Earth,) that It Is almost incomparably Greater in respect of them, than all our Atmosphere is in respect of the Clouds, not to make the comparison between the Sea and the Fishes that swim in it.
A Continuation of New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air, and their Effects (1669), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bear (159)  |  Call (769)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Dark Matter (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Empty (80)  |  Engage (39)  |  Ether (35)  |  Evident (91)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

If a hundred or a thousand people, all of the same age, of the same constitution and habits, were suddenly seized by the same illness, and one half of them were to place themselves under the care of doctors, such as they are in our time, whilst the other half entrusted themselves to Nature and to their own discretion, I have not the slightest doubt that there would be more cases of death amongst the former, and more cases of recovery among the latter.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Among (3)  |  Care (186)  |  Case (99)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Death (388)  |  Discretion (3)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Entrust (2)  |  Habit (168)  |  Half (56)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Illness (34)  |  Latter (21)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Place (177)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Same (157)  |  Seize (15)  |  Slight (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whilst (3)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Betterment (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Despair (40)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fit (134)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Help (105)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humble (50)  |  Humility (28)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Industry (137)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Race (268)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

If I were a comet, I should consider the men of our present age a degenerate breed. In former times, the respect for comets was universal and profound.
In 'On Comets', collected in In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays (1935), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Breed (24)  |  Comet (54)  |  Consider (416)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Present (619)  |  Profound (104)  |  Respect (207)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universal (189)

If the finding of Coines, Medals, Urnes, and other Monuments of famous Persons, or Towns, or Utensils, be admitted for unquestionable Proofs, that such Persons or things have, in former Times, had a being, certainly those Petrifactions may be allowed to be of equal Validity and Evidence, that there have been formerly such Vegetables or Animals. These are truly Authentick Antiquity not to be counterfeited, the Stamps, and Impressions, and Characters of Nature that are beyond the Reach and Power of Humane Wit and Invention, and are true universal Characters legible to all rational Men.
Lectures and Discourses of Earthquakes (1668). In The Posthumous Works of Robert Hooke, containing his Cutlerian Lectures and other Discourses read at the Meetings of the Illustrious Royal Society (1705), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Character (243)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Humane (18)  |  Impression (114)  |  Invention (369)  |  Monument (45)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reach (281)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unquestionable (9)  |  Validity (47)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Wit (59)

If the juices of the body were more chymically examined, especially by a naturalist, that knows the ways of making fixed bodies volatile, and volatile fixed, and knows the power of the open air in promoting the former of those operations; it is not improbable, that both many things relating to the nature of the humours, and to the ways of sweetening, actuating, and otherwise altering them, may be detected, and the importance of such discoveries may be discerned.
Quoted In Barbara Kaplan (ed.) Divulging of Useful Truths in Physick: The Medical Agenda of Robert Boyle (1993), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Detect (44)  |  Discern (33)  |  Humour (116)  |  Importance (286)  |  Know (1518)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Open (274)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Power (746)  |  Research (664)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

In 1925 [state legislators] prohibited by law the teaching of evolution in Tennessee. … Anti-evolutionists feared that a scientific idea would undermine religious belief. In the present…, pro-evolutionists fear that a religious idea will undermine scientific belief. The former had insufficient confidence in religion; the latter, insufficient confidence in science.
In Building a Bridge to the 18th Century: How the Past Can Improve Our Future (1999), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Anti-evolutionist (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fear (197)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insufficient (9)  |  Law (894)  |  Present (619)  |  Prohibit (3)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  State (491)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  State of Tennessee (3)  |  Undermine (6)  |  Will (2355)

In all cases of the motion of free material points under the influence of their attractive and repulsive forces, whose intensity depends solely upon distance, the loss in tension is always equal to the gain in vis viva, and the gain in the former equal to the loss in the latter. Hence the sum of the existing tensions and vires vivae is always constant. In this most general form we can distinguish our law as the principle of the conservation of force.
'On the Conservation of Force; a Physical Memoir'. In John Tyndall and William Francis (eds.), Scientific Memoirs: Natural Philosophy (1853), 121.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Constant (144)  |  Depend (228)  |  Distance (161)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Gain (145)  |  General (511)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Law (894)  |  Loss (110)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Sum (102)  |  Tension (24)

In former times, … when ships buffeted by storms threw a portion of their cargo overboard, it was recognized that those whose goods were sacrificed had a claim in equity to indemnification at the expense of those whose goods were safely delivered. The value of the lost goods was paid for by agreement between all those whose merchandise had been in the same ship. This sea damage to cargo in transit was known as “havaria” and the word came naturally to be applied to the compensation money which each individual was called upon to pay. From this Latin word derives our modern word average.
In 'On the Average', Facts From Figures (1951), Chap. 4, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Average (82)  |  Call (769)  |  Cargo (5)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compensation (7)  |  Damage (34)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Derive (65)  |  Equity (4)  |  Expense (16)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Hazard (18)  |  Indemnification (2)  |  Individual (404)  |  Known (454)  |  Latin (38)  |  Lost (34)  |  Merchandise (2)  |  Modern (385)  |  Money (170)  |  Nomencalture (4)  |  Overboard (3)  |  Portion (84)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Safely (8)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transit (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (619)

In general, a fact is worth more than theories in the long run. The theory stimulates, but the fact builds. The former in due time is replaced by one better but the fact remains and becomes fertile.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Due (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Fertility (19)  |  General (511)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Run (174)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Worth (169)

In order that an inventory of plants may be begun and a classification of them correctly established, we must try to discover criteria of some sort for distinguishing what are called “species”. After a long and considerable investigation, no surer criterion for determining species had occurred to me than distinguishing features that perpetuate themselves in propagation from seed. Thus, no matter what variations occur in the individuals or the species, if they spring from the seed of one and the same plant, they are accidental variations and not such as to distinguish a species. For these variations do not perpetuate themselves in subsequent seeding. Thus, for example, we do not regard caryophylli with full or multiple blossoms as a species distinct from caryophylli with single blossoms, because the former owe their origin to the seed of the latter and if the former are sown from their own seed, they once more produce single-blossom caryophylli. But variations that never have as their source seed from one and the same species may finally be regarded as distinct species. Or, if you make a comparison between any two plants, plants which never spring from each other's seed and never, when their seed is sown, are transmuted one into the other, these plants finally are distinct species. For it is just as in animals: a difference in sex is not enough to prove a difference of species, because each sex is derived from the same seed as far as species is concerned and not infrequently from the same parents; no matter how many and how striking may be the accidental differences between them; no other proof that bull and cow, man and woman belong to the same species is required than the fact that both very frequently spring from the same parents or the same mother. Likewise in the case of plants, there is no surer index of identity of species than that of origin from the seed of one and the same plant, whether it is a matter of individuals or species. For animals that differ in species preserve their distinct species permanently; one species never springs from the seed of another nor vice versa.
John Ray
Historia Plantarum (1686), Vol. 1, 40. Trans. Edmund Silk. Quoted in Barbara G. Beddall, 'Historical Notes on Avian Classification', Systematic Zoology (1957), 6, 133-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Animal (617)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Both (493)  |  Bull (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Classification (97)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Concern (228)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Cow (39)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Identity (19)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inventory (7)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Likewise (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Mother (114)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Parent (76)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Plant (294)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Production (183)  |  Proof (287)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regard (305)  |  Required (108)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Single (353)  |  Species (401)  |  Spring (133)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vice (40)  |  Woman (151)

In the beginning, there was benzene!
[Written over Thiele’s office door. His former student Heinrich Otto Wieland said it expressed Thiele’s disdain for the chemistry of natural products.]
Quoted in R. Huisgen, 'The Wieland Memorial Lecture: Heinrich Wieland', Proceedings of the Chemical Society (1958), 214.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Door (93)  |  Express (186)  |  Natural (796)  |  Office (71)  |  Product (160)  |  Student (300)

Induction, then, is that operation of the mind by which we infer that what we know to be true in a particular case or cases, will be true in all cases which resemble the former in certain assignable respects. In other words, induction is the process by which we conclude that what is true of certain individuals of a class is true of the whole class, or that what is true at certain times will be true in similar circumstances at all times.
In A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence, and the Methods of Scientific Investigation (1843), Vol. 1, 352.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Class (164)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infer (12)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Respect (207)  |  Similar (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Infinities and indivisibles transcend our finite understanding, the former on account of their magnitude, the latter because of their smallness; Imagine what they are when combined.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Combine (57)  |  Finite (59)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Latter (21)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

It has become a cheap intellectual pastime to contrast the infinitesimal pettiness of man with the vastnesses of the stellar universes. Yet all such comparisons are illicit. We cannot compare existence and meaning; they are disparate. The characteristic life of a man is itself the meaning of vast stretches of existences, and without it the latter have no value or significance. There is no common measure of physical existence and conscious experience because the latter is the only measure there is of the former. The significance of being, though not its existence, is the emotion it stirs, the thought it sustains.
Philosophy and Civilization (1931), reprinted in David Sidorsky (ed.), John Dewey: The Essential Writings (1977), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Common (436)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Pastime (4)  |  Pettiness (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Significance (113)  |  Stir (21)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Vast (177)

It has been said that science is opposed to, and in conflict with revelation. But the history of the former shown that the greater its progress, and the more accurate its investigations and results, the more plainly it is seen not only not to clash with the Latter, but in all things to confirm it. The very sciences from which objections have been brought against religion have, by their own progress, removed those objections, and in the end furnished fall confirmation of the inspired Word of God.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Bring (90)  |  Clash (8)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Conflict (73)  |  End (590)  |  Fall (230)  |  Furnish (96)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  History (673)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Latter (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Objection (32)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Plainly (5)  |  Progress (465)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Result (677)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

It is easier to perceive error than to find truth, for the former lies on the surface and is easily seen, while the latter lies in the depth, where few are willing to search for it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Depth (94)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Error (321)  |  Find (998)  |  Latter (21)  |  Lie (364)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Surface (209)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Willing (44)

It is the task of science, as a collective human undertaking, to describe from the external side, (on which alone agreement is possible), such statistical regularity as there is in a world “in which every event has a unique aspect, and to indicate where possible the limits of such description. It is not part of its task to make imaginative interpretation of the internal aspect of reality—what it is like, for example, to be a lion, an ant or an ant hill, a liver cell, or a hydrogen ion. The only qualification is in the field of introspective psychology in which each human being is both observer and observed, and regularities may be established by comparing notes. Science is thus a limited venture. It must act as if all phenomena were deterministic at least in the sense of determinable probabilities. It cannot properly explain the behaviour of an amoeba as due partly to surface and other physical forces and partly to what the amoeba wants to do, with out danger of something like 100 per cent duplication. It must stick to the former. It cannot introduce such principles as creative activity into its interpretation of evolution for similar reasons. The point of view indicated by a consideration of the hierarchy of physical and biological organisms, now being bridged by the concept of the gene, is one in which science deliberately accepts a rigorous limitation of its activities to the description of the external aspects of events. In carrying out this program, the scientist should not, however, deceive himself or others into thinking that he is giving an account of all of reality. The unique inner creative aspect of every event necessarily escapes him.
In 'Gene and Organism', American Naturalist, (1953), 87, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Ant (28)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Cell (138)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creative (137)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Gene (98)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Inner (71)  |  Internal (66)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Ion (21)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Limited (101)  |  Lion (22)  |  Liver (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Side (233)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Surface (209)  |  Task (147)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Unique (67)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

It is well-known that both rude and civilized peoples are capable of showing unspeakable, and as it is erroneously termed, inhuman cruelty towards each other. These acts of cruelty, murder and rapine are often the result of the inexorable logic of national characteristics, and are unhappily truly human, since nothing like them can be traced in the animal world. It would, for instance, be a grave mistake to compare a tiger with the bloodthirsty exectioner of the Reign of Terror, since the former only satisfies his natural appetite in preying on other mammals. The atrocities of the trials for witchcraft, the indiscriminate slaughter committed by the negroes on the coast of Guinea, the sacrifice of human victims made by the Khonds, the dismemberment of living men by the Battas, find no parallel in the habits of animals in their savage state. And such a comparision is, above all, impossible in the case of anthropoids, which display no hostility towards men or other animals unless they are first attacked. In this respect the anthropid ape stands on a higher plane than many men.
Robert Hartmann, Anthropoid Apes, 294-295.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Attack (84)  |  Both (493)  |  Capable (168)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Compare (69)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Display (56)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Grave (52)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Known (454)  |  Living (491)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  People (1005)  |  Reign (23)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Terror (30)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truly (116)  |  Victim (35)  |  Witchcraft (6)  |  World (1774)

It was astonishing that for some considerable distance around the mould growth the staphococcal colonies were undergoing lysis. What had formerly been a well-grown colony was now a faint shadow of its former self...I was sufficiently interested to pursue the subject.
[Sep 1928, the first observation of penicillin. Lysis is the dissolution or destruction of cells.]
Sarah R. Riedman and Elton T. Gustafson, Portraits of Nobel Laureates in Medicine and Physiology (1964), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Distance (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Mold (33)  |  Observation (555)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Self (267)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Staphylococcus (2)  |  Subject (521)

It would be an easy task to show that the characteristics in the organization of man, on account of which the human species and races are grouped as a distinct family, are all results of former changes of occupation, and of acquired habits, which have come to be distinctive of individuals of his kind. When, compelled by circumstances, the most highly developed apes accustomed themselves to walking erect, they gained the ascendant over the other animals. The absolute advantage they enjoyed, and the new requirements imposed on them, made them change their mode of life, which resulted in the gradual modification of their organization, and in their acquiring many new qualities, and among them the wonderful power of speech.
Quoted in Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel The Evolution of Man (1897), Vol. 1, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Account (192)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Easy (204)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Family (94)  |  Gain (145)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  Speech (61)  |  Task (147)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Wonderful (149)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rise (166)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Vary (27)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whereby (2)  |  Why (491)

Let us now discuss the extent of the mathematical quality in Nature. According to the mechanistic scheme of physics or to its relativistic modification, one needs for the complete description of the universe not merely a complete system of equations of motion, but also a complete set of initial conditions, and it is only to the former of these that mathematical theories apply. The latter are considered to be not amenable to theoretical treatment and to be determinable only from observation.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 125.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Amenable (4)  |  Apply (160)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Description (84)  |  Determine (144)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extent (139)  |  Initial (17)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanistic (3)  |  Merely (316)  |  Modification (55)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Quality (135)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Set (394)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Universe (857)

Mathematics is of two kinds, Rigorous and Physical. The former is Narrow: the latter Bold and Broad. To have to stop to formulate rigorous demonstrations would put a stop to most physico-mathematical inquiries. Am I to refuse to eat because I do not fully understand the mechanism of digestion?
As quoted by Charles Melbourne Focken in Dimensional Methods and Their Applications (1953), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Bold (22)  |  Broad (27)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Physical (508)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Stop (80)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)

Mathematics make the mind attentive to the objects which it considers. This they do by entertaining it with a great variety of truths, which are delightful and evident, but not obvious. Truth is the same thing to the understanding as music to the ear and beauty to the eye. The pursuit of it does really as much gratify a natural faculty implanted in us by our wise Creator as the pleasing of our senses: only in the former case, as the object and faculty are more spiritual, the delight is more pure, free from regret, turpitude, lassitude, and intemperance that commonly attend sensual pleasures.
In An Essay on the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning (1701), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creator (91)  |  Delight (108)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ear (68)  |  Entertaining (9)  |  Evident (91)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Free (232)  |  Gratify (3)  |  Great (1574)  |  Implant (4)  |  Intemperance (3)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Natural (796)  |  Object (422)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Please (65)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Regret (30)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensual (2)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turpitude (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wise (131)

Meanwhile I flatter myself with so much success, that: students... will not be so easily mistaken in the subjects of the mineral kingdom, as has happened with me and others in following former systems; and I also hope to obtain some protectors against those who are so possessed with the figuromania, and so addicted to the surface of things, that they are shocked at the boldness of calling a marble a limestone, and of placing the Porphyry amongst the Saxa.
An Essay Towards a System of Mineralogy (1770), trans. G. Von Engestrom, xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hope (299)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Marble (20)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Myself (212)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Shock (37)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

More discoveries have arisen from intense observation of very limited material than from statistics applied to large groups. The value of the latter lies mainly in testing hypotheses arising from the former. While observing one should cultivate a speculative, contemplative attitude of mind and search for clues to be followed up. Training in observation follows the same principles as training in any activity. At first one must do things consciously and laboriously, but with practice the activities gradually become automatic and unconscious and a habit is established. Effective scientific observation also requires a good background, for only by being familiar with the usual can we notice something as being unusual or unexplained.
The Art of Scientific Investigation (1950), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Applied (177)  |  Arising (22)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Background (43)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Material (353)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observation (555)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Training (80)  |  Unexplained (8)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Value (365)

Mountains have been formed by one [or other] of the causes of the formation of stone, most probably from agglutinative clay which slowly dried and petrified during ages of which we have no record. It seems likely that this habitable world was in former days uninhabitable and, indeed, submerged beneath the ocean. Then, becoming exposed little by little, it petrified in the course of ages.
Avicenna
Congelatione et Conglutinatione Lapidium (1021-23), trans. E. J. Hohnyard and D. C. Mandeville (1927), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Little (707)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Petrification (5)  |  Record (154)  |  Stone (162)  |  World (1774)

Never was there a dogma more calculated to foster indolence, and to blunt the keen edge of curiosity, than ... [the] assumption of the discordance between the former and the existing causes of change.
Principles of Geology(1830-3), Vol. 3, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Blunt (5)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discord (10)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Edge (47)  |  Foster (12)  |  Indolence (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)

No other explanation of living forms is allowed than heredity, and any which is founded on another basis must be rejected. The present fashion requires that even the smallest and most indifferent inquiry must be dressed in phylogenetic costume, and whilst in former centuries authors professed to read in every natural detail some intention of the creator mundi, modern scientists have the aspiration to pick out from every occasional observation a fragment of the ancestral history of the living world.
'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2 Apr 1888), 15, 294. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Author (167)  |  Basis (173)  |  Creator (91)  |  Detail (146)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Form (959)  |  Founded (20)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Heredity (60)  |  History (673)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Intention (46)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phylogenetic (3)  |  Pick (16)  |  Present (619)  |  Profess (20)  |  Read (287)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  World (1774)

No science doth make known the first principles whereon it buildeth; but they are always taken as plain and manifest in themselves, or as proved and granted already, some former knowledge having made them evident.
In The of Mr. Richard Hooker in Eight Books Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (1723), Book 3, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Build (204)  |  Evident (91)  |  First (1283)  |  Grant (73)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Plain (33)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Themselves (433)

Not only is the state of nature hostile to the state of art of the garden; but the principle of the horticultural process, by which the latter is created and maintained, is antithetic to that of the cosmic process. The characteristic feature of the latter is the intense and unceasing competition of the struggle for existence. The characteristic of the former is the elimination of that struggle, by the removal of the conditions which give rise to it. The tendency of the cosmic process is to bring about the adjustment of the forms of plant life to the current conditions; the tendency of the horticultural process is the adjustment of the conditions to the needs of the forms of plant life which the gardener desires to raise.
'Evolution and Ethics-Prolegomena' (1894). In Collected Essays (1894), Vol. 9, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Competition (39)  |  Condition (356)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Current (118)  |  Desire (204)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Garden (60)  |  Horticulture (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Plant (294)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Rise (166)  |  State (491)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Tendency (99)

Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. If no use is made of the labors of past ages, the world must remain always in the infancy of knowledge.
In Samuel Johnson and Arthur Murphy, The works of Samuel Johnson (1837), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Child (307)  |  History (673)  |  Infancy (12)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Must (1526)  |  Past (337)  |  Remain (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transact (2)  |  Use (766)  |  World (1774)

One would have to have been brought up in the “spirit of militarism” to understand the difference between Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the one hand, and Auschwitz and Belsen on the other. The usual reasoning is the following: the former case is one of warfare, the latter of cold-blooded slaughter. But the plain truth is that the people involved are in both instances nonparticipants, defenseless old people, women, and children, whose annihilation is supposed to achieve some political or military objective.… I am certain that the human race is doomed, unless its instinctive detestation of atrocities gains the upper hand over the artificially constructed judgment of reason.
Max Born
In The Born-Einstein Letters: Correspondence Between Albert Einstein and Max Born (1971), 205. Born’s commentary (at age 86) added for the book, printed after letter to Albert Einstein, 8 Nov 1953.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Auschwitz (5)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Certain (550)  |  Children (200)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cold-Blooded (2)  |  Construct (124)  |  Defenseless (3)  |  Difference (337)  |  Doom (32)  |  Gain (145)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Involved (90)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Military (40)  |  Nagasaki (3)  |  Objective (91)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Political (121)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Warfare (11)

Saturated with that speculative spirit then pervading the Greek mind, he [Pythagoras] endeavoured to discover some principle of homogeneity in the universe. Before him, the philosophers of the Ionic school had sought it in the matter of things; Pythagoras looked for it in the structure of things. He observed the various numerical relations or analogies between numbers and the phenomena of the universe. Being convinced that it was in numbers and their relations that he was to find the foundation to true philosophy, he proceeded to trace the origin of all things to numbers. Thus he observed that musical strings of equal lengths stretched by weights having the proportion of 1/2, 2/3, 3/4, produced intervals which were an octave, a fifth and a fourth. Harmony, therefore, depends on musical proportion; it is nothing but a mysterious numerical relation. Where harmony is, there are numbers. Hence the order and beauty of the universe have their origin in numbers. There are seven intervals in the musical scale, and also seven planets crossing the heavens. The same numerical relations which underlie the former must underlie the latter. But where number is, there is harmony. Hence his spiritual ear discerned in the planetary motions a wonderful “Harmony of spheres.”
In History of Mathematics (1893), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cross (16)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discover (553)  |  Ear (68)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fifth (3)  |  Find (998)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fourth (8)  |  Greek (107)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Interval (13)  |  Length (23)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Musical (10)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Octave (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Pervading (7)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Relation (157)  |  Scale (121)  |  School (219)  |  Seek (213)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stretch (39)  |  String (21)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  True (212)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wonderful (149)

Since Copernicus, man seems to have got himself on an inclined plane—now he is slipping faster and faster away from the center into—what? into nothingness? into a 'penetrating sense of his nothingness?' ... all science, natural as well as unnatural—which is what I call the self-critique of knowledge—has at present the object of dissuading man from his former respect for himself, as if this had been but a piece of bizarre conceit.
On the Genealogy of Morals (1887), trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale (1969), 155-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Call (769)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Faster (50)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Object (422)  |  Present (619)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Unnatural (15)

So-called extraordinary events always split into two extremes naturalists who have not witnessed them: those who believe blindly and those who do not believe at all. The latter have always in mind the story of the golden goose; if the facts lie slightly beyond the limits of their knowledge, they relegate them immediately to fables. The former have a secret taste for marvels because they seem to expand Nature; they use their imagination with pleasure to find explanations. To remain doubtful is given to naturalists who keep a middle path between the two extremes. They calmly examine facts; they refer to logic for help; they discuss probabilities; they do not scoff at anything, not even errors, because they serve at least the history of the human mind; finally, they report rather than judge; they rarely decide unless they have good evidence.
Quoted in Albert V. Carozzi, Histoire des sciences de la terre entre 1790 et 1815 vue à travers les documents inédités de la Societé de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi. (1990), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Call (769)  |  Decision (91)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Error (321)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Gold (97)  |  Golden (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Path (144)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Probability (130)  |  Rare (89)  |  Relegation (3)  |  Remain (349)  |  Report (38)  |  Scoff (7)  |  Secret (194)  |  Service (110)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Split (13)  |  Story (118)  |  Taste (90)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Witness (54)

Some of what these pamphlets [of astrological forecasts] say will turn out to be true, but most of it time and experience will expose as empty and worthless. The latter part will be forgotten [literally: written on the winds] while the former will be carefully entered in people’s memories, as is usual with the crowd.
On giving astrology sounder foundations, De fundamentis astrologiae certioribus, (1602), Thesis 2, Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 4, 12, trans. J. V. Field, in Archive for History of Exact Sciences, 1984, 31, 229-72.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expose (23)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Literally (30)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Say (984)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)

Spontaneous generation, to put the matter simply, takes place in smaller plants, especially in those that are annuals and herbaceous. But still it occasionally occurs too in larger plants whenever there is rainy weather or some peculiar condition of air or soil; for thus it is said that the silphium sprang up in Libya when a murky and heavy sort of wet weather condition occurred, and that the timber growth which is now there has come from some similar reason or other; for it was not there in former times.
De Causis Plantarum 1.5.1, in Robert Ewing Dengler (trans.) Theophrastus: De Causis Plantarum Book One: Text, Critical Apparatus, Translation, and Commentary, (1927), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Annual (5)  |  Condition (356)  |  Generation (242)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Herbaceous (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurence (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Plant (294)  |  Rain (62)  |  Reason (744)  |  Small (477)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spontaneous (27)  |  Spontaneous Generation (9)  |  Still (613)  |  Timber (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weather (44)  |  Whenever (81)

Taking … the mathematical faculty, probably fewer than one in a hundred really possess it, the great bulk of the population having no natural ability for the study, or feeling the slightest interest in it*. And if we attempt to measure the amount of variation in the faculty itself between a first-class mathematician and the ordinary run of people who find any kind of calculation confusing and altogether devoid of interest, it is probable that the former could not be estimated at less than a hundred times the latter, and perhaps a thousand times would more nearly measure the difference between them.
[* This is the estimate furnished me by two mathematical masters in one of our great public schools of the proportion of boys who have any special taste or capacity for mathematical studies. Many more, of course, can be drilled into a fair knowledge of elementary mathematics, but only this small proportion possess the natural faculty which renders it possible for them ever to rank high as mathematicians, to take any pleasure in it, or to do any original mathematical work.]
In Darwinism, chap. 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Amount (151)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Boy (94)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Class (164)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Course (409)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drill (11)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fair (15)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fewer (8)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  First-Class (2)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Latter (21)  |  Less (103)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Original (58)  |  People (1005)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Population (110)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probable (20)  |  Probably (49)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rank (67)  |  Really (78)  |  Render (93)  |  Run (174)  |  School (219)  |  Slight (31)  |  Small (477)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Work (1351)

Taxonomy is often regarded as the dullest of subjects, fit only for mindless ordering and sometimes denigrated within science as mere “stamp collecting” (a designation that this former philatelist deeply resents). If systems of classification were neutral hat racks for hanging the facts of the world, this disdain might be justified. But classifications both reflect and direct our thinking. The way we order represents the way we think. Historical changes in classification are the fossilized indicators of conceptual revolutions.
In Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1983, 2010), 72
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Classification (97)  |  Concept (221)  |  Designation (13)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Dull (54)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Hang (45)  |  Hat (9)  |  Historical (70)  |  Indicator (6)  |  Mindless (4)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Order (632)  |  Rack (4)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Resent (4)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Stamp Collecting (4)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Taxonomy (18)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

That which, to the anatomist, is the end,—is, to the sculptor, the means. The former desires details, for their own sake; the latter, that by means of them, he may kindle his work with life, and stamp it with beauty.
In 'Sculpture', The True and the Beautiful in Nature, Art, Morals, and Religion (1872), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Desire (204)  |  Detail (146)  |  End (590)  |  Kindle (6)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Sake (58)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Work (1351)

The 4th sort of creatures... which moved through the 3 former sorts, were incredibly small, and so small in my eye that I judged, that if 100 of them lay [stretched out] one by another, they would not equal the length of a grain of course Sand; and according to this estimate, ten hundred thousand of them could not equal the dimensions of a grain of such course Sand. There was discover’d by me a fifth sort, which had near the thickness of the former, but they were almost twice as long.
The first time bacteria were observed.
Letter to H. Oldenburg, 9 Oct 1676. In The Collected Letters of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1957), Vol. 2, 95.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Discover (553)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Grain (50)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Long (790)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Observed (149)  |  Sand (62)  |  Small (477)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)

The Atomic Age was born in secrecy, and for two decades after Hiroshima, the high priests of the cult of the atom concealed vital information about the risks to human health posed by radiation. Dr. Alice Stewart, an audacious and insightful medical researcher, was one of the first experts to alert the world to the dangers of low-level radiation.
(Udeall is a former U.S. Secretary of the Interior.)
Quoted in Gayle Jacoba Greene, The Woman Who Knew Too Much (1999), back cover.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Alert (13)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Age (6)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Expert (65)  |  First (1283)  |  Health (193)  |  High (362)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Human (1468)  |  Information (166)  |  Interior (32)  |  Low (80)  |  Priest (28)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Risk (61)  |  Alice Stewart (5)  |  Two (937)  |  Vital (85)  |  World (1774)

The catastrophist constructs theories, the uniformitarian demolishes them. The former adduces evidence of an Origin, the latter explains the evidence away.
Aphorism 110, 'Aphorisms Concerning Ideas', The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840), Vol. 1, xxxvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Construct (124)  |  Demolish (8)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Explain (322)  |  Origin (239)  |  Theory (970)  |  Uniformitarian (4)

The colleges of Edinburgh and Geneva as seminaries of science, are considered as the two eyes of Europe. While Great Britain and America give the preference to the former, all other countries give it to the latter.
Letter to Wilson Nicholas (Monticello, Nov 1794). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 5. From Paul Leicester Ford (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1892-99). Vol 6, 513.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Britain (24)  |  College (66)  |  Consider (416)  |  Eye (419)  |  Great (1574)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preference (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Two (937)

The critical mathematician has abandoned the search for truth. He no longer flatters himself that his propositions are or can be known to him or to any other human being to be true; and he contents himself with aiming at the correct, or the consistent. The distinction is not annulled nor even blurred by the reflection that consistency contains immanently a kind of truth. He is not absolutely certain, but he believes profoundly that it is possible to find various sets of a few propositions each such that the propositions of each set are compatible, that the propositions of each such set imply other propositions, and that the latter can be deduced from the former with certainty. That is to say, he believes that there are systems of coherent or consistent propositions, and he regards it his business to discover such systems. Any such system is a branch of mathematics.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 94. Also in Science (1912), New Series, 35, 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Aim (165)  |  Annul (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blur (8)  |  Branch (150)  |  Business (149)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Coherent (13)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Contain (68)  |  Content (69)  |  Correct (86)  |  Critical (66)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Immanently (2)  |  Imply (17)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Latter (21)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Regard (305)  |  Say (984)  |  Search (162)  |  Set (394)  |  System (537)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)

The difference between a good observer and one who is not good is that the former is quick to take a hint from the facts, from his early efforts to develop skill in handling them, and quick to acknowledge the need to revise or alter the conceptual framework of his thinking. The other—the poor observer—continues dogmatically onward with his original thesis, lost in a maze of correlations, long after the facts have shrieked in protest against the interpretation put upon them.
In The Social Problems of an Industrial Civilization (1945).
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Against (332)  |  Alter (62)  |  Continue (165)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Framework (31)  |  Good (889)  |  Hint (21)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Protest (9)  |  Skill (109)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Thinking (414)

The domain, over which the language of analysis extends its sway, is, indeed, relatively limited, but within this domain it so infinitely excels ordinary language that its attempt to follow the former must be given up after a few steps. The mathematician, who knows how to think in this marvelously condensed language, is as different from the mechanical computer as heaven from earth.
In Jahresberichte der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, 13, 367. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Computer (127)  |  Condense (13)  |  Different (577)  |  Domain (69)  |  Earth (996)  |  Excel (4)  |  Extend (128)  |  Follow (378)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Step (231)  |  Sway (4)  |  Think (1086)

The electrical matter consists of particles extremely subtile, since it can permeate common matter, even the densest metals, with such ease and freedom as not to receive any perceptible resistance.
If anyone should doubt whether the electrical matter passes through the substance of bodies, or only over along their surfaces, a shock from an electrified large glass jar, taken through his own body, will probably convince him.
Electrical matter differs from common matter in this, that the parts of the latter mutually attract, those of the former mutually repel each other.
'Opinions and Conjectures, Concerning the Properties and Effects of the Electrical Matter, arising from Experiments and Observations, made at Philadelphia, 1749.' In I. Bernard Cohen (ed.), Benjamin Franklin's Experiments (1941), 213.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Common (436)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convince (41)  |  Differ (85)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Glass (92)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metal (84)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Receive (114)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Shock (37)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

The epoch of intense cold which preceded the present creation has been only a temporary oscillation of the earth’s temperature, more important than the century-long phases of cooling undergone by the Alpine valleys. It was associated with the disappearance of the animals of the diluvial epoch of the geologists, as still demonstrated by the Siberian mammoths; it preceded the uplifting of the Alps and the appearance of the present-day living organisms, as demonstrated by the moraines and the existence of fishes in our lakes. Consequently, there is complete separation between the present creation and the preceding ones, and if living species are sometimes almost identical to those buried inside the earth, we nevertheless cannot assume that the former are direct descendants of the latter or, in other words, that they represent identical species.
From Discours de Neuchâtel (1837), as translated by Albert V. Carozzi in Studies on Glaciers: Preceded by the Discourse of Neuchâtel (1967), lviii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (8)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Century (310)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creation (327)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Identical (53)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Organism (220)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phase (36)  |  Present (619)  |  Represent (155)  |  Separation (57)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Valley (32)  |  Word (619)

The errors of a wise man are literally more instructive than the truths of a fool. The wise man travels in lofty, far-seeing regions; the fool in low-lying, high-fenced lanes; retracing the footsteps of the former, to discover where he diviated, whole provinces of the universe are laid open to us; in the path of the latter, granting even that he has not deviated at all, little is laid open to us but two wheel-ruts and two hedges.
In James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 425:26.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Error (321)  |  Far-Seeing (3)  |  Fool (116)  |  High (362)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Literally (30)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Open (274)  |  Path (144)  |  Province (35)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Travel (114)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wise Man (15)

The experiment of transfusing the blood of one dog into another was made before the Society by Mr King and Mr Thomas Coxe, upon a little mastiff and a spaniel, with very good success, the former bleeding to death, and the latter receiving the blood of the other, and emitting so much of his own as to make him capable of receiving the other.
From the Minutes of the Royal Society recording the first blood transfusion (14 Nov 1666). Quoted in Marjorie Hope Nicolson, Pepys's Diary and the New Science (1965), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Blood (134)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Death (388)  |  Dog (70)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Good (889)  |  Little (707)  |  Other (2236)  |  Society (326)  |  Success (302)  |  Transfusion (2)

The first concept of continental drift first came to me as far back as 1910, when considering the map of the world, under the direct impression produced by the congruence of the coast lines on either side of the Atlantic. At first I did not pay attention to the ideas because I regarded it as improbable. In the fall of 1911, I came quite accidentally upon a synoptic report in which I learned for the first time of palaeontological evidence for a former land bridge between Brazil and Africa. As a result I undertook a cursory examination of relevant research in the fields of geology and palaeontology, and this provided immediately such weighty corroboration that a conviction of the fundamental soundness of the idea took root in my mind.
In The Origins of Continents and Oceans (4th ed. 1929), trans. John Biram (1966), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Africa (35)  |  Atlantic (8)  |  Attention (190)  |  Back (390)  |  Brazil (3)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Coast (13)  |  Concept (221)  |  Congruence (3)  |  Continental Drift (10)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corroboration (2)  |  Direct (225)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fall (230)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Geology (220)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impression (114)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Map (44)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Produced (187)  |  Regard (305)  |  Report (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Root (120)  |  Side (233)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion (either as being the received opinion or as being agreeable to itself) draws all things else to support and agree with it. And though there be a greater number and weight of instances to be found on the other side, yet these it either neglects and despises, or else by some distinction sets aside and rejects, in order that by this great and pernicious predetermination the authority of its former conclusions may remain inviolate.
From Aphorism 46, Novum Organum, Book I (1620). Collected in James Spedding (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1858), Vol. 4, 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Authority (95)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Draw (137)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Human (1468)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Reject (63)  |  Remain (349)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Support (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Weight (134)

The inhibitory nerves are of as fundamental importance in the economy of the body as the motor nerves. No evidence exists that the same nerve fibre is sometimes capable of acting as a motor nerve, sometimes as a nerve of inhibition, but on the contrary the latter nerves form a separate and complete nervous system subject to as definite anatomical and histological laws as the former.
'On the Structure, Distribution and Function of the Nerves which Innervate the Visceral and Vascular Systems', The Journal of Physiology, 1886, 7, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Capable (168)  |  Complete (204)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definite (110)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exist (443)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Law (894)  |  Motor (23)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Separate (143)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)

The joy of suddenly learning a former secret and the joy of suddenly discovering a hitherto unknown truth are the same to me—both have the flash of enlightenment, the almost incredibly enhanced vision, and the ecstasy and euphoria of released tension.
In I Want to be a Mathematician: An Automathography (1985), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Discover (553)  |  Ecstasy (9)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Euphoria (2)  |  Flash (49)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Released (2)  |  Secret (194)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Tension (24)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vision (123)

The mind has its illusions as the sense of sight; and in the same manner that the sense of feeling corrects the latter, reflection and calculation correct the former.
A Philosophical Essay on Probabilities translated by F.W. Truscott and F.L. Emory (1902), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (127)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)

The moment after, I began to respire 20 quarts of unmingled nitrous oxide. A thrilling, extending from the chest to the extremities, was almost immediately produced. I felt a sense of tangible extension highly pleasurable in every limb; my visible impressions were dazzling, and apparently magnified, I heard distinctly every sound in the room and was perfectly aware of my situation. By degrees, as the pleasurable sensations increased, I last all connection with external things; trains of vivid visible images rapidly passed through my mind, and were connected with words in such a manner, as to produce perceptions perfectly novel. I existed in a world of newly connected and newly modified ideas. I theorised—I imagined that I made discoveries. When I was awakened from this semi-delirious trance by Dr. Kinglake, who took the bag from my mouth, indignation and pride were the first feelings produced by the sight of the persons about me. My emotions were enthusiastic and sublime; and for a minute I walked round the room, perfectly regardless of what was said to me. As I recovered my former state of mind, I felt an inclination to communicate the discoveries I had made during the experiment. I endeavoured to recall the ideas, they were feeble and indistinct; one collection of terms, however, presented itself: and with the most intense belief and prophetic manner, I exclaimed to Dr Kinglake, 'Nothing exists but thoughts!—the universe is composed of impressions, ideas, pleasures and pains!'
Researches, Chemical and Philosophical (1800), in J. Davy (ed.), The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy (1839-40), Vol 3, 289-90.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anaesthetic (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biography (240)  |  Collection (64)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Degree (276)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extension (59)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Image (96)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nitrous Oxide (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Novel (32)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perception (97)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Pride (78)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sound (183)  |  State (491)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Walk (124)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The novelties in the fish line this week are two—brook trout and California salmon. … Long Island cultivated trout, alive, sell for $1.50 a pound; killed $1 a pound; trout from other portions of the state, 75 cents; wild trout from the Adirondacks, 50 cents; Canada trout 25 to 35 cents. … Certainly ten times as many trout are eaten in New-York as in former years. California salmon … brought 45 cents a pound. … This is rather a high price for California fish, but the catch is very light, caused by overfishing. (1879)
In 'Features of the Markets', New York Times (6 Apr 1879), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Brook (6)  |  California (9)  |  Canada (6)  |  Catch (31)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cent (5)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Eat (104)  |  Fish (120)  |  High (362)  |  Island (46)  |  Kill (100)  |  Killed (2)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  New York (15)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Portion (84)  |  Price (51)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Sell (15)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trout (4)  |  Two (937)  |  Week (70)  |  Wild (87)  |  Year (933)

The only similarity between the car and the human body is that if something is seriously wrong with the design of the former you can send it back to its maker.
A Sense of Asher (1972), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Car (71)  |  Design (195)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Maker (34)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Something (719)  |  Wrong (234)

The physicist, in his study of natural phenomena, has two methods of making progress: (1) the method of experiment and observation, and (2) the method of mathematical reasoning. The former is just the collection of selected data; the latter enables one to infer results about experiments that have not been performed. There is no logical reason why the second method should be possible at all, but one has found in practice that it does work and meets with reasonable success.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 122.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Collection (64)  |  Data (156)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Infer (12)  |  Logical (55)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meet (31)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observation (555)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performed (3)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Select (44)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Two (937)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

The plain fact is that there are no conclusions. If we must state a conclusion, it would be that many of the former conclusions of the nineteenth-century science on philosophical questions are once again in the melting-pot.
In 'On Free-Will', Physics and Philosophy (1942), 216. Also collected in Franklin Le Van Baumer (ed.), Main Currents of Western Thought (1978), 703.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Melting-Pot (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)

The powers which tend to preserve, and those which tend to change the condition of the earth's surface, are never in equilibrio; the latter are, in all cases, the most powerful, and, in respect of the former, are like living in comparison of dead forces. Hence the law of decay is one which suffers no exception: The elements of all bodies were once loose and unconnected, and to the same state nature has appointed that they should all return... TIME performs the office of integrating the infinitesimal parts of which this progression is made up; it collects them into one sum, and produces from them an amount greater than any that can be assigned.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 116-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Appointment (12)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Change (593)  |  Collection (64)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Condition (356)  |  Decay (53)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Exception (73)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Integration (19)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Loose (14)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Office (71)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Production (183)  |  Progression (23)  |  Respect (207)  |  Return (124)  |  State (491)  |  Sum (102)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tend (124)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconnected (10)

The progress of science has always been the result of a close interplay between our concepts of the universe and our observations on nature. The former can only evolve out of the latter and yet the latter is also conditioned greatly by the former. Thus in our exploration of nature, the interplay between our concepts and our observations may sometimes lead to totally unexpected aspects among already familiar phenomena.
'Weak Interactions and Nonconservation of Parity', Nobel Lecture, 11 Dec 1957. In Nobel Lectures: Physics 1942-1962 (1964), 417.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Concept (221)  |  Condition (356)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Lead (384)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obervation (4)  |  Observation (555)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Universe (857)

The pursuits of the greatest trifles may sometimes have a very good effect. The search after the philosopher’s stone has preserved chemistry; and the following astrology so much in former ages has been the cause of astronomy’s being so much advanced in ours. Sir Isaac Newton himself has owned that he began with studying judicial astrology, and that it was his pursuits of that idle and vain study which led him into the beauties and love of astronomy.
As recalled and recorded in Joseph Spence and Edmund Malone (ed.) Anecdotes, Observations, and Characters of Books and Men (1858), 159-160.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Effect (393)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idle (33)  |  Love (309)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosopher’s Stone (7)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Search (162)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Vain (83)

The question now at issue, whether the living species are connected with the extinct by a common bond of descent, will best be cleared up by devoting ourselves to the study of the actual state of the living world, and to those monuments of the past in which the relics of the animate creation of former ages are best preserved and least mutilated by the hand of time.
The Antiquity of Man (1863), 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Age (499)  |  Best (459)  |  Bond (45)  |  Common (436)  |  Connect (125)  |  Creation (327)  |  Descent (27)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Living (491)  |  Monument (45)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Question (621)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The student of palaetiological sciences is a scientist and a historian. The former tries to be as uniformitarian as possible, the latter has to recognize the contingency of events which will ever be a 'skandalon' to the scientist. Verily, the geologist 'lives in a divided world'.
Natural Law and Divine Miracle: The Principle of Uniformity in Geology, Biology and Theology (1963), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Divided (50)  |  Event (216)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Live (628)  |  Palaetiology (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The true-spinal system consists of a series of nerves passing principally from the cutaneous surface, and the surface of the mucous membranes, to the spinal marrow; and of another series of nerves passing from the spinal marrow to a series of muscles, destined to be moved simultaneously. The former, thence designated the incident nerves; the latter, reflex nerves: the spinal marrow is their common centre.
On the Mutual Relations between Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology and Therapeutics, and the Practice of Medicine. Being the Gulstonian Lectures for 1842 (1842), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Consist (223)  |  Destined (42)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Passing (76)  |  Reflex (14)  |  Series (149)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)

The use of thesis-writing is to train the mind, or to prove that the mind has been trained; the former purpose is, I trust, promoted, the evidences of the latter are scanty and occasional.
From Preface to First Edition to Notes on the Composition of Scientific Papers (1904), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Evidence (248)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Scanty (3)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Trust (66)  |  Use (766)  |  Writing (189)

The value the world sets upon motives is often grossly unjust and inaccurate. Consider, for example, two of them: mere insatiable curiosity and the desire to do good. The latter is put high above the former, and yet it is the former that moves some of the greatest men the human race has yet produced: the scientific investigators. What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep down in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows by life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. No man of self-respect could devote himself to pathology on such terms. What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity–his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. His prototype is not the liberator releasing slaves, the good Samaritan lifting up the fallen, but the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes.
In 'Types of Men: The Scientist', Prejudices (1923), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Down (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harm (39)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Liberator (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Praise (26)  |  Produced (187)  |  Profit (52)  |  Prototype (9)  |  Race (268)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Slave (37)  |  Society (326)  |  Soul (226)  |  Surely (101)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Unjust (6)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The works of Lavoisier and his associates operated upon many of us at that time like the Sun's rising after a night of moonshine: but Chemistry is now betrothed to the Mathematics, and is in consequence grown somewhat shy of her former admirers.
In Luke Howard, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and D.F.S. Scott (ed.), Luke Howard (1772-1864): His Correspondence with Goethe and his Continental Journey of 1816(1976), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admirer (9)  |  Associate (25)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moonshine (4)  |  Night (120)  |  Rising (44)  |  Shy (3)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

There are in fact two things, science and opinion; the former begets knowledge, the latter ignorance.
The Canon Law sect. 4, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 2, 265. The second part is also seen translated as “Science is the father of knowledge, but opinion breeds ignorance,” as in Hippocratic Writings (1978), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (1210)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

There are no better terms available to describe the difference between the approach of the natural and the social sciences than to call the former ‘objective’ and the latter ‘subjective.’ ... While for the natural scientist the contrast between objective facts and subjective opinions is a simple one, the distinction cannot as readily be applied to the object of the social sciences. The reason for this is that the object, the ‘facts’ of the social sciences are also opinions—not opinions of the student of the social phenomena, of course, but opinions of those whose actions produce the object of the social scientist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Approach (108)  |  Available (78)  |  Better (486)  |  Call (769)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Course (409)  |  Describe (128)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Latter (21)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Object (422)  |  Objective (91)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Produce (104)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Student (300)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

There are two types of mind … the mathematical, and what might be called the intuitive. The former arrives at its views slowly, but they are firm and rigid; the latter is endowed with greater flexibility and applies itself simultaneously to the diverse lovable parts of that which it loves.
In Discours sur les passions de l’amour (1653).
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Call (769)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Firm (47)  |  Flexibility (6)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Part (222)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  View (488)

There are, and can be, but these two ways of seeking truth; the former, the anticipatory, is the one now in use; the latter is the true but yet untried path.
Cited as Aphorism 19 in book review 'A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy' in The Quarterly Review (Jul 1831), 45, No. 90, 399. This appears to be an abridged version of Aphorism 20 shown on this web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Path (144)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Untried (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

Thus it might be said, that the vegetable is only the sketch, nor rather the ground-work of the animal; that for the formation of the latter, it has only been requisite to clothe the former with an apparatus of external organs, by which it might be connected with external objects.
From hence it follows, that the functions of the animal are of two very different classes. By the one (which is composed of an habitual succession of assimilation and excretion) it lives within itself, transforms into its proper substance the particles of other bodies, and afterwards rejects them when they are become heterogeneous to its nature. By the other, it lives externally, is the inhabitant of the world, and not as the vegetable of a spot only; it feels, it perceives, it reflects on its sensations, it moves according to their influence, and frequently is enabled to communicate by its voice its desires, and its fears, its pleasures, and its pains.
The aggregate of the functions of the first order, I shall name the organic life, because all organized beings, whether animal or vegetable, enjoy it more or less, because organic texture is the sole condition necessary to its existence. The sum of the functions of the second class, because it is exclusively the property of the animal, I shall denominate the animal life.
Physiological Researches on Life and Death (1815), trans. P. Gold, 22-3.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Class (164)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Desire (204)  |  Different (577)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Formation (96)  |  Function (228)  |  Ground (217)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Particle (194)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Proper (144)  |  Property (168)  |  Reject (63)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sole (49)  |  Substance (248)  |  Succession (77)  |  Sum (102)  |  Transform (73)  |  Two (937)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Thus we conclude, that the strata both primary and secondary, both those of ancient and those of more recent origin, have had their materials furnished from the ruins of former continents, from the dissolution of rocks, or the destruction of animal or vegetable bodies, similar, at least in some respects, to those that now occupy the surface of the earth.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 14-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Both (493)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continent (76)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Furnishing (4)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  Primary (80)  |  Recent (77)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rock (161)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Vegetable (46)

Truth travels down from the heights of philosophy to the humblest walks of life, and up from the simplest perceptions of an awakened intellect to the discoveries which almost change the face of the world. At every stage of its progress it is genial, luminous, creative. When first struck out by some distinguished and fortunate genius, it may address itself only to a few minds of kindred power. It exists then only in the highest forms of science; it corrects former systems, and authorizes new generalizations. Discussion, controversy begins; more truth is elicited, more errors exploded, more doubts cleared up, more phenomena drawn into the circle, unexpected connexions of kindred sciences are traced, and in each step of the progress, the number rapidly grows of those who are prepared to comprehend and carry on some branches of the investigation,— till, in the lapse of time, every order of intellect has been kindled, from that of the sublime discoverer to the practical machinist; and every department of knowledge been enlarged, from the most abstruse and transcendental theory to the daily arts of life.
In An Address Delivered Before the Literary Societies of Amherst College (25 Aug 1835), 16-17.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Art (657)  |  Authorize (5)  |  Awakened (2)  |  Begin (260)  |  Carry (127)  |  Change (593)  |  Circle (110)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Connection (162)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Creative (137)  |  Daily (87)  |  Department (92)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  Exist (443)  |  Exploded (11)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genial (3)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grow (238)  |  Height (32)  |  Humblest (4)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplest (10)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transcendental (10)  |  Travel (114)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Walk (124)  |  Walk Of Life (2)  |  World (1774)

Truths are known to us in two ways: some are known directly, and of themselves; some through the medium of other truths. The former are the subject of Intuition, or Consciousness; the latter, of Inference; the latter of Inference. The truths known by Intuition are the original premisses, from which all others are inferred.
A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Inference (45)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Known (454)  |  Other (2236)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)

Two contrary laws seem to be wrestling with each other nowadays: the one, a law of blood and of death, ever imagining new means of destruction and forcing nations to be constantly ready for the battlefield—the other, a law of peace, work and health, ever evolving new means for delivering man from he scourges which beset him. The one seeks violent conquests, the other the relief of humanity. The latter places one human life above any victory: while the former would sacrifice hundreds and thousands of lives to the ambition of one.
Address at the Inauguration of the Pasteur Institute. In René Vallery-Radot, The Life of Pasteur, translated by Mrs. R. L. Devonshire (1919), 444.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (43)  |  Battlefield (9)  |  Blood (134)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Death (388)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Health (193)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nation (193)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Relief (30)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Scourge (3)  |  Seek (213)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Victory (39)  |  Violent (17)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrestle (2)

Two extreme views have always been held as to the use of mathematics. To some, mathematics is only measuring and calculating instruments, and their interest ceases as soon as discussions arise which cannot benefit those who use the instruments for the purposes of application in mechanics, astronomy, physics, statistics, and other sciences. At the other extreme we have those who are animated exclusively by the love of pure science. To them pure mathematics, with the theory of numbers at the head, is the only real and genuine science, and the applications have only an interest in so far as they contain or suggest problems in pure mathematics.
Of the two greatest mathematicians of modern tunes, Newton and Gauss, the former can be considered as a representative of the first, the latter of the second class; neither of them was exclusively so, and Newton’s inventions in the science of pure mathematics were probably equal to Gauss’s work in applied mathematics. Newton’s reluctance to publish the method of fluxions invented and used by him may perhaps be attributed to the fact that he was not satisfied with the logical foundations of the Calculus; and Gauss is known to have abandoned his electro-dynamic speculations, as he could not find a satisfying physical basis. …
Newton’s greatest work, the Principia, laid the foundation of mathematical physics; Gauss’s greatest work, the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, that of higher arithmetic as distinguished from algebra. Both works, written in the synthetic style of the ancients, are difficult, if not deterrent, in their form, neither of them leading the reader by easy steps to the results. It took twenty or more years before either of these works received due recognition; neither found favour at once before that great tribunal of mathematical thought, the Paris Academy of Sciences. …
The country of Newton is still pre-eminent for its culture of mathematical physics, that of Gauss for the most abstract work in mathematics.
In History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1903), 630.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Academy (35)  |  Academy Of Sciences (4)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animated (5)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Basis (173)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cease (79)  |  Class (164)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contain (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deterrent (2)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Due (141)  |  Easy (204)  |  Equal (83)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Favor (63)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluxion (7)  |  Fluxions (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Head (81)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invent (51)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Laid (7)  |  Latter (21)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paris (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Preeminent (5)  |  Principia (13)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publish (36)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reader (40)  |  Real (149)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Representative (14)  |  Result (677)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Snake (26)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Style (23)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tribunal (2)  |  Tune (19)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

We are many small puppets moved by fate and fortune through strings unseen by us; therefore, if it is so as I think, one has to prepare oneself with a good heart and indifference to accept things coming towards us, because they cannot be avoided, and to oppose them requires a violence that tears our souls too deeply, and it seems that both fortune and men are always busy in affairs for our dislike because the former is blind and the latter only think of their interest.
'Letter to Bellini' (17 Oct 1689), in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), The Correspondence of Marcello Malpighi (1975), Vol. 4, 1534.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Affair (29)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Both (493)  |  Coming (114)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Heart (229)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Interest (386)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Puppet (3)  |  Require (219)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  String (21)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Violence (34)

We have really, that I know of, no philosophical basis for high and low. Moreover, the vegetable kingdom does not culminate, as the animal kingdom does. It is not a kingdom, but a common-wealth; a democracy, and therefore puzzling and unaccountable from the former point of view.
Asa Gray
Letter to Charles Darwin (27 Jan 1863), collected in Letters of Asa Gray (1893), Vol. 2, 496. Gray was replying to Darwin’s question, “If flowers of an Oak or Beech tree had fine well-colored corolla & calyx, would they still be classed as low in the Vegetable Kingdom?”
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Basis (173)  |  Common (436)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Evolution (590)  |  High (362)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Low (80)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Puzzling (8)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  View (488)  |  Wealth (94)

We may conclude, that the flux and reflux of the ocean have produced all the mountains, valleys, and other inequalities on the surface of the earth; that currents of the sea have scooped out the valleys, elevated the hills, and bestowed on them their corresponding directions; that that same waters of the ocean, by transporting and depositing earth, &c., have given rise to the parallel strata; that the waters from the heavens gradually destroy the effects of the sea, by continually diminishing the height of the mountains, filling up the valleys, and choking the mouths of rivers; and, by reducing every thing to its former level, they will, in time, restore the earth to the sea, which, by its natural operations, will again create new continents, interspersed with mountains and valleys, every way similar to those we inhabit.
'Second Discours: Histoire et Théorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. I, 124; Natural History, General and Particular (1785), Vol. I, Irans. W. Smellie, 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Choking (3)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Continent (76)  |  Create (235)  |  Current (118)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direction (175)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Flux (21)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rain (62)  |  Reflux (2)  |  Rise (166)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Strata (35)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Valley (32)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

What I have related is sufficient for establishing the main principle, namely, that the heat which disappears in the conversion of water into vapour, is not lost, but is retained in vapour, and indicated by its expansive form, although it does not affect the thermometer. This heat emerges again from this vapour when it becomes water, and recovers its former quality of affecting the thermometer; in short, it appears again as the cause of heat and expansion.
Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry, delivered in the University of Edinburgh (1803), Vol. I, 173.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change Of State (2)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Expansive (5)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Latent Heat (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quality (135)  |  Retain (56)  |  Short (197)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thermometer (11)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Water (481)

What terrible questions we are learning to ask! The former men believed in magic, by which temples, cities, and men were swallowed up, and all trace of them gone. We are coming on the secret of a magic which sweeps out of men's minds all vestige of theism and beliefs which they and their fathers held and were framed upon.
In 'Illusions', The Atlantic Monthly (Nov 1858), 1, 60.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Belief (578)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Father (110)  |  Frame (26)  |  Hold (95)  |  Learning (274)  |  Magic (86)  |  Men (20)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Question (621)  |  Secret (194)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Temple (42)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vestige (11)

When experimental results are found to be in conflict with those of an earlier investigator, the matter is often taken too easily and disposed of for an instance by pointing out a possible source of error in the experiments of the predessessor, but without enquiring whether the error, if present, would be quantitatively sufficient to explain the discrepancy. I think that disagreement with former results should never be taken easily, but every effort should be made to find a true explanation. This can be done in many more cases than it actually is; and as a result, it can be done more easily by the man “on the spot” who is already familiar with the essential details. But it may require a great deal of imagination, and very often it will require supplementary experiments.
From 'August Krogh' in Festkrift Københavns Universitet 1950 (1950), 18, as cited by E. Snorrason, 'Krogh, Schack August Steenberg', in Charles Coulton Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol 7, 501. The DSB quote is introduced, “All his life Krogh was more interested in physical than in chemiical problems in biology, and he explained his critical attitude thus.”
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Deal (188)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Discrepancy (7)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Source Of Error (2)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supplementary (4)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

When the interval between the intellectual classes and the practical classes is too great, the former will possess no influence, the latter will reap no benefit.
In History of Civilization (1857), Vol. 1, 244. As quoted and cited in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (1858), 84, No. 517, 532.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Class (164)  |  Great (1574)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interval (13)  |  Possess (156)  |  Practical (200)  |  Reap (17)  |  Will (2355)

Words change their meanings, just as organism s evolve. We would impose an enormous burden on our economy if we insisted on payment in cattle every time we identified a bonus as a pecuniary advantage (from the Latin pecus, or cattle, a verbal fossil from a former commercial reality).
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Bonus (2)  |  Burden (27)  |  Cattle (18)  |  Change (593)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Economy (55)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Identify (13)  |  Impose (22)  |  Insist (20)  |  Latin (38)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Organism (220)  |  Payment (6)  |  Pecuniary (2)  |  Reality (261)  |  Time (1877)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Word (619)

[My advice] will one day be found
With other relics of 'a former world,'
When this world shall be former, underground,
Thrown topsy-turvy, twisted, crisped, and curled,
Baked, fried or burnt, turned inside-out, or drowned,
Like all the worlds before, which have been hurled
First out of, and then back again to Chaos,
The Superstratum which will overlay us.
Don Juan (1821), Canto 9, Verse 37. In Jerome J. McGann (ed.), Lord Byron: The Complete Poetical Works (1986), Vol. 5, 420.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaos (91)  |  First (1283)  |  Other (2236)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twist (8)  |  Underground (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

[The Book of Genesis is] [p]rofoundly interesting and indeed pathetic to me are those attempts of the opening mind of man to appease its hunger for a Cause. But the Book of Genesis has no voice in scientific questions. It is a poem, not a scientific treatise. In the former aspect it is for ever beautiful; in the latter it has been, and it will continue to be, purely obstructive and hurtful.'
In 'Professor Virchow and Evolution', Fragments of Science (1879), Vol. 2, 377. Tyndall is quoting himself from “four years ago”&mdashthus c.1875.
Science quotes on:  |  Appease (6)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Cause (541)  |  Continue (165)  |  Early (185)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Hurtful (8)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obstruction (4)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Pathetic (4)  |  Poem (96)  |  Profound (104)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Will (2355)

[To] explain the phenomena of the mineral kingdom ... systems are usually reduced to two classes, according as they refer to the origin of terrestrial bodies to FIRE or to WATER; and ... their followers have of late been distinguished by the fanciful names of Vulcanists and Neptunists. To the former of these Dr HUTTON belongs much more than to the latter; though, as he employs the agency both of fire and water in his system, he cannot, in strict propriety, be arranged with either.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802) collected in The Works of John Playfair (1822), Vol. 1, 21
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Belong (162)  |  Both (493)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Employ (113)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fire (189)  |  Geology (220)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Late (118)  |  Mineral (59)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Origin (239)  |  Propriety (6)  |  Small (477)  |  System (537)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Water (481)

… for it is very probable, that the motion of gravity worketh weakly, both far from the earth, and also within the earth: the former because the appetite of union of dense bodies with the earth, in respect of the distance, is more dull: the latter, because the body hath in part attained its nature when it is some depth in the earth.
[Foreshadowing Newton's Universal Law of Gravitation (1687)]
Sylva Sylvarum; or a Natural History in Ten Centuries (1627), Century 1, Experiment 33. Collected in The Works of Francis Bacon (1826), Vol 1, 255.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Attain (125)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Depth (94)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dull (54)  |  Earth (996)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Respect (207)  |  Union (51)  |  Universal (189)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.