Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Continuity

Continuity Quotes (23 quotes)

Natura non facit saltum or, Nature does not make leaps… If you assume continuity, you can open the well-stocked mathematical toolkit of continuous functions and differential equations, the saws and hammers of engineering and physics for the past two centuries (and the foreseeable future).
From Benoit B. Mandelbrot and Richard Hudson, The (Mis)Behaviour of Markets: A Fractal View of Risk, Ruin and Reward (2004,2010), 85-86.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (19)  |  Century (94)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Differential (2)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Equation (69)  |  Foreseeable (2)  |  Function (90)  |  Future (229)  |  Hammer (12)  |  Leap (23)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Natura Non Facit Saltum (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Open (38)  |  Physics (301)  |  Saw (3)

All the different classes of beings which taken together make up the universe are, in the ideas of God who knows distinctly their essential gradations, only so many ordinates of a single curve so closely united that it would be impossible to place others between any two of them, since that would imply disorder and imperfection. Thus men are linked with the animals, these with the plants and these with the fossils which in turn merge with those bodies which our senses and our imagination represent to us as absolutely inanimate. And, since the law of continuity requires that when the essential attributes of one being approximate those of another all the properties of the one must likewise gradually approximate those of the other, it is necessary that all the orders of natural beings form but a single chain, in which the various classes, like so many rings, are so closely linked one to another that it is impossible for the senses or the imagination to determine precisely the point at which one ends and the next begins?all the species which, so to say, lie near the borderlands being equivocal, at endowed with characters which might equally well be assigned to either of the neighboring species. Thus there is nothing monstrous in the existence zoophytes, or plant-animals, as Budaeus calls them; on the contrary, it is wholly in keeping with the order of nature that they should exist. And so great is the force of the principle of continuity, to my thinking, that not only should I not be surprised to hear that such beings had been discovered?creatures which in some of their properties, such as nutrition or reproduction, might pass equally well for animals or for plants, and which thus overturn the current laws based upon the supposition of a perfect and absolute separation of the different orders of coexistent beings which fill the universe;?not only, I say, should I not be surprised to hear that they had been discovered, but, in fact, I am convinced that there must be such creatures, and that natural history will perhaps some day become acquainted with them, when it has further studied that infinity of living things whose small size conceals them for ordinary observation and which are hidden in the bowels of the earth and the depth of the sea.
Lettre Prétendue de M. De Leibnitz, à M. Hermann dont M. Koenig a Cité le Fragment (1753), cxi-cxii, trans. in A. O. Lovejoy, Great Chain of Being: A Study of the History of an Idea (1936), 144-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Plant (173)  |  Species (181)

Believing, as I do, in the continuity of nature, I cannot stop abruptly where our microscopes cease to be of use. Here the vision of the mind authoritatively supplements the vision of the eye. By a necessity engendered and justified by science I cross the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern in that Matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial Life.
'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast', (19 Aug 1874). Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abruptness (2)  |  Belief (400)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Cessation (10)  |  Cover (23)  |  Creator (40)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Engendering (3)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Eye (159)  |  Hitherto (3)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Justification (33)  |  Life (917)  |  Matter (270)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Notwithstanding (2)  |  Potency (5)  |  Power (273)  |  Professing (2)  |  Promise (27)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Stop (56)  |  Supplement (2)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Vision (55)

I prefer a God who once and for all impressed his will upon creation, to one who continually busied about modifying what he had already done.
Attributed. As stated in W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter, Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (2005), 575.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (211)  |  Evolution (482)  |  God (454)  |  Impressed (10)  |  Modification (31)  |  Will (29)

I should rejoice to see... Euclid honourably shelved or buried ‘deeper than did ever plummet sound’ out of the schoolboys’ reach; morphology introduced into the elements of algebra; projection, correlation, and motion accepted as aids to geometry; the mind of the student quickened and elevated and his faith awakened by early initiation into the ruling ideas of polarity, continuity, infinity, and familiarization with the doctrines of the imaginary and inconceivable.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Aid (23)  |  Algebra (36)  |  Awaken (8)  |  Bury (8)  |  Correlation (9)  |  Deep (81)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Early (39)  |  Element (129)  |  Elevate (5)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Faith (131)  |  Familiarization (2)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Idea (440)  |  Imaginary (10)  |  Inconceivable (7)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Initiation (4)  |  Introduce (27)  |  Mind (544)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Motion (127)  |  Polarity (2)  |  Projection (4)  |  Quicken (2)  |  Reach (68)  |  Rejoice (9)  |  Rule (135)  |  Schoolboy (5)  |  See (197)  |  Shelve (2)  |  Sound (59)  |  Student (131)

If the 'Principle of Relativity' in an extreme sense establishes itself, it seems as if even Time would become discontinuous and be supplied in atoms, as money is doled out in pence or centimes instead of continuously;—in which case our customary existence will turn out to be no more really continuous than the events on a kinematograph screen;—while that great agent of continuity, the Ether of Space, will be relegated to the museum of historical curiosities.
Continuity: The Presidential Address to the British Association (1913), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |  Ether (24)  |  Money (125)  |  Museum (22)  |  Relativity (50)  |  Time (439)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Cause (231)  |  Cause And Effect (11)  |  Completeness (9)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Determination (53)  |  Development (228)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Finding (30)  |  Forefather (3)  |  Gratification (14)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Impression (51)  |  Indolence (5)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Interest (170)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Joy (61)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Labour (36)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pain (82)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Ratiocination (2)  |  Reason (330)  |  Sense (240)  |  Series (38)  |  Term (87)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Unfathomable (3)  |  Will (29)

It is very desirable to have a word to express the Availability for work of the heat in a given magazine; a term for that possession, the waste of which is called Dissipation. Unfortunately the excellent word Entropy, which Clausius has introduced in this connexion, is applied by him to the negative of the idea we most naturally wish to express. It would only confuse the student if we were to endeavour to invent another term for our purpose. But the necessity for some such term will be obvious from the beautiful examples which follow. And we take the liberty of using the term Entropy in this altered sense ... The entropy of the universe tends continually to zero.
Sketch of Thermodynamics (1868), 100-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Application (117)  |  Availability (10)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Rudolf Clausius (8)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Connection (86)  |  Desire (101)  |  Dissipation (2)  |  Endeavour (24)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Example (57)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Expression (82)  |  Follow (66)  |  Heat (90)  |  Idea (440)  |  Introduce (27)  |  Invention (283)  |  Liberty (17)  |  Magazine (19)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Negative (24)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Possession (37)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Sense (240)  |  Student (131)  |  Term (87)  |  Unfortunately (14)  |  Universe (563)  |  Waste (57)  |  Word (221)  |  Work (457)  |  Zero (15)

Learning how to access a continuity of common sense can be one of your most efficient accomplishments in this decade. Can you imagine common sense surpassing science and technology in the quest to unravel the human stress mess? In time, society will have a new measure for confirming truth. It’s inside the people-not at the mercy of current scientific methodology. Let scientists facilitate discovery, but not invent your inner truth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Access (12)  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Confirm (12)  |  Current (43)  |  Decade (19)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Efficient (20)  |  Facilitate (2)  |  Human (445)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Inner (27)  |  Inside (16)  |  Invent (30)  |  Learn (160)  |  Let (30)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mercy (9)  |  Mess (10)  |  New (340)  |  Quest (24)  |  Science And Technology (20)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Society (188)  |  Stress (8)  |  Surpass (12)  |  Time (439)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unravel (4)

Nature does not know extinction; all it knows is transformation. … Everything science has taught me—and continues to teach me—strengthens my belief in the continuity of our spiritual existence after death. Nothing disappears without a trace.
Wehner von Braun article in This Week Magazine (24 Jan 1960), 2. Excerpted in Viola Walden, Sword Scrapbook (1980), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Death (270)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Transformation (47)

Nothing is accomplished all at once, and it is one of my great maxims, and one of the most completely verified, that Nature makes no leaps: a maxim which I have called the law of continuity.
[Referring to the gradual nature of all change from an initial state, through a continuous series of intermediate stages, to a final state.]
Letter to de Volder, in Nouveaux Essais, New Essays (1703) translated by A. G. Langley (3rd ed. 1949). In Frederick Copleston, A History of Philosophy (1999), 292.
Science quotes on:  |  Maxim (13)  |  Nature (1029)

One of the grandest generalizations formulated by modern biological science is that of the continuity of life; the protoplasmic activity within each living body now on earth has continued without cessation from the remote beginnings of life on our planet, and from that period until the present no single organism has ever arisen save in the form of a bit of living protoplasm detached from a pre-existing portion; the eternal flame of life once kindled upon this earth has passed from organism to organism, and is still, going on existing and propagating, incarnated within the myriad animal and plant forms of everyday life.
In History of the Human Body (1919), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Animal (309)  |  Arise (32)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Biology (150)  |  Cessation (10)  |  Continuation (17)  |  Detach (2)  |  Earth (487)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  Form (210)  |  Formulation (20)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Incarnation (3)  |  Kindled (2)  |  Life (917)  |  Living Body (2)  |  Myriad (18)  |  Organism (126)  |  Planet (199)  |  Plant (173)  |  Propagation (9)  |  Protoplasm (12)

Physical changes take place continuously, while chemical changes take place discontinuously. Physics deals chiefly with continuous varying quantities, while chemistry deals chiefly with whole numbers.
Treatise on Thermodynamics (1897), trans. Alexander Ogg (1903), 22, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical Change (4)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Chiefly (7)  |  Discontinuity (3)  |  Number (179)  |  Physical Change (4)  |  Physics (301)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Variation (50)

The advance of science is not comparable to the changes of a city, where old edifices are pitilessly torn down to give place to new, but to the continuous evolution of zoologic types which develop ceaselessly and end by becoming unrecognisable to the common sight, but where an expert eye finds always traces of the prior work of the centuries past. One must not think then that the old-fashioned theories have been sterile and vain.
The Value of Science (1905), in The Foundations of Science: Science and Hypothesis, The Value of Science, Science and Method(1946), trans. by George Bruce Halsted, 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Century (94)  |  Change (291)  |  City (37)  |  Common (92)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Demolition (4)  |  Development (228)  |  Edifice (13)  |  End (141)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Expert (42)  |  New (340)  |  Old-Fashioned (5)  |  Past (109)  |  Pity (7)  |  Prior (5)  |  Replacement (8)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sight (25)  |  Sterility (3)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Trace (39)  |  Type (34)  |  Vanity (14)  |  Work (457)  |  Zoology (28)

The Continuity of the Germ-plasm.
The Continuity of the Germ-plasm as the Foundations of a Theory of Heredity (1885). This was an early attempt to explain heredity, with the proposal of germ-plasm hereditary material present in eggs and sperm, that is passed from generation to generation. The subject quote is from the title of his first publication on this idea.
Science quotes on:  |  DNA (67)  |  Germ-Plasm (2)

The first thing to realise about the Ether is its absolute continuity.
Ether and Reality: A Series of Discourses on the Many Functions of the Ether of Space (1925), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Ether (24)

The great revelation of the quantum theory was that features of discreteness were discovered in the Book of Nature, in a context in which anything other than continuity seemed to be absurd according to the views held until then.
What is Life? (1944), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Book (181)  |  Book Of Nature (6)  |  Context (17)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Feature (34)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Quantum Theory (55)  |  Revelation (29)  |  View (115)

The history of a species, or any natural phenomenon that requires unbroken continuity in a world of trouble, works like a batting streak. All are games of a gambler playing with a limited stake against a house with infinite resources. The gambler must eventually go bust. His aim can only be to stick around as long as possible, to have some fun while he’s at it, and, if he happens to be a moral agent as well, to worry about staying the course with honor.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Aim (58)  |  Bat (8)  |  Bust (2)  |  Course (57)  |  Eventually (14)  |  Fun (28)  |  Gambler (4)  |  Game (45)  |  Happen (63)  |  History (302)  |  Honor (21)  |  House (36)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Limit (86)  |  Long (95)  |  Moral (100)  |  Natural (128)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Play (60)  |  Possible (100)  |  Require (33)  |  Resource (47)  |  Species (181)  |  Stake (14)  |  Stay (15)  |  Stick (19)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Unbroken (9)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)  |  Worry (27)

The rudest numerical scales, such as that by which the mineralogists distinguish different degrees of hardness, are found useful. The mere counting of pistils and stamens sufficed to bring botany out of total chaos into some kind of form. It is not, however, so much from counting as from measuring, not so much from the conception of number as from that of continuous quantity, that the advantage of mathematical treatment comes. Number, after all, only serves to pin us down to a precision in our thoughts which, however beneficial, can seldom lead to lofty conceptions, and frequently descend to pettiness.
On the Doctrine of Chances, with Later Reflections (1878), 61-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Beneficial (10)  |  Botany (47)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Conception (63)  |  Count (34)  |  Degree (48)  |  Descent (14)  |  Difference (208)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Form (210)  |  Hardness (3)  |  Lofty (7)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mineralogist (3)  |  Number (179)  |  Pettiness (2)  |  Precision (38)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Scale (49)  |  Stamen (2)  |  Sufficiency (13)  |  Thought (374)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Usefulness (70)

The skein of human continuity must often become this tenuous across the centuries (hanging by a thread, in the old cliche’), but the circle remains unbroken if I can touch the ink of Lavoisier’s own name, written by his own hand. A candle of light, nurtured by the oxygen of his greatest discovery, never burns out if we cherish the intellectual heritage of such unfractured filiation across the ages. We may also wish to contemplate the genuine physical thread of nucleic acid that ties each of us to the common bacterial ancestor of all living creatures, born on Lavoisier’s ancienne terre more than 3.5 billion years ago– and never since disrupted, not for one moment, not for one generation. Such a legacy must be worth preserving from all the guillotines of our folly.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (9)  |  Age (137)  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Bacteria (32)  |  Bear (28)  |  Become (100)  |  Billion (52)  |  Burn (29)  |  Candle (19)  |  Century (94)  |  Cherish (6)  |  Circle (28)  |  Cliche (6)  |  Common (92)  |  Contemplate (8)  |  Creature (127)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Folly (27)  |  Generation (111)  |  Genuine (19)  |  Great (300)  |  Guillotine (4)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hang (13)  |  Heritage (10)  |  Human (445)  |  Ink (7)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Legacy (6)  |  Light (246)  |  Live (186)  |  Moment (61)  |  Name (118)  |  Nucleic Acid (4)  |  Nurture (12)  |  Often (69)  |  Old (104)  |  Oxygen (49)  |  Physical (94)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Remain (77)  |  Tenuous (2)  |  Thread (14)  |  Tie (21)  |  Touch (48)  |  Unbroken (9)  |  Wish (62)  |  Worth (74)  |  Write (87)  |  Year (214)

The University of Cambridge, in accordance with that law of its evolution, by which, while maintaining the strictest continuity between the successive phases of its history, it adapts itself with more or less promptness to the requirements of the times, has lately instituted a course of Experimental Physics.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics', (1871). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 241.Course;Experiment;Cambridge;History;Promptness;Adapt;Requirement
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (18)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Feature (34)  |  History (302)  |  Law (418)  |  Phase (14)  |  Primary (29)  |  Promptness (2)  |  Quality (65)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Strict (7)  |  Successive (14)  |  University (51)

There is no instrument for measuring the pressure of the Ether, which is probably millions of times greater: it is altogether too uniform for direct apprehension. A deep-sea fish has probably no means of apprehending the existence of water, it is too uniformly immersed in it: and that is our condition in regard to the Ether.
Ether and Reality: A Series of Discourses on the Many Functions of the Ether of Space (1925), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Ether (24)  |  Fish (85)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Sea (143)  |  Water (244)

“Yes,” he said. “But these things (the solutions to problems in solid geometry such as the duplication of the cube) do not seem to have been discovered yet.” “There are two reasons for this,” I said. “Because no city holds these things in honour, they are investigated in a feeble way, since they are difficult; and the investigators need an overseer, since they will not find the solutions without one. First, it is hard to get such an overseer, and second, even if one did, as things are now those who investigate these things would not obey him, because of their arrogance. If however a whole city, which did hold these things in honour, were to oversee them communally, the investigators would be obedient, and when these problems were investigated continually and with eagerness, their solutions would become apparent.”
Plato
In The Republic 7 528bc, trans. R.W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (26)  |  Arrogance (12)  |  City (37)  |  Community (65)  |  Cube (9)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Eagerness (4)  |  Feebleness (2)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Honour (23)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Obedience (15)  |  Problem (362)  |  Reason (330)  |  Solution (168)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.