Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sweep

Sweep Quotes (19 quotes)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (87)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (349)  |  All (4107)  |  Appreciatively (2)  |  Audience (27)  |  Back (391)  |  Basket (7)  |  Basketball (3)  |  Battle (34)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (5)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conference (18)  |  Country (251)  |  Court (33)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Curious (91)  |  Difficult (247)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Eliminate (22)  |  Emotionally (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  First (1284)  |  Foot (60)  |  Game (101)  |  Graceful (3)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (363)  |  Home (170)  |  Hook (5)  |  Increase (211)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Jump (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Leave (130)  |  Local (19)  |  Long (789)  |  March (46)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Military (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Move (216)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Net (11)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (111)  |  Player (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Promise (68)  |  Providence (18)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rest (281)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Right (452)  |  Routine (25)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Southern (3)  |  Start (221)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Team (15)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warming (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (932)

Each pregnant Oak ten thousand acorns forms
Profusely scatter’d by autumnal storms;
Ten thousand seeds each pregnant poppy sheds
Profusely scatter’d from its waving heads;
The countless Aphides, prolific tribe,
With greedy trunks the honey’d sap imbibe;
Swarm on each leaf with eggs or embryons big,
And pendent nations tenant every twig ...
—All these, increasing by successive birth,
Would each o’erpeople ocean, air, and earth.
So human progenies, if unrestrain’d,
By climate friended, and by food sustain’d,
O’er seas and soils, prolific hordes! would spread
Erelong, and deluge their terraqueous bed;
But war, and pestilence, disease, and dearth,
Sweep the superfluous myriads from the earth...
The births and deaths contend with equal strife,
And every pore of Nature teems with Life;
Which buds or breathes from Indus to the Poles,
And Earth’s vast surface kindles, as it rolls!
The Temple of Nature (1803), canto 4, lines 347-54, 367-74, 379-82, pages 156-60.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (349)  |  All (4107)  |  Birth (147)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Climate (97)  |  Countless (37)  |  Death (391)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Disease (332)  |  Earth (998)  |  Egg (69)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (961)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honey (15)  |  Human (1470)  |  Kindle (6)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1801)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nation (194)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Oak (14)  |  Ocean (203)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pole (47)  |  Roll (40)  |  Sea (309)  |  Seed (93)  |  Soil (87)  |  Spread (83)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Successive (73)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Surface (209)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Twig (14)  |  Vast (178)  |  War (226)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Famine … the most dreadful resource of nature.
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Famine seems to be the last, the most dreadful resource of nature. The power of population is so superior to the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race. The vices of mankind are active and able ministers of depopulation. They are the precursors in the great army of destruction; and often finish the dreadful work themselves. But should they fail in this war of extermination, sickly seasons, epidemics, pestilence, and plague, advance in terrific array, and sweep off their thousands and ten thousands. Should success be still incomplete, gigantic inevitable famine stalks in the rear, and with one mighty blow, levels the population with the food of the world.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 140, and in new enlarged edition (1803), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (153)  |  Active (76)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Army (33)  |  Array (5)  |  Blow (44)  |  Death (391)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  Earth (998)  |  Epidemic (7)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (162)  |  Famine (16)  |  Finish (59)  |  Food (199)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Great (1575)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Race (103)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Inevitability (10)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mankind (340)  |  Minister (9)  |  Most (1729)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Plague (41)  |  Population (110)  |  Power (748)  |  Precursor (5)  |  Premature (20)  |  Production (183)  |  Race (268)  |  Resource (63)  |  Season (47)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Stalk (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Subsistence (9)  |  Success (303)  |  Superior (82)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Terrific (4)  |  Themself (3)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Vice (40)  |  War (226)  |  Work (1352)  |  World (1778)

Fiction is, indeed, an indispensable supplement to logic, or even a part of it; whether we are working inductively or deductively, both ways hang closely together with fiction: and axioms, though they seek to be primary verities, are more akin to fiction. If we had realized the nature of axioms, the doctrine of Einstein, which sweeps away axioms so familiar to us that they seem obvious truths, and substitutes others which seem absurd because they are unfamiliar, might not have been so bewildering.
In The Dance of Life (1923), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Akin (5)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Bewildering (3)  |  Both (494)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (606)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Fiction (22)  |  Hang (45)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Logic (287)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Realize (147)  |  Seek (213)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Verity (5)  |  Way (1216)

If a person sweeps streets for a living, he should sweep them as Michelangelo painted, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote his plays.
As quoted, without citation, in Patricia J. Raskin, Pathfinding: Seven Principles for Positive Living (2002), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven (14)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Compose (17)  |  Living (491)  |  Michelangelo (3)  |  Music (131)  |  Paint (22)  |  Person (363)  |  Play (111)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Street (23)  |  Write (231)

In the republic of scholarship everybody wants to rule, there are no aldermen there, and that is a bad thing: every general must, so to speak, draw up the plan, stand sentry, sweep out the guardroom and fetch the water; no one wants to work for the good of another.
Aphorism 80 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (7)  |  Bad (180)  |  Draw (137)  |  Everybody (70)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Must (1526)  |  Plan (117)  |  Republic (15)  |  Rule (295)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Sweeping (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (482)  |  Work (1352)

It is not I who seek to base Man's dignity upon his great toe, or insinuate that we are lost if an Ape has a hippocampus minor. On the contrary, I have done my best to sweep away this vanity. I have endeavoured to show that no absolute structural line of demarcation, wider than that between the animals which immediately succeed us in the scale, can be drawn between the animal world and ourselves; and I may add the expression of my belief that the attempt to draw a physical distinction is equally futile, and that even the highest facuities of feeling and of intellect begin to germinate in lower forms of life. At the same time, no one is more strongly convinced than I am of the vastness of the gulf between civilized man and the brutes; or is more certain that whether from them or not, he is assuredly not of them.
'On the Relations of Man to the Lower Animals' (1863). In Collected Essays (1894), Vol. 7. 152-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (146)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (54)  |  Attempt (252)  |  Base (117)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belief (579)  |  Best (459)  |  Brute (28)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contrary (142)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Draw (137)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Equally (130)  |  Expression (176)  |  Feeling (252)  |  Form (961)  |  Futile (11)  |  Great (1575)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Hippocampus (2)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Life (1801)  |  Man (2249)  |  More (2559)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Scale (121)  |  Seek (213)  |  Show (346)  |  Structural (29)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vastness (15)  |  World (1778)

Nature, with equal mind,
Sees all her sons at play,
Sees man control the wind,
The wind sweep man away.
From dramatic poem, 'Empedocles on Etna', first published anonymously, collected in Empedocles on Etna, and Other Poems (1852). As quoted in The Contemporary Review (1867), Vol. 6, 344. Also in The Poems of Matthew Arnold, 1840-1867 (1909), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Control (167)  |  Equal (84)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Play (111)  |  See (1082)  |  Son (24)  |  Wind (128)

No one has yet been found so firm of mind and purpose as resolutely to compel himself to sweep away all theories and common notions, and to apply the understanding, thus made fair and even, to a fresh examination of particulars. Thus it happens that human knowledge, as we have it, is a mere medley and ill-digested mass, made up of much credulity and much accident, and also of the childish notions which we at first imbibed.
In Novum Organum (1620), Book 2, Aphorism 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  All (4107)  |  Apply (160)  |  Childish (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Compel (30)  |  Credulity (14)  |  Examination (98)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1284)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Happen (275)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1470)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Notion (113)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Theory (972)  |  Understanding (514)

Science corrects the old creeds, sweeps away, with every new perception, our infantile catechisms, and necessitates a faith commensurate with the grander orbits and universal laws which it discloses yet it does not surprise the moral sentiment that was older and awaited expectant these larger insights.
Hialmer Day Gould and Edward Louis Hessenmueller, Best Thoughts of Best Thinkers (1904), 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Creed (27)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Faith (203)  |  Insight (102)  |  Law (895)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1218)  |  Old (480)  |  Orbit (82)  |  Perception (97)  |  Science (3880)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Universal (189)

Since we have no choice but to be swept along by [this] vast technological surge, we might as well learn to surf.
in David Western and Mary C. Pearl, Conservation for the 21st Century (1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Choice (110)  |  Learn (632)  |  Surge (2)  |  Technological (61)  |  Vast (178)

Stick Figure 1: Nice store. How do you keep the floors so clean?
Stick Figure 2:Oh, we hired this dude named Kepler… Sweeps out the same area every night.
A pun on Kepler’s Second Law in caption from 'Kepler', cartoon on website xkcd.com.
Science quotes on:  |  Area (31)  |  Clean (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Figure (160)  |  Floor (20)  |  Kepler_Nicolaus (2)  |  Night (120)  |  Store (48)

The biologist can push it back to the original protist, and the chemist can push it back to the crystal, but none of them touch the real question of why or how the thing began at all. The astronomer goes back untold million of years and ends in gas and emptiness, and then the mathematician sweeps the whole cosmos into unreality and leaves one with mind as the only thing of which we have any immediate apprehension. Cogito ergo sum, ergo omnia esse videntur. All this bother, and we are no further than Descartes. Have you noticed that the astronomers and mathematicians are much the most cheerful people of the lot? I suppose that perpetually contemplating things on so vast a scale makes them feel either that it doesn’t matter a hoot anyway, or that anything so large and elaborate must have some sense in it somewhere.
As co-author with Robert Eustace, The Documents in the Case (1930), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Astronomer (94)  |  Back (391)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Crystal (69)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  End (590)  |  Feel (366)  |  Gas (83)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Matter (801)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Most (1729)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Protist (3)  |  Push (63)  |  Question (622)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sum (102)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (142)  |  Unreality (3)  |  Vast (178)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (932)

The generalizations of science sweep on in ever-widening circles, and more aspiring flights, through a limitless creation.
In 'The Darwinian Hypothesis: Darwin on the Origin of Species', Man's Place in Nature and Other Essays (1910), 337.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspire (13)  |  Circle (110)  |  Creation (329)  |  Flight (98)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Limitless (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Science (3880)  |  Through (849)

The Greeks made Space the subject-matter of a science of supreme simplicity and certainty. Out of it grew, in the mind of classical antiquity, the idea of pure science. Geometry became one of the most powerful expressions of that sovereignty of the intellect that inspired the thought of those times. At a later epoch, when the intellectual despotism of the Church, which had been maintained through the Middle Ages, had crumbled, and a wave of scepticism threatened to sweep away all that had seemed most fixed, those who believed in Truth clung to Geometry as to a rock, and it was the highest ideal of every scientist to carry on his science “more geometrico.”
In Space,Time, Matter, translated by Henry Leopold Brose (1952), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4107)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Belief (579)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Church (57)  |  Classical (46)  |  Cling (6)  |  Crumble (3)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Expression (176)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Greek (107)  |  Grow (238)  |  Idea (846)  |  Ideal (100)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Later (18)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (801)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Mind (1339)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Powerful (140)  |  Pure (292)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Rock (164)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3880)  |  Scientist (826)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Skepticism (29)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Space (501)  |  Subject (522)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Thinking (415)  |  Thought (956)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Wave (107)

The mathematical intellectualism is henceforth a positive doctrine, but one that inverts the usual doctrines of positivism: in place of originating progress in order, dynamics in statics, its goal is to make logical order the product of intellectual progress. The science of the future is not enwombed, as Comte would have had it, as Kant had wished it, in the forms of the science already existing; the structure of these forms reveals an original dynamism whose onward sweep is prolonged by the synthetic generation of more and more complicated forms. No speculation on number considered as a category a priori enables one to account for the questions set by modern mathematics … space affirms only the possibility of applying to a multiplicity of any elements whatever, relations whose type the intellect does not undertake to determine in advance, but, on the contrary, it asserts their existence and nourishes their unlimited development.
As translated in James Byrnie Shaw, Lectures on the Philosophy of Mathematics (1918), 193. From Léon Brunschvicg, Les Étapes de La Philosophie Mathématique (1912), 567-568, “L’intellectualisme mathématique est désormais une doctrine positive, mais qui intervertira les formules habituelles du positivisme: au lieu de faire sortir le progrès de l’ordre, ou le dynamique du statique, il tend à faire de l'ordre logique le produit du progrès intellectuel. La science à venir n'est pas enfermée, comme l’aurait voulu Comte, comme le voulait déjà Kant, dans les formes de la science déjà faite; la constitution de ces formes révèle un dynamisme originel dont l’élan se prolonge par la génération synthétique de notions de plus en plus compliquées. Aucune spéculation sur le nombre, considéré comme catégorie a priori, ne permet de rendre compte des questions qui se sont posées pour la mathématique moderne … … l’espace ne fait qu'affirmer la possibilité d'appliquer sur une multiplicité d’éléments quelconques des relations dont l’intelligence ne cherche pas à déterminer d’avance le type, dont elle constate, au contraire, dont elle suscite le développement illimité.”
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Account (192)  |  Advance (280)  |  Already (222)  |  Assert (66)  |  Category (18)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrary (142)  |  Determine (144)  |  Development (425)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Element (310)  |  Enable (119)  |  Existence (460)  |  Form (961)  |  Future (433)  |  Generation (242)  |  Goal (146)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Immanuel Kant (50)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Number (701)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Positive (94)  |  Positivism (3)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Product (160)  |  Progress (468)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Question (622)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3880)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (501)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statics (6)  |  Structure (346)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Type (167)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Unlimited (23)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)

The swift metamorphosis and the onward march of civilization, sweeping ever westward and transforming and taming our wilderness, fills us with a strange regret, and we rejoice that parts of that wilderness will yet remain to us unchanged
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (206)  |  Fill (61)  |  March (46)  |  Metamorphosis (5)  |  Onward (6)  |  Part (223)  |  Regret (30)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Remain (349)  |  Strange (157)  |  Swift (12)  |  Tame (4)  |  Transform (73)  |  Unchanged (3)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2354)

We must in imagination sweep off the drifted matter that clogs the surface of the ground; we must suppose all the covering of moss and heath and wood to be torn away from the sides of the mountains, and the green mantle that lies near their feet to be lifted up; we may then see the muscular integuments, and sinews, and bones of our mother Earth, and so judge of the part played by each of them during those old convulsive movements whereby her limbs were contorted and drawn up into their present posture.
Letter 2 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Bone (96)  |  Clog (5)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Covering (14)  |  Drift (13)  |  Earth (998)  |  Feet (5)  |  Green (63)  |  Ground (218)  |  Heath (5)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Integument (3)  |  Judge (108)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lift (55)  |  Limb (8)  |  Mantle (3)  |  Matter (801)  |  Moss (10)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mountain (189)  |  Movement (155)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (480)  |  Part (223)  |  Play (111)  |  Posture (7)  |  Present (621)  |  See (1082)  |  Side (232)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surface (209)  |  Torn (17)  |  Wood (92)

What terrible questions we are learning to ask! The former men believed in magic, by which temples, cities, and men were swallowed up, and all trace of them gone. We are coming on the secret of a magic which sweeps out of men's minds all vestige of theism and beliefs which they and their fathers held and were framed upon.
In 'Illusions', The Atlantic Monthly (Nov 1858), 1, 60.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Ask (411)  |  Belief (579)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Father (110)  |  Former (137)  |  Frame (26)  |  Hold (95)  |  Learning (274)  |  Magic (86)  |  Men (20)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Question (622)  |  Secret (196)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Temple (42)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Trace (104)  |  Vestige (11)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.