Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Stride

Stride Quotes (9 quotes)

[Students or readers about teachers or authors.] They will listen with both ears to what is said by the men just a step or two ahead of them, who stand nearest to them, and within arm’s reach. A guide ceases to be of any use when he strides so far ahead as to be hidden by the curvature of the earth.
From Lecture (5 Apr 1917) at Hackley School, Tarrytown, N.Y., 'Choosing Books', collected in Canadian Stories (1918), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (58)  |  Cease (37)  |  Curvature (4)  |  Earth (632)  |  Far (154)  |  Guide (62)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Listen (38)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Reader (37)  |  Stand (106)  |  Step (108)  |  Student (198)  |  Teacher (117)

A formative influence on my undergraduate self was the response of a respected elder statesmen of the Oxford Zoology Department when an American visitor had just publicly disproved his favourite theory. The old man strode to the front of the lecture hall, shook the American warmly by the hand and declared in ringing, emotional tones: ‘My dear fellow, I wish to thank you. I have been wrong these fifteen years.’ And we clapped our hands red. Can you imagine a Government Minister being cheered in the House of Commons for a similar admission? “Resign, Resign” is a much more likely response!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (12)  |  American (45)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Clap (3)  |  Declare (27)  |  Department (46)  |  Disprove (15)  |  Elder (4)  |  Emotional (16)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Formative (2)  |  Front (14)  |  Government (93)  |  Hand (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Influence (136)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Likely (33)  |  Minister (8)  |  Old Man (3)  |  Oxford (9)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Red (35)  |  Resign (4)  |  Respect (82)  |  Response (28)  |  Ring (16)  |  Self (43)  |  Shake (29)  |  Similar (34)  |  Statesman (18)  |  Thank You (4)  |  Theory (687)  |  Tone (10)  |  Undergraduate (9)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Wish (91)  |  Wrong (137)  |  Year (297)  |  Zoology (31)

Man now presides
In power, where once he trembled in his weakness;
Science advances with gigantic strides;
But are we aught enriched in love and meekness?
In To the Planet Venus (1838). In The Works of William Wordsworth (1994), Book 4, 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Love (214)  |  Man (373)  |  Meekness (2)  |  Power (355)  |  Tremble (5)  |  Weakness (35)

Newton advanced, with one gigantic stride, from the regions of twilight into the noon day of science. A Boyle and a Hooke, who would otherwise have been deservedly the boast of their century, served but as obscure forerunners of Newton's glories.
A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Boast (21)  |  Robert Boyle (27)  |  Century (130)  |  Day (41)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Gigantic (22)  |  Glory (57)  |  Robert Hooke (20)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Noon (6)  |  Obscurity (25)  |  Otherwise (23)  |  Region (35)  |  Science (2017)  |  Twilight (6)

Now is the time to take longer strides—time for a new American enterprise—time for this nation to take a clearly leading role in space achievement, which in many ways may hold the key to our future on earth.
Address to Joint Session of Congress, on Urgent National Needs (25 May 1961). On web site of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. Also in Vital Speeches of the Day (15 Jun 1961), Vol. 27, No. 17, 518-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (149)  |  America (87)  |  Earth (632)  |  Enterprise (31)  |  Future (283)  |  Key (49)  |  Leading (17)  |  Nation (132)  |  New (477)  |  Role (48)  |  Space (256)  |  Space Exploration (9)

So I travelled, stopping ever and again, in great strides of a thousand years or more, drawn on by the mystery of the earth’s fate, watching with a strange fascination the sun grow larger and duller in the westward sky, and the life of the old earth ebbing out.
In The Time Machine (1898), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Dull (31)  |  Earth (632)  |  Ebb (3)  |  Fascination (28)  |  Fate (46)  |  Great (517)  |  Life (1113)  |  Mystery (150)  |  Old (143)  |  Sky (124)  |  Strange (89)  |  Sun (276)  |  Thousand (151)  |  Travel (61)  |  Watch (63)  |  West (17)  |  Year (297)

Step by step we cross great eras in the development of thought: there is no sudden gigantic stride; a theory proceeds by slow evolution until it dominates or is destroyed.
In 'Theory of Phlogiston', The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science (Jan 1868), 35, 28-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Destroyed (2)  |  Development (270)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Era (17)  |  Evolution (530)  |  Gigantic (22)  |  Proceed (41)  |  Slow (54)  |  Sudden (32)  |  Theory (687)  |  Thought (531)

The ancients devoted a lifetime to the study of arithmetic; it required days to extract a square root or to multiply two numbers together. Is there any harm in skipping all that, in letting the school boy learn multiplication sums, and in starting his more abstract reasoning at a more advanced point? Where would be the harm in letting the boy assume the truth of many propositions of the first four books of Euclid, letting him assume their truth partly by faith, partly by trial? Giving him the whole fifth book of Euclid by simple algebra? Letting him assume the sixth as axiomatic? Letting him, in fact, begin his severer studies where he is now in the habit of leaving off? We do much less orthodox things. Every here and there in one’s mathematical studies one makes exceedingly large assumptions, because the methodical study would be ridiculous even in the eyes of the most pedantic of teachers. I can imagine a whole year devoted to the philosophical study of many things that a student now takes in his stride without trouble. The present method of training the mind of a mathematical teacher causes it to strain at gnats and to swallow camels. Such gnats are most of the propositions of the sixth book of Euclid; propositions generally about incommensurables; the use of arithmetic in geometry; the parallelogram of forces, etc., decimals.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Advance (158)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Ancient (102)  |  Arithmetic (114)  |  Assume (35)  |  Assumption (57)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Begin (104)  |  Book (255)  |  Camel (11)  |  Cause (283)  |  Decimal (14)  |  Devote (34)  |  Euclid (52)  |  Extract (17)  |  Eye (215)  |  Fact (717)  |  Faith (156)  |  First (306)  |  Generally (15)  |  Geometry (213)  |  Give (197)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Habit (104)  |  Harm (37)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Incommensurable (2)  |  Large (129)  |  Learn (277)  |  Leave (126)  |  Lifetime (28)  |  Mathematics (1130)  |  Method (225)  |  Methodical (6)  |  Mind (733)  |  Multiplication (22)  |  Multiply (18)  |  Number (275)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Partly (5)  |  Pedantic (3)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Point (122)  |  Present (173)  |  Proposition (78)  |  Reason (449)  |  Require (78)  |  Ridiculous (12)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Severe (16)  |  Simple (169)  |  Skip (4)  |  Square Root (8)  |  Start (97)  |  Strain (11)  |  Student (198)  |  Study (456)  |  Sum (41)  |  Swallow (20)  |  Teacher (117)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (29)  |  Together (75)  |  Training (62)  |  Trial (28)  |  Trouble (71)  |  Truth (901)  |  Whole (186)  |  Year (297)

The geologist strides across the landscape to get the big picture, but the paleontologist stays at one spot or shuffles along looking at the ground for his pet objects.
'Fossils—The How and Why of Collecting and Storing', Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington (1969), 82, 590.
Science quotes on:  |  Geologist (47)  |  Ground (88)  |  Landscape (29)  |  Look (52)  |  Object (167)  |  Paleontologist (15)  |  Pet (8)  |  Shuffle (5)  |  Spot (17)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.