Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Perpetually

Perpetually Quotes (20 quotes)

A man can do his best only by confidently seeking (and perpetually missing) an unattainable perfection.
In Forbes (1946), 57, 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Best (459)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Missing (21)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Unattainable (6)

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustable source of pure and exciting contemplations:— One would think that Shakespeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man as finding
    “Tongues in trees—books in running brooks—
    Sermons in stones—and good in everything.”
Accustomed to trace the operations of general causes and the exemplification of general laws, in circumstances where the uninformed and uninquiring eye, perceives neither novelty nor beauty, he walks in the midst of wonders; every object which falls in his way elucidates some principle, affords some instruction and impresses him with a sense of harmony and order. Nor is it a mere passive pleasure which is thus communicated. A thousand questions are continually arising in his mind, a thousand objects of enquiry presenting themselves, which keep his faculties in constant exercise, and his thoughts perpetually on the wing, so that lassitude is excluded from his life, and that craving after artificial excitement and dissipation of the mind, which leads so many into frivolous, unworthy, and destructive pursuits, is altogether eradicated from his bosom.
In Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Arising (22)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Describe (128)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Running (61)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Stone (162)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unworthy (18)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wonder (236)

A rock or stone is not a subject that, of itself, may interest a philosopher to study; but, when he comes to see the necessity of those hard bodies, in the constitution of this earth, or for the permanency of the land on which we dwell, and when he finds that there are means wisely provided for the renovation of this necessary decaying part, as well as that of every other, he then, with pleasure, contemplates this manifestation of design, and thus connects the mineral system of this earth with that by which the heavenly bodies are made to move perpetually in their orbits.
Theory of the Earth, with Proofs and l1lustrations, Vol. 1 (1795), 276.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Decay (53)  |  Design (195)  |  Earth (996)  |  Find (998)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hard (243)  |  Interest (386)  |  Land (115)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Move (216)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)

Being perpetually charmed by his familiar siren, that is, by his geometry, he [Archimedes] neglected to eat and drink and took no care of his person; that he was often carried by force to the baths, and when there he would trace geometrical figures in the ashes of the fire, and with his finger draws lines upon his body when it was anointed with oil, being in a state of great ecstasy and divinely possessed by his science.
Plutarch
As translated in George Finlay Simmons, Calculus Gems: Brief Lives and Memorable Mathematics, (1992), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ash (20)  |  Bath (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Care (186)  |  Carry (127)  |  Charm (51)  |  Divine (112)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Ecstasy (9)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Figure (160)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Force (487)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Line (91)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Often (106)  |  Oil (59)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Person (363)  |  Possess (156)  |  Science (3879)  |  Siren (4)  |  State (491)  |  Trace (103)

I know well there are those who would have the Study of Nature restrained wholly to Observations; without ever proceeding further. But due Consideration, and a deeper Insight into Things, would soon have undeceived and made them sensible of their error. Assuredly, that man who should spend his whole life in amassing together stone, timber, and other materials for building, without ever at the making any use, or raising any fabrick out of them, might well be reputed very fantastic and extravagant. And a like censure would be his due, who should be perpetually heaping up of natural collections without design. building a structure of philosophy out of them, or advancing some propositions that might turn to the benefit and advantage of the world. This is in reality the true and only proper end of collections, of observations, and natural history: and they are of no manner of use or value without it.
In An Attempt Toward a Natural History of the Fossils of England (1729), xiii-xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Building (156)  |  Censure (5)  |  Collection (64)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Design (195)  |  Due (141)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  History (673)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reality (261)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stone (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Timber (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)

I much condole with you on your late loss... pains and diseases of the mind are only cured by Forgetfulness;-—Reason but skins the wound, which is perpetually liable to fester again.
Letter to Richard Lovell Edgeworth, 24 April 1790. Quoted in Desmond King-Hele (ed.), The Letters of Erasmus Darwin (1981), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Late (118)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pain (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Skin (47)  |  Wound (26)

It seems to be saying perpetually; 'I am the end of the nineteenth century; I am glad they built me of iron; let me rust.' ... It is like a passing fool in a crowd of the University, a buffoon in the hall; for all the things in Paris has made, it alone has neither wits nor soul.
About the Eiffel Tower.
Paris (1900). In Peter Yapp, The Travellers' Dictionary of Quotation: Who Said What, About Where? (1983), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Buffoon (3)  |  Century (310)  |  Eiffel Tower (12)  |  End (590)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fool (116)  |  Iron (96)  |  Passing (76)  |  Rust (7)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tower (42)  |  University (121)  |  Wit (59)

Nobody knows how the stand of our knowledge about the atom would be without him. Personally, [Niels] Bohr is one of the amiable colleagues I have met. He utters his opinions like one perpetually groping and never like one who believes himself to be in possession of the truth.
Quoted in Bill Becker, 'Pioneer of the Atom', New York Times Sunday Magazine (20 Oct 1957), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Amiable (10)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Groping (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Personally (7)  |  Possession (65)  |  Stand (274)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Without (13)

Our treasure lies in the beehives of our knowledge. We are perpetually on our way thither, being by nature winged insects and honey gatherers of the mind. The only thing that lies close to our heart is the desire to bring something home to the hive.
The Genealogy of Morals (1887), as translated by Francis Golffing (1956), 149. In another translation, by Maudemarie Clark and Alan J. Swensen, it appears as: “It has rightly been said: ‘where your treasure is, there will your heart be also’; our treasure is where the beehives of our knowledge stand. We are forever underway towards them, as born winged animals and honey-gathers of the spirit, concerned will all our heart about only one thing—"bringing home" something.”
Science quotes on:  |  Beehive (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Desire (204)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Honey (15)  |  Insect (77)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)

Science is a capital or fund perpetually reinvested; it accumulates, rolls up, is carried forward by every new man. Every man of science has all the science before him to go upon, to set himself up in business with. What an enormous sum Darwin availed himself of and reinvested! Not so in literature; to every poet, to every artist, it is still the first day of creation, so far as the essentials of his task are concerned. Literature is not so much a fund to be reinvested as it is a crop to be ever new-grown.
Indoor Studies, vol. 12, Collected Works, Houghton (1913).
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Avail (4)  |  Business (149)  |  Capital (15)  |  Carry (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crop (25)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Essential (199)  |  Far (154)  |  First (1283)  |  Forward (102)  |  Fund (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Literature (103)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  New (1216)  |  Poet (83)  |  Roll (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Still (613)  |  Sum (102)  |  Task (147)

Science … is perpetually advancing. It is like a torch in the sombre forest of mystery. Man enlarges every day the circle of light which spreads round him, but at the same time, and in virtue of his very advance, he finds himself confronting, at an increasing number of points, the darkness of the Unknown.
In Einstein and the Universe; A Popular Exposition of the Famous Theory (1922), xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Circle (110)  |  Confront (17)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Find (998)  |  Forest (150)  |  Himself (461)  |  Increase (210)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Number (699)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Point (580)  |  Round (26)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sombre (2)  |  Spread (83)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torch (12)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Virtue (109)

Such propositions are therefore called Eternal Truths, not because they are Eternal Truths, not because they are External Propositions actually formed, and antecedent to the Understanding, that at any time makes them; nor because they are imprinted on the Mind from any patterns, that are any where out of the mind, and existed before: But because, being once made, about abstract Ideas, so as to be true, they will, whenever they can be supposed to be made again at any time, past or to come, by a Mind having those Ideas, always actually be true. For names being supposed to stand perpetually for the same ideas, and the same ideas having immutably the same habitudes one to another, Propositions concerning any abstract Ideas that are once true, must needs be eternal Verities.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 4, Chapter 11, Section 14, 638-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Exist (443)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Past (337)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Stand (274)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)

The biologist can push it back to the original protist, and the chemist can push it back to the crystal, but none of them touch the real question of why or how the thing began at all. The astronomer goes back untold million of years and ends in gas and emptiness, and then the mathematician sweeps the whole cosmos into unreality and leaves one with mind as the only thing of which we have any immediate apprehension. Cogito ergo sum, ergo omnia esse videntur. All this bother, and we are no further than Descartes. Have you noticed that the astronomers and mathematicians are much the most cheerful people of the lot? I suppose that perpetually contemplating things on so vast a scale makes them feel either that it doesn’t matter a hoot anyway, or that anything so large and elaborate must have some sense in it somewhere.
As co-author with Robert Eustace, The Documents in the Case (1930), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Crystal (68)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  End (590)  |  Feel (367)  |  Gas (83)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Protist (3)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sum (102)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Unreality (3)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

The greatest marvel is not in the individual. It is in the succession, in the renewal and in the duration of the species that Nature would seem quite inconceivable. This power of producing its likeness that resides in animals and plants, this form of unity, always subsisting and appearing eternal, this procreative virtue which is perpetually expressed without ever being destroyed, is for us a mystery which, it seems, we will never be able to fathom.
'Histoire des Animaux', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. 2, 3. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Express (186)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Form (959)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Likeness (18)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Renewal (4)  |  Reside (25)  |  Species (401)  |  Succession (77)  |  Unity (78)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Will (2355)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Balance (77)  |  Blood (134)  |  Certain (550)  |  Cold (112)  |  Composition (84)  |  Contention (14)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crust (38)  |  Denial (17)  |  Deny (66)  |  Design (195)  |  Drought (13)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Environment (216)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Foresight (6)  |  Fragile (21)  |  Fragility (2)  |  Free (232)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Function (228)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grant (73)  |  Habitation (7)  |  Heat (174)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Organ (115)  |  Owe (71)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plan (117)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Predator (6)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sea (308)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sphere (116)  |  State (491)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Succession (77)  |  Swamp (7)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Urine (16)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Water (481)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Year (933)

There prevails among men of letters, an opinion, that all appearance of science is particularly hateful to Women; and that therefore whoever desires to be well received in female assemblies, 'must qualify himself by a total rejection of all that is serious, rational, or important; must consider argument or criticism as perpetually interdicted; and devote all his attention to trifles, and all his eloquence to compliment.
The Rambler, Number 173, 12 Nov 1751. In W. J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (eds.), The Rambler (1969), Vol. 3, 152-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Consider (416)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Desire (204)  |  Female (50)  |  Himself (461)  |  Letter (109)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serious (91)  |  Total (94)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Woman (151)

Thus the great drama of universal life is perpetually sustained; and though the individual actors undergo continual change, the same parts are ever filled by another and another generation; renewing the face of the earth, and the bosom of the deep, with endless successions of life and happiness.
Geology and Mineralogy, Considered with Reference to Natural Theology (1836), Vol. I, 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Bosom (13)  |  Change (593)  |  Continual (43)  |  Deep (233)  |  Drama (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Face (212)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Individual (404)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Succession (77)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Universal (189)

What I chiefly admired, and thought altogether unaccountable, was the strong disposition I observed in them [the mathematicians of Laputa] towards news and politics; perpetually inquiring into public affairs; giving their judgments in matters of state; and passionately disputing every inch of party opinion. I have indeed observed the same disposition among most of the mathematicians I have known in Europe, although I could never discover the least analogy between the two sciences.
In Gulliver's Travels, Part 8, chap. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Europe (43)  |  Give (202)  |  Inch (9)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Least (75)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Party (18)  |  Passionately (3)  |  Politics (112)  |  Public Affairs (2)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)

You know, all is development. The principle is perpetually going on. First, there was nothing, then there was something; then—I forget the next—I think there were shells, then fishes; then we came—let me see—did we come next? Never mind that; we came at last. And at the next change there will be something very superior to us—something with wings. Ah! That's it: we were fishes, and I believe we shall be crows.
Tancred: or, The New Crusade (1847), 124.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Development (422)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Forget (115)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Principle (507)  |  See (1081)  |  Shell (63)  |  Something (719)  |  Superior (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)

… the truth is that the knowledge of external nature and of the sciences which that knowledge requires or includes, is not the great or the frequent business of the human mind. Whether we provide for action or conversation, whether we wish to be useful or pleasing, the first requisite is the religious and moral knowledge of right and wrong; the next is an acquaintance with the history of mankind, and with those examples which may be said to embody truth, and prove by events the reasonableness of opinions. Prudence and justice are virtues, and excellencies, of all times and of all places; we are perpetually moralists, but we are geometricians only by chance. Our intercourse with intellectual nature is necessary; our speculations upon matter are voluntary, and at leisure. Physical knowledge is of such rare emergence, that one man may know another half his life without being able to estimate his skill in hydrostatics or astronomy; but his moral and prudential character immediately appears.
In Lives of the Poets (1779-81).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Being (1278)  |  Business (149)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Event (216)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Include (90)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Justice (39)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Next (236)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rare (89)  |  Reasonableness (6)  |  Religious (126)  |  Require (219)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wrong (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.