Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Despair

Despair Quotes (40 quotes)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

As every circumstance relating to so capital a discovery as this (the greatest, perhaps, that has been made in the whole compass of philosophy, since the time of Sir Isaac Newton) cannot but give pleasure to all my readers, I shall endeavour to gratify them with the communication of a few particulars which I have from the best authority. The Doctor [Benjamin Franklin], after having published his method of verifying his hypothesis concerning the sameness of electricity with the matter lightning, was waiting for the erection of a spire in Philadelphia to carry his views into execution; not imagining that a pointed rod, of a moderate height, could answer the purpose; when it occurred to him, that, by means of a common kite, he could have a readier and better access to the regions of thunder than by any spire whatever. Preparing, therefore, a large silk handkerchief, and two cross sticks, of a proper length, on which to extend it, he took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field, in which there was a shed convenient for his purpose. But dreading the ridicule which too commonly attends unsuccessful attempts in science, he communicated his intended experiment to no body but his son, who assisted him in raising the kite.
The kite being raised, a considerable time elapsed before there was any appearance of its being electrified. One very promising cloud passed over it without any effect; when, at length, just as he was beginning to despair of his contrivance, he observed some loose threads of the hempen string to stand erect, and to avoid one another, just as if they had been suspended on a common conductor. Struck with this promising appearance, he inmmediately presented his knuckle to the key, and (let the reader judge of the exquisite pleasure he must have felt at that moment) the discovery was complete. He perceived a very evident electric spark. Others succeeded, even before the string was wet, so as to put the matter past all dispute, and when the rain had wetted the string, he collected electric fire very copiously. This happened in June 1752, a month after the electricians in France had verified the same theory, but before he had heard of any thing that they had done.
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767, 3rd ed. 1775), Vol. 1, 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attend (65)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Carry (127)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Common (436)  |  Communication (94)  |  Compass (34)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evident (91)  |  Execution (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  France (27)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Judge (108)  |  Key (50)  |  Kite (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Past (337)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Present (619)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silk (13)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stand (274)  |  Storm (51)  |  String (21)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)

Before his [Sir Astley Cooper’s] time, operations were too often frightful alternatives or hazardous compromises; and they were not seldom considered rather as the resource of despair than as a means of remedy; he always made them follow, as it were, in the natural course of treatment; he gave them a scientific character; and he moreover, succeeded, in a great degree, in divesting them of their terrors, by performing them unostentatiously, simply, confidently, and cheerfully, and thereby inspiring the patient with hope of relief, where previously resignation under misfortune had too often been all that could be expected from the sufferer.
In John Forbes (ed.), British and Foreign Medical Review (Jul 1840), 10, No. 19, 104. In Bransby Blake Cooper, The Life of Sir Astley Cooper (1843), Vol. 2, 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Character (243)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Consider (416)  |  Sir Astley Paston Cooper (13)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Expect (200)  |  Follow (378)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misfortune (12)  |  Natural (796)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Patient (199)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sufferer (7)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Terror (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)

But by far the greatest obstacle to the progress of science and to the undertaking of new tasks and provinces therein is found in this—that men despair and think things impossible.
Translation of Novum Organum, CIX. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |  Greatest (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  New (1216)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Province (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)

Despair is better treated with hope, not dope.
Lancet (1958), 1, 954.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Dope (3)  |  Drug (57)  |  Hope (299)

Everything around us is filled with mystery and magic. I find this no cause for despair, no reason to turn for solace to esoteric formulae or chariots of gods. On the contrary, our inability to find easy answers fills me with a fierce pride in our ambivalent biology ... with a constant sense of wonder and delight that we should be part of anything so profound.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Delight (108)  |  Easy (204)  |  Esoteric (3)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fierce (7)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Formula (98)  |  God (757)  |  Inability (10)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Part (222)  |  Pride (78)  |  Profound (104)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solace (7)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wonder (236)

Gravity, a mere nuisance to Christian, was a terror to Pope, Pagan, and Despair. You can drop a mouse down a thousand-yard mine shaft; and, on arriving at the bottom, it gets a slight shock and walks away, provided that the ground is fairly soft. A rat is killed, a man is broken, a horse splashes.
Essay, 'On Being the Right Size', collected in Possible Worlds: And Other Essays (1927, 1945), 19. (Note: Christian appears in John Bunyan, Pilgrim’s Progress, in which Pope, Pagan and Despair are giants — Webmaster.)
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Broken (56)  |  John Bunyan (5)  |  Christian (43)  |  Down (456)  |  Drop (76)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Ground (217)  |  Horse (74)  |  Kill (100)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  Pope (10)  |  Rat (37)  |  Shaft (5)  |  Shock (37)  |  Soft (29)  |  Terror (30)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Walk (124)

I despair of persuading people to drop the familiar and comforting tactic of dichotomy. Perhaps, instead, we might expand the framework of debates by seeking other dichotomies more appropriate than, or simply different from, the conventional divisions. All dichotomies are simplifications, but the rendition of a conflict along differing axes of several orthogonal dichotomies might provide an amplitude of proper intellectual space without forcing us to forgo our most comforting tool of thought.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amplitude (4)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Axe (15)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Debate (38)  |  Dichotomy (4)  |  Differ (85)  |  Different (577)  |  Division (65)  |  Drop (76)  |  Expand (53)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Force (487)  |  Forgo (4)  |  Framework (31)  |  Instead (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Proper (144)  |  Provide (69)  |  Seek (213)  |  Several (32)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Simply (53)  |  Space (500)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tool (117)

I have said that mathematics is the oldest of the sciences; a glance at its more recent history will show that it has the energy of perpetual youth. The output of contributions to the advance of the science during the last century and more has been so enormous that it is difficult to say whether pride in the greatness of achievement in this subject, or despair at his inability to cope with the multiplicity of its detailed developments, should be the dominant feeling of the mathematician. Few people outside of the small circle of mathematical specialists have any idea of the vast growth of mathematical literature. The Royal Society Catalogue contains a list of nearly thirty- nine thousand papers on subjects of Pure Mathematics alone, which have appeared in seven hundred serials during the nineteenth century. This represents only a portion of the total output, the very large number of treatises, dissertations, and monographs published during the century being omitted.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 285.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Advance (280)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appear (118)  |  Being (1278)  |  Catalogue (5)  |  Century (310)  |  Circle (110)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Cope (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dissertation (2)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Glance (34)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inability (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  List (10)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monograph (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nineteenth (6)  |  Number (699)  |  Oldest (8)  |  Omit (11)  |  Output (10)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Portion (84)  |  Pride (78)  |  Publish (36)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Recent (77)  |  Represent (155)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serial (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Society (326)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Total (94)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

I remember discussions with Bohr which went through many hours till very late at night and ended almost in despair; and when at the end of the discussion I went alone for a walk in the neighboring park I repeated to myself again and again the question: Can nature possibly be as absurd as it seemed to us in these atomic experiments?
In Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1958, 1962), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Alone (311)  |  Atom (355)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Discussion (72)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Hour (186)  |  Late (118)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Park (6)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (621)  |  Remember (179)  |  Seem (145)  |  Through (849)  |  Walk (124)

I trust ... I have succeeded in convincing you that modern chemistry is not, as it has so long appeared, an ever-growing accumulation of isolated facts, as impossible for a single intellect to co-ordinate as for a single memory to grasp.
The intricate formulae that hang upon these walls, and the boundless variety of phenomena they illustrate, are beginning to be for us as a labyrinth once impassable, but to which we have at length discovered the clue. A sense of mastery and power succeeds in our minds to the sort of weary despair with which we at first contemplated their formidable array. For now, by the aid of a few general principles, we find ourselves able to unravel the complexities of these formulae, to marshal the compounds which they represent in orderly series; nay, even to multiply their numbers at our will, and in a great measure to forecast their nature ere we have called them into existence. It is the great movement of modern chemistry that we have thus, for an hour, seen passing before us. It is a movement as of light spreading itself over a waste of obscurity, as of law diffusing order throughout a wilderness of confusion, and there is surely in its contemplation something of the pleasure which attends the spectacle of a beautiful daybreak, something of the grandeur belonging to the conception of a world created out of chaos.
Concluding remark for paper presented at the Friday Discourse of the the Royal Institution (7 Apr 1865). 'On the Combining Power of Atoms', Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1865), 4, No. 42, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Aid (97)  |  Attend (65)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clue (17)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Discover (553)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hang (45)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Measure (232)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Movement (155)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passing (76)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Represent (155)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Surely (101)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Trust (66)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wall (67)  |  Waste (101)  |  Weary (11)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

If a man dies of cancer in fear and despair, then cry for his pain and celebrate his life. The other man, who fought like hell and laughed in the end, but also died, may have had an easier time in his final months, but took his leave with no more humanity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Cry (29)  |  Die (86)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fight (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Hell (32)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Time (1877)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Betterment (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fit (134)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Help (105)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humble (50)  |  Humility (28)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Industry (137)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Race (268)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

If we are industrious, we shall never starve; for, ‘at the workingman’s house hunger looks in, but dares not enter.’ Nor will the bailiff or the constable enter, for ‘industry pays debts, while despair increaseth them.’
Published in Poor Richard's Almanac. Collected in Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin (1834), 477.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Dare (50)  |  Debt (13)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enter (141)  |  House (140)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Industry (137)  |  Look (582)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pay (43)  |  Starvation (13)  |  Will (2355)  |  Workingman (2)

In despair, I offer your readers their choice of the following definitions of entropy. My authorities are such books and journals as I have by me at the moment.
(a) Entropy is that portion of the intrinsic energy of a system which cannot be converted into work by even a perfect heat engine.—Clausius.
(b) Entropy is that portion of the intrinsic energy which can be converted into work by a perfect engine.—Maxwell, following Tait.
(c) Entropy is that portion of the intrinsic energy which is not converted into work by our imperfect engines.—Swinburne.
(d) Entropy (in a volume of gas) is that which remains constant when heat neither enters nor leaves the gas.—W. Robinson.
(e) Entropy may be called the ‘thermal weight’, temperature being called the ‘thermal height.’—Ibid.
(f) Entropy is one of the factors of heat, temperature being the other.—Engineering.
I set up these bald statement as so many Aunt Sallys, for any one to shy at.
[Lamenting a list of confused interpretations of the meaning of entropy, being hotly debated in journals at the time.]
In The Electrician (9 Jan 1903).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Choice (110)  |  Rudolf Clausius (9)  |  Constant (144)  |  Converted (2)  |  Definition (221)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Factor (46)  |  Gas (83)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heat Engine (4)  |  Height (32)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Journal (30)  |  Leave (130)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Moment (253)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Portion (84)  |  Remain (349)  |  Set (394)  |  Shy (3)  |  Statement (142)  |  System (537)  |  Peter Guthrie Tait (10)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weight (134)  |  Work (1351)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Account (192)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Against (332)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deal (188)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Determination (78)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Finding (30)  |  Force (487)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pain (136)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Successful (123)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Train (114)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

It has been proposed (in despair) to define mathematics as “what mathematicians do.” Only such a broad definition, it was felt, would cover all the things that might become embodied in mathematics; for mathematicians today attack many problems not regarded as mathematics in the past, and what they will do in the future there is no saying.
In 'The Extent of Mathematics', Prelude to Mathematics (1955), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attack (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Broad (27)  |  Cover (37)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embody (16)  |  Future (429)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Past (337)  |  Problem (676)  |  Propose (23)  |  Regard (305)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Will (2355)

Mr. [Granville T.] Woods says that he has been frequently refused work because of the previous condition of his race, but he has had great determination and will and never despaired because of disappointments. He always carried his point by persistent efforts. He says the day is past when colored boys will be refused work only because of race prejudice. There are other causes. First, the boy has not the nerve to apply for work after being refused at two or three places. Second, the boy should have some knowledge of mechanics. The latter could be gained at technical schools, which should be founded for the purpose. And these schools must sooner or later be established, and thereby, we should be enabled to put into the hands of our boys and girls the actual means of livelihood.
From William J. Simmons, Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising (1887), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  African American (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cause (541)  |  Color (137)  |  Condition (356)  |  Determination (78)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Effort (227)  |  Establishment (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Point (580)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Work (1351)

My life as a surgeon-scientist, combining humanity and science, has been fantastically rewarding. In our daily patients we witness human nature in the raw–fear, despair, courage, understanding, hope, resignation, heroism. If alert, we can detect new problems to solve, new paths to investigate.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 565.
Science quotes on:  |  Alert (13)  |  Courage (69)  |  Daily (87)  |  Detect (44)  |  Fear (197)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Path (144)  |  Patient (199)  |  Problem (676)  |  Raw (28)  |  Resignation (3)  |  Rewarding (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solve (130)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Witness (54)

Never despair
Horace
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 245
Science quotes on:  |  Never (1087)

O star-eyed Science, hast thou wander’d there,
To waft us home the message of despair?
'Pleasures of Hope', Part 2. In Samuel Rogers, Thomas Campbell, et al, The Poetical Works of Rogers, Campbell, J. Montgomery, Lamb, and Kirke White (1830), 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Home (170)  |  Message (49)  |  Poem (96)  |  Science (3879)  |  Star (427)  |  Wander (35)

Of all regions of the earth none invites speculation more than that which lies beneath our feet, and in none is speculation more dangerous; yet, apart from speculation, it is little that we can say regarding the constitution of the interior of the earth. We know, with sufficient accuracy for most purposes, its size and shape: we know that its mean density is about 5½ times that of water, that the density must increase towards the centre, and that the temperature must be high, but beyond these facts little can be said to be known. Many theories of the earth have been propounded at different times: the central substance of the earth has been supposed to be fiery, fluid, solid, and gaseous in turn, till geologists have turned in despair from the subject, and become inclined to confine their attention to the outermost crust of the earth, leaving its centre as a playground for mathematicians.
'The Constitution of the Interior of the Earth, as Revealed by Earthquakes', Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society (1906), 62, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Central (80)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Crust (38)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Density (25)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Geologist (75)  |  High (362)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interior (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Playground (6)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Say (984)  |  Solid (116)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Water (481)

Physical misery is great everywhere out here [Africa]. Are we justified in shutting our eyes and ignoring it because our European newspapers tell us nothing about it? We civilised people have been spoilt. If any one of us is ill the doctor comes at once. Is an operation necessary, the door of some hospital or other opens to us immediately. But let every one reflect on the meaning of the fact that out here millions and millions live without help or hope of it. Every day thousands and thousands endure the most terrible sufferings, though medical science could avert them. Every day there prevails in many and many a far-off hut a despair which we could banish. Will each of my readers think what the last ten years of his family history would have been if they had been passed without medical or surgical help of any sort? It is time that we should wake from slumber and face our responsibilities!
In On the Edge of the Primeval Forest, trans. C. T. Campion (1948, 1998), 126-127.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Banish (11)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Door (93)  |  Europe (43)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Ignoring (11)  |  Illness (34)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Justification (48)  |  Last (426)  |  Live (628)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Million (114)  |  Misery (30)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  People (1005)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Slumber (6)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Relativity was a highly technical new theory that gave new meanings to familiar concepts and even to the nature of the theory itself. The general public looked upon relativity as indicative of the seemingly incomprehensible modern era, educated scientists despaired of ever understanding what Einstein had done, and political ideologues used the new theory to exploit public fears and anxieties—all of which opened a rift between science and the broader culture that continues to expand today.
'The Cultural Legacy of Relativity Theory' in Albert Einstein, Robert W. Lawson, Robert Geroch, Roger Penrose and David C. Cassidy, Relativity (2005), 226.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Concept (221)  |  Continue (165)  |  Culture (143)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Era (51)  |  Expand (53)  |  Exploit (19)  |  Fear (197)  |  General (511)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Look (582)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Political (121)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Rift (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Theory (970)  |  Today (314)  |  Understanding (513)

Science would have us believe that such accuracy, leading to certainty, is the only criterion of knowledge, would make the trial of Galileo the paradigm of the two points of view which aspire to truth, would suggest, that is, that the cardinals represent only superstition and repression, while Galileo represents freedom. But there is another criterion which is systematically neglected in this elevation of science. Man does not now—and will not ever—live by the bread of scientific method alone. He must deal with life and death, with love and cruelty and despair, and so must make conjectures of great importance which may or may not be true and which do not lend themselves to experimentation: It is better to give than to receive; Love thy neighbor as thyself; Better to risk slavery through non-violence than to defend freedom with murder. We must deal with such propositions, must decide whether they are true, whether to believe them, whether to act on them—and scientific method is no help for by their nature these matters lie forever beyond the realm of science.
In The End of the Modern Age (1973), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bread (39)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Deal (188)  |  Death (388)  |  Decide (41)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Experimentation (7)  |  Forever (103)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Paradigm (14)  |  Point (580)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Realm (85)  |  Receive (114)  |  Represent (155)  |  Repression (3)  |  Risk (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Violence (34)  |  Will (2355)

Scientific discovery is a private event, and the delight that accompanies it, or the despair of finding it illusory does not travel.
In Hypothesis and Imagination.
Science quotes on:  |  Delight (108)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Event (216)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Travel (114)

That the fundamental aspects of heredity should have turned out to be so extraordinarily simple supports us in the hope that nature may, after all, be entirely approachable. Her much-advertised inscrutability has once more been found to be an illusion due to our ignorance. This is encouraging, for, if the world in which we live were as complicated as some of our friends would have us believe we might well despair that biology could ever become an exact science.
The Physical Basis of Heredity (1919), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Become (815)  |  Biology (216)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Due (141)  |  Encouraging (12)  |  Exact (68)  |  Friend (168)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Hope (299)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Inscrutability (2)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Support (147)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)

The astronomer who studies the motion of the stars is surely like a blind man who, with only a staff [mathematics] to guide him, must make a great, endless, hazardous journey that winds through innumerable desolate places. What will be the result? Proceeding anxiously for a while and groping his way with his staff, he will at some time, leaning upon it, cry out in despair to Heaven, Earth and all the Gods to aid him in his misery.
In The Sleepwalkers by Arthur Koestler (1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Blind (95)  |  Cry (29)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Journey (42)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Misery (30)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Result (677)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Surely (101)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)

The history of mathematics, as of any science, is to some extent the story of the continual replacement of one set of misconceptions by another. This is of course no cause for despair, for the newly instated assumptions very often possess the merit of being closer approximations to truth than those that they replace.
In 'Consistency and Completeness—A Résumé', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1956), 63, No.5, 295.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximation (31)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Closer (43)  |  Continual (43)  |  Course (409)  |  Extent (139)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mathematics (7)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merit (50)  |  Misconception (5)  |  Possess (156)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Story (118)  |  Truth (1057)

The history of science alone can keep the physicist from the mad ambitions of dogmatism as well as the despair of pyrrhonian scepticism.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 270.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Dogmatism (14)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Mad (53)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)

The history of semiconductor physics is not one of grand heroic theories, but one of painstaking intelligent labor. Not strokes of genius producing lofty edifices, but great ingenuity and endless undulation of hope and despair. Not sweeping generalizations, but careful judgment of the border between perseverance and obstinacy. Thus the history of solid-state physics in general, and of semiconductors in particular, is not so much about great men and women and their glorious deeds, as about the unsung heroes of thousands of clever ideas and skillful experiments—reflection of an age of organization rather than of individuality.
'Selected Topics from the History of Semiconductor Physics and Its Applications', in Lillian Hoddeson et al. (eds.), Out of the Crystal Maze (1992), 474.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Clever (38)  |  Deed (34)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Endless (56)  |  Experiment (695)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Labor (107)  |  Organization (114)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Research (664)  |  Semiconductor (4)  |  Skillful (14)  |  Solid (116)  |  State (491)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Unsung (4)

The hypothetical character of continual creation has been pointed out, but why is it more of a hypothesis to say that creation is taking place now than that it took place in the past? On the contrary, the hypothesis of continual creation is more fertile in that it answers more questions and yields more results, and results that are, at least in principle, observable. To push the entire question of creation into the past is to restrict science to a discussion of what happened after creation while forbidding it to examine creation itself. This is a counsel of despair to be taken only if everything else fails.
From Cosmology (), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Character (243)  |  Continual (43)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Creation (327)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Everything (476)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  More (2559)  |  Observable (21)  |  Past (337)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Why (491)  |  Yield (81)

The next decade will perhaps raise us a step above despair to a cleaner, clearer wisdom and biology cannot fail to help in this. As we become increasingly aware of the ethical problems raised by science and technology, the frontiers between the biological and social sciences are clearly of critical importance—in population density and problems of hunger, psychological stress, pollution of the air and water and exhaustion of irreplaceable resources.
As quoted in 'H. Bentley Glass', New York Times (12 Jan 1970), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cleaner (2)  |  Clearer (4)  |  Critical (66)  |  Decade (59)  |  Density (25)  |  Environment (216)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Fail (185)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Help (105)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Importance (286)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Next (236)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Population (110)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Resource (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Step (231)  |  Stress (22)  |  Technology (257)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Pollution (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

There is romance, the genuine glinting stuff, in typewriters, and not merely in their development from clumsy giants into agile dwarfs, but in the history of their manufacture, which is filled with raids, battles, lonely pioneers, great gambles, hope, fear, despair, triumph. If some of our novels could be written by the typewriters instead of on them, how much better they would be.
English Journey (1934), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (34)  |  Better (486)  |  Development (422)  |  Fear (197)  |  Gamble (3)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Giant (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hope (299)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Merely (316)  |  Novel (32)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Raid (4)  |  Romance (15)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Typewriter (6)

This is a mighty wonder: in the discharge from the lungs alone, which is not particularly dangerous, the patients do not despair of themselves, even although near the last.
Concerning Tuberculosis.
On the Causes and Symptoms of Acute Diseases, II, ii,18.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Death (388)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Last (426)  |  Lung (34)  |  Patient (199)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tuberculosis (8)  |  Wonder (236)

We cannot despair of humanity, since we are ourselves human beings.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Ourselves (245)

We have learned that there is an endocrinology of elation and despair, a chemistry of mystical insight, and, in relation to the autonomic nervous system, a meteorology and even... an astro-physics of changing moods.
Literature and Science (1963), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Autonomic (2)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Endocrinology (2)  |  Insight (102)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Mood (13)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  System (537)

Wilderness is an anchor to windward. Knowing it is there, we can also know that we are still a rich nation, tending our resources as we should—not a people in despair searching every last nook and cranny of our land for a board of lumber, a barrel of oil, a blade of grass, or a tank of water.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anchor (10)  |  Barrel (5)  |  Blade (11)  |  Board (12)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Grass (46)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Land (115)  |  Last (426)  |  Lumber (5)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nook And Cranny (2)  |  Oil (59)  |  People (1005)  |  Resource (63)  |  Rich (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Still (613)  |  Tank (6)  |  Tend (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Windward (2)

Words were originally magic, and the word retains much of its old magical power even to-day, With words one man can make another blessed, or drive him to despair;… Words call forth effects and are the universal means of influencing human beings. Therefore let us not underestimate the use of words in psychotherapy.
From a series of 28 lectures for laymen, Part One, 'The Psychology of Errors'. Lecture 1, 'Introduction' collected in Sigmund Freud and G. Stanley Hall (trans.), A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis (1920), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessed (20)  |  Call (769)  |  Effect (393)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Influence (222)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Magic (86)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Old (481)  |  Original (58)  |  Power (746)  |  Psychotherapy (2)  |  Retain (56)  |  Underestimate (7)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

[Magic] enables man to carry out with confidence his important tasks, to maintain his poise and his mental integrity in fits of anger, in the throes of hate, of unrequited love, of despair and anxiety. The function of magic is to ritualize man's optimism, to enhance his faith in the victory of hope over fear. Magic expresses the greater value for man of confidence over doubt, of steadfastness over vacillation, of optimism over pessimism.
Magic, Science and Religion (1925), 90.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anger (20)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Carry (127)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fit (134)  |  Function (228)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hate (64)  |  Hope (299)  |  Importance (286)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Love (309)  |  Magic (86)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Pessimism (4)  |  Poise (4)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Steadfastness (2)  |  Task (147)  |  Value (365)  |  Victory (39)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.