Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Obey

Obey Quotes (40 quotes)

(1) A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
(2) A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law.
(3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
'The Three Laws of Robotics', in I, Robot (1950), Frontispiece.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Robot (13)  |  Through (849)

La chaleur pénètre, comme la gravité, toutes les substances de l’univers, ses rayons occupent toutes les parties de l’espace. Le but de notre ouvrage est d’exposer les lois mathématiques que suit cet élément. Cette théorie formera désormais une des branches les plus importantes de la physique générale.
Heat, like gravity, penetrates every substance of the universe, its rays occupy all parts of space. The object of our work is to set forth the mathematical laws which this element obeys. The theory of heat will hereafter form one of the most important branches of general physics.
From 'Discours Préliminaire' to Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), i, translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Branch (150)  |  Element (310)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heat (174)  |  Important (209)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Part (222)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plus (43)  |  Ray (114)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (500)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

A mind not wholly wishful to reach the truth, or to rest it in or obey it when found, is to that extent a mind impervious to truth an incapable of unbiased belief.
Recent Theistic Discussion: the twentieth series of Croall Lectures (1921), 78. In The Homiletic Review, Vol. 83-84 (1922), Vol. 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Bias (20)  |  Extent (139)  |  Impervious (5)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unbiased (7)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wishful (6)

And nature must obey necessity.
Julius Caesar (1599), IV, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Obedience (19)

Architecture is of all the arts the one nearest to a science, for every architectural design is at its inception dominated by scientific considerations. The inexorable laws of gravitation and of statics must be obeyed by even the most imaginative artist in building.
Anonymous
In 'The Message of Greek Architecture', The Chautauquan (Apr 1906), 43, 110.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Building (156)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Design (195)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Inception (3)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Statics (6)

Augustine's Law XVI: Software is like entropy. It is difficult to grasp, weighs nothing, and obeys the second law of thermodynamics; i.e. it always increases.
In Augustine's Laws (1997), 114.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Increase (210)  |  Law (894)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  Software (13)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weight (134)

Even now, the imprisoned winds which the earliest poet made the Grecian warrior bear for the protection of his fragile bark; or those which, in more modern times, the Lapland wizards sold to the deluded sailors;—these, the unreal creations of fancy or of fraud, called, at the command of science, from their shadowy existence, obey a holier spell: and the unruly masters of the poet and the seer become the obedient slaves of civilized man.
In 'Future Prospects', On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1st ed., 1832), chap. 32, 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Bark (18)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Command (58)  |  Creation (327)  |  Delude (3)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fragile (21)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Grecian (2)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Poet (83)  |  Protection (36)  |  Renewable Energy (14)  |  Sailor (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seer (4)  |  Sell (15)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Ship (62)  |  Slave (37)  |  Spell (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unreal (4)  |  Unruly (2)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wind Power (9)  |  Wizard (4)

Experiments may be of two kinds: experiments of simple fact, and experiments of quantity. ...[In the latter] the conditions will ... vary, not in quality, but quantity, and the effect will also vary in quantity, so that the result of quantitative induction is also to arrive at some mathematical expression involving the quantity of each condition, and expressing the quantity of the result. In other words, we wish to know what function the effect is of its conditions. We shall find that it is one thing to obtain the numerical results, and quite another thing to detect the law obeyed by those results, the latter being an operation of an inverse and tentative character.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 1892), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Condition (356)  |  Detect (44)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Function (228)  |  Induction (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)

Geometry, which should only obey Physics, when united with it sometimes commands it. If it happens that the question which we wish to examine is too complicated for all the elements to be able to enter into the analytical comparison which we wish to make, we separate the more inconvenient [elements], we substitute others for them, less troublesome, but also less real, and we are surprised to arrive, notwithstanding a painful labour, only at a result contradicted by nature; as if after having disguised it, cut it short or altered it, a purely mechanical combination could give it back to us.
From Essai d’une nouvelle théorie de la résistance des fluides (1752), translated as an epigram in Ivor Grattan-Guinness, Convolutions in French Mathematics, 1800-1840: From the Calculus and Mechanics to Mathematical Analysis and Mathematical Physics (1990), Vol. 1, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Back (390)  |  Combination (144)  |  Command (58)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Cut (114)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Enter (141)  |  Examine (78)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Happen (274)  |  Inconvenient (4)  |  Labour (98)  |  Less (103)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painful (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  United (14)  |  Wish (212)

Happy is he who bears a god within himself, an ideal of beauty, and obeys him: an ideal of art, an ideal of the virtues of the Gospel. These are the living springs of great thoughts and great actions. All are illuminated by reflections of the sublime.
Speech (27 Apr 1882) on his reception into the Académie Française, as translated in Maurice Benjamin Strauss, Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), 490.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beauty (299)  |  God (757)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Living (491)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Virtue (109)

Human knowledge and human power meet in one; for where the cause is not known the effect cannot be produced. Nature to be commanded must be obeyed; and that which in contemplation is as the cause is in operation as the rule.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 3. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Effect (393)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rule (294)

I do not see the possibility of comparison between his [H. G. Wells] work and mine. We do not proceed in the same manner. It occurs to me that his stories do not repose on a very scientific basis. ... I make use of physics. He invents. I go to the moon in a cannon-ball, discharged from a cannon. Here there is no invention. He goes to Mars in an airship, which he constructs of a metal which does not obey the law of gravitation. Ça c'est très joli ... but show me this metal. Let him produce it.
Quoted in R. H. Sherard, 'Jules Verne Re-Visited', T.P.'s Weekly (9 Oct 1903).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ball (62)  |  Basis (173)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Construct (124)  |  Do (1908)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Invention (369)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Mars (44)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mine (76)  |  Moon (237)  |  Occur (150)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Use (766)  |  Herbert George (H.G.) Wells (38)  |  Work (1351)

I wish that one would be persuaded that psychological experiments, especially those on the complex functions, are not improved [by large studies]; the statistical method gives only mediocre results; some recent examples demonstrate that. The American authors, who love to do things big, often publish experiments that have been conducted on hundreds and thousands of people; they instinctively obey the prejudice that the persuasiveness of a work is proportional to the number of observations. This is only an illusion.
L' Études expérimentale de l'intelligence (1903), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Complex (188)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Function (228)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Large (394)  |  Love (309)  |  Mediocre (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  People (1005)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Recent (77)  |  Result (677)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)

If to-day you ask a physicist what he has finally made out the æther or the electron to be, the answer will not be a description in terms of billiard balls or fly-wheels or anything concrete; he will point instead to a number of symbols and a set of mathematical equations which they satisfy. What do the symbols stand for? The mysterious reply is given that physics is indifferent to that; it has no means of probing beneath the symbolism. To understand the phenomena of the physical world it is necessary to know the equations which the symbols obey but not the nature of that which is being symbolised. …this newer outlook has modified the challenge from the material to the spiritual world.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Billiard (4)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electron (93)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fly (146)  |  Know (1518)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Reply (56)  |  Set (394)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stand (274)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Understand (606)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

If you will have your laws obeyed without mutiny. see well that they be pieces of God Almighty’s Law; otherwise, all the artillery in the world will not keep down mutiny.
In History of Friedrich II. of Prussia: Called Frederick the Great (1869), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Artillery (2)  |  Down (456)  |  God (757)  |  Law (894)  |  Mutiny (3)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  See (1081)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Illness is the most heeded of doctors: to goodness and wisdom we only make promises; pain we obey.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Heed (12)  |  Illness (34)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pain (136)  |  Promise (67)  |  Wisdom (221)

It would take a civilization far more advanced than ours, unbelievably advanced, to begin to manipulate negative energy to create gateways to the past. But if you could obtain large quantities of negative energy—and that's a big “IF”—then you could create a time machine that apparently obeys Einstein's equation and perhaps the laws of quantum theory.
Quoted by J.R. Minkel in 'Borrowed Time: Interview with Michio Kaku', Scientific American (23 Nov 2003).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Create (235)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equation (132)  |  Gateway (6)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Machine (257)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Negative (63)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Past (337)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Machine (4)  |  Time Travel (4)

Modern man is weighed down more by the burden of responsibility than by the burden of sin. We think him more a savior who shoulders our responsibilities than him who shoulders our sins. If instead of making decisions we have but to obey and do our duty, we feel it as a sort of salvation.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Burden (27)  |  Decision (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Duty (68)  |  Feel (367)  |  Instead (21)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Savior (5)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sin (42)  |  Sort (49)  |  Think (1086)  |  Weigh (49)

Nature! … We obey her laws even when we rebel against them; we work with her even when we desire to work against her.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Desire (204)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Rebel (7)  |  Work (1351)

Nothing travels faster than the speed of light, with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.
In Mostly Harmless (1992), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Exception (73)  |  Faster (50)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Possible (552)  |  Special (184)  |  Speed (65)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Travel (114)

Physical science enjoys the distinction of being the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, and its laws are obeyed universally, so far as is known, not merely by inanimate things, but also by living organisms, in their minutest parts, as single individuals, and also as whole communities. It results from this that, however complicated a series of phenomena may be and however many other sciences may enter into its complete presentation, the purely physical aspect, or the application of the known laws of matter and energy, can always be legitimately separated from the other aspects.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Being (1278)  |  Community (104)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Legitimacy (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Purely (109)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separation (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whole (738)

Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.
A Treatise on Human Nature (1739-40), ed. L. A. Selby-Bigge (1888), book 2, part 3, section 3, 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Never (1087)  |  Office (71)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  Reason (744)  |  Slave (37)

Sir Arthur Eddington deduces religion from the fact that atoms do not obey the laws of mathematics. Sir James Jeans deduces it from the fact that they do.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (130)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Sir James Jeans (33)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Religion (361)

Suicide is merely the product of the general condition of society, and that the individual felon only carries into effect what is a necessary consequence of preceding circumstances. In a given state of society, a certain number of persons must put an end to their own life. This is the general law; and the special question as to who shall commit the crime depends of course upon special laws; which, however, in their total action, must obey the large social law to which they are all subordinate. And the power of the larger law is so irresistible, that neither the love of life nor the fear of another world can avail any thing towards even checking its operation.
In History of Civilization in England (1857, 1904), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Commit (41)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Crime (38)  |  Depend (228)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Fear (197)  |  General (511)  |  Individual (404)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Product (160)  |  Question (621)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Total (94)  |  World (1774)

The Earth obey’d and straight
Op’ning her fertile womb, teem’d at a birth Innumerous living creatures, perfect forms,
Limb’d and full grown.
From 'Paradise Lost', Book 7, collected in Edward Hawkins (ed.), The Poetical Works of John Milton (1824), Vol. 2, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Form (959)  |  Full (66)  |  Grow (238)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Straight (73)  |  Womb (24)

The largest land animal is the elephant, and it is the nearest to man in intelligence: it understands the language of its country and obeys orders, remembers duties that it has been taught, is pleased by affection and by marks of honour, nay more it possesses virtues rare even in man, honesty, wisdom, justice, also respect for the stars and reverence for the sun and moon.
Natural History, 8, I. Trans. H. Rackham, Pliny: Natural History (1947), Vol. 3, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Animal (617)  |  Country (251)  |  Duty (68)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Honour (56)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Justice (39)  |  Language (293)  |  Largest (39)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Order (632)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Possession (65)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rarity (11)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wisdom (221)

The mathematician is entirely free, within the limits of his imagination, to construct what worlds he pleases. What he is to imagine is a matter for his own caprice; he is not thereby discovering the fundamental principles of the universe nor becoming acquainted with the ideas of God. If he can find, in experience, sets of entities which obey the same logical scheme as his mathematical entities, then he has applied his mathematics to the external world; he has created a branch of science.
Aspects of Science: Second Series (1926), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Applied (177)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Branch (150)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Creation (327)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Entity (35)  |  Experience (467)  |  External (57)  |  Find (998)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  God (757)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Please (65)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Set (394)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

The result would inevitably be a state of universal rest and death, if the universe were finite and left to obey existing laws. But it is impossible to conceive a limit to the extent of matter in the universe; and therefore science points rather to an endless progress, through an endless space, of action involving the transformation of potential energy into palpable motion and thence into heat, than to a single finite mechanism, running down like a clock, and stopping for ever.
In 'On the Age of the Sun's Heat' (1862), Popular Lectures and Addresses (1891), Vol. 1, 349-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Clock (47)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Death (388)  |  Down (456)  |  Endless (56)  |  Energy (344)  |  Extent (139)  |  Finite (59)  |  Heat (174)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Motion (310)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Potential (69)  |  Potential Energy (5)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Running (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Through (849)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)

There is beauty in space, and it is orderly. There is no weather, and there is regularity. It is predictable…. Everything in space obeys the laws of physics. If you know these laws, and obey them, space will treat you kindly. And don't tell me that man doesn't belong out there. Man belongs wherever he wants to go—and he’ll do plenty well when he gets there.
Quoted in 'Reach For The Stars', Time (17 Feb 1958), 71, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Everything (476)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Space (500)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Want (497)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)

This fundamental discovery that all bodies owe their origin to arrangements of single initial corpuscular type is the beacon that lights the history of the universe to our eyes. In its own way, matter obeyed from the beginning that great law of biology to which we shall have to recur time and time again, the law of “complexification.”
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 48. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Beacon (8)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Initial (17)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Origin (239)  |  Owe (71)  |  Recur (4)  |  Single (353)  |  Time (1877)  |  Type (167)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

This law [of gravitation] has been called “the greatest generalization achieved by the human mind”. … I am interested not so much in the human mind as in the marvel of a nature which can obey such an elegant and simple law as this law of gravitation. Therefore our main concentration will not be on how clever we are to have found it all out, but on how clever nature is to pay attention to it.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Call (769)  |  Clever (38)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Interest (386)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Simple (406)  |  Will (2355)

This perpetual motion machine she [Lisa] made today is a joke, it just keeps going faster and faster…. Lisa … In this house, we OBEY the laws of thermodynamics!
Spoken by fictional animated character, Homer Simpson, in TV show by Matt Groening, 'Simpsons Roasting On an Open Fire' (also known as 'The Simpsons Christmas Special'), The Simpsons (1989), Series 1, Ep. 1, voiced by Dan Castellaneta, written by Mimi Pond.
Science quotes on:  |  Faster (50)  |  House (140)  |  Joke (83)  |  Law (894)  |  Machine (257)  |  Motion (310)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Today (314)

This prime matter which is proper for the form of the Elixir is taken from a single tree which grows in the lands of the West. It has two branches, which are too high for whoso seeks to eat the fruit thereof to reach them without labour and trouble; and two other branches, but the fruit of these is drier and more tanned than that of the two preceding. The blossom of one of the two is red [corresponding to gold], and the blossom of the second is between white and black [corresponding to silver]. Then there are two other branches weaker and softer than the four preceding, and the blossom of one of them is black [referring to iron] and the other between white and yellow [probably tin]. And this tree grows on the surface of the ocean [the material prima from which all metals are formed] as plants grow on the surface of the earth. This is the tree of which whosoever eats, man and jinn obey him; it is also the tree of which Adam (peace be upon him!) was forbidden to eat, and when he ate thereof he was transformed from his angelic form to human form. And this tree may be changed into every animal shape.
Al- Iraqi
'Cultivation of Gold', trans. E. J. Holmyard (1923), 23. Quoted and annotated in Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Science and Civilization in Islam (1968), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eat (104)  |  Elixir (5)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Gold (97)  |  Grow (238)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Iron (96)  |  Labour (98)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Plant (294)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science In Islam (2)  |  Seek (213)  |  Silver (46)  |  Single (353)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tin (18)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  White (127)  |  Yellow (30)

To-day we no longer beg of nature; we command her, because we have discovered certain of her secrets and shall discover others each day. We command her in the name of laws she can not challenge because they are hers; these laws we do not madly ask her to change, we are the first to submit to them. Nature can only be governed by obeying her.
In Henri Poincaré and George Bruce Halsted (trans.), The Value of Science: Essential Writings of Henri Poincare (1907), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Beg (5)  |  Certain (550)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Command (58)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Govern (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Mad (53)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Secret (194)  |  Submit (18)

We see a universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws, but only dimly understand these laws. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that moves the constellations. I am fascinated by Spinoza’s pantheism, but admire even more his contributions to modern thought because he is the first philosopher to deal with the soul and the body as one, not two separate things.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admire (18)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Deal (188)  |  Dimly (6)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Spinozas (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)

When people talk of atoms obeying fixed laws, they are either ascribing some kind of intelligence and free will to atoms or they are talking nonsense. There is no obedience unless there is at any rate a potentiality of disobeying.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascribing (2)  |  Atom (355)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Obedience (19)  |  People (1005)  |  Potentiality (9)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Will (2355)

Who can estimate the value to civilization of the Copernican system of the sun and planets? A round earth, an earth not the centre of the universe, an earth obeying law, an earth developed by processes of evolution covering tens of millions of years, is incomparably grander than the earth which ante-Copernican imagination pictured.
In 'The Nature of the Astronomer’s Work', North American Review (Jun 1908), 187, No. 631, 915.
Science quotes on:  |  Centre (28)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Copernican (3)  |  Covering (14)  |  Develop (268)  |  Earth (996)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Grand (27)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Millions (17)  |  Planet (356)  |  Process (423)  |  Research (664)  |  Round (26)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Year (933)

You don’t know who he was? Half the particles in the universe obey him!
[Reply by a physics professor when a student asked who Bose was.]
Anonymous
Quoted in 'Original Vision, Forgotten Hero', The Calcutta Telegraph (3 Jan 2012)
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Half (56)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reply (56)  |  Student (300)  |  Universe (857)

[The] seminary spirit of minerals hath its proper wombs where it resides, and is like a Prince or Emperour, whose prescripts both Elements and matter must obey; and it is never idle, but always in action, producing and maintaining natural substances, untill they have fulfilled their destiny.
A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters (1669), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Both (493)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Element (310)  |  Idle (33)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reside (25)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Substance (248)  |  Womb (24)

“Yes,” he said. “But these things (the solutions to problems in solid geometry such as the duplication of the cube) do not seem to have been discovered yet.” “There are two reasons for this,” I said. “Because no city holds these things in honour, they are investigated in a feeble way, since they are difficult; and the investigators need an overseer, since they will not find the solutions without one. First, it is hard to get such an overseer, and second, even if one did, as things are now those who investigate these things would not obey him, because of their arrogance. If however a whole city, which did hold these things in honour, were to oversee them communally, the investigators would be obedient, and when these problems were investigated continually and with eagerness, their solutions would become apparent.”
Plato
In The Republic 7 528bc, trans. R.W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (84)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Become (815)  |  City (78)  |  Community (104)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Cube (13)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hard (243)  |  Honour (56)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Overseer (2)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Solid (116)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.