Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Pose

Pose Quotes (9 quotes)


...the scientific cast of mind examines the world critically, as if many alternative worlds might exist, as if other things might be here which are not. Then we are forced to ask why what we see is present and not something else. Why are the Sun and moon and the planets spheres? Why not pyramids, or cubes, or dodecahedra? Why not irregular, jumbly shapes? Why so symmetrical, worlds? If you spend any time spinning hypotheses, checking to see whether they make sense, whether they conform to what else we know. Thinking of tests you can pose to substantiate or deflate hypotheses, you will find yourself doing science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Ask (160)  |  Cast (25)  |  Check (24)  |  Conform (11)  |  Critical (41)  |  Cube (11)  |  Deflate (2)  |  Examine (44)  |  Exist (148)  |  Find (408)  |  Force (249)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Irregular (6)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Know (556)  |  Mind (760)  |  Moon (199)  |  Planet (263)  |  Present (176)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  See (369)  |  Sense (321)  |  Shape (70)  |  Spend (43)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Spin (15)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Sun (276)  |  Symmetrical (2)  |  Test (125)  |  Think (347)  |  Time (595)  |  World (898)

An experiment is a question which science poses to Nature, and a measurement is the recording of Nature's answer.
'The Meaning and Limits of Exact Science', Science (30 Sep 1949), 110, No. 2857, 325. Advance reprinting of chapter from book Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Question (404)  |  Recording (4)  |  Science (2067)

I believe that certain erroneous developments in particle theory ... are caused by a misconception by some physicists that it is possible to avoid philosophical arguments altogether. Starting with poor philosophy, they pose the wrong questions. It is only a slight exaggeration to say that good physics has at times been spoiled by poor philosophy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Altogether (9)  |  Argument (82)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Belief (504)  |  Cause (285)  |  Certain (126)  |  Development (289)  |  Erroneous (5)  |  Exaggeration (11)  |  Good (345)  |  Misconception (5)  |  Particle (99)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Physics (348)  |  Poor (58)  |  Possible (158)  |  Question (404)  |  Say (228)  |  Slight (31)  |  Spoil (7)  |  Start (97)  |  Theory (696)  |  Time (595)  |  Wrong (139)

Mathematics is a public activity. It occurs in a social context and has social consequences. Posing a problem, formulating a definition, proving a theorem are none of them private acts. They are all part of that larger social process we call science.
In 'Mathematics as an Objective Science', The American Mathematical Monthly (Aug-Sep 1979), 86, No. 7, 542. Reprinted in The Mathematical Intelligencer (1983), 5, No. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (117)  |  Activity (135)  |  Call (128)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Context (22)  |  Definition (192)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Large (130)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Occur (43)  |  Part (222)  |  Private (21)  |  Problem (497)  |  Process (267)  |  Prove (109)  |  Public (94)  |  Science (2067)  |  Social (108)  |  Theorem (90)

She has the sort of body you go to see in marble. She has golden hair. Quickly, deftly, she reaches with both hands behind her back and unclasps her top. Setting it on her lap, she swivels ninety degrees to face the towboat square. Shoulders back, cheeks high, she holds her pose without retreat. In her ample presentation there is defiance of gravity. There is no angle of repose. She is a siren and these are her songs.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ample (4)  |  Angle (20)  |  Back (104)  |  Behind (38)  |  Body (247)  |  Both (81)  |  Cheek (3)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Degree (82)  |  Face (108)  |  Golden (14)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Hair (25)  |  Hand (142)  |  High (153)  |  Hold (94)  |  Lap (5)  |  Marble (14)  |  Ninety (2)  |  Presentation (18)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Reach (121)  |  Repose (6)  |  Retreat (11)  |  See (369)  |  Set (99)  |  Shoulder (18)  |  Siren (4)  |  Song (27)  |  Sort (49)  |  Square (24)  |  Top (34)

The crack-brained bobolink courts his crazy mate,
Posed on a bulrush tipsy with his weight.
In poem, 'Spring', collected in Grandmother's Story: And Other Poems (1883, 1903), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Court (20)  |  Crazy (17)  |  Mate (6)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Weight (77)

There is no area of the world that should not be investigated by scientists. There will always remain some questions that have not been answered. In general, these are the questions that have not yet been posed.
As quoted in J. Robert Moskin, Morality in America, 70-71. Otherwise unconfirmed in this form. Please contact webmaster if you know a primary print source.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Investigate (65)  |  Question (404)  |  Research (590)  |  Scientist (522)

Undoubtedly, the capstone of every mathematical theory is a convincing proof of all of its assertions. Undoubtedly, mathematics inculpates itself when it foregoes convincing proofs. But the mystery of brilliant productivity will always be the posing of new questions, the anticipation of new theorems that make accessible valuable results and connections. Without the creation of new viewpoints, without the statement of new aims, mathematics would soon exhaust itself in the rigor of its logical proofs and begin to stagnate as its substance vanishes. Thus, in a sense, mathematics has been most advanced by those who distinguished themselves by intuition rather than by rigorous proofs.
As quoted in Hermann Weyl, Unterrichtsblδtter fόr Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften (1932), 38, 177-188. As translated by Abe Shenitzer, in 'Part I. Topology and Abstract Algebra as Two Roads of Mathematical Comprehension', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1995), 102, No. 7, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (16)  |  Advance (165)  |  Aim (89)  |  Anticipation (14)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Brilliant (28)  |  Capstone (2)  |  Connection (111)  |  Convince (23)  |  Creation (242)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Logic (260)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mystery (153)  |  New (496)  |  Productivity (17)  |  Proof (245)  |  Question (404)  |  Result (389)  |  Rigor (23)  |  Sense (321)  |  Stagnate (3)  |  Statement (76)  |  Substance (87)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Theory (696)  |  Value (242)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Viewpoint (8)

What is the meaning of human life, or for that matter, of the life of any creature? To know an answer to this question means to be religious. Does it make any sense, then, to pose this question? I answer: The man who regards his own life and that of his fellow creatures as meaningless is not merely unhappy but hardly fit for life.
In Ideas and Opinions (1954), 11. A different translation is given in The World As I See It (1935), 1. From the original German in Mein Weltbild (1934).
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Creature (155)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Fit (48)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Know (556)  |  Life (1131)  |  Mean (101)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  Mere (82)  |  Question (404)  |  Regard (95)  |  Religious (49)  |  Sense (321)  |  Unhappy (8)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.