Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Raise

Raise Quotes (20 quotes)

Altering a gene in the gene line to produce improved offspring is likely to be very difficult because of the danger of unwanted side effects. It would also raise obvious ethical problems.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (19)  |  Danger (62)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Ethical (10)  |  Gene (68)  |  Improve (39)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Problem (362)  |  Reproduction (57)

Ants are so much like human beings as to be an embarrassment. They farm fungi, raise aphids as livestock, launch armies into wars, use chemical sprays to alarm and confuse enemies, capture slaves…. They exchange information ceaselessly. They do everything but watch television.
(1974) In 'On Societies as Organisms', A Long Line of Cells: Collected Essays (1990), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (9)  |  Ant (19)  |  Aphid (2)  |  Army (22)  |  Capture (8)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Confuse (13)  |  Embarrassment (3)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Farm (17)  |  Fungus (4)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Information (102)  |  Slave (21)  |  Spray (4)  |  Television (27)  |  War (144)  |  Watch (39)

Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army. If we retrench the wages of the schoolmaster, we must raise those of the recruiting sergeant.
Given as a column-end filler in The Farmer's Cabinet, and American Herd Book (15 Mar 1839), Vol. 3, No. 8, 247. This is the earliest occurrence yet found by the editor. If you know the primary source, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (22)  |  Better (131)  |  Education (280)  |  Liberty (17)  |  Recruiting (3)  |  Safeguard (4)  |  Schoolmaster (4)  |  Standing (11)  |  Wage (5)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (2)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Character (82)  |  Chief (25)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Desk (10)  |  Drive (38)  |  First (174)  |  Force (194)  |  Fund (12)  |  Institution (32)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Observation (418)  |  Observe (48)  |  Professional (27)  |  Project (22)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Second (33)  |  Sky (68)  |  Spend (24)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Time (439)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Carry (35)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (79)  |  Concept (102)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Depth (32)  |  Design (92)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Earth (487)  |  Field (119)  |  Flexible (3)  |  Functional (5)  |  Granite (6)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Matter (270)  |  Opponent (10)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Primeval (8)  |  Process (201)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rock (107)  |  Satisfactory (9)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sea (143)  |  Study (331)  |  Suppose (29)  |  System (141)  |  Variety (53)  |  Abraham Werner (4)  |  Working (20)

I shall devote only a few lines to the expression of my belief in the importance of science ... it is by this daily striving after knowledge that man has raised himself to the unique position he occupies on earth, and that his power and well-being have continually increased.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Continually (14)  |  Daily (19)  |  Devote (23)  |  Earth (487)  |  Expression (82)  |  Importance Of Science (2)  |  Increase (107)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Line (44)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Position (54)  |  Power (273)  |  Strive (35)  |  Unique (24)  |  Well-Being (4)

Knock, And He’ll open the door
Vanish, And He’ll make you shine like the sun
Fall, And He’ll raise you to the heavens
Become nothing, And He’ll turn you into everything.
Rumi
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 164
Science quotes on:  |  Become (100)  |  Door (25)  |  Everything (120)  |  Fall (89)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Hell (29)  |  Knock (3)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Open (38)  |  Shine (22)  |  Sun (211)  |  Turn (72)  |  Vanish (10)

Mostly, I spend my time being a mother to my two children, working in my organic garden, raising masses of sweet peas, being passionately involved in conservation, recycling and solar energy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Garden (23)  |  Involve (27)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mother (59)  |  Organic (48)  |  Passionately (2)  |  Pea (3)  |  Recycling (4)  |  Solar Energy (17)  |  Spend (24)  |  Sweet (10)  |  Time (439)  |  Work (457)

No research will answer all queries that the future may raise. It is wiser to praise the work for what it has accomplished and then to formulate the problems still to be solved.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Answer (201)  |  Formulation (20)  |  Future (229)  |  Praise (17)  |  Problem (362)  |  Query (3)  |  Research (517)  |  Solution (168)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Work (457)

Now, at Suiattle Pass, Brower was still talking about butterflies. He said he had raised them from time to time and had often watched them emerge from the chrysalis—first a crack in the case, then a feeler, and in an hour a butterfly. He said he had felt that he wanted to help, to speed them through the long and awkward procedure; and he had once tried. The butterflies came out with extended abdomens, and their wings were balled together like miniature clenched fists. Nothing happened. They sat there until they died. ‘I have never gotten over that,’ he said. ‘That kind of information is all over in the country, but it’s not in town.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (2)  |  Awkward (6)  |  Ball (20)  |  Brower (2)  |  Butterfly (19)  |  Case (64)  |  Clench (2)  |  Country (121)  |  Crack (11)  |  Die (46)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Extend (20)  |  Feel (93)  |  Feeler (2)  |  First (174)  |  Fist (2)  |  Happen (63)  |  Help (68)  |  Hour (42)  |  Information (102)  |  Kind (99)  |  Long (95)  |  Miniature (5)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Often (69)  |  Pass (60)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Say (126)  |  Sit (24)  |  Speed (27)  |  Talk (61)  |  Time (439)  |  Together (48)  |  Town (18)  |  Try (103)  |  Want (120)  |  Watch (39)  |  Wing (36)

People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices. It is impossible indeed to prevent such meetings, by any law which either could be executed, or would be consistent with liberty and justice.
An Enquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). In R. H. Campbell and A. S. Skinner (eds.), An Enquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1976), Vol. 1, Book 1, Chapter 10, Part 2, 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Consistency (21)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Conversation (18)  |  Diversion (7)  |  End (141)  |  Execution (9)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Justice (24)  |  Law (418)  |  Liberty (17)  |  Meeting (14)  |  People (269)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Price (26)  |  Public (82)  |  Seldom (21)  |  Trade (24)

Self-righteousness is a loud din raised to drown the voice of guilt within us.
In The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951) Section 69
Science quotes on:  |  Drown (9)  |  Guilt (8)  |  Loud (7)  |  Voice (41)

The venereal Disease first invaded the Spaniards and Italians, before the Efficacy of Mercury was known. … By the Use of Mercury, given with Discretion, so as to raise a Salivation; after the Use of which the whole Body, in a manner, seems to grow young again.
In Dr. Boerhaave's Academical Lectures on the Theory of Physic (1746), Vol. 6, 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Discretion (2)  |  Grow (66)  |  Italian (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Manner (35)  |  Mercury (39)  |  Salivation (2)  |  Seem (89)  |  Spaniard (2)  |  Venereal Disease (2)  |  Young (72)

The worst primary school scolding I ever received was for ridiculing a classmate who asked, ‘What’s an atom?’ To my third grader’s mind, the question betrayed a level of ignorance more befitting a preschooler, but the teacher disagreed and banned me from recess for a week. I had forgotten the incident until a few years ago, while sitting in on a quantum mechanics class taught by a Nobel Prizewinning physicist. Midway through a brutally abstract lecture on the hydrogen atom, a plucky sophomore raised his hand and asked the very same question. To the astonishment of all, our speaker fell silent. He stared out the window for what seemed like an eternity before answering, ‘I don’t know.’
'The Secret Life of Atoms'. Discover (Jun 2007), 28:6, 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Answer (201)  |  Ask (99)  |  Astonishment (19)  |  Atom (251)  |  Bad (78)  |  Ban (9)  |  Betray (7)  |  Class (64)  |  Disagree (6)  |  Eternity (44)  |  Fall (89)  |  Forget (40)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hydrogen (37)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Incident (3)  |  Know (321)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Level (51)  |  Midway (3)  |  Mind (544)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Primary (29)  |  Quantum Mechanics (31)  |  Question (315)  |  Receive (39)  |  Recess (5)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Same (92)  |  School (87)  |  Scold (5)  |  Seem (89)  |  Silent (18)  |  Sit (24)  |  Speaker (5)  |  Stare (3)  |  Teach (102)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Third (11)  |  Week (8)  |  Window (25)  |  Year (214)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (35)  |  Balance (43)  |  Blood (95)  |  Cold (38)  |  Composition (52)  |  Contention (7)  |  Continent (39)  |  Creation (211)  |  Crust (17)  |  Denial (13)  |  Design (92)  |  Drought (9)  |  Dry (12)  |  Earth (487)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Environment (138)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Fact (609)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fluid (18)  |  Foresight (4)  |  Free (59)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Geology (187)  |  Grant (21)  |  Habitation (3)  |  Heat (90)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Human (445)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Independent (41)  |  Internal (18)  |  Keep (47)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Land (83)  |  Life (917)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Organ (60)  |  Perpetual (10)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Plan (69)  |  Predator (5)  |  Purity (13)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reason (330)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Revolution (56)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Sea (143)  |  Search (85)  |  Sense (240)  |  Serve (34)  |  Sphere (40)  |  State (96)  |  Storm (19)  |  Succession (39)  |  Swamp (5)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Vertebrate (13)  |  Vicissitude (4)  |  Water (244)  |  Welfare (16)

This theme of mutually invisible life at widely differing scales bears an important implication for the ‘culture wars’ that supposedly now envelop our universities and our intellectual discourse in general ... One side of this false dichotomy features the postmodern relativists who argue that all culturally bound modes of perception must be equally valid, and that no factual truth therefore exists. The other side includes the benighted, old-fashioned realists who insist that flies truly have two wings, and that Shakespeare really did mean what he thought he was saying. The principle of scaling provides a resolution for the false parts of this silly dichotomy. Facts are facts and cannot be denied by any rational being. (Often, facts are also not at all easy to determine or specify–but this question raises different issues for another time.) Facts, however, may also be highly scale dependent–and the perceptions of one world may have no validity or expression in the domain of another. The one-page map of Maine cannot recognize the separate boulders of Acadia, but both provide equally valid representations of a factual coastline.
The World as I See It (1999)
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (17)  |  Bear (28)  |  Benighted (2)  |  Bind (18)  |  Both (52)  |  Boulder (5)  |  Culturally (2)  |  Culture (85)  |  Deny (29)  |  Dependent (14)  |  Determine (45)  |  Dichotomy (4)  |  Differ (13)  |  Different (110)  |  Discourse (13)  |  Domain (21)  |  Easy (56)  |  Envelop (3)  |  Equally (18)  |  Exist (89)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fact (609)  |  Factual (8)  |  False (79)  |  Feature (34)  |  Fly (65)  |  General (92)  |  Highly (8)  |  Implication (14)  |  Important (124)  |  Include (27)  |  Insist (13)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Issue (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Map (21)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mode (29)  |  Mutually (4)  |  Often (69)  |  Old-Fashioned (5)  |  Part (146)  |  Perception (53)  |  Principle (228)  |  Provide (48)  |  Question (315)  |  Rational (42)  |  Realist (2)  |  Really (50)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Relativist (2)  |  Representation (27)  |  Resolution (16)  |  Say (126)  |  Scale (49)  |  Separate (46)  |  Shakespeare (3)  |  Side (36)  |  Silly (10)  |  Specify (6)  |  Supposedly (2)  |  Theme (8)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Truly (19)  |  Truth (750)  |  University (51)  |  Valid (6)  |  Validity (22)  |  War (144)  |  Widely (5)  |  Wing (36)  |  World (667)

We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We'll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. All this we will do.
From First Inaugural Address (20 Jan 2009)
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (18)  |  Bridge (22)  |  Build (80)  |  Car (20)  |  College (27)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Cost (31)  |  Demand (52)  |  Digital (4)  |  Factory (13)  |  Feed (22)  |  Fuel (27)  |  Harness (15)  |  Health Care (7)  |  Internet (12)  |  Line (44)  |  Lower (11)  |  Place (111)  |  Quality (65)  |  Restore (5)  |  Rightful (2)  |  Road (47)  |  School (87)  |  Science (1699)  |  Soil (51)  |  Sun (211)  |  Technology (199)  |  Transform (20)  |  University (51)  |  Wield (5)  |  Wind (52)  |  Wonder (134)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Aim (58)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Analyze (3)  |  Answer (201)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arise (32)  |  Belief (400)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Break (33)  |  Briefly (3)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Conform (5)  |  Connect (15)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Construction (69)  |  Country (121)  |  Decision (58)  |  Define (29)  |  Definite (27)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demand (52)  |  Deny (29)  |  Describe (38)  |  Design (92)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dominate (13)  |  Easy (56)  |  Element (129)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exclusion (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Human (445)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instance (18)  |  Intention (25)  |  Learn (160)  |  Likely (23)  |  Merely (35)  |  Method (154)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Movement (65)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Observe (48)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Part (146)  |  Path (59)  |  Pattern (56)  |  People (269)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Problem (362)  |  Produce (63)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reckon (6)  |  Region (26)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Result (250)  |  Room (29)  |  Seek (57)  |  Seem (89)  |  Show (55)  |  Single (72)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Sciences (4)  |  Society (188)  |  Sort (32)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (12)  |  Technical (26)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Thought (374)  |  Totality (9)  |  Track (9)  |  Traverse (4)  |  Try (103)  |  Type (34)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wild (39)

Wildlife management consists mainly of raising more animals for hunters to shoot.
From interview collected in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Hunter (11)  |  Shoot (10)

[In] the realm of science, ... what we have achieved will be obsolete in ten, twenty or fifty years. That is the fate, indeed, that is the very meaning of scientific work. ... Every scientific “fulfillment” raises new “questions” and cries out to be surpassed rendered obsolete. Everyone who wishes to serve science has to resign himself to this.
Max Weber
The Vocation Lectures: Science as a Vocation, translated by Rodney Livingstone (2004), xxviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Fate (38)  |  Fulfillment (9)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Obsolete (7)  |  Question (315)  |  Realm (40)  |  Render (17)  |  Resign (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Serve (34)  |  Surpass (12)  |  Wish (62)  |  Work (457)  |  Year (214)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.