Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Statesman

Statesman Quotes (18 quotes)

A formative influence on my undergraduate self was the response of a respected elder statesmen of the Oxford Zoology Department when an American visitor had just publicly disproved his favourite theory. The old man strode to the front of the lecture hall, shook the American warmly by the hand and declared in ringing, emotional tones: ‘My dear fellow, I wish to thank you. I have been wrong these fifteen years.’ And we clapped our hands red. Can you imagine a Government Minister being cheered in the House of Commons for a similar admission? “Resign, Resign” is a much more likely response!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (12)  |  American (46)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Clap (3)  |  Declare (27)  |  Department (47)  |  Disprove (16)  |  Elder (4)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Formative (2)  |  Front (16)  |  Government (93)  |  Hand (141)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Influence (137)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Likely (33)  |  Minister (9)  |  Old Man (3)  |  Oxford (9)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Red (35)  |  Resign (4)  |  Respect (86)  |  Response (28)  |  Ring (16)  |  Self (47)  |  Shake (29)  |  Similar (35)  |  Stride (9)  |  Thank You (4)  |  Theory (690)  |  Tone (10)  |  Undergraduate (9)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Wish (92)  |  Wrong (138)  |  Year (299)  |  Zoology (31)

A witty statesman said you might prove anything with figures.
In Chartism (1839, 1840), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Figure (68)  |  Proof (243)  |  Prove Anything (7)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Wit (35)

At times the mathematician has the passion of a poet or a conqueror, the rigor of his arguments is that of a responsible statesman or, more simply, of a concerned father, and his tolerance and resignation are those of an old sage; he is revolutionary and conservative, skeptical and yet faithfully optimistic.
Max Dehn
Address (18 Jan 1928) at the University of Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Trans. by Abe Schenitzer, and published in 'The Mentality of the Mathematician: A Characterization', The Mathematical Intelligencer (1983), 5, No. 2. As quoted in Michael Fitzgerald and Ioan James, The Mind of the Mathematician (2007), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (81)  |  Concern (108)  |  Conqueror (6)  |  Conservative (11)  |  Faithfully (3)  |  Father (57)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Old (147)  |  Passion (70)  |  Poet (78)  |  Resignation (3)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Revolutionary (16)  |  Rigor (21)  |  Sage (15)  |  Skeptical (11)  |  Tolerance (8)

Every man is ready to join in the approval or condemnation of a philosopher or a statesman, a poet or an orator, an artist or an architect. But who can judge of a mathematician? Who will write a review of Hamilton’s Quaternions, and show us wherein it is superior to Newton’s Fluxions?
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (10)  |  Architect (20)  |  Artist (61)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Fluxions (2)  |  Sir William Rowan Hamilton (8)  |  Join (25)  |  Judge (61)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Orator (2)  |  Philosopher (164)  |  Poet (78)  |  Quaternion (7)  |  Ready (37)  |  Review (8)  |  Show (90)  |  Superior (40)  |  Write (153)

How greatly would the heroes and statesmen of antiquity have despised the labours of that man who devoted his life to investigate the properties of the magnet! Little could they anticipate that this humble mineral was destined to change the very form and condition of human society in every quarter of the globe.
In 'Observations on the Study of Mineralogy', The Philosophical Magazine and Journal (Jul 1819), 54, 46. Slightly edited and used by Joseph Henry in 'Introductory Lecture on Chemistry' (Jan-Mar 1832), The Papers of Joseph Henry, Vol. 1, 396.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (18)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Devote (34)  |  Globe (47)  |  Hero (35)  |  Human Society (5)  |  Investigate (65)  |  Labour (45)  |  Life (1124)  |  Magnet (10)  |  Mineral (41)  |  Property (123)

In the higher walks of politics the same sort of thing occurs. The statesman who has gradually concentrated all power within himself … may have had anything but a public motive… The phrases which are customary on the platform and in the Party Press have gradually come to him to seem to express truths, and he mistakes the rhetoric of partisanship for a genuine analysis of motives… He retires from the world after the world has retired from him.
In The Conquest of Happiness (1930, 2006), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Genuine (26)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Motive (33)  |  Party (18)  |  Phrase (28)  |  Platform (3)  |  Politics (95)  |  Power (358)  |  Press (21)  |  Public (93)  |  Retire (3)  |  Rhetoric (8)  |  Truth (914)  |  World (892)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Achievement (150)  |  Administrator (10)  |  Admit (44)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (41)  |  Alike (22)  |  Alone (101)  |  Analogous (4)  |  Analysis (159)  |  Anatomist (17)  |  Application (166)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (25)  |  Attain (42)  |  Author (61)  |  Balance (54)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Calculus (48)  |  Call (127)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (3)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (33)  |  Certainty (129)  |  Chair (11)  |  Civil (6)  |  Classic (9)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (37)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Creation (239)  |  Creator (52)  |  Current (54)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Deal (49)  |  Degree (81)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (25)  |  Direct (82)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (44)  |  Diverse (16)  |  Division (33)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (20)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (28)  |  Engage (25)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Eye (218)  |  Fact (725)  |  False (98)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (170)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (405)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (15)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (128)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (73)  |  General (156)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Great (524)  |  Ground (90)  |  Group (72)  |  Hero (35)  |  Hide (53)  |  High (152)  |  Histology (2)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (577)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Immortal (19)  |  Industry (108)  |  Infinitesimal (15)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (235)  |  Intimate (14)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Kingdom (37)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (547)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (130)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (50)  |  Logical (54)  |  Major (32)  |  Master (93)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Matter (340)  |  Microscopic (11)  |  Mind (743)  |  Minute (43)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Office (22)  |  Operation (118)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Organize (20)  |  Part (220)  |  Blaise Pascal (79)  |  Peace (84)  |  Peer (11)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Henri Poincaré (93)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (75)  |  Practical (129)  |  Prepare (34)  |  Probability (106)  |  Projective Geometry (2)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (98)  |  Range (57)  |  Reality (188)  |  Recess (7)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Relate (19)  |  Render (30)  |  Require (79)  |  Bernhard Riemann (6)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (4)  |  Say (228)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (2043)  |  Seldom (28)  |  Similarity (20)  |  Single (119)  |  Structure (221)  |  Surprise (70)  |  Survey (20)  |  Theory (690)  |  Tune (14)  |  Unfit (11)  |  Variety (69)  |  View (171)  |  Vision (94)  |  War (161)  |  Karl Weierstrass (6)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (626)  |  World (892)

It seems to me, that if statesmen had a little more arithmetic, or were accustomed to calculation, wars would be much less frequent.
Letter to his sister, Mrs. Jane Mecom (1787) just after the close of the Constitutional Convention. In Jared Sparks (ed.) The Works of Benjamin Franklin (1840), Vol. 10, 445.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Frequent (18)  |  Less (102)  |  Seem (143)  |  War (161)

Neither the absolute nor the relative size of the brain can be used to measure the degree of mental ability in animal or in man. So far as man is concerned, the weights of the brains or the volumes of the cranial cavities of a hundred celebrities of all branches of knowledge all over the world have been listed. … At the bottom of those lists are Gall, the famous phrenologist, Anatole France, the French novelist, and Gambetta, the French statesman, each with about 1,100 cc brain mass. The lists are topped by Dean Jonathan Swift, the English writer, Lord Byron, the English poet, and Turgenev, the Russian novelist, all with about 2,000 cc … Now our mental test! Had Turgenev really twice the mental ability of Anatole France?
In 'The Human Brain in the Light of Its Phylogenetic Development', Scientific Monthly (Aug 1948), 67, No. 2, 104-105. Collected in Sherwood Larned Washburn and ‎Davida Wolffson (eds.), The Shorter Anthropological Papers of Franz Weidenreich Published in the Period 1939-1948: A Memorial Volume (1949), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Absolute (97)  |  Animal (356)  |  Brain (209)  |  Lord George Gordon Byron (27)  |  Cavity (3)  |  Celebrity (8)  |  Cranial (2)  |  Anatole France (12)  |  Franz Joseph Gall (4)  |  Mass (78)  |  Measure (102)  |  Mental (78)  |  Novelist (6)  |  Phrenologist (2)  |  Poet (78)  |  Relative (39)  |  Size (60)  |  Jonathan Swift (26)  |  Test (124)  |  Ivan Turgenev (2)  |  Volume (19)  |  Weight (75)  |  Writer (45)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Accurate (32)  |  Acquire (38)  |  Act (115)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Angle (19)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (284)  |  Attention (115)  |  Badly (15)  |  Base (71)  |  Best (172)  |  Calculus (48)  |  Case (98)  |  Clear (97)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Country (144)  |  Curve (32)  |  Data (120)  |  Deal (49)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Deep (121)  |  Department (47)  |  Desire (140)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Direct (82)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (47)  |  Draw (55)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (38)  |  Enter (30)  |  Erroneous (4)  |  Error (275)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Exact (64)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Expect (44)  |  False (98)  |  First (313)  |  Follower (10)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (90)  |  Furnish (40)  |  Future (284)  |  General (156)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  God (535)  |  Good (345)  |  Habit (107)  |  High (152)  |  Ignorant (36)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Inference (31)  |  Instance (32)  |  Know (547)  |  Lawyer (21)  |  Learn (281)  |  Least (74)  |  Legitimate (14)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1124)  |  Likely (33)  |  Line (89)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Logic (247)  |  Logical (54)  |  Long (172)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mere (78)  |  Mind (743)  |  Moral (123)  |  Myself (36)  |  Need (283)  |  Number (276)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (73)  |  Political (36)  |  Portal (4)  |  Premise (25)  |  Primary (39)  |  Principle (285)  |  Probability (106)  |  Problem (490)  |  Process (261)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Pure Science (23)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Question (404)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Region (35)  |  Relate (19)  |  Relation (149)  |  Respect (86)  |  Right (196)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Same (155)  |  Save (56)  |  School (117)  |  Science (2043)  |  Simply (52)  |  Small (161)  |  Social (108)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (88)  |  Space (257)  |  Stand (107)  |  Start (97)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (235)  |  Success (248)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Surface (101)  |  System (191)  |  Systematic (32)  |  Task (83)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Together (77)  |  Topic (12)  |  Training (64)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (201)  |  Truth (914)  |  Try (141)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (80)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (10)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)  |  Variation (61)  |  Want (175)  |  Weigh (14)  |  Whole (189)  |  World (892)  |  Write (153)

That radioactive elements created by us are found in nature is an astounding event in the history of the earth. And of the Human race. To fail to consider its importance and its consequences would be a folly for which humanity would have to pay a terrible price. When public opinion has been created in the countries concerned and among all the nations, an opinion informed of the dangers involved in going on with the tests and led by the reason which this information imposes, then the statesmen may reach an agreement to stop the experiments.
In 'Excerpts from Message by Schweitzer', New York Times (24 Apr 1957), 4, translated from a letter issued by Schweitzer through the Nobel Committee, asking that public opinion demand an end to nuclear tests.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (39)  |  Astounding (3)  |  Consequence (110)  |  Consider (80)  |  Danger (78)  |  Element (162)  |  Event (115)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Fail (58)  |  Folly (32)  |  History Of The Earth (2)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Importance (216)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Price (33)  |  Public Opinion (2)  |  Radioactivity (28)  |  Reach (119)  |  Stop (75)  |  Terrible (19)  |  Test (124)

The calculus of probabilities, when confined within just limits, ought to interest, in an equal degree, the mathematician, the experimentalist, and the statesman.
In François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, 'Laplace', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 364. This comment introduces how the calculus of probabilities, being used in preparing tables of, for example, population and mortality, can give information for use by government and businesses deciding reserves for pensions, or premiums for life insurance.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculus (48)  |  Experimenter (20)  |  Interest (235)  |  Mathematician (364)

The school of Plato has advanced the interests of the race as much through geometry as through philosophy. The modern engineer, the navigator, the astronomer, built on the truths which those early Greeks discovered in their purely speculative investigations. And if the poetry, statesmanship, oratory, and philosophy of our day owe much to Plato’s divine Dialogues, our commerce, our manufactures, and our science are equally indebted to his Conic Sections. Later instances may be abundantly quoted, to show that the labors of the mathematician have outlasted those of the statesman, and wrought mightier changes in the condition of the world. Not that we would rank the geometer above the patriot, but we claim that he is worthy of equal honor.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (162)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Build (117)  |  Change (363)  |  Claim (70)  |  Commerce (15)  |  Condition (160)  |  Conic Section (7)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Discover (196)  |  Divine (60)  |  Early (61)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Equal (77)  |  Equally (25)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Geometer (22)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Greek (71)  |  Honor (31)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Instance (32)  |  Interest (235)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Labor (71)  |  Late (52)  |  Manufacture (15)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Modern (159)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Owe (23)  |  Patriot (4)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Plato (73)  |  Poetry (120)  |  Purely (28)  |  Quote (18)  |  Race (103)  |  Rank (32)  |  School (117)  |  Science (2043)  |  Show (90)  |  Speculative (8)  |  Statesmanship (2)  |  Truth (914)  |  Work (626)  |  World (892)  |  Worthy (34)

The study of economics does not seem to require any specialised gifts of an unusually high order. Is it not, intellectually regarded, a very easy subject compared with the higher branches of philosophy and pure science? Yet good, or even competent, economists are the rarest of birds. An easy subject, at which very few excel! The paradox finds its explanation, perhaps, in that the master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts. He must reach a high standard in several different directions and must combine talents not often found together. He must be mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher—in some degree. He must understand symbols and speak in words. He must contemplate the particular in terms of the general, and touch abstract and concrete in the same flight of thought. He must study the present in the light of the past for the purposes of the future. No part of man's nature or his institutions must lie entirely outside his regard. He must be purposeful and disinterested in a simultaneous mood; as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near the earth as a politician.
'Alfred Marshall: 1842-1924' (1924). In Geoffrey Keynes (ed.), Essays in Biography (1933), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Economics (34)  |  Historian (33)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Paradox (43)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Pure Science (23)  |  Science (2043)  |  Talent (61)

Without an acquaintance with chemistry, the statesman must remain a stranger to the true vital interests of the state, to the means of its organic development and improvement; ... The highest economic or material interests of a country, the increased and more profitable production of food for man and animals, ... are most closely linked with the advancement and diffusion of the natural sciences, especially of chemistry.
Familiar Letters on Chemistry (1851), 3rd edn., 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (66)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Country (144)  |  Development (276)  |  Economics (34)  |  Food (152)  |  Improvement (73)  |  Increase (145)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Nation (132)  |  Production (115)  |  Profit (38)  |  Science (2043)  |  Stranger (15)

You can prepare yourself for work. The paintings of the great masters, the compositions of great musicians, the sermons of great preachers, the policies of great statesmen, and the campaigns of great generals, do not spring full bloom from barren rock. … If you are a true student you will be more dissatisfied with yourself when you graduate than you are now.
From Cameron Prize Lecture (1928), delivered before the University of Edinburgh. As quoted in J.B. Collip 'Frederick Grant Banting, Discoverer of Insulin', The Scientific Monthly (May 1941), 52, No. 5, 473-474.
Science quotes on:  |  Barren (15)  |  Bloom (9)  |  Campaign (6)  |  Composition (56)  |  Dissatisfaction (6)  |  Full (63)  |  General (156)  |  Graduate (13)  |  Great (524)  |  Master (93)  |  Musician (15)  |  Painting (42)  |  Policy (24)  |  Preacher (10)  |  Prepare (34)  |  Rock (125)  |  Sermon (6)  |  Spring (70)  |  Student (201)  |  True (201)  |  Work (626)

[Among the books he chooses, a statesman] ought to read interesting books on history and government, and books of science and philosophy; and really good books on these subjects are as enthralling as any fiction ever written in prose or verse.
In Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography (1913), 333.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Fiction (22)  |  Government (93)  |  History (368)  |  Interesting (48)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Prose (11)  |  Read (144)  |  Science (2043)  |  Verse (8)

~~[No Known Source]~~ The role of the scholar is to destroy chimeras, that of the statesman is to make use of them.
Webmaster has looked for a primary source, and cannot yet find one. Can you help? Meanwhile it may be better to attribute to Anonymous.
Science quotes on:  |  Chimera (8)  |  Destroy (80)  |  Politics (95)  |  Role (49)  |  Scholar (37)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.