Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Hardly

Hardly Quotes (19 quotes)

Another advantage of a mathematical statement is that it is so definite that it might be definitely wrong; and if it is found to be wrong, there is a plenteous choice of amendments ready in the mathematicians’ stock of formulae. Some verbal statements have not this merit; they are so vague that they could hardly be wrong, and are correspondingly useless.
From 'Mathematics of War and Foreign Politics', in James R. Newman, The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 2, 1248.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Amendment (2)  |  Choice (110)  |  Corresponding (3)  |  Definite (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Formula (98)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merit (50)  |  Ready (39)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stock (7)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vague (47)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Wrong (234)

As evolutionary time is measured, we have only just turned up and have hardly had time to catch breath, still marveling at our thumbs, still learning to use the brand-new gift of language. Being so young, we can be excused all sorts of folly and can permit ourselves the hope that someday, as a species, we will begin to grow up.
From 'Introduction' written by Lewis Thomas for Horace Freeland Judson, The Search for Solutions (1980, 1987), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Breath (59)  |  Catch (31)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Folly (43)  |  Gift (104)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hope (299)  |  Language (293)  |  Learning (274)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Measurement (174)  |  New (1216)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Permission (7)  |  Permit (58)  |  Someday (14)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

Besides accustoming the student to demand, complete proof, and to know when he has not obtained it, mathematical studies are of immense benefit to his education by habituating him to precision. It is one of the peculiar excellencies of mathematical discipline, that the mathematician is never satisfied with à peu près. He requires the exact truth. Hardly any of the non-mathematical sciences, except chemistry, has this advantage. One of the commonest modes of loose thought, and sources of error both in opinion and in practice, is to overlook the importance of quantities. Mathematicians and chemists are taught by the whole course of their studies, that the most fundamental difference of quality depends on some very slight difference in proportional quantity; and that from the qualities of the influencing elements, without careful attention to their quantities, false expectation would constantly be formed as to the very nature and essential character of the result produced.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 611. [The French phrase, à peu près means “approximately”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attention (190)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Both (493)  |  Careful (24)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complete (204)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Course (409)  |  Demand (123)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Education (378)  |  Element (310)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exact (68)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Expectation (65)  |  False (100)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Immense (86)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loose (14)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mode (41)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Practice (204)  |  Precision (68)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Slight (31)  |  Source Of Error (2)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Whole (738)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciatively (2)  |  Audience (26)  |  Back (390)  |  Basket (7)  |  Basketball (3)  |  Battle (34)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (5)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conference (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Court (33)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Curious (91)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Emotionally (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Game (101)  |  Graceful (3)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Jump (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Leave (130)  |  Local (19)  |  Long (790)  |  March (46)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Net (11)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Promise (67)  |  Providence (18)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Right (452)  |  Routine (25)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Southern (3)  |  Start (221)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Team (15)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warming (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (933)

Hardly a year passes that fails to find a new, oft-times exotic, research method or technique added to the armamentarium of political inquiry. Anyone who cannot negotiate Chi squares, assess randomization, statistical significance, and standard deviations
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Armamentarium (3)  |  Assess (4)  |  Chi (2)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Fail (185)  |  Find (998)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Method (505)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  New (1216)  |  Pass (238)  |  Political (121)  |  Research (664)  |  Significance (113)  |  Square (70)  |  Standard Deviation (3)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Technique (80)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)

In mathematics it [sophistry] had no place from the beginning: Mathematicians having had the wisdom to define accurately the terms they use, and to lay down, as axioms, the first principles on which their reasoning is grounded. Accordingly we find no parties among mathematicians, and hardly any disputes.
In Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, Essay 1, chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Accurately (7)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Define (49)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Down (456)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Party (18)  |  Place (177)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Sophistry (3)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Use (766)  |  Wisdom (221)

Mathematics was born and nurtured in a cultural environment. Without the perspective which the cultural background affords, a proper appreciation of the content and state of present-day mathematics is hardly possible.
In Introduction to the Foundations of Mathematics (1952), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Background (43)  |  Born (33)  |  Content (69)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Environment (216)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Present Day (5)  |  Proper (144)  |  State (491)

Philosophers no longer write for the intelligent, only for their fellow professionals. The few thousand academic philosophers in the world do not stint themselves: they maintain more than seventy learned journals. But in the handful that cover more than one subdivision of philosophy, any given philosopher can hardly follow more than one or two articles in each issue. This hermetic condition is attributed to “technical problems” in the subject. Since William James, Russell, and Whitehead, philosophy, like history, has been confiscated by scholarship and locked away from the contamination of general use.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Article (22)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contamination (4)  |  Cover (37)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Handful (13)  |  Hermetic (2)  |  History (673)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Issue (42)  |  William James (47)  |  Journal (30)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lock (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  More (2559)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professional (70)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Seventy (2)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Subject (521)  |  Technical (43)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Whitehead (2)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

Since the time of the Greeks and Romans medicine has made no progress, or hardly any, It should be reconstructed upon an entirely now basis.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Greek (107)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reconstruct (5)  |  Roman (36)  |  Time (1877)

That which enters the mind through reason can be corrected. That which is admitted through faith, hardly ever.
In Charlas de Café: pensamientos, anécdotas y confidencias (1920). (Café Chats: Thoughts, Anecdotes and Confidences). As translated in Peter McDonald (ed.) Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Admitted (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Ever (4)  |  Faith (203)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Reason (744)  |  Through (849)

The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Beast (55)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Birth (147)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Leave (130)  |  Material (353)  |  Member (41)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Remain (349)  |  Significance (113)  |  Society (326)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Thought (953)  |  Virtue (109)

The more efficient causes of progress seem to consist of a good education during youth whilst the brain is impressible, and of a high standard of excellence, inculcated by the ablest and best men, embodied in the laws, customs and traditions of the nation, and enforced by public opinion. It should, however, be borne in mind, that the enforcement of public opinion depends on our appreciation of the approbation and disapprobation of others; and this appreciation is founded on our sympathy, which it can hardly be doubted was originally developed through natural selection as one of the most important elements of the social instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Bear (159)  |  Best (459)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consist (223)  |  Custom (42)  |  Depend (228)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disapprobation (2)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Education (378)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Element (310)  |  Embody (16)  |  Enforce (11)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Founded (20)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Law (894)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Originally (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Progress (465)  |  Public (96)  |  Seem (145)  |  Selection (128)  |  Social (252)  |  Standard (57)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Through (849)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Whilst (3)  |  Youth (101)

The nineteenth century planted the words which the twentieth ripened into the atrocities of Stalin and Hitler. There is hardly an atrocity committed in the twentieth century that was not foreshadowed or even advocated by some noble man of words in the nineteenth.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Advocate (18)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Century (310)  |  Commit (41)  |  Foreshadow (5)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nineteenth (6)  |  Noble (90)  |  Plant (294)  |  Ripen (4)  |  Stalin_Joseph (5)  |  Word (619)

The prevailing trend in modern physics is thus much against any sort of view giving primacy to ... undivided wholeness of flowing movement. Indeed, those aspects of relativity theory and quantum theory which do suggest the need for such a view tend to be de-emphasized and in fact hardly noticed by most physicists, because they are regarded largely as features of the mathematical calculus and not as indications of the real nature of things.
Wholeness and the Implicate Order? (1981), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feature (44)  |  Flow (83)  |  Give (202)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Largely (13)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Need (290)  |  Notice (77)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Primacy (3)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Real (149)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Sort (49)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trend (22)  |  Undivided (3)  |  View (488)  |  Wholeness (9)

Those who assert that the mathematical sciences make no affirmation about what is fair or good make a false assertion; for they do speak of these and frame demonstrations of them in the most eminent sense of the word. For if they do not actually employ these names, they do not exhibit even the results and the reasons of these, and therefore can be hardly said to make any assertion about them. Of what is fair, however, the most important species are order and symmetry, and that which is definite, which the mathematical sciences make manifest in a most eminent degree. And since, at least, these appear to be the causes of many things—now, I mean, for example, order, and that which is a definite thing, it is evident that they would assert, also, the existence of a cause of this description, and its subsistence after the same manner as that which is fair subsists in.
Aristotle
In Metaphysics [MacMahon] Bk. 12, chap. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Affirmation (7)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Cause (541)  |  Definite (110)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Description (84)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Employ (113)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Evident (91)  |  Example (94)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fair (15)  |  False (100)  |  Frame (26)  |  Good (889)  |  Important (209)  |  It Is Evident (5)  |  Least (75)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Order (632)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sense Of The Word (5)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Subsist (5)  |  Subsistence (9)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

We receive it as a fact, that some minds are so constituted as absolutely to require for their nurture the severe logic of the abstract sciences; that rigorous sequence of ideas which leads from the premises to the conclusion, by a path, arduous and narrow, it may be, and which the youthful reason may find it hard to mount, but where it cannot stray; and on which, if it move at all, it must move onward and upward… . Even for intellects of a different character, whose natural aptitude is for moral evidence and those relations of ideas which are perceived and appreciated by taste, the study of the exact sciences may be recommended as the best protection against the errors into which they are most likely to fall. Although the study of language is in many respects no mean exercise in logic, yet it must be admitted that an eminently practical mind is hardly to be formed without mathematical training.
In Orations and Speeches (1870), Vol. 8, 510.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Admit (45)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Best (459)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Different (577)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fall (230)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Hard (243)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Language (293)  |  Lead (384)  |  Likely (34)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Move (216)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Path (144)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Practical (200)  |  Premise (37)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Relation (157)  |  Require (219)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Severe (16)  |  Stray (6)  |  Study (653)  |  Taste (90)  |  Training (80)  |  Upward (43)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Youthful (2)

What is the meaning of human life, or for that matter, of the life of any creature? To know an answer to this question means to be religious. Does it make any sense, then, to pose this question? I answer: The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unhappy but hardly fit for life.
In Ideas and Opinions (1954), 11. A different translation is given in The World As I See It (1935), 1. From the original German in Mein Weltbild (1934).
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Creature (233)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Fit (134)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  Means (579)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Pose (9)  |  Question (621)  |  Regard (305)  |  Religious (126)  |  Sense (770)  |  Unhappy (16)

When we survey our lives and endeavours we soon observe that almost the whole of our actions and desires are bound up with the existence of other human beings. We see that our whole nature resembles that of the social animals. We eat food that others have grown, wear clothes that others have made, live in houses that others have built. The greater part of our knowledge and beliefs has been communicated to us by other people through the medium of a language which others have created. Without language our mental capacities would be poor indeed, comparable to those of the higher animals; we have, therefore, to admit that we owe our principal advantage over the beasts to the fact of living in human society. The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beast (55)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bound (119)  |  Build (204)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Create (235)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direct (225)  |  Eat (104)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Food (199)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  High (362)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Leave (130)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Medium (12)  |  Member (41)  |  Mental (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Poor (136)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principal (63)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resemble (63)  |  See (1081)  |  Significance (113)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Survey (33)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wear (18)  |  Whole (738)

Why do they prefer to tell stories about the possible medicinal bene-fits of the Houston toad rather than to offer moral reasons for sup-porting the Endangered Species Act? That law is plainly ideological; it is hardly to be excused on economic grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Endangered Species (4)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Fit (134)  |  Ground (217)  |  Houston (5)  |  Ideological (2)  |  Law (894)  |  Medicinal (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  Offer (141)  |  Plainly (5)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Reason (744)  |  Species (401)  |  Story (118)  |  Tell (340)  |  Toad (10)  |  Why (491)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.