Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Formulate

Formulate Quotes (15 quotes)

A scientist can be productive in various ways. One is having the ability to plan and carry out experiments, but the other is having the ability to formulate new ideas, which can be about what experiments can be carried out … by making [the] proper calculations. Individual scientists who are successful in their work are successful for different reasons.
Interview with George B. Kauffman and Laurie M. Kauffman, in 'Linus Pauling: Reflections', American Scientist (Nov-Dec 1994), 82, No. 6, 522.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Carry (127)  |  Different (577)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Making (300)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Productive (32)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reason (744)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Common sense is only the application of theories which have grown and been formulated unconsciously as result of experience.
From 'For Mans Use of God's Gifts', collected in Robert C. Goodpasture (ed.), Engineers and Ivory Towers (1952), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Experience (467)  |  Grow (238)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unconscious (22)

Darwin grasped the philosophical bleakness with his characteristic courage. He argued that hope and morality cannot, and should not, be passively read in the construction of nature. Aesthetic and moral truths, as human concepts, must be shaped in human terms, not ‘discovered’ in nature. We must formulate these answers for ourselves and then approach nature as a partner who can answer other kinds of questions for us–questions about the factual state of the universe, not about the meaning of human life. If we grant nature the independence of her own domain–her answers unframed in human terms–then we can grasp her exquisite beauty in a free and humble way. For then we become liberated to approach nature without the burden of an inappropriate and impossible quest for moral messages to assuage our hopes and fears. We can pay our proper respect to nature’s independence and read her own ways as beauty or inspiration in our different terms.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Argue (23)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Burden (27)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Concept (221)  |  Construction (112)  |  Courage (69)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Domain (69)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Factual (8)  |  Fear (197)  |  Free (232)  |  Grant (73)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Humble (50)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inappropriate (3)  |  Independence (34)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Message (49)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Partner (5)  |  Passively (3)  |  Pay (43)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (621)  |  Read (287)  |  Respect (207)  |  Shape (72)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and the convenience of people. In its modern form engineering involves people, money, materials, machines, and energy. It is differentiated from science because it is primarily concerned with how to direct to useful and economical ends the natural phenomena which scientists discover and formulate into acceptable theories. Engineering therefore requires above all the creative imagination to innovate useful applications of natural phenomena. It seeks newer, cheaper, better means of using natural sources of energy and materials.
In McGraw Hill, Science and Technology Encyclopedia
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (13)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Art (657)  |  Better (486)  |  Cheaper (6)  |  Concern (228)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Creative (137)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Direct (225)  |  Directing (5)  |  Discover (553)  |  Economical (9)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Innovate (2)  |  Involve (90)  |  Machine (257)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Modern (385)  |  Money (170)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Power (746)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Source (93)  |  Theory (970)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)

Generality of points of view and of methods, precision and elegance in presentation, have become, since Lagrange, the common property of all who would lay claim to the rank of scientific mathematicians. And, even if this generality leads at times to abstruseness at the expense of intuition and applicability, so that general theorems are formulated which fail to apply to a single special case, if furthermore precision at times degenerates into a studied brevity which makes it more difficult to read an article than it was to write it; if, finally, elegance of form has well-nigh become in our day the criterion of the worth or worthlessness of a proposition,—yet are these conditions of the highest importance to a wholesome development, in that they keep the scientific material within the limits which are necessary both intrinsically and extrinsically if mathematics is not to spend itself in trivialities or smother in profusion.
In Die Entwickdung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1884), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Apply (160)  |  Article (22)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Claim (146)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Expense (16)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Lead (384)  |  Limit (280)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Profusion (3)  |  Property (168)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rank (67)  |  Read (287)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Smother (3)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triviality (2)  |  View (488)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Worth (169)  |  Worthless (21)  |  Write (230)

Mathematics is a public activity. It occurs in a social context and has social consequences. Posing a problem, formulating a definition, proving a theorem are none of them private acts. They are all part of that larger social process we call science.
In 'Mathematics as an Objective Science', The American Mathematical Monthly (Aug-Sep 1979), 86, No. 7, 542. Reprinted in The Mathematical Intelligencer (1983), 5, No. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Context (29)  |  Definition (221)  |  Large (394)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Occur (150)  |  Part (222)  |  Pose (9)  |  Private (23)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Public (96)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Theorem (112)

Melvin [Calvin]’s marvellous technique for delivering a scientific lecture was unique. His mind must have roamed constantly, especially in planning lectures. His remarkable memory enabled him to formulate a lecture or manuscript with no breaks in the sequence of his thoughts. His lectures usually began hesitatingly, as if he had little idea of how to begin or what to say. This completely disarmed his audiences, who would try to guess what he might have to say. Soon enough, however, his ideas would coalesce, to be delivered like an approaching freight train, reaching a crescendo of information at breakneck speed and leaving his rapt audience nearly overwhelmed.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Audience (26)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biography (240)  |  Break (99)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Completely (135)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Enough (340)  |  Freight (3)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Little (707)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Planning (20)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Roam (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speed (65)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Try (283)  |  Unique (67)  |  Usually (176)

Religion and science ... constitute deep-rooted and ancient efforts to find richer experience and deeper meaning than are found in the ordinary biological and social satisfactions. As pointed out by Whitehead, religion and science have similar origins and are evolving toward similar goals. Both started from crude observations and fanciful concepts, meaningful only within a narrow range of conditions for the people who formulated them of their limited tribal experience. But progressively, continuously, and almost simultaneously, religious and scientific concepts are ridding themselves of their coarse and local components, reaching higher and higher levels of abstraction and purity. Both the myths of religion and the laws of science, it is now becoming apparent, are not so much descriptions of facts as symbolic expressions of cosmic truths.
'On Being Human,' A God Within, Scribner (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Coarse (4)  |  Component (48)  |  Concept (221)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Crude (31)  |  Deep (233)  |  Description (84)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Goal (145)  |  High (362)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Local (19)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Myth (56)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Observation (555)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Progressively (3)  |  Purity (14)  |  Range (99)  |  Reach (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rich (62)  |  Rid (13)  |  Root (120)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Social (252)  |  Start (221)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whitehead (2)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Act (272)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Badly (32)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Country (251)  |  Curve (49)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deep (233)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (40)  |  Enter (141)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expect (200)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Follower (11)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inference (45)  |  Instance (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Least (75)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (76)  |  Political (121)  |  Portal (7)  |  Premise (37)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Topic (21)  |  Training (80)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (121)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Variation (90)  |  Want (497)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

The basic thesis of gestalt theory might be formulated thus: there are contexts in which what is happening in the whole cannot be deduced from the characteristics of the separate pieces, but conversely; what happens to a part of the whole is, in clearcut cases, determined by the laws of the inner structure of its whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Case (99)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Context (29)  |  Conversely (2)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Determine (144)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Inner (71)  |  Law (894)  |  Part (222)  |  Piece (38)  |  Separate (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Whole (738)

The history of thought should warn us against concluding that because the scientific theory of the world is the best that has yet been formulated, it is necessarily complete and final. We must remember that at bottom the generalizations of science or, in common parlance, the laws of nature are merely hypotheses devised to explain that ever-shifting phantasmagoria of thought which we dignify with the high-sounding names of the world and the universe. In the last analysis magic, religion, and science are nothing but theories of thought.
In The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (1890, 1900), Vol. 3, 460.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Best (459)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Devise (14)  |  Dignify (2)  |  Explain (322)  |  Final (118)  |  Generalization (57)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Parlance (2)  |  Phantasmagoria (3)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Warn (5)  |  World (1774)

The mathematically formulated laws of quantum theory show clearly that our ordinary intuitive concepts cannot be unambiguously applied to the smallest particles. All the words or concepts we use to describe ordinary physical objects, such as position, velocity, color, size, and so on, become indefinite and problematic if we try to use them of elementary particles.
In Across the Frontiers (1974), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Concept (221)  |  Describe (128)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Object (422)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physical (508)  |  Position (77)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Theory (970)  |  Try (283)  |  Unambiguously (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Word (619)

The question of the origin of the hypothesis belongs to a domain in which no very general rules can be given; experiment, analogy and constructive intuition play their part here. But once the correct hypothesis is formulated, the principle of mathematical induction is often sufficient to provide the proof.
As co-author with Herbert Robbins, in What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods (1941, 1996), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Belong (162)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Correct (86)  |  Domain (69)  |  Experiment (695)  |  General (511)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Induction (77)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Origin (239)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Provide (69)  |  Question (621)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sufficient (128)

We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form.
Dean Inge
From Romanes Lecture (27 May 1920), 'The Idea of Progress', collected in Outspoken Essays: Second Series (1922), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Badly (32)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Creation (327)  |  Depict (3)  |  Devil (31)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enslave (2)  |  Feather (12)  |  Form (959)  |  Fur (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rest (280)

We have gone a long way towards solving a problem when we are able to formulate it.
In Le Phénomène Humain (1955) as translated by Bernard Wall in 'The Expansion of Life',The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Long (790)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solution (267)  |  Way (1217)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.