Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Raise

Raise Quotes (35 quotes)

Altering a gene in the gene line to produce improved offspring is likely to be very difficult because of the danger of unwanted side effects. It would also raise obvious ethical problems.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (23)  |  Danger (78)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Ethical (13)  |  Gene (72)  |  Improve (56)  |  Offspring (16)  |  Problem (497)  |  Reproduction (61)

Among the memoirs of Kirchhoff are some of uncommon beauty. … Can anything be beautiful, where the author has no time for the slightest external embellishment?—But—; it is this very simplicity, the indispensableness of each word, each letter, each little dash, that among all artists raises the mathematician nearest to the World-creator; it establishes a sublimity which is equalled in no other art, something like it exists at most in symphonic music. The Pythagoreans recognized already the similarity between the most subjective and the most objective of the arts.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 28-29, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 186. From the original German, “Gerade unter den zuletzt erwähnten Abhandlungen Kirchhoff’s sind einige von ungewöhnlicher Schönheit. … kann etwas schön sein, wo dem Autor auch zur kleinsten äusseren Ausschmückung die Zeit fehlt?–Doch–; gerade durch diese Einfachheit, durch diese Unentbehrlichkeit jedes Wortes, jedes Buchstaben, jedes Strichelchens kömmt der Mathematiker unter allen Künstlern dem Weltenschöpfer am nächsten; sie begründet eine Erhabenheit, die in keiner Kunst ein Gleiches,–Aehnliches höchstens in der symphonischen Musik hat. Erkannten doch schon die Pythagoräer die Aehnlichkeit der subjectivsten und der objectivsten der Künste.”
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Artist (69)  |  Author (62)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Creator (55)  |  Dash (3)  |  Equal (83)  |  Establish (56)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (3)  |  Letter (51)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Music (106)  |  Objective (66)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Similarity (21)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Subjective (12)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Symphony (6)  |  Time (595)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Word (302)  |  World (898)

Ants are so much like human beings as to be an embarrassment. They farm fungi, raise aphids as livestock, launch armies into wars, use chemical sprays to alarm and confuse enemies, capture slaves…. They exchange information ceaselessly. They do everything but watch television.
(1974) In 'On Societies as Organisms', A Long Line of Cells: Collected Essays (1990), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (11)  |  Ant (24)  |  Aphid (2)  |  Army (25)  |  Capture (10)  |  Chemical (79)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Enemy (65)  |  Everything (181)  |  Exchange (12)  |  Farm (19)  |  Fungus (4)  |  Human Being (73)  |  Information (122)  |  Slave (28)  |  Spray (4)  |  Television (29)  |  War (161)  |  Watch (65)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (42)  |  Anybody (11)  |  Appear (118)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Common (122)  |  Complete (87)  |  Condition (163)  |  Conquer (23)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Depend (90)  |  Describe (57)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Evident (29)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fail (58)  |  Genius (249)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Goethe (3)  |  Higher (37)  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Idea (580)  |  Magic (78)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Perception (64)  |  Power (366)  |  Quality (95)  |  Question (404)  |  Real (149)  |  Require (85)  |  Seem (143)  |  Sight (48)  |  Solution (216)  |  Space (257)  |  Speak (92)  |  Stand Out (2)  |  Strange (94)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Tell (110)  |  Transform (35)  |  Visible (38)  |  Vision (94)  |  Whole (192)  |  Word (302)

At the planet’s very heart lies a solid rocky core, at least five times larger than Earth, seething with the appalling heat generated by the inexorable contraction of the stupendous mass of material pressing down to its centre. For more than four billion years Jupiter’s immense gravitational power has been squeezing the planet slowly, relentlessly, steadily, converting gravitational energy into heat, raising the temperature of that rocky core to thirty thousand degrees, spawning the heat flow that warms the planet from within. That hot, rocky core is the original protoplanet seed from the solar system’s primeval time, the nucleus around which those awesome layers of hydrogen and helium and ammonia, methane, sulphur compounds and water have wrapped themselves.
Ben Bova
Jupiter
Science quotes on:  |  Ammonia (12)  |  Appalling (8)  |  Awesome (11)  |  Billion (62)  |  Centre (28)  |  Compound (58)  |  Contraction (8)  |  Convert (22)  |  Core (14)  |  Degree (82)  |  Down (86)  |  Earth (638)  |  Energy (214)  |  Five (16)  |  Flow (42)  |  Generate (14)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Heart (139)  |  Heat (100)  |  Helium (9)  |  Hot (20)  |  Hydrogen (44)  |  Immense (42)  |  Inexorable (6)  |  Large (130)  |  Layer (22)  |  Least (74)  |  Lie (115)  |  Mass (78)  |  Material (156)  |  Methane (7)  |  Nucleus (33)  |  Original (57)  |  Planet (263)  |  Power (366)  |  Press (21)  |  Primeval (10)  |  Relentlessly (2)  |  Rocky (3)  |  Seed (63)  |  Seething (3)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Solar Systems (3)  |  Solid (50)  |  Squeeze (6)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Stupendous (10)  |  Sulphur (16)  |  Temperature (47)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Time (595)  |  Warm (34)  |  Water (293)  |  Wrap (7)  |  Year (299)

Behind every man’s busy-ness there should be a level of undisturbed serenity and industry, as within the reef encircling a coral isle there is always an expanse of still water, where the depositions are going on which will finally raise it above the surface.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 380.
Science quotes on:  |  Busy (28)  |  Circle (56)  |  Coral (10)  |  Deposition (4)  |  Industry (109)  |  Isle (6)  |  Reef (7)  |  Serenity (7)  |  Still (5)  |  Surface (101)  |  Undisturbed (4)  |  Water (293)

Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army. If we retrench the wages of the schoolmaster, we must raise those of the recruiting sergeant.
Given as a column-end filler in The Farmer's Cabinet, and American Herd Book (15 Mar 1839), Vol. 3, No. 8, 247. This is the earliest occurrence yet found by the editor. If you know the primary source, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (25)  |  Better (192)  |  Education (347)  |  Liberty (25)  |  Recruiting (3)  |  Retrench (2)  |  Safeguard (5)  |  Schoolmaster (4)  |  Sergeant (2)  |  Standing (11)  |  Wage (5)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Character (118)  |  Chief (38)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Desk (13)  |  Drive (55)  |  First (314)  |  Force (249)  |  Fund (12)  |  Institution (39)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Observation (450)  |  Observe (76)  |  Professional (37)  |  Project (31)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Second (59)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spend (43)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Time (595)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (19)  |  Artificial (32)  |  Carry (59)  |  Circuit (15)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (87)  |  Concept (146)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Depth (51)  |  Design (115)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Earth (638)  |  Field (171)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Functional (10)  |  Granite (7)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Inclination (25)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Matter (343)  |  Opponent (11)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Primeval (10)  |  Process (267)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (154)  |  Rock (125)  |  Romanticist (2)  |  Satisfactory (16)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Sea (188)  |  Study (476)  |  Suppose (49)  |  System (191)  |  Variety (71)  |  Abraham Werner (5)  |  Working (20)

I am by training a positivist, by inclination a pragmatist, in temperament a mystic, in practice a democrat; my faith Jewish, educated by Catholics, a habitual Protestant; born in Europe, raised in the Midwest, hardened in the East, softened in California and living in Israel.
Given as “said of himself”, in Eyal Diskin, 'Abraham Kaplan' in Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik (eds.), Encyclopaedia Judaica (2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Born (31)  |  California (9)  |  Catholic (8)  |  East (18)  |  Educate (12)  |  Europe (43)  |  Faith (157)  |  Habitual (3)  |  Harden (2)  |  In Practice (2)  |  Inclination (25)  |  Israel (5)  |  Jewish (10)  |  Living (56)  |  Mystic (12)  |  Positivist (4)  |  Pragmatist (2)  |  Protestant (2)  |  Temperament (11)  |  Training (66)

I raised the visor on my helmet cover and looked out to try to identify constellations. As I looked out into space, I was overwhelmed by the darkness. I felt the flesh crawl on my back and the hair rise on my neck.
In How Do You Go To The Bathroom In Space?: All the Answers to All the Questions You Have About Living in Space (1999), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (104)  |  Constellation (15)  |  Cover (37)  |  Crawl (6)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Feel (167)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Hair (25)  |  Identify (13)  |  Neck (13)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Rise (70)  |  Space (257)  |  Try (141)

I shall devote only a few lines to the expression of my belief in the importance of science ... it is by this daily striving after knowledge that man has raised himself to the unique position he occupies on earth, and that his power and well-being have continually increased.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Continually (16)  |  Daily (29)  |  Devote (35)  |  Earth (638)  |  Expression (110)  |  Importance Of Science (2)  |  Increase (146)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Line (90)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Position (76)  |  Power (366)  |  Strive (45)  |  Unique (41)  |  Well-Being (5)

It has long been a complaint against mathematicians that they are hard to convince: but it is a far greater disqualification both for philosophy, and for the affairs of life, to be too easily convinced; to have too low a standard of proof. The only sound intellects are those which, in the first instance, set their standards of proof high. Practice in concrete affairs soon teaches them to make the necessary abatement: but they retain the consciousness, without which there is no sound practical reasoning, that in accepting inferior evidence because there is no better to be had, they do not by that acceptance raise it to completeness.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 611.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Better (192)  |  Both (81)  |  Complaint (10)  |  Completeness (15)  |  Concrete (32)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Convince (23)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Disqualification (2)  |  Easily (35)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Far (154)  |  First (314)  |  Great (534)  |  Hard (99)  |  High (153)  |  Inferior (19)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Life (1131)  |  Low (24)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Practical (133)  |  Practice (94)  |  Proof (245)  |  Reason (471)  |  Retain (19)  |  Set (99)  |  Soon (34)  |  Sound (90)  |  Standard (55)  |  Teach (188)

It is curious to observe how differently these great men [Plato and Bacon] estimated the value of every kind of knowledge. Take Arithmetic for example. Plato, after speaking slightly of the convenience of being able to reckon and compute in the ordinary transactions of life, passes to what he considers as a far more important advantage. The study of the properties of numbers, he tells us, habituates the mind to the contemplation of pure truth, and raises us above the material universe. He would have his disciples apply themselves to this study, not that they may be able to buy or sell, not that they may qualify themselves to be shop-keepers or travelling merchants, but that they may learn to withdraw their minds from the ever-shifting spectacle of this visible and tangible world, and to fix them on the immutable essences of things.
Bacon, on the other hand, valued this branch of knowledge only on account of its uses with reference to that visible and tangible world which Plato so much despised. He speaks with scorn of the mystical arithmetic of the later Platonists, and laments the propensity of mankind to employ, on mere matters of curiosity, powers the whole exertion of which is required for purposes of solid advantage. He advises arithmeticians to leave these trifles, and employ themselves in framing convenient expressions which may be of use in physical researches.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (68)  |  Advantage (77)  |  Advise (7)  |  Apply (77)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Arithmetician (3)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Branch (107)  |  Buy (20)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consider (81)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Curious (43)  |  Despise (13)  |  Different (186)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Employ (35)  |  Essence (55)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Example (94)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Expression (110)  |  Fix (25)  |  Frame (26)  |  Great (534)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Immutable (13)  |  Important (205)  |  Kind (140)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Lament (9)  |  Late (52)  |  Learn (288)  |  Leave (128)  |  Life (1131)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Material (156)  |  Matter (343)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Mere (82)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Number (282)  |  Observe (76)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Pass (93)  |  Physical (134)  |  Plato (76)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Power (366)  |  Propensity (8)  |  Property (126)  |  Pure (103)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Reference (33)  |  Require (85)  |  Research (590)  |  Scorn (7)  |  Sell (14)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Solid (50)  |  Speak (92)  |  Spectacle (14)  |  Study (476)  |  Tangible (8)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Travel (61)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Truth (928)  |  Universe (686)  |  Value (242)  |  Visible (38)  |  Whole (192)  |  Withdraw (9)  |  World (898)

Knock, And He’ll open the door
Vanish, And He’ll make you shine like the sun
Fall, And He’ll raise you to the heavens
Become nothing, And He’ll turn you into everything.
Rumi
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 164
Science quotes on:  |  Become (172)  |  Door (39)  |  Everything (181)  |  Fall (120)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Hell (32)  |  Knock (3)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Open (66)  |  Shine (45)  |  Sun (276)  |  Turn (118)  |  Vanish (18)

Mostly, I spend my time being a mother to my two children, working in my organic garden, raising masses of sweet peas, being passionately involved in conservation, recycling and solar energy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Child (252)  |  Conservation (143)  |  Garden (34)  |  Involve (48)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mother (71)  |  Organic (55)  |  Passionately (3)  |  Pea (4)  |  Recycling (4)  |  Solar Energy (17)  |  Spend (43)  |  Sweet (14)  |  Time (595)  |  Work (635)

No research will answer all queries that the future may raise. It is wiser to praise the work for what it has accomplished and then to formulate the problems still to be solved.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (80)  |  Answer (249)  |  Formulation (26)  |  Future (287)  |  Praise (26)  |  Problem (497)  |  Query (3)  |  Research (590)  |  Solution (216)  |  Wisdom (182)  |  Work (635)

Now, at Suiattle Pass, Brower was still talking about butterflies. He said he had raised them from time to time and had often watched them emerge from the chrysalis—first a crack in the case, then a feeler, and in an hour a butterfly. He said he had felt that he wanted to help, to speed them through the long and awkward procedure; and he had once tried. The butterflies came out with extended abdomens, and their wings were balled together like miniature clenched fists. Nothing happened. They sat there until they died. ‘I have never gotten over that,’ he said. ‘That kind of information is all over in the country, but it’s not in town.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (3)  |  Awkward (7)  |  Ball (31)  |  Brower (2)  |  Butterfly (20)  |  Case (99)  |  Clench (2)  |  Country (147)  |  Crack (15)  |  Die (82)  |  Emerge (21)  |  Extend (44)  |  Feel (167)  |  Feeler (2)  |  First (314)  |  Fist (3)  |  Happen (82)  |  Help (103)  |  Hour (71)  |  Information (122)  |  Kind (140)  |  Long (174)  |  Miniature (5)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Often (106)  |  Pass (93)  |  Procedure (25)  |  Say (228)  |  Sit (47)  |  Speed (35)  |  Talk (100)  |  Time (595)  |  Together (79)  |  Town (27)  |  Try (141)  |  Want (176)  |  Watch (65)  |  Wing (48)

People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices. It is impossible indeed to prevent such meetings, by any law which either could be executed, or would be consistent with liberty and justice.
An Enquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). In R. H. Campbell and A. S. Skinner (eds.), An Enquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1976), Vol. 1, Book 1, Chapter 10, Part 2, 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Consistency (23)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Conversation (26)  |  Diversion (9)  |  End (195)  |  Execution (19)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Justice (27)  |  Law (515)  |  Liberty (25)  |  Meeting (20)  |  People (390)  |  Prevention (30)  |  Price (34)  |  Public (94)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Trade (30)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (165)  |  Appearance (85)  |  Argument (82)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (12)  |  Color (99)  |  Concern (110)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Draw (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (181)  |  Find (408)  |  Give (201)  |  Habit (112)  |  Hold (94)  |  Idea (580)  |  Influence (140)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (188)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Observe (76)  |  Omit (7)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (123)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (176)  |  Probability (106)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (86)  |  Rest (93)  |  Result (389)  |  See (369)  |  Separate (74)  |  Show (93)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (476)  |  Summary (5)  |  Thought (546)  |  Truth (928)  |  Usually (31)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (171)

Self-righteousness is a loud din raised to drown the voice of guilt within us.
In The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951) Section 69
Science quotes on:  |  Drown (12)  |  Guilt (9)  |  Loud (9)  |  Voice (51)

The average English author [of mathematical texts] leaves one under the impression that he has made a bargain with his reader to put before him the truth, the greater part of the truth, and nothing but the truth; and that if he has put the facts of his subject into his book, however difficult it may be to unearth them, he has fulfilled his contract with his reader. This is a very much mistaken view, because effective teaching requires a great deal more than a bare recitation of facts, even if these are duly set forth in logical order—as in English books they often are not. The probable difficulties which will occur to the student, the objections which the intelligent student will naturally and necessarily raise to some statement of fact or theory—these things our authors seldom or never notice, and yet a recognition and anticipation of them by the author would be often of priceless value to the student. Again, a touch of humour (strange as the contention may seem) in mathematical works is not only possible with perfect propriety, but very helpful; and I could give instances of this even from the pure mathematics of Salmon and the physics of Clerk Maxwell.
In Perry, Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 59-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (14)  |  Author (62)  |  Average (42)  |  Bare (11)  |  Bargain (4)  |  Book (257)  |  Contention (10)  |  Contract (11)  |  Deal (49)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Effective (30)  |  English (35)  |  Fact (733)  |  Forth (13)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Great (534)  |  Helpful (15)  |  Humour (103)  |  Impression (72)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intelligent (47)  |  Leave (128)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Notice (37)  |  Objection (18)  |  Occur (43)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (242)  |  Part (222)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Physics (348)  |  Possible (158)  |  Priceless (5)  |  Probable (20)  |  Propriety (4)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Reader (40)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Require (85)  |  Salmon (6)  |  Seem (143)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Set (99)  |  Statement (76)  |  Strange (94)  |  Student (203)  |  Subject (240)  |  Teach (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Text (14)  |  Theory (696)  |  Touch (77)  |  Truth (928)  |  Unearth (2)  |  Value (242)  |  View (171)  |  Work (635)

The first question which you will ask and which I must try to answer is this, “What is the use of climbing Mount Everest ?” and my answer must at once be, “It is no use.” There is not the slightest prospect of any gain whatsoever. Oh, we may learn a little about the behavior of the human body at high altitudes, and possibly medical men may turn our observation to some account for the purposes of aviation. But otherwise nothing will come of it. We shall not bring back a single bit of gold or silver, not a gem, nor any coal or iron. We shall not find a single foot of earth that can be planted with crops to raise food. It’s no use. So, if you cannot understand that there is something in man which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself upward and forever upward, then you won’t see why we go. What we get from this adventure is just sheer joy. And joy is, after all, the end of life. We do not live to eat and make money. We eat and make money to be able to enjoy life. That is what life means and what life is for.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Account (68)  |  Adventure (47)  |  Altitude (4)  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (160)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Back (104)  |  Behavior (60)  |  Bit (22)  |  Bring (90)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Climb (34)  |  Coal (45)  |  Crop (19)  |  Earth (638)  |  Eat (52)  |  End (195)  |  Enjoy (39)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Food (154)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forever (60)  |  Gain (70)  |  Gem (13)  |  Gold (68)  |  High (153)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Iron (65)  |  Joy (88)  |  Learn (288)  |  Life (1131)  |  Little (188)  |  Live (272)  |  Means (176)  |  Medical (24)  |  Meet (31)  |  Money (142)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Observation (450)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Plant (200)  |  Possibly (19)  |  Prospect (22)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Question (404)  |  Respond (12)  |  See (369)  |  Sheer (9)  |  Silver (33)  |  Single (120)  |  Slight (31)  |  Struggle (78)  |  Try (141)  |  Turn (118)  |  Understand (340)  |  Upward (11)  |  Whatsoever (9)

The reasoning of mathematicians is founded on certain and infallible principles. Every word they use conveys a determinate idea, and by accurate definitions they excite the same ideas in the mind of the reader that were in the mind of the writer. When they have defined the terms they intend to make use of, they premise a few axioms, or self-evident principles, that every one must assent to as soon as proposed. They then take for granted certain postulates, that no one can deny them, such as, that a right line may be drawn from any given point to another, and from these plain, simple principles they have raised most astonishing speculations, and proved the extent of the human mind to be more spacious and capacious than any other science.
In Diary, Works (1850), Vol. 2, 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (35)  |  Assent (6)  |  Astonishing (11)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Capacious (2)  |  Certain (126)  |  Convey (16)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (192)  |  Deny (42)  |  Determinate (6)  |  Draw (55)  |  Excite (15)  |  Extent (51)  |  Founded (20)  |  Give (201)  |  Grant (32)  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Idea (580)  |  Infallible (8)  |  Intend (16)  |  Line (90)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Plain (33)  |  Point (123)  |  Postulate (31)  |  Premise (27)  |  Principle (292)  |  Propose (23)  |  Prove (109)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Right (197)  |  Same (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  Self-Evident (12)  |  Simple (178)  |  Soon (34)  |  Spacious (2)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Term (122)  |  Word (302)  |  Writer (46)

The sea itself offers a perennial source of power hitherto almost unapplied. The tides, twice in each day, raise a vast mass of water, which might be made available for driving machinery.
In 'Future Prospects', On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1st ed., 1832), chap. 32, 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Drive (55)  |  Machinery (33)  |  Mass (78)  |  Power (366)  |  Renewable Energy (13)  |  Sea (188)  |  Tidal Power (3)  |  Tide (24)  |  Vast (89)  |  Water (293)

The venereal Disease first invaded the Spaniards and Italians, before the Efficacy of Mercury was known. … By the Use of Mercury, given with Discretion, so as to raise a Salivation; after the Use of which the whole Body, in a manner, seems to grow young again.
In Dr. Boerhaave's Academical Lectures on the Theory of Physic (1746), Vol. 6, 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (247)  |  Discretion (3)  |  Grow (99)  |  Italian (5)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mercury (44)  |  Salivation (2)  |  Seem (143)  |  Spaniard (3)  |  Venereal Disease (2)  |  Young (100)

The worst primary school scolding I ever received was for ridiculing a classmate who asked, ‘What’s an atom?’ To my third grader’s mind, the question betrayed a level of ignorance more befitting a preschooler, but the teacher disagreed and banned me from recess for a week. I had forgotten the incident until a few years ago, while sitting in on a quantum mechanics class taught by a Nobel Prizewinning physicist. Midway through a brutally abstract lecture on the hydrogen atom, a plucky sophomore raised his hand and asked the very same question. To the astonishment of all, our speaker fell silent. He stared out the window for what seemed like an eternity before answering, ‘I don’t know.’
'The Secret Life of Atoms'. Discover (Jun 2007), 28:6, 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (160)  |  Astonishment (23)  |  Atom (280)  |  Bad (99)  |  Ban (9)  |  Betray (8)  |  Class (84)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Eternity (49)  |  Fall (120)  |  Forget (63)  |  Hand (142)  |  Hydrogen (44)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Incident (4)  |  Know (556)  |  Lecture (68)  |  Level (67)  |  Midway (4)  |  Mind (760)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Primary (41)  |  Quantum Mechanics (37)  |  Question (404)  |  Receive (60)  |  Recess (7)  |  Ridicule (17)  |  Same (156)  |  School (119)  |  Scold (6)  |  Seem (143)  |  Silent (28)  |  Sit (47)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Stare (9)  |  Teach (188)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Third (15)  |  Week (13)  |  Window (40)  |  Year (299)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (43)  |  Balance (55)  |  Blood (104)  |  Cold (58)  |  Composition (60)  |  Contention (10)  |  Continent (52)  |  Creation (242)  |  Crust (18)  |  Denial (14)  |  Design (115)  |  Drought (11)  |  Dry (21)  |  Earth (638)  |  Enemy (65)  |  Environment (181)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Fact (733)  |  Failure (138)  |  Fluid (19)  |  Foresight (5)  |  Fragility (2)  |  Free (92)  |  Fresh (30)  |  Function (131)  |  Geology (201)  |  Grant (32)  |  Habitation (3)  |  Heat (100)  |  Homo Sapiens (20)  |  Human (550)  |  Ideal (72)  |  Independent (67)  |  Internal (25)  |  Keep (100)  |  Kidney (14)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1131)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Maintenance (14)  |  Manufacturing (23)  |  Marvel (28)  |  Organ (64)  |  Perpetual (21)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Plan (87)  |  Predator (5)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reason (471)  |  Regulation (20)  |  Revolution (69)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sea (188)  |  Search (105)  |  Sense (321)  |  Serve (58)  |  Sphere (58)  |  State (137)  |  Storm (30)  |  Succession (45)  |  Swamp (5)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Vertebrate (16)  |  Vicissitude (4)  |  Water (293)  |  Welfare (17)

There is no study in the world which brings into more harmonious action all the faculties of the mind than [mathematics], … or, like this, seems to raise them, by successive steps of initiation, to higher and higher states of conscious intellectual being.
In Presidential Address to British Association (19 Aug 1869), 'A Plea for the Mathematician', published in Nature (6 Jan 1870), 1, 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Being (41)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Higher (37)  |  Initiation (5)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  State (137)  |  Step (110)  |  Study (476)  |  Successive (23)  |  World (898)

This theme of mutually invisible life at widely differing scales bears an important implication for the ‘culture wars’ that supposedly now envelop our universities and our intellectual discourse in general ... One side of this false dichotomy features the postmodern relativists who argue that all culturally bound modes of perception must be equally valid, and that no factual truth therefore exists. The other side includes the benighted, old-fashioned realists who insist that flies truly have two wings, and that Shakespeare really did mean what he thought he was saying. The principle of scaling provides a resolution for the false parts of this silly dichotomy. Facts are facts and cannot be denied by any rational being. (Often, facts are also not at all easy to determine or specify–but this question raises different issues for another time.) Facts, however, may also be highly scale dependent–and the perceptions of one world may have no validity or expression in the domain of another. The one-page map of Maine cannot recognize the separate boulders of Acadia, but both provide equally valid representations of a factual coastline.
The World as I See It (1999)
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (23)  |  Bear (67)  |  Benighted (2)  |  Bind (25)  |  Both (81)  |  Boulder (7)  |  Coastline (2)  |  Culturally (2)  |  Culture (104)  |  Deny (42)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Determine (76)  |  Dichotomy (4)  |  Differ (22)  |  Different (186)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Domain (42)  |  Easy (102)  |  Envelop (5)  |  Equally (26)  |  Exist (148)  |  Expression (110)  |  Fact (733)  |  Factual (8)  |  False (99)  |  Feature (44)  |  Fly (99)  |  General (160)  |  Highly (16)  |  Implication (22)  |  Important (205)  |  Include (40)  |  Insist (19)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Issue (42)  |  Life (1131)  |  Map (30)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mode (40)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Often (106)  |  Old-Fashioned (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Perception (64)  |  Principle (292)  |  Provide (69)  |  Question (404)  |  Rational (57)  |  Realist (2)  |  Really (78)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Relativist (2)  |  Representation (36)  |  Resolution (18)  |  Say (228)  |  Scale (63)  |  Separate (74)  |  Shakespeare (5)  |  Side (51)  |  Silly (12)  |  Specify (6)  |  Supposedly (2)  |  Theme (12)  |  Thought (546)  |  Time (595)  |  Truly (33)  |  Truth (928)  |  University (81)  |  Valid (11)  |  Validity (31)  |  War (161)  |  Widely (8)  |  Wing (48)  |  World (898)

We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We'll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. All this we will do.
From First Inaugural Address (20 Jan 2009)
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (25)  |  Bridge (30)  |  Build (117)  |  Car (27)  |  College (35)  |  Commerce (15)  |  Cost (44)  |  Demand (76)  |  Digital (4)  |  Factory (13)  |  Feed (27)  |  Fuel (31)  |  Harness (19)  |  Health Care (8)  |  Internet (14)  |  Line (90)  |  Lower (11)  |  New Age (5)  |  Place (175)  |  Quality (95)  |  Restore (8)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Road (64)  |  School (119)  |  Science (2067)  |  Soil (64)  |  Sun (276)  |  Technology (222)  |  Transform (35)  |  University (81)  |  Wield (10)  |  Wind (80)  |  Wonder (169)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Aim (89)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (249)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (49)  |  Belief (504)  |  Best (173)  |  Better (192)  |  Break (54)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (11)  |  Connect (33)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (83)  |  Country (147)  |  Decision (72)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (43)  |  Deliberate (12)  |  Demand (76)  |  Deny (42)  |  Describe (57)  |  Design (115)  |  Different (186)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Easy (102)  |  Element (162)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (13)  |  Existence (299)  |  Explain (107)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Fact (733)  |  First (314)  |  Form (314)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Group (72)  |  Human (550)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (221)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intention (28)  |  Learn (288)  |  Likely (33)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (239)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Movement (83)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Observe (76)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (242)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (84)  |  Pattern (79)  |  People (390)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Possible (158)  |  Prejudice (66)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Region (36)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Result (389)  |  Room (39)  |  Seek (107)  |  Seem (143)  |  Show (93)  |  Single (120)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Science (31)  |  Society (228)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Technical (42)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (546)  |  Totality (10)  |  Track (15)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (141)  |  Type (52)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wild (49)

Wildlife management consists mainly of raising more animals for hunters to shoot.
From interview collected in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Conservation (143)  |  Ecology (69)  |  Hunter (13)  |  Shoot (19)

[In] the realm of science, … what we have achieved will be obsolete in ten, twenty or fifty years. That is the fate, indeed, that is the very meaning of scientific work. … Every scientific “fulfillment” raises new “questions” and cries out to be surpassed and rendered obsolete. Everyone who wishes to serve science has to resign himself to this.
Max Weber
From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufsätze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. As translated by Rodney Livingstone in David Owen (ed.), The Vocation Lectures: Science as a Vocation: Politics as a Vocation (2004), 11. A different translation of a longer excerpt for this quote, beginning “In science, each of us knows …”, is also on the Max Weber Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Fate (46)  |  Fulfillment (16)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Obsolete (10)  |  Question (404)  |  Realm (55)  |  Render (33)  |  Resign (4)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Serve (58)  |  Surpass (19)  |  Wish (92)  |  Work (635)  |  Year (299)

…the simplicity, the indispensableness of each word, each letter, each little dash, that among all artists raises the mathematician nearest to the World-creator; it establishes a sublimity which is equalled in no other art,—Something like it exists at most in symphonic music.
As quoted in Robert E. Moritz, 'Meaning, Methods and Mission of Modern Mathematics', The Scientific Monthly (May 1928), 26, No. 5, 424.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Artist (69)  |  Creator (55)  |  Dash (3)  |  Equal (83)  |  Establish (56)  |  Exist (148)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Letter (51)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Music (106)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Sublime (27)  |  Word (302)  |  World (898)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.