Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Modern

Modern Quotes (162 quotes)

“The Universe repeats itself, with the possible exception of history.” Of all earthly studies history is the only one that does not repeat itself. ... Astronomy repeats itself; botany repeats itself; trigonometry repeats itself; mechanics repeats itself; compound long division repeats itself. Every sum if worked out in the same way at any time will bring out the same answer. ... A great many moderns say that history is a science; if so it occupies a solitary and splendid elevation among the sciences; it is the only science the conclusions of which are always wrong.
In 'A Much Repeated Repetition', Daily News (26 Mar 1904). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Division (34)  |  Earthly (8)  |  Evaluation (7)  |  Exception (40)  |  History (369)  |  Mechanics (57)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Repetition (22)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (2067)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Splendid (12)  |  Study (476)  |  Sum (41)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  Wrong (139)

Mathematical truth has validity independent of place, personality, or human authority. Mathematical relations are not established, nor can they be abrogated, by edict. The multiplication table is international and permanent, not a matter of convention nor of relying upon authority of state or church. The value of π is not amenable to human caprice. The finding of a mathematical theorem may have been a highly romantic episode in the personal life of the discoverer, but it cannot be expected of itself to reveal the race, sex, or temperament of this discoverer. With modern means of widespread communication even mathematical notation tends to be international despite all nationalistic tendencies in the use of words or of type.
Anonymous
In 'Light Thrown on the Nature of Mathematics by Certain Aspects of Its Development', Mathematics in General Education (1940), 256. This is the Report of the Committee on the Function of Mathematics in General Education of the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum, which was established by the Executive Board of the Progressive Education Association in 1932.
Science quotes on:  |  Amenable (4)  |  Authority (66)  |  Caprice (5)  |  Church (34)  |  Communication (76)  |  Convention (14)  |  Despite (7)  |  Discoverer (15)  |  Episode (5)  |  Establish (56)  |  Human (550)  |  Independent (67)  |  International (23)  |  Life (1131)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Matter (343)  |  Multiplication Table (10)  |  Nation (134)  |  Notation (23)  |  Permanent (29)  |  Personal (66)  |  Personality (47)  |  Place (175)  |  Race (104)  |  Relation (154)  |  Romantic (9)  |  Sex (49)  |  State (137)  |  Temperament (11)  |  Tend (36)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Truth (928)  |  Type (52)  |  Validity (31)  |  Widespread (11)  |  Word (302)

A few days ago, a Master of Arts, who is still a young man, and therefore the recipient of a modern education, stated to me that until he had reached the age of twenty he had never been taught anything whatever regarding natural phenomena, or natural law. Twelve years of his life previously had been spent exclusively amongst the ancients. The case, I regret to say, is typical. Now we cannot, without prejudice to humanity, separate the present from the past.
'On the Study of Physics', From a Lecture delivered in the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Spring of 1854. Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 1, 284-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Education (347)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Law (515)  |  Life (1131)  |  Man (373)  |  Natural (173)  |  Past (152)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Prejudice (66)  |  Present (176)  |  Previous (12)  |  Recipient (3)  |  Regret (21)  |  Separation (36)  |  Statement (76)  |  Teaching (108)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Typical (13)  |  Young (100)

A modern branch of mathematics, having achieved the art of dealing with the infinitely small, can now yield solutions in other more complex problems of motion, which used to appear insoluble. This modern branch of mathematics, unknown to the ancients, when dealing with problems of motion, admits the conception of the infinitely small, and so conforms to the chief condition of motion (absolute continuity) and thereby corrects the inevitable error which the human mind cannot avoid when dealing with separate elements of motion instead of examining continuous motion. In seeking the laws of historical movement just the same thing happens. The movement of humanity, arising as it does from innumerable human wills, is continuous. To understand the laws of this continuous movement is the aim of history. … Only by taking an infinitesimally small unit for observation (the differential of history, that is, the individual tendencies of man) and attaining to the art of integrating them (that is, finding the sum of these infinitesimals) can we hope to arrive at the laws of history.
War and Peace (1869), Book 11, Chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (98)  |  Aim (89)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arise (49)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attain (45)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Branch (107)  |  Chief (38)  |  Complex (95)  |  Concept (146)  |  Condition (163)  |  Conform (11)  |  Continuity (30)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Correct (85)  |  Deal (49)  |  Differential (7)  |  Element (162)  |  Error (277)  |  Examine (44)  |  Find (408)  |  History (369)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human (550)  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Individual (221)  |  Inevitable (27)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Infinitesimal (15)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Insoluble (15)  |  Integrate (5)  |  Law (515)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Motion (160)  |  Movement (83)  |  Observation (450)  |  Problem (497)  |  Seek (107)  |  Separate (74)  |  Small (163)  |  Solution (216)  |  Sum (41)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Understand (340)  |  Unit (31)  |  Unknown (107)  |  Yield (38)

A modern mathematical proof is not very different from a modern machine, or a modern test setup: the simple fundamental principles are hidden and almost invisible under a mass of technical details.
Unterrichtsblätter für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften (1932), 38, 177-188. As translated by Abe Shenitzer, in 'Part I. Topology and Abstract Algebra as Two Roads of Mathematical Comprehension', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1995), 102, No. 7, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Detail (87)  |  Different (186)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Machine (157)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Principle (292)  |  Proof (245)  |  Simple (178)  |  Technical (42)  |  Test (125)

A noteworthy and often-remarked similarity exists between the facts and methods of geology and those of linguistic study. The science of language is, as it were, the geology of the most modern period, the Age of the Man, having for its task to construct the history of development of the earth and its inhabitants from the time when the proper geological record remains silent … The remains of ancient speech are like strata deposited in bygone ages, telling of the forms of life then existing, and of the circumstances which determined or affected them; while words are as rolled pebbles, relics of yet more ancient formations, or as fossils, whose grade indicates the progress of organic life, and whose resemblances and relations show the correspondence or sequence of the different strata; while, everywhere, extensive denudation has marred the completeness of the record, and rendered impossible a detailed exhibition of the whole course of development.
In Language and the Study of Language (1867), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Construction (83)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Development (289)  |  Earth (638)  |  Fact (733)  |  Formation (59)  |  Fossil (113)  |  Geology (201)  |  History (369)  |  Inhabitant (28)  |  Language (228)  |  Life (1131)  |  Man (373)  |  Method (239)  |  Organic (55)  |  Pebble (19)  |  Period (66)  |  Progress (368)  |  Record (68)  |  Sequence (41)  |  Speech (47)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Task (83)  |  Word (302)

A student who wishes now-a-days to study geometry by dividing it sharply from analysis, without taking account of the progress which the latter has made and is making, that student no matter how great his genius, will never be a whole geometer. He will not possess those powerful instruments of research which modern analysis puts into the hands of modern geometry. He will remain ignorant of many geometrical results which are to be found, perhaps implicitly, in the writings of the analyst. And not only will he be unable to use them in his own researches, but he will probably toil to discover them himself, and, as happens very often, he will publish them as new, when really he has only rediscovered them.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometrical Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (166)  |  Discover (199)  |  Divide (40)  |  Genius (249)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Ignorant (40)  |  Implicit (7)  |  Instrument (95)  |  New (496)  |  Possess (56)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Progress (368)  |  Publish (34)  |  Research (590)  |  Result (389)  |  Student (203)  |  Study (476)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Toil (18)  |  Whole (192)  |  Writing (81)

Agnosticism is of the essence of science, whether ancient or modern. It simply means that a man shall not say he knows or believes that for which he has no grounds for professing to believe.
In Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1913), Vol. 3, 98, footnote 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Agnosticism (2)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Belief (504)  |  Essence (55)  |  Grounds (2)  |  Know (556)  |  Mean (101)  |  Profess (10)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2067)

Alchemy. The link between the immemorial magic arts and modern science. Humankind’s first systematic effort to unlock the secrets of matter by reproducible experiment.
In Good Words to You (1987), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Art (294)  |  Effort (144)  |  Experiment (602)  |  First (314)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Link (42)  |  Magic (78)  |  Matter (343)  |  Science (2067)  |  Secret (131)  |  Systematic (33)  |  Unlock (5)

Almost every major systematic error which has deluded men for thousands of years relied on practical experience. Horoscopes, incantations, oracles, magic, witchcraft, the cures of witch doctors and of medical practitioners before the advent of modern medicine, were all firmly established through the centuries in the eyes of the public by their supposed practical successes. The scientific method was devised precisely for the purpose of elucidating the nature of things under more carefully controlled conditions and by more rigorous criteria than are present in the situations created by practical problems.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Care (95)  |  Century (131)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Control (114)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cure (96)  |  Delusion (22)  |  Devising (7)  |  Elucidation (6)  |  Error (277)  |  Establishment (35)  |  Experience (342)  |  Eye (222)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Incantation (4)  |  Magic (78)  |  Major (32)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Practicality (6)  |  Practitioner (13)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Problem (497)  |  Public (94)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reliance (10)  |  Rigor (23)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Situation (52)  |  Success (250)  |  Supposition (37)  |  System (191)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Witch Doctor (2)  |  Witchcraft (5)  |  Year (299)

Among the studies to which the [Rockefeller] Foundation is giving support is a series in a relatively new field, which may be called molecular biology, in which delicate modern techniques are being used to investigate ever more minute details of certain life processes.
In 'Molecular Biology', Annual Report of the Rockefeller Foundation (1938), 203-4. Reprinted in a letter to Science (6 Nov 1970), 170, 582.
Science quotes on:  |  Delicate (21)  |  Detail (87)  |  Field (171)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Life (1131)  |  Minute (44)  |  Molecular Biology (24)  |  New (496)  |  Process (267)  |  Series (51)  |  Study (476)  |  Support (78)  |  Technique (49)

As a naturalist you will never suffer from that awful modern disease called boredom—so go out and greet the natural world with curiosity and delight, and enjoy it.
In The Amateur Naturalist (1989), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Awful (8)  |  Boredom (9)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Delight (66)  |  Disease (275)  |  Enjoy (39)  |  Greet (6)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Suffer (40)

Astrology was much in vogue during the middle ages, and became the parent of modern astronomy, as alchemy did of chemistry.
As given in Edwin Davies, Other Men's Minds, Or, Seven Thousand Choice Extracts on History, Science, Philosophy, Religion, Etc (1800), 41. Webmaster so far has not found the primary source-can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Astrology (41)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Middle Ages (7)  |  Parent (46)  |  Vogue (4)

Before the introduction of the Arabic notation, multiplication was difficult, and the division even of integers called into play the highest mathematical faculties. Probably nothing in the modern world could have more astonished a Greek mathematician than to learn that, under the influence of compulsory education, the whole population of Western Europe, from the highest to the lowest, could perform the operation of division for the largest numbers. This fact would have seemed to him a sheer impossibility. … Our modern power of easy reckoning with decimal fractions is the most miraculous result of a perfect notation.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Arabic (3)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Compulsory (7)  |  Decimal (15)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Division (34)  |  Easy (102)  |  Education (347)  |  Europe (43)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fraction (13)  |  Greek (73)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Influence (140)  |  Integer (10)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Modern World (4)  |  Multiplication (23)  |  Notation (23)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Number (282)  |  Operation (121)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Perform (38)  |  Population (79)  |  Power (366)  |  Probably (48)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Result (389)  |  Whole (192)

But for the persistence of a student of this university in urging upon me his desire to study with me the modern algebra I should never have been led into this investigation; and the new facts and principles which I have discovered in regard to it (important facts, I believe), would, so far as I am concerned, have remained still hidden in the womb of time. In vain I represented to this inquisitive student that he would do better to take up some other subject lying less off the beaten track of study, such as the higher parts of the calculus or elliptic functions, or the theory of substitutions, or I wot not what besides. He stuck with perfect respectfulness, but with invincible pertinacity, to his point. He would have the new algebra (Heaven knows where he had heard about it, for it is almost unknown in this continent), that or nothing. I was obliged to yield, and what was the consequence? In trying to throw light upon an obscure explanation in our text-book, my brain took fire, I plunged with re-quickened zeal into a subject which I had for years abandoned, and found food for thoughts which have engaged my attention for a considerable time past, and will probably occupy all my powers of contemplation advantageously for several months to come.
In Johns Hopkins Commemoration Day Address, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 3, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (48)  |  Advantageous (4)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Attention (121)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Belief (504)  |  Better (192)  |  Brain (213)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Concern (110)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Continent (52)  |  Desire (142)  |  Discover (199)  |  Ellipse (6)  |  Engage (25)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Fact (733)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (408)  |  Fire (133)  |  Food (154)  |  Function (131)  |  Hear (63)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Hide (53)  |  High (153)  |  Important (205)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Know (556)  |  Lead (160)  |  Less (102)  |  Lie (115)  |  Light (347)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Month (31)  |  New (496)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Obscure (32)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Part (222)  |  Past (152)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Persistence (20)  |  Pertinacity (2)  |  Plunge (9)  |  Point (123)  |  Power (366)  |  Principle (292)  |  Probably (48)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Represent (43)  |  Several (31)  |  Stick (24)  |  Student (203)  |  Study (476)  |  Subject (240)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Theory (696)  |  Thought (546)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (595)  |  Try (141)  |  University (81)  |  Unknown (107)  |  Urge (16)  |  Womb (14)  |  Year (299)  |  Yield (38)  |  Zeal (11)

By his very success in inventing labor-saving devices, modern man has manufactured an abyss of boredom that only the privileged classes in earlier civilizations have ever fathomed.
The Conduct of Life (1951), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (23)  |  Boredom (9)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Class (84)  |  Device (28)  |  Early (62)  |  Fathom (8)  |  Invention (324)  |  Labor-Saving (2)  |  Man (373)  |  Manufacturing (23)  |  Privilege (26)  |  Success (250)

Chemistry has the same quickening and suggestive influence upon the algebraist as a visit to the Royal Academy, or the old masters may be supposed to have on a Browning or a Tennyson. Indeed it seems to me that an exact homology exists between painting and poetry on the one hand and modern chemistry and modern algebra on the other. In poetry and algebra we have the pure idea elaborated and expressed through the vehicle of language, in painting and chemistry the idea enveloped in matter, depending in part on manual processes and the resources of art for its due manifestation.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Art (294)  |  Robert Browning (7)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Dependence (37)  |  Elaboration (7)  |  Envelope (5)  |  Expression (110)  |  Idea (580)  |  Influence (140)  |  Language (228)  |  Manifestation (35)  |  Manual (7)  |  Master (98)  |  Matter (343)  |  Painting (43)  |  Poetry (124)  |  Process (267)  |  Pure (103)  |  Quickening (2)  |  Suggestive (4)  |  Lord Alfred Tennyson (24)  |  Vehicle (7)  |  Visit (26)

Clinical ecology [is] a new branch of medicine aimed at helping people made sick by a failure to adapt to facets of our modern, polluted environment. Adverse reactions to processed foods and their chemical contaminants, and to indoor and outdoor air pollution with petrochemicals, are becoming more and more widespread and so far these reactions are being misdiagnosed by mainstream medical practitioners and so are not treated effectively.
Quoted in article 'Richard Mackarness', Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (49)  |  Adverse (2)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  Allergy (2)  |  Chemical (79)  |  Effectiveness (11)  |  Environment (181)  |  Facet (8)  |  Failure (138)  |  Food (154)  |  Illness (24)  |  Mainstream (3)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Pollution (43)  |  Practitioner (13)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Sickness (22)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Widespread (11)

Descartes, the father of modern philosophy … would never—so he assures us—have been led to construct his philosophy if he had had only one teacher, for then he would have believed what he had been told; but, finding that his professors disagreed with each other, he was forced to conclude that no existing doctrine was certain.
From 'Philosophy For Laymen', collected in Unpopular Essays (1950, 1996), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Assure (15)  |  Belief (504)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Conclude (16)  |  Construct (41)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Existing (10)  |  Father (60)  |  Forced (3)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Professor (54)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Told (4)

Despite the dazzling successes of modern technology and the unprecedented power of modern military systems, they suffer from a common and catastrophic fault. While providing us with a bountiful supply of food, with great industrial plants, with high-speed transportation, and with military weapons of unprecedented power, they threaten our very survival.
In Science and Survival (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Catastrophic (3)  |  Common (122)  |  Dazzling (11)  |  Despite (7)  |  Fault (33)  |  Food (154)  |  Great (534)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Military (29)  |  Plant (200)  |  Power (366)  |  Provide (69)  |  Success (250)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Supply (47)  |  System (191)  |  Technology (222)  |  Unprecedented (8)

Despite the vision and the far-seeing wisdom of our wartime heads of state, the physicists felt a peculiarly intimate responsibility for suggesting, for supporting, and in the end, in large measure, for achieving the realization of atomic weapons. Nor can we forget that these weapons, as they were in fact used, dramatized so mercilessly the inhumanity and evil of modern war. In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose.
In Arthur Dehon Little Memorial Lecture (25 Nov 1947) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 'Physics in the Contemporary World'. Collected in J. Robert Oppenheimer, The Open Mind (1955), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (107)  |  Crude (17)  |  Evil (79)  |  Humour (103)  |  Inhumanity (3)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Lose (94)  |  Merciless (3)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Realization (37)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Sense (321)  |  Suggestion (30)  |  Support (78)  |  Vision (94)  |  Vulgarity (2)  |  War (161)  |  Weapon (66)  |  Wisdom (182)

Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and the convenience of people. In its modern form engineering involves people, money, materials, machines, and energy. It is differentiated from science because it is primarily concerned with how to direct to useful and economical ends the natural phenomena which scientists discover and formulate into acceptable theories. Engineering therefore requires above all the creative imagination to innovate useful applications of natural phenomena. It seeks newer, cheaper, better means of using natural sources of energy and materials.
In McGraw Hill, Science and Technology Encyclopedia
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (6)  |  Application (170)  |  Art (294)  |  Better (192)  |  Cheaper (6)  |  Concern (110)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Creative (61)  |  Differentiate (13)  |  Direct (84)  |  Directing (5)  |  Discover (199)  |  Economical (9)  |  End (195)  |  Energy (214)  |  Engineering (141)  |  Form (314)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Great (534)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Innovate (2)  |  Involve (48)  |  Machine (157)  |  Material (156)  |  Means (176)  |  Money (142)  |  Natural (173)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Person (154)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Power (366)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Require (85)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Seek (107)  |  Source (91)  |  Theory (696)  |  Useful (100)

Equations are Expressions of Arithmetical Computation, and properly have no place in Geometry, except as far as Quantities truly Geometrical (that is, Lines, Surfaces, Solids, and Proportions) may be said to be some equal to others. Multiplications, Divisions, and such sort of Computations, are newly received into Geometry, and that unwarily, and contrary to the first Design of this Science. For whosoever considers the Construction of a Problem by a right Line and a Circle, found out by the first Geometricians, will easily perceive that Geometry was invented that we might expeditiously avoid, by drawing Lines, the Tediousness of Computation. Therefore these two Sciences ought not to be confounded. The Ancients did so industriously distinguish them from one another, that they never introduced Arithmetical Terms into Geometry. And the Moderns, by confounding both, have lost the Simplicity in which all the Elegance of Geometry consists. Wherefore that is Arithmetically more simple which is determined by the more simple Equation, but that is Geometrically more simple which is determined by the more simple drawing of Lines; and in Geometry, that ought to be reckoned best which is geometrically most simple.
In 'On the Linear Construction of Equations', Universal Arithmetic (1769), Vol. 2, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Best (173)  |  Both (81)  |  Circle (56)  |  Computation (18)  |  Confound (14)  |  Consider (81)  |  Consist (46)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Design (115)  |  Determine (76)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Division (34)  |  Draw (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elegance (30)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equation (96)  |  Expression (110)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (408)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Industrious (9)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Invent (51)  |  Line (90)  |  Lose (94)  |  Multiplication (23)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Place (175)  |  Problem (497)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Right (197)  |  Science (2067)  |  Simple (178)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Solid (50)  |  Sort (49)  |  Surface (101)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tedious (9)  |  Term (122)  |  Truly (33)  |  Wherefore (2)

Euclid always contemplates a straight line as drawn between two definite points, and is very careful to mention when it is to be produced beyond this segment. He never thinks of the line as an entity given once for all as a whole. This careful definition and limitation, so as to exclude an infinity not immediately apparent to the senses, was very characteristic of the Greeks in all their many activities. It is enshrined in the difference between Greek architecture and Gothic architecture, and between Greek religion and modern religion. The spire of a Gothic cathedral and the importance of the unbounded straight line in modern Geometry are both emblematic of the transformation of the modern world.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (135)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Architecture (43)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Both (81)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cathedral (16)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Definite (43)  |  Definition (192)  |  Difference (246)  |  Draw (55)  |  Enshrine (2)  |  Entity (31)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  Gothic (3)  |  Greek (73)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Importance (218)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Limitation (30)  |  Line (90)  |  Mention (23)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Modern World (4)  |  Point (123)  |  Produce (102)  |  Religion (239)  |  Segment (6)  |  Sense (321)  |  Spire (5)  |  Straight Line (17)  |  Think (347)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Unbounded (5)  |  Whole (192)

Evolution: The Modern Synthesis.
Book title
Evolution: The Modern Synthesis (1942).
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (535)  |  Synthesis (44)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Accomplishment (80)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (29)  |  Application (170)  |  Attention (121)  |  Author (62)  |  Base (71)  |  Basis (91)  |  Begin (108)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (32)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Correct (85)  |  Course (84)  |  Danger (78)  |  Decade (32)  |  Development (289)  |  Difficult (121)  |  End (195)  |  Essential (117)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  Extent (51)  |  Extreme (56)  |  Follow (124)  |  Former (25)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (26)  |  Framework (20)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (19)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (94)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (205)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (9)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Interest (237)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (228)  |  Leave (128)  |  Logic (260)  |  Lose (94)  |  Majority (42)  |  Mastery (28)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Matter (343)  |  Middle (16)  |  Need (287)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (15)  |  Permit (31)  |  Point (123)  |  Possible (158)  |  Premise (27)  |  Proper (38)  |  Psychological (12)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Pursue (23)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (471)  |  Receive (60)  |  Recommend (7)  |  Rigid (13)  |  Secure (21)  |  Sense (321)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (49)  |  Sharpen (16)  |  Side (51)  |  Solid (50)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (203)  |  Stunt (3)  |  Subject (240)  |  Success (250)  |  Swing (10)  |  Teach (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Think (347)  |  Transition (18)  |  True (208)  |  Understand (340)  |  Want (176)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wise (61)  |  World (898)  |  Young (100)

Fourier’s Theorem … is not only one of the most beautiful results of modern analysis, but it may be said to furnish an indispensable instrument in the treatment of nearly every recondite question in modern physics. To mention only sonorous vibrations, the propagation of electric signals along a telegraph wire, and the conduction of heat by the earth’s crust, as subjects in their generality intractable without it, is to give but a feeble idea of its importance.
In William Thomson and Peter Guthrie Tait, Treatise on Natural Philosophy (1867), Vol. 1, 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (166)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Conduction (4)  |  Crust (18)  |  Earth (638)  |  Electric (15)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Generality (34)  |  Heat (100)  |  Idea (580)  |  Importance (218)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Intractable (2)  |  Mention (23)  |  Modern Physics (14)  |  Propagation (10)  |  Question (404)  |  Recondite (5)  |  Result (389)  |  Signal (18)  |  Sound (90)  |  Subject (240)  |  Telegraph (32)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Vibration (16)  |  Wire (20)

From packaging materials, through fibers, foams and surface coatings, to continuous extrusions and large-scale moldings, plastics have transformed almost every aspect of life. Without them, much of modern medicine would be impossible and the consumer electronics and computer industries would disappear. Plastic sewage and water pipes alone have made an immeasurable contribution to public health worldwide.
'Plastics—No Need To Apologize', Trends in Polymer Science (Jun 1996), 4, 172. In Paul C. Painter and Michael M. Coleman, Essentials of Polymer Science and Engineering (2008), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (58)  |  Computer (105)  |  Consumer (6)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Disappearance (22)  |  Electronics (8)  |  Fiber (10)  |  Health (156)  |  Immeasurable (4)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Industry (109)  |  Life (1131)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Mold (26)  |  Pipe (7)  |  Plastic (15)  |  Public (94)  |  Sewage (6)  |  Surface (101)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Water (293)  |  Worldwide (9)

From the level of pragmatic, everyday knowledge to modern natural science, the knowledge of nature derives from man’s primary coming to grips with nature; at the same time it reacts back upon the system of social labour and stimulates its development.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Back (104)  |  Derive (33)  |  Development (289)  |  Everyday (16)  |  Grip (9)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Labour (47)  |  Level (67)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Pragmatic (2)  |  Primary (41)  |  React (7)  |  Same (156)  |  Social (108)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  System (191)  |  Time (595)

Greek mathematics is the real thing. The Greeks first spoke a language which modern mathematicians can understand… So Greek mathematics is ‘permanent’, more permanent even than Greek literature.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Greek (73)  |  Language (228)  |  Literature (79)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Permanent (29)  |  Real (149)  |  Understanding (325)

How can a modern anthropologist embark upon a generalization with any hope of arriving at a satisfactory conclusion? By thinking of the organizational ideas that are present in any society as a mathematical pattern.
In Rethinking Anthropology (1961), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropologist (6)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Embark (7)  |  Generalize (15)  |  Hope (174)  |  Idea (580)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Organization (84)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Present (176)  |  Satisfactory (16)  |  Society (228)  |  Think (347)

How then did we come to the “standard model”? And how has it supplanted other theories, like the steady state model? It is a tribute to the essential objectivity of modern astrophysics that this consensus has been brought about, not by shifts in philosophical preference or by the influence of astrophysical mandarins, but by the pressure of empirical data.
In The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysics (14)  |  Consensus (5)  |  Data (120)  |  Empiricism (19)  |  Essential (117)  |  Influence (140)  |  Objectivity (9)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Preference (21)  |  Pressure (34)  |  Shift (29)  |  Standard Model (2)  |  Steady State (3)  |  Supplanting (2)  |  Theory (696)  |  Tribute (7)

However far modern science and technics have fallen short of their inherent possibilities, they have taught mankind at least one lesson: Nothing is impossible.
Technics and Civilization (1934), 435.
Science quotes on:  |  Impossible (113)  |  Inherent (30)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Teach (188)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Accommodation (7)  |  Accustom (9)  |  Afraid (21)  |  Apparent (39)  |  Atom (280)  |  Change (364)  |  Connection (111)  |  Contradiction (54)  |  Difference (246)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Finite (32)  |  Freedom (102)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Idea (580)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Material (156)  |  Paradox (43)  |  Physical (134)  |  Process (267)  |  Property (126)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Radius (4)  |  Side By Side (2)  |  Star (336)  |  Stellar (4)  |  Structure (225)  |  System (191)  |  Theory (696)  |  Universe (686)

I am afraid I shall have to give up my trade; I am far too inert to keep up with organic chemistry, it is becoming too much for me, though I may boast of having contributed something to its development. The modern system of formulae is to me quite repulsive.
Letter to Christian Schönbein (21 May 1862), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), footnote, 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Boast (21)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Development (289)  |  Formula (80)  |  Inert (9)  |  Organic Chemistry (33)  |  System (191)  |  Trade (30)

I believe television is going to be the test of the modern world, and that in this new opportunity to see beyond the range of our vision we shall discover either a new and unbearable disturbance of the general peace or a saving radiance in the sky. We shall stand or fall by television—of that I am quite sure
In 'Removal' (Jul 1938), collected in One Man's Meat (1942), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Discover (199)  |  Disturbance (21)  |  Fall (120)  |  General (160)  |  New (496)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Peace (84)  |  Radiance (6)  |  Range (57)  |  Saving (20)  |  Sky (124)  |  Stand (108)  |  Television (29)  |  Test (125)  |  Unbearable (2)  |  Vision (94)  |  World (898)

I count Maxwell and Einstein, Eddington and Dirac, among “real” mathematicians. The great modern achievements of applied mathematics have been in relativity and quantum mechanics, and these subjects are at present at any rate, almost as “useless” as the theory of numbers.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Paul A. M. Dirac (44)  |  Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (130)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Great (534)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Number Theory (6)  |  Quantum Mechanics (37)  |  Real (149)  |  Relativity (56)  |  Subject (240)  |  Uselessness (22)

If on occasion Mr. Casson exhibits an insularity of judgment when it comes to the evaluation of the contribution made by various men to the development of modern anthropology, he may be forgiven upon the ground that, where anthropology is concerned, he is only following an old English custom!
In 'Review: The Discovery of Man by Stanley Casson', Isis (Jun 1941), 33, No. 2, 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (56)  |  Stanley Casson (2)  |  Concern (110)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Custom (30)  |  Development (289)  |  English (35)  |  Evaluation (7)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Follow (124)  |  Forgive (9)  |  Ground (90)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Occasion (23)  |  Old (147)  |  Various (47)

If science fiction is the mythology of modern technology, then its myth is tragic
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Myth (48)  |  Mythology (13)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Technology (222)  |  Tragic (10)

If we compare a mathematical problem with an immense rock, whose interior we wish to penetrate, then the work of the Greek mathematicians appears to us like that of a robust stonecutter, who, with indefatigable perseverance, attempts to demolish the rock gradually from the outside by means of hammer and chisel; but the modern mathematician resembles an expert miner, who first constructs a few passages through the rock and then explodes it with a single blast, bringing to light its inner treasures.
In Die Entwickelung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1869), 9. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 114. From the original German, “Vergleichen wir ein mathematisches Problem mit einem gewaltigen Felsen, in dessen Inneres wir eindringen wollen, so erscheint die Arbeit der griechischen Mathematiker uns als die eines rüstigen Steinhauers, der mit Hammer und Meissel in unermüdlicher Ausdauer den Felsen langsam von aussen her zu zerbröckeln beginnt; der moderne Mathematiker aber als ein trefflicher Minirer, der diesen Felsen zunächst mit wenigen Gängen durchzieht, von denen aus er dann den Felsblock mit einem gewaltigem Schlage zersprengt und die Schätze des Inneren zu Tage fördert.”
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Blast (10)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chisel (2)  |  Compare (38)  |  Construct (41)  |  Demolish (4)  |  Expert (50)  |  Explode (7)  |  First (314)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Greek (73)  |  Hammer (21)  |  Immense (42)  |  Inner (39)  |  Interior (19)  |  Light (347)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Means (176)  |  Miner (9)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Outside (48)  |  Passage (20)  |  Penetrate (30)  |  Perseverance (20)  |  Problem (497)  |  Resemble (29)  |  Robust (7)  |  Rock (125)  |  Single (120)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Wish (92)  |  Work (635)

If we survey the mathematical works of Sylvester, we recognize indeed a considerable abundance, but in contradistinction to Cayley—not a versatility toward separate fields, but, with few exceptions—a confinement to arithmetic-algebraic branches. …
The concept of Function of a continuous variable, the fundamental concept of modern mathematics, plays no role, is indeed scarcely mentioned in the entire work of Sylvester—Sylvester was combinatorist [combinatoriker].
In Mathematische Annalen (1898), Bd.50, 134-135. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 173.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (21)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Branch (107)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Concept (146)  |  Confinement (4)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Distinction (46)  |  Entire (47)  |  Exception (40)  |  Field (171)  |  Function (131)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mention (23)  |  Play (112)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Role (49)  |  Separate (74)  |  Survey (20)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Variable (16)  |  Versatility (4)  |  Work (635)

In a recent newspaper interview I was asked what, above all, I associated with Socialism in this modern age. I answered that if there was one word I would use to identify modern Socialism it was “science.”
In The Relevance of British Socialism (1964), 41. See also Sir Alan Cottrell, Physics Bulletin (Mar 1976), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Identification (11)  |  Science (2067)  |  Socialism (4)  |  Word (302)

In Euclid each proposition stands by itself; its connection with others is never indicated; the leading ideas contained in its proof are not stated; general principles do not exist. In modern methods, on the other hand, the greatest importance is attached to the leading thoughts which pervade the whole; and general principles, which bring whole groups of theorems under one aspect, are given rather than separate propositions. The whole tendency is toward generalization. A straight line is considered as given in its entirety, extending both ways to infinity, while Euclid is very careful never to admit anything but finite quantities. The treatment of the infinite is in fact another fundamental difference between the two methods. Euclid avoids it, in modern mathematics it is systematically introduced, for only thus is generality obtained.
In 'Geometry', Encyclopedia Britannica (9th edition).
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Aspect (58)  |  Attach (14)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Both (81)  |  Bring (90)  |  Careful (24)  |  Connection (111)  |  Consider (81)  |  Contain (67)  |  Difference (246)  |  Entirety (4)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exist (148)  |  Extend (44)  |  Fact (733)  |  Finite (32)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  General (160)  |  Generality (34)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Give (201)  |  Great (534)  |  Group (72)  |  Idea (580)  |  Importance (218)  |  Indicate (18)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Lead (160)  |  Method (239)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Obtain (45)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Principle (292)  |  Proof (245)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Separate (74)  |  Stand (108)  |  State (137)  |  Straight Line (17)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Thought (546)  |  Toward (45)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Whole (192)

In Japan, an exceptional dexterity that comes from eating with chopsticks … is especially useful in micro-assembly. (This … brings smiles from my colleagues, but I stand by it. Much of modern assembly is fine tweezer work, and nothing prepares for it better than eating with chopsticks from early childhood.)
In The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor (1998, 1999), 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Assembly (8)  |  Better (192)  |  Childhood (28)  |  Colleague (23)  |  Dexterity (6)  |  Early (62)  |  Eating (21)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exception (40)  |  Fine (33)  |  Japan (8)  |  Preparation (43)  |  Smile (19)  |  Stand (108)  |  Useful (100)  |  Work (635)

In modern Europe, the Middle Ages were called the Dark Ages. Who dares to call them so now? … Their Dante and Alfred and Wickliffe and Abelard and Bacon; their Magna Charta, decimal numbers, mariner’s compass, gunpowder, glass, paper, and clocks; chemistry, algebra, astronomy; their Gothic architecture, their painting,—are the delight and tuition of ours. Six hundred years ago Roger Bacon explained the precession of the equinoxes, and the necessity of reform in the calendar; looking over how many horizons as far as into Liverpool and New York, he announced that machines can be constructed to drive ships more rapidly than a whole galley of rowers could do, nor would they need anything but a pilot to steer; carriages, to move with incredible speed, without aid of animals; and machines to fly into the air like birds.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Peter Abelard (3)  |  Aid (42)  |  Air (190)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Animal (359)  |  Announce (9)  |  Architecture (43)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Roger Bacon (20)  |  Bird (120)  |  Calendar (5)  |  Call (128)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Clock (29)  |  Compass (24)  |  Construct (41)  |  Dante Alighieri (9)  |  Dare (30)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Decimal (15)  |  Delight (66)  |  Drive (55)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Europe (43)  |  Explain (107)  |  Far (154)  |  Fly (99)  |  Glass (44)  |  Gothic (3)  |  Gunpowder (14)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Incredible (21)  |  Liverpool (3)  |  Looking (26)  |  Machine (157)  |  Magna Carta (3)  |  Mariner (8)  |  Middle Ages (7)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Need (287)  |  New York (15)  |  Number (282)  |  Painting (43)  |  Paper (83)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Precession (3)  |  Rapid (32)  |  Reform (14)  |  Ship (44)  |  Speed (35)  |  Steer (4)  |  Transportation (11)  |  Tuition (2)  |  Whole (192)

In modern thought, (if not in fact)
Nothing is that doesn't act, So that is reckoned wisdom which
Describes the scratch but not the itch.
Anonymous
Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man? (2nd Ed.,1964), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (117)  |  Description (84)  |  Fact (733)  |  Itch (6)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Scratch (7)  |  Thought (546)  |  Wisdom (182)

In the vestibule of the Manchester Town Hall are placed two life-sized marble statues facing each other. One of these is that of John Dalton … the other that of James Prescott Joule. … Thus honour is done to Manchester’s two greatest sons—to Dalton, the founder of modern Chemistry and of the Atomic Theory, and the laws of chemical-combining proportions; to Joule, the founder of modern Physics and the discoverer of the Law of Conservation of Energy. The one gave to the world the final and satisfactory proof … that in every kind of chemical change no loss of matter occurs; the other proved that in all the varied modes of physical change, no loss of energy takes place.
In John Dalton and the Rise of Modern Chemistry (1895), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Theory (13)  |  Chemical Change (4)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Combination (91)  |  Conservation Of Energy (27)  |  Conservation Of Mass (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Founder (16)  |  Honour (25)  |  James Prescott Joule (7)  |  Law (515)  |  Loss (73)  |  Manchester (4)  |  Marble (14)  |  Matter (343)  |  Physical Change (4)  |  Physics (348)  |  Proof (245)  |  Statue (11)  |  Town Hall (2)  |  Vestibule (2)

In these days of conflict between ancient and modern studies, there must surely be something to be said for a study which did not begin with Pythagoras, and will not end with Einstein, but is the oldest and the youngest of all.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Conflict (55)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Ending (3)  |  Oldest (8)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Study (476)

Indeed the modern developments of mathematics constitute not only one of the most impressive, but one of the most characteristic, phenomena of our age. It is a phenomenon, however, of which the boasted intelligence of a “universalized” daily press seems strangely unaware; and there is no other great human interest, whether of science or of art, regarding which the mind of the educated public is permitted to hold so many fallacious opinions and inferior estimates.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Arts (1908), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Art (294)  |  Boast (21)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Daily (29)  |  Development (289)  |  Educate (12)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Fallacy (26)  |  Great (534)  |  Hold (94)  |  Human (550)  |  Impressive (20)  |  Inferior (19)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Interest (237)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Permit (31)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Press (21)  |  Public (94)  |  Regard (95)  |  Science (2067)  |  Unaware (5)

Induction and analogy are the special characteristics of modern mathematics, in which theorems have given place to theories and no truth is regarded otherwise than as a link in an infinite chain. “Omne exit in infinitum” is their favorite motto and accepted axiom.
In 'A Plea for the Mathematician', Nature, Vol. 1, 861. [The Latin phrase “Omne exit in infinitum” means “Everything goes to infinity”.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Analogy (60)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Chain (50)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Favorite (24)  |  Give (201)  |  Induction (60)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Link (42)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Motto (28)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Place (175)  |  Regard (95)  |  Special (77)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Theory (696)  |  Truth (928)

Inspiration in the field of science by no means plays any greater role, as academic conceit fancies, than it does in the field of mastering problems of practical life by a modern entrepreneur. On the other hand, and this also is often misconstrued, inspiration plays no less a role in science than it does in the realm of art.
Max Weber
From a Speech (1918) presented at Munich University, published in 1919, and collected in 'Wissenschaft als Beruf', Gessammelte Aufsätze zur Wissenschaftslehre (1922), 524-525. As given in H.H. Gerth and C. Wright-Mills (translators and eds.), 'Science as a Vocation', Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Art (294)  |  Conceit (12)  |  Entrepreneur (5)  |  Fancy (24)  |  Field (171)  |  Greater (42)  |  Hand (142)  |  Inspiration (61)  |  Less (102)  |  Life (1131)  |  Mastering (4)  |  Mean (101)  |  Often (106)  |  Play (112)  |  Practical (133)  |  Problem (497)  |  Realm (55)  |  Role (49)  |  Science (2067)

Is evolution a theory, a system or a hypothesis? It is much more: it is a general condition to which all theories, all hypotheses, all systems must bow and which they must satisfy henceforth if they are to be thinkable and true. Evolution is a light illuminating all facts, a curve that all lines must follow. ... The consciousness of each of us is evolution looking at itself and reflecting upon itself....Man is not the center of the universe as once we thought in our simplicity, but something much more wonderful—the arrow pointing the way to the final unification of the world in terms of life. Man alone constitutes the last-born, the freshest, the most complicated, the most subtle of all the successive layers of life. ... The universe has always been in motion and at this moment continues to be in motion. But will it still be in motion tomorrow? ... What makes the world in which we live specifically modern is our discovery in it and around it of evolution. ... Thus in all probability, between our modern earth and the ultimate earth, there stretches an immense period, characterized not by a slowing-down but a speeding up and by the definitive florescence of the forces of evolution along the line of the human shoot.
In The Phenomenon of Man (1975), pp 218, 220, 223, 227, 228, 277.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrow (13)  |  Bow (10)  |  Center (34)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Condition (163)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Curve (33)  |  Definitive (3)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Earth (638)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fact (733)  |  Final (50)  |  Follow (124)  |  General (160)  |  Human (550)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Illuminating (3)  |  Immense (42)  |  Layer (22)  |  Life (1131)  |  Light (347)  |  Line (90)  |  Live (272)  |  Looking (26)  |  Moment (107)  |  Motion (160)  |  Period (66)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Probability (106)  |  Reflecting (3)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Subtle (34)  |  Successive (23)  |  System (191)  |  Term (122)  |  Theory (696)  |  Thought (546)  |  Tomorrow (39)  |  True (208)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Unification (9)  |  Universe (686)  |  Wonderful (60)  |  World (898)

Isolated, so-called “pretty theorems” have even less value in the eyes of a modern mathematician than the discovery of a new “pretty flower” has to the scientific botanist, though the layman finds in these the chief charm of the respective Sciences.
In Die Entwickelung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1869), 19. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 92. From the original German, “Einzelne, sogenannte „hübsche Sätze“ haben an und für sich in den Augen eines modernen Mathematikers noch weniger Werth, als für den wissenschaftlichen Botaniker die Entdeckung einer neuen „hübschen Blume“, obgleich dem Laien gerade hierin der Hauptreiz der betreffenden Wissenschaft zu liegen pflegt.”
Science quotes on:  |  Botanist (17)  |  Charm (28)  |  Chief (38)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Find (408)  |  Flower (77)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Layman (18)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  New (496)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Respective (2)  |  Science (2067)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Value (242)

It is almost a miracle that modern teaching methods have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiousity of inquiry; for what this delicate little plant needs more than anything, besides stimulation, is freedom.
Quoted in H. Eves, Return to Mathematical Circles.
Science quotes on:  |  Delicate (21)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Freedom (102)  |  Holy (17)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Little (188)  |  Method (239)  |  Miracle (66)  |  Need (287)  |  Plant (200)  |  Stimulation (15)  |  Strangle (3)  |  Teach (188)

It is difficult to give an idea of the vast extent of modern mathematics. The word “extent” is not the right one: I mean extent crowded with beautiful detail—not an extent of mere uniformity such as an objectless plain, but of a tract of beautiful country seen at first in the distance, but which will bear to be rambled through and studied in every detail of hillside and valley, stream, rock, wood, and flower.
President’s address (1883) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, in The Collected Mathematical Papers (1895), Vol. 8, xxii.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (248)  |  Country (147)  |  Detail (87)  |  Distant (32)  |  Extent (51)  |  Flower (77)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Plain (33)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Rock (125)  |  Stream (40)  |  Study (476)  |  Uniformity (20)  |  Valley (22)  |  Wood (49)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Age (178)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (31)  |  Animal (359)  |  Apparently (19)  |  Available (25)  |  Back (104)  |  Best (173)  |  Blind (47)  |  Boundless (13)  |  Branch (107)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Charge (35)  |  Collect (16)  |  Collection (44)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Country (147)  |  Creation (242)  |  Creator (55)  |  Cultivation (27)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Direct (84)  |  Distribution (29)  |  Earth (638)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Extinction (66)  |  Face (108)  |  Form (314)  |  Future (287)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Government (93)  |  Handiwork (6)  |  Higher (37)  |  History (369)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Important (205)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (221)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Institution (39)  |  Interpretation (70)  |  Invaluable (7)  |  Invariably (9)  |  Known (16)  |  Letter (51)  |  Life (1131)  |  Living (56)  |  Long (174)  |  Look (52)  |  Lost (32)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (156)  |  Museum (24)  |  National (25)  |  Native (15)  |  Natural (173)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Object (175)  |  Obscure (32)  |  Past (152)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Perish (29)  |  Person (154)  |  Plant (200)  |  Possible (158)  |  Power (366)  |  Preserve (52)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (368)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Record (68)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Render (33)  |  Rest (93)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Secure (21)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Sentence (28)  |  Species (221)  |  Step (110)  |  Strange (94)  |  Study (476)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Tropical (8)  |  Unintelligible (10)  |  Unknown (107)  |  Variation (63)  |  Volume (19)  |  Want (176)  |  Wealth (66)

It is known that the mathematics prescribed for the high school [Gymnasien] is essentially Euclidean, while it is modern mathematics, the theory of functions and the infinitesimal calculus, which has secured for us an insight into the mechanism and laws of nature. Euclidean mathematics is indeed, a prerequisite for the theory of functions, but just as one, though he has learned the inflections of Latin nouns and verbs, will not thereby be enabled to read a Latin author much less to appreciate the beauties of a Horace, so Euclidean mathematics, that is the mathematics of the high school, is unable to unlock nature and her laws.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 37-38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (30)  |  Author (62)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Enable (46)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Function (131)  |  High School (11)  |  Horace (12)  |  Infinitesimal (15)  |  Inflection (3)  |  Insight (73)  |  Know (556)  |  Latin (33)  |  Law (515)  |  Learn (288)  |  Less (102)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mechanism (52)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Noun (3)  |  Prerequisite (7)  |  Prescribe (9)  |  Read (145)  |  Secure (21)  |  Theory (696)  |  Unable (24)  |  Unlock (5)

It is not only a decided preference for synthesis and a complete denial of general methods which characterizes the ancient mathematics as against our newer Science [modern mathematics]: besides this extemal formal difference there is another real, more deeply seated, contrast, which arises from the different attitudes which the two assumed relative to the use of the concept of variability. For while the ancients, on account of considerations which had been transmitted to them from the Philosophie school of the Eleatics, never employed the concept of motion, the spatial expression for variability, in their rigorous system, and made incidental use of it only in the treatment of phonoromically generated curves, modern geometry dates from the instant that Descartes left the purely algebraic treatment of equations and proceeded to investigate the variations which an algebraic expression undergoes when one of its variables assumes a continuous succession of values.
In 'Untersuchungen über die unendlich oft oszillierenden und unstetigen Functionen', Ostwald’s Klassiker der exacten Wissenschaften (1905), No. 153, 44-45. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 115. From the original German, “Nicht allein entschiedene Vorliebe für die Synthese und gänzliche Verleugnung allgemeiner Methoden charakterisiert die antike Mathematik gegenüber unserer neueren Wissenschaft; es gibt neben diesem mehr äußeren, formalen, noch einen tiefliegenden realen Gegensatz, welcher aus der verschiedenen Stellung entspringt, in welche sich beide zu der wissenschaftlichen Verwendung des Begriffes der Veränderlichkeit gesetzt haben. Denn während die Alten den Begriff der Bewegung, des räumlichen Ausdruckes der Veränderlichkeit, aus Bedenken, die aus der philosophischen Schule der Eleaten auf sie übergegangen waren, in ihrem strengen Systeme niemals und auch in der Behandlung phoronomisch erzeugter Kurven nur vorübergehend verwenden, so datiert die neuere Mathematik von dem Augenblicke, als Descartes von der rein algebraischen Behandlung der Gleichungen dazu fortschritt, die Größenveränderungen zu untersuchen, welche ein algebraischer Ausdruck erleidet, indem eine in ihm allgemein bezeichnete Größe eine stetige Folge von Werten durchläuft.”
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Contrast (29)  |  Curve (33)  |  Denial (14)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Difference (246)  |  Equation (96)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Investigate (65)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Method (239)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Motion (160)  |  Preference (21)  |  Synthesis (44)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Value (242)  |  Variable (16)

It is one of the signs of the times that modern chemists hold themselves bound and consider themselves in a position to give an explanation for everything, and when their knowledge fails them to make sure of supernatural explanations. Such a treatment of scientific subjects, not many degrees removed from a belief in witches and spirit-rapping, even Wislicenus considers permissible.
In H. Kolbe, 'Sign of the Times', Journal für Praktische Chemie (1877), 15, 473. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Supernatural (21)  |  Johannes Wislicenus (4)  |  Witch (4)

It is the technologist who is transforming at least the outward trappings of modern civilization and no hard and fast line can or should be drawn between those who apply science, and in the process make discoveries, and those who pursue what is sometimes called basic science.
Presidential Address to the Anniversary Meeting (30 Nov 1964) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences (5 Jan 1965), 283, No. 1392, xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Basic (66)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Process (267)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Science (2067)  |  Technologist (5)  |  Transformation (54)

It was my Uncle George who discovered that alcohol was a food well in advance of modern medical thought.
'The Delayed Exit of Claude and Eustace', The Inimitable Jeeves (2011), 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Alcohol (18)  |  Food (154)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Thought (546)

It’s humbling to realise that the developmental gulf between a miniscule ant colony and our modern human civilisation is only a tiny fraction of the distance between a Type 0 and a Type III civilisation – a factor of 100 billion billion, in fact. Yet we have such a highly regarded view of ourselves, we believe a Type III civilisation would find us irresistible and would rush to make contact with us. The truth is, however, they may be as interested in communicating with humans as we are keen to communicate with ants.
'Star Makers', Cosmos (Feb 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (24)  |  Billion (62)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Colony (7)  |  Communication (76)  |  Contact (34)  |  Development (289)  |  Gulf (11)  |  Human (550)  |  Humility (23)  |  Realization (37)  |  Truth (928)

I’m very good at integral and differential calculus,
I know the scientific names of beings animalculous:
In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I am the very model of a modern Major-General.
In The Pirates of Penzance (1879), Act 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Good (345)  |  Integral Calculus (5)  |  Know (556)  |  Matter (343)  |  Mineral (41)  |  Model (81)  |  Name (170)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Vegetable (25)

Kepler’s suggestion of gravitation with the inverse distance, and Bouillaud’s proposed substitution of the inverse square of the distance, are things which Newton knew better than his modern readers. I have discovered two anagrams on his name, which are quite conclusive: the notion of gravitation was not new; but Newton went on.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Anagram (9)  |  Better (192)  |  Conclusive (7)  |  Discover (199)  |  Distance (77)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Inverse (7)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Know (556)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Name (170)  |  New (496)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notion (59)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reader (40)  |  Square (24)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Suggestion (30)

Kurt Gödel’s achievement in modern logic is singular and monumental—indeed it is more than a monument, it is a landmark which will remain visible far in space and time. … The subject of logic has certainly completely changed its nature and possibilities with Gödel's achievement.
From remarks at the Presentation (Mar 1951) of the Albert Einstein Award to Dr. Gödel, as quoted in 'Tribute to Dr. Gödel', in Jack J. Bulloff, ‎Thomas C. Holyok (eds.), Foundations of Mathematics: Symposium Papers Commemorating the Sixtieth Birthday of Kurt Gödel (1969), ix. https://books.google.com/books?id=irZLAAAAMAAJ Kurt Gödel, ‎Jack J. Bulloff, ‎Thomas C. Holyoke - 1969 -
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Change (364)  |  Kurt Gödel (8)  |  Landmark (8)  |  Logic (260)  |  Monument (26)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Space And Time (9)  |  Subject (240)  |  Visible (38)

Leibnitz’s discoveries lay in the direction in which all modern progress in science lies, in establishing order, symmetry, and harmony, i.e., comprehensiveness and perspicuity,—rather than in dealing with single problems, in the solution of which followers soon attained greater dexterity than himself.
In Leibnitz (1884), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (45)  |  Comprehensive (17)  |  Deal (49)  |  Dexterity (6)  |  Direction (76)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Establish (56)  |  Follower (10)  |  Great (534)  |  Harmony (72)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Order (242)  |  Perspicuity (2)  |  Problem (497)  |  Progress (368)  |  Science (2067)  |  Single (120)  |  Solution (216)  |  Symmetry (37)

Like Molière’s M. Jourdain, who spoke prose all his life without knowing it, mathematicians have been reasoning for at least two millennia without being aware of all the principles underlying what they were doing. The real nature of the tools of their craft has become evident only within recent times A renaissance of logical studies in modern times begins with the publication in 1847 of George Boole’s The Mathematical Analysis of Logic.
Co-authored with James R. Newman in Gödel's Proof (1986, 2005), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (166)  |  Aware (31)  |  Begin (108)  |  George Boole (10)  |  Craft (10)  |  Evident (29)  |  Logic (260)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Millennia (4)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Principle (292)  |  Prose (11)  |  Publication (91)  |  Real (149)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Recent (30)  |  Renaissance (11)  |  Study (476)  |  Time (595)  |  Tool (87)

Lo! keen-eyed towering science,
As from tall peaks the modern overlooking.
In poem, 'Song of the Universal', Leaves of Grass (1867), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Overlook (12)  |  Peak (20)  |  Science (2067)  |  Tower (17)

Modern anthropology has taught us, through comparative investigation of so-called primitive cultures, that the social behavior of human beings may differ greatly, depending upon prevailing cultural patterns and the types of organisation which predominate in society. It is on this that those who are striving to improve the lot of man may ground their hopes: human beings are not condemned, because of their biological constitution, to annihilate each other or to be at the mercy of a cruel, self-inflicted fate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (6)  |  Anthropology (56)  |  Behavior (60)  |  Biological (35)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Condemn (14)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Cruel (12)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Culture (104)  |  Depend (90)  |  Differ (22)  |  Fate (46)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Ground (90)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Improve (56)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Lot (29)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (17)  |  Primitive (42)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Society (228)  |  Strive (45)  |  Teach (188)  |  Type (52)

Modern chemistry, with its far-reaching generalizations and hypotheses, is a fine example of how far the human mind can go in exploring the unknown beyond the limits of human senses.
In 'Introduction', General Chemistry: An Elementary Survey Emphasizing Industrial Applications of Fundamental Principles (1923), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Example (94)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Far (154)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Limit (126)  |  Sense (321)  |  Unknown (107)

Modern civilisation rests upon physical science; take away her gifts to our own country, and our position among the leading nations of the world is gone to-morrow; for it is physical science only that makes intelligence and moral energy stronger than brute force
By Thomas Henry Huxley and Henrietta A. Huxley (ed.), Aphorisms and Reflections (1908), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Brute (15)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Country (147)  |  Energy (214)  |  Force (249)  |  Gift (61)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Leading (17)  |  Moral (124)  |  Nation (134)  |  Physical Science (66)  |  Position (76)  |  Strong (72)  |  Tomorrow (39)  |  World (898)

Modern cytological work involves an intricacy of detail, the significance of which can be appreciated by the specialist alone; but Miss Stevens had a share in a discovery of importance, and her work will be remembered for this, when the minutiae of detailed investigations that she carried out have become incorporated in the general body of the subject.
In obituary, 'The Scientific Work of Miss N.M. Steves', Science (11 Oct 1912), 36, No. 928, 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (30)  |  Body (247)  |  Carry (59)  |  Cytology (5)  |  Detail (87)  |  Discovery (680)  |  General (160)  |  Importance (218)  |  Incorporate (4)  |  Intricacy (7)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Involve (48)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Remember (82)  |  Share (49)  |  Significance (71)  |  Specialist (25)  |  Nettie Maria Stevens (4)  |  Subject (240)  |  Work (635)

Modern discoveries have not been made by large collections of facts, with subsequent discussion, separation, and resulting deduction of a truth thus rendered perceptible. A few facts have suggested an hypothesis, which means a supposition, proper to explain them. The necessary results of this supposition are worked out, and then, and not till then, other facts are examined to see if their ulterior results are found in Nature.
In A Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Deduction (69)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Discussion (48)  |  Explain (107)  |  Fact (733)  |  Find (408)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Result (389)  |  Supposition (37)  |  Truth (928)

Modern man is weighed down more by the burden of responsibility than by the burden of sin. We think him more a savior who shoulders our responsibilities than him who shoulders our sins. If instead of making decisions we have but to obey and do our duty, we feel it as a sort of salvation.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Burden (27)  |  Decision (72)  |  Down (86)  |  Duty (68)  |  Feel (167)  |  Instead (19)  |  Obey (16)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Salvation (8)  |  Savior (3)  |  Shoulder (18)  |  Sin (30)  |  Sort (49)  |  Think (347)  |  Weigh (14)

Modern masters of science are much impressed with the need of beginning all inquiry with a fact. The ancient masters of religion were quite equally impressed with that necessity. They began with the fact of sin—a fact as practical as potatoes. Whether or not man could be washed in miraculous waters, there was no doubt at any rate that he wanted washing.
In Orthodoxy (1908), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Fact (733)  |  Impression (72)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Master (98)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Need (287)  |  Potato (7)  |  Practical (133)  |  Religion (239)  |  Sin (30)  |  Want (176)  |  Wash (7)  |  Water (293)

Modern music, headstrong, wayward, tragically confused as to what to say and how to say it, has mounted its horse, as the joke goes, and ridden off in all directions. If we require of an art that it be unified as a whole and expressed in a universal language known to all, if it must be a consistent symbolization of the era, then modern music is a disastrous failure. It has many voices, many symbolizations. It it known to one, unknown to another. But if an art may be as variable and polyvocal as the different individuals and emotional regions from which it comes in this heterogeneous modern world, then the diversity and contradiction of modern music may be acceptable.
In Art Is Action: A Discussion of Nine Arts in a Modern World (1939), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Confused (12)  |  Contradiction (54)  |  Disastrous (3)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Failure (138)  |  Horse (49)  |  Individual (221)  |  Joke (74)  |  Language (228)  |  Music (106)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Tragic (10)  |  Unified (9)  |  Universal (105)  |  Wayward (3)

Modern science is necessarily a double-edged tool, a tool that cuts both ways. ... There is no doubt that a Zeppelin is a wonderful thing; but that did not prevent it from becoming a horrible thing.
'The Efficiency of the Police', Illustrated London News (1 Apr 1922). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Becoming (13)  |  Both (81)  |  Cutting (6)  |  Double-Edged (2)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Prevention (30)  |  Science (2067)  |  Tool (87)  |  Way (37)  |  Wonder (169)  |  Zeppelin (4)

Modern technology
Owes ecology
An apology.
From Worse Verse (1969), as cited in Colin Jarman, The Book of Poisonous Quotes (1993), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Apology (5)  |  Ecology (69)  |  Owe (23)  |  Technology (222)

Modern theories did not arise from revolutionary ideas which have been, so to speak, introduced into the exact sciences from without. On the contrary they have forced their way into research which was attempting consistently to carry out the programme of classical physics—they arise out of its very nature. It is for this reason that the beginnings of modern physics cannot be compared with the great upheavals of previous periods like the achievements of Copernicus. Copernicus’s idea was much more an import from outside into the concepts of the science of his time, and therefore caused far more telling changes in science than the ideas of modern physics are creating to-day.
In Philosophical Problems of Nuclear Science: Eight Lectures (1952), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempting (3)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Change (364)  |  Classical Physics (5)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Idea (580)  |  Import (5)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Program (52)  |  Reason (471)  |  Research (590)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Theory (696)  |  Upheaval (4)

Modern times breed modern phobias. Until the present age, for example, it has been impossible for any woman to suffer crippling fear of artificial insemination.
(1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (32)  |  Fear (142)  |  Phobia (2)  |  Reproduction (61)

Modern tree communities in Amazonia are structured to an important extent by a long history of plant domestication by Amazonian peoples.
As quoted in Robinson Meyer, 'The Amazon Rainforest Was Profoundly Changed by Ancient Humans', The Atlantic (2 Mar 2017).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (9)  |  Community (82)  |  Domestication (3)  |  Extent (51)  |  History (369)  |  Important (205)  |  Long (174)  |  People (390)  |  Plant (200)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Structure (225)  |  Tree (171)

Most, if not all, of the great ideas of modern mathematics have had their origin in observation. Take, for instance, the arithmetical theory of forms, of which the foundation was laid in the diophantine theorems of Fermat, left without proof by their author, which resisted all efforts of the myriad-minded Euler to reduce to demonstration, and only yielded up their cause of being when turned over in the blow-pipe flame of Gauss’s transcendent genius; or the doctrine of double periodicity, which resulted from the observation of Jacobi of a purely analytical fact of transformation; or Legendre’s law of reciprocity; or Sturm’s theorem about the roots of equations, which, as he informed me with his own lips, stared him in the face in the midst of some mechanical investigations connected (if my memory serves me right) with the motion of compound pendulums; or Huyghen’s method of continued fractions, characterized by Lagrange as one of the principal discoveries of that great mathematician, and to which he appears to have been led by the construction of his Planetary Automaton; or the new algebra, speaking of which one of my predecessors (Mr. Spottiswoode) has said, not without just reason and authority, from this chair, “that it reaches out and indissolubly connects itself each year with fresh branches of mathematics, that the theory of equations has become almost new through it, algebraic geometry transfigured in its light, that the calculus of variations, molecular physics, and mechanics” (he might, if speaking at the present moment, go on to add the theory of elasticity and the development of the integral calculus) “have all felt its influence”.
In 'A Plea for the Mathematician', Nature, 1, 238 in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 655-56.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Author (62)  |  Authority (66)  |  Automaton (10)  |  Become (172)  |  Branch (107)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Cause (285)  |  Chair (11)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Compound (58)  |  Connect (33)  |  Construction (83)  |  Continue (65)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Development (289)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Double (15)  |  Effort (144)  |  Elasticity (5)  |  Equation (96)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Face (108)  |  Fact (733)  |  Feel (167)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Flame (26)  |  Form (314)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Fraction (13)  |  Fresh (30)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genius (249)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Great (534)  |  Christiaan Huygens (10)  |  Idea (580)  |  Influence (140)  |  Inform (16)  |  Instance (32)  |  Integral Calculus (5)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Karl Jacobi (10)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Laid (7)  |  Law (515)  |  Lead (160)  |  Leave (128)  |  Adrien-Marie Legendre (3)  |  Light (347)  |  Lip (4)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mechanic (23)  |  Mechanical (50)  |  Memory (106)  |  Method (239)  |  Midst (7)  |  Molecular (7)  |  Moment (107)  |  Motion (160)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (496)  |  Observation (450)  |  Origin (88)  |  Pendulum (15)  |  Periodicity (5)  |  Physics (348)  |  Planetary (10)  |  Predecessor (21)  |  Present (176)  |  Principal (28)  |  Proof (245)  |  Purely (28)  |  Reach (121)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Resist (15)  |  Result (389)  |  Right (197)  |  Root (61)  |  Say (228)  |  Serve (58)  |  Speak (92)  |  William Spottiswoode (3)  |  Stare (9)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Theory (696)  |  Transcendent (2)  |  Transfigure (2)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Turn (118)  |  Variation (63)  |  Year (299)  |  Yield (38)

My visceral perception of brotherhood harmonizes with our best modern biological knowledge ... Many people think (or fear) that equality of human races represents a hope of liberal sentimentality probably squashed by the hard realities of history. They are wrong. This essay can be summarized in a single phrase, a motto if you will: Human equality is a contingent fact of history. Equality is not true by definition; it is neither an ethical principle (though equal treatment may be) nor a statement about norms of social action. It just worked out that way. A hundred different and plausible scenarios for human history would have yielded other results (and moral dilemmas of enormous magnitude). They didn’t happen.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Best (173)  |  Biological (35)  |  Brotherhood (5)  |  Contingent (10)  |  Definition (192)  |  Different (186)  |  Dilemma (8)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equality (22)  |  Essay (14)  |  Ethical (13)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fear (142)  |  Happen (82)  |  Hard (99)  |  Harmonize (4)  |  History (369)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human (550)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Moral (124)  |  Motto (28)  |  Norm (5)  |  People (390)  |  Perception (64)  |  Phrase (29)  |  Plausible (11)  |  Principle (292)  |  Probably (48)  |  Reality (190)  |  Represent (43)  |  Result (389)  |  Scenario (3)  |  Sentimentality (2)  |  Single (120)  |  Social (108)  |  Squash (2)  |  Statement (76)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Think (347)  |  Treatment (100)  |  True (208)  |  Visceral (3)  |  Work (635)  |  Wrong (139)  |  Yield (38)

No one must think that Newton’s great creation can be overthrown in any real sense by this [Theory of Relativity] or by any other theory. His clear and wide ideas will for ever retain their significance as the foundation on which our modern conceptions of physics have been built.
In 'Time, Space, and Gravitation', The Times (28 Nov 1919). Excerpted in David E. Rowe and Robert J. Schulmann, Einstein on Politics: His Private Thoughts and Public Stands on Nationalism, Zionism, War, Peace, and the Bomb (2007), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (98)  |  Conception (92)  |  Creation (242)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Idea (580)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Overthrown (5)  |  Physics (348)  |  Significance (71)  |  Theory Of Relativity (14)  |  Wide (28)

No other explanation of living forms is allowed than heredity, and any which is founded on another basis must be rejected. The present fashion requires that even the smallest and most indifferent inquiry must be dressed in phylogenetic costume, and whilst in former centuries authors professed to read in every natural detail some intention of the creator mundi, modern scientists have the aspiration to pick out from every occasional observation a fragment of the ancestral history of the living world.
'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2 Apr 1888), 15, 294. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Basis (91)  |  Detail (87)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Form (314)  |  Founded (20)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Heredity (53)  |  History (369)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Intention (28)  |  Life (1131)  |  Natural (173)  |  Observation (450)  |  Occasional (14)  |  Phylogenetic (2)  |  Pick (16)  |  Read (145)  |  Reject (29)  |  Scientist (522)

One could almost phrase the motto of our modern civilization thus: Science is my shepherd; I shall not want.
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (175)  |  Motto (28)  |  Phrase (29)  |  Science (2067)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Want (176)

One feature which will probably most impress the mathematician accustomed to the rapidity and directness secured by the generality of modern methods is the deliberation with which Archimedes approaches the solution of any one of his main problems. Yet this very characteristic, with its incidental effects, is calculated to excite the more admiration because the method suggests the tactics of some great strategist who foresees everything, eliminates everything not immediately conducive to the execution of his plan, masters every position in its order, and then suddenly (when the very elaboration of the scheme has almost obscured, in the mind of the spectator, its ultimate object) strikes the final blow. Thus we read in Archimedes proposition after proposition the bearing of which is not immediately obvious but which we find infallibly used later on; and we are led by such easy stages that the difficulties of the original problem, as presented at the outset, are scarcely appreciated. As Plutarch says: “It is not possible to find in geometry more difficult and troublesome questions, or more simple and lucid explanations.” But it is decidedly a rhetorical exaggeration when Plutarch goes on to say that we are deceived by the easiness of the successive steps into the belief that anyone could have discovered them for himself. On the contrary, the studied simplicity and the perfect finish of the treatises involve at the same time an element of mystery. Though each step depends on the preceding ones, we are left in the dark as to how they were suggested to Archimedes. There is, in fact, much truth in a remark by Wallis to the effect that he seems “as it were of set purpose to have covered up the traces of his investigation as if he had grudged posterity the secret of his method of inquiry while he wished to extort from them assent to his results.” Wallis adds with equal reason that not only Archimedes but nearly all the ancients so hid away from posterity their method of Analysis (though it is certain that they had one) that more modern mathematicians found it easier to invent a new Analysis than to seek out the old.
In The Works of Archimedes (1897), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustomed (16)  |  Add (40)  |  Admiration (44)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appreciate (30)  |  Approach (54)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Assent (6)  |  Bear (67)  |  Belief (504)  |  Blow (22)  |  Calculate (33)  |  Certain (126)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Conducive (3)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Cover (37)  |  Dark (77)  |  Deceive (16)  |  Decidedly (2)  |  Deliberation (3)  |  Depend (90)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Discover (199)  |  Easiness (3)  |  Easy (102)  |  Effect (166)  |  Elaboration (7)  |  Element (162)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Equal (83)  |  Everything (181)  |  Exaggeration (11)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execution (19)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Extort (2)  |  Fact (733)  |  Feature (44)  |  Final (50)  |  Find (408)  |  Finish (25)  |  Foresee (13)  |  Generality (34)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Great (534)  |  Grudge (2)  |  Hide (53)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Impress (16)  |  Incidental (12)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Involve (48)  |  Late (52)  |  Lead (160)  |  Leave (128)  |  Lucid (5)  |  Main (28)  |  Master (98)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Method (239)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Nearly (26)  |  New (496)  |  Object (175)  |  Obscure (32)  |  Obvious (83)  |  Old (147)  |  Order (242)  |  Original (57)  |  Outset (7)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Plan (87)  |  Plutarch (15)  |  Position (76)  |  Possible (158)  |  Posterity (19)  |  Precede (23)  |  Present (176)  |  Probably (48)  |  Problem (497)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Question (404)  |  Rapidity (16)  |  Read (145)  |  Reason (471)  |  Remark (27)  |  Result (389)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Scarcely (13)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Secret (131)  |  Secure (21)  |  Seek (107)  |  Set (99)  |  Simple (178)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Solution (216)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stage (55)  |  Step (110)  |  Strike (40)  |  Study (476)  |  Successive (23)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Suggest (33)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Time (595)  |  Trace (53)  |  Treatise (34)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Truth (928)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  John Wallis (3)  |  Wish (92)

One of the most striking results of modern investigation has been the way in which several different and quite independent lines of evidence indicate that a very great event occurred about two thousand million years ago. The radio-active evidence for the age of meteorites; and the estimated time for the tidal evolution of the Moon's orbit (though this is much rougher), all agree in their testimony, and, what is far more important, the red-shift in the nebulae indicates that this date is fundamental, not merely in the history of our system, but in that of the material universe as a whole.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Date (13)  |  Different (186)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Event (116)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Great (534)  |  History (369)  |  Importance (218)  |  Independence (34)  |  Indication (23)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Meteorite (8)  |  Million (111)  |  Moon (199)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Radioactivity (28)  |  Red-Shift (4)  |  Result (389)  |  Striking (5)  |  System (191)  |  Testimony (13)  |  Tide (24)  |  Time (595)  |  Universe (686)  |  Whole (192)  |  Year (299)

One wonders whether a generation that demands instant satisfaction of all its needs and instant solution of the world’s problems will produce anything of lasting value. Such a generation, even when equipped with the most modern technology, will be essentially primitive - it will stand in awe of nature, and submit to the tutelage of medicine men.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (33)  |  Demand (76)  |  Equip (5)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Generation (141)  |  Instant (17)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Need (287)  |  Primitive (42)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Solution (216)  |  Stand (108)  |  Submit (18)  |  Technology (222)  |  Value (242)  |  Wonder (169)  |  World (898)

Our science, in contrast with others, is not founded on a single period of human history, but has accompanied the development of culture through all its stages. Mathematics is as much interwoven with Greek culture as with the most modern problems in Engineering. She not only lends a hand to the progressive natural sciences but participates at the same time in the abstract investigations of logicians and philosophers.
In Klein und Riecke: Ueber angewandte Mathematik und Physik (1900), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Accompany (22)  |  Contrast (29)  |  Culture (104)  |  Development (289)  |  Engineering (141)  |  Founded (20)  |  Greek (73)  |  Help (103)  |  Human History (5)  |  Interwoven (8)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Logician (12)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Participate (8)  |  Period (66)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Problem (497)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Science (2067)  |  Stage (55)

Perhaps the least inadequate description of the general scope of modern Pure Mathematics—I will not call it a definition—would be to say that it deals with form, in a very general sense of the term; this would include algebraic form, functional relationship, the relations of order in any ordered set of entities such as numbers, and the analysis of the peculiarities of form of groups of operations.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 287.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Definition (192)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Entity (31)  |  Group (72)  |  Number (282)  |  Operation (121)  |  Order (242)  |  Peculiar (45)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Relation (154)  |  Scope (23)  |  Set (99)

Probability is the most important concept in modern science, especially as nobody has the slightest notion of what it means.
In Lecture (1929), as quoted in E.T. Bell (ed.), Development of Mathematics (1940), 540.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (146)  |  Important (205)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Notion (59)  |  Probability (106)  |  Science (2067)

Psychologists, like other scientists, pride themselves on being extremely modern, and therefore much better than any group of people that ever were before....
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Psychologist (15)

Results rarely specify their causes unambiguously. If we have no direct evidence of fossils or human chronicles, if we are forced to infer a process only from its modern results, then we are usually stymied or reduced to speculation about probabilities. For many roads lead to almost any Rome.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (285)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Direct (84)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Force (249)  |  Fossil (113)  |  Human (550)  |  Infer (12)  |  Lead (160)  |  Probability (106)  |  Process (267)  |  Rarely (20)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Result (389)  |  Road (64)  |  Rome (14)  |  Specify (6)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Unambiguously (2)  |  Usually (31)

Richard Drew embodied the essential spirit of the inventor, a person of vision and unrelenting persistence who refused to give in to adversity. He made an enormous contribution, not only to the growth of 3M, but also to advancement of many modern industries vital to worldwide economic growth.
Speaking at Drew's posthumous induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Akron, Ohio (4 May 2007). From Press Release (7 May 2007) on 3M Company website.
Science quotes on:  |  3M Company (2)  |  Advancement (40)  |  Adversity (3)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Richard G. Drew (6)  |  Economy (54)  |  Embody (16)  |  Essential (117)  |  Give In (3)  |  Growth (124)  |  Industry (109)  |  Inventor (56)  |  Persistence (20)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Vision (94)  |  Vital (39)  |  Worldwide (9)

Rudolf Virchow, often referred to as the father of modern pathology, broke sharply with such traditional concepts by proposing that the basis of all disease is injury to the smallest living unit of the body, namely, the cell. More than a century later, both clinical and experimental pathology remain rooted in Virchow’s cellular pathology.
In Emanuel Rubin and John L. Farber (eds.), Pathology (1944), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (91)  |  Body (247)  |  Break (54)  |  Cell (137)  |  Century (131)  |  Concept (146)  |  Disease (275)  |  Father (60)  |  Injury (23)  |  Pathology (14)  |  Propose (23)  |  Remain (113)  |  Root (61)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Unit (31)  |  Rudolf Virchow (50)

Science in the modern world has many uses, its chief use, however, is to provide long words to cover the errors of the rich. The word “kleptomania” is a vulgar example of what I mean.
From 'Celts and Celtophiles', in Heretics (1905, 1909), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Chief (38)  |  Cover (37)  |  Error (277)  |  Long (174)  |  Provision (16)  |  Rich (61)  |  Use (76)  |  Word (302)  |  World (898)

Science is not gadgetry. The desirable adjuncts of modern living, although in many instances made possible by science, certainly do not constitute science. Basic scientific knowledge often (but not always) is a prerequisite to such developments, but technology primarily deserves the credit for having the financial courage, the ingenuity, and the driving energy to see to it that so-called ‘pure knowledge’ is in fact brought to the practical service of man. And it should also be recognized that those who have the urge to apply knowledge usefully have themselves often made significant contribution to pure knowledge and have even more often served as a stimulation to the activities of a pure researcher.
Warren Weaver (1894–1978), U.S. mathematician, scientist, educator. Science and Imagination, ch. 1, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (135)  |  Adjunct (3)  |  Apply (77)  |  Basic (66)  |  Bring (90)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Courage (55)  |  Credit (20)  |  Deserve (28)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Development (289)  |  Drive (55)  |  Energy (214)  |  Fact (733)  |  Financial (5)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Instance (32)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Live (272)  |  Often (106)  |  Possible (158)  |  Practical (133)  |  Prerequisite (7)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Pure (103)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific Knowledge (9)  |  See (369)  |  Serve (58)  |  Service (64)  |  Significant (36)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Stimulation (15)  |  Technology (222)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Urge (16)

Scientific training gives its votaries freedom from the impositions of modern quackery. Those who know nothing of the laws and processes of Nature fall an easy prey to quacks and impostors. Perfectionism in the realm of religion; a score of frauds in the realm of medicine, as electric shoe soles, hair brushes and belts, electropises, oxydonors, insulating bed casters, and the like; Christian science. In the presence of whose unspeakable stillness and self-stultifying idealism a wise man knows not whether to laugh or cry; Prof. Weltmer's magnetic treatment of disease; divine healing and miracle working by long-haired peripatetics—these and a score of other contagious fads and rank impostures find their followers among those who have no scientific training. Among their deluded victims are thousands of men and women of high character, undoubted piety, good intentions, charitable impulses and literary culture, but none trained to scientific research. Vaccinate the general public with scientific training and these epidemics will become a thing of the past.
As quoted by S.D. Van Meter, Chairman, closing remarks for 'Report of Committee on Public Policy and Legislation', to the Colorado State Medical Society in Denver, printed in Colorado Medicine (Oct 1904), 1, No. 12, 363. Van Meter used the quote following his statement, “In conclusion, allow me to urge once more the necessity of education of the public as well as the profession if we ever expect to correct the evils we are striving to reach by State and Society legislation. Much can be accomplished toward this end by the publication of well edited articles in the secular press upon medical subjects the public is eager to know about.” Prof. Weitmer is presumably Sidney A. Weltmer, founder of The Weltmer Institute of Suggestive Therapeutics, who offered a Course in Magnetic Healing by mail order correspondance (1899).
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (22)  |  Belt (2)  |  Brush (5)  |  Character (118)  |  Charity (9)  |  Christian (22)  |  Contagious (4)  |  Cry (18)  |  Culture (104)  |  Deluded (2)  |  Disease (275)  |  Divine (61)  |  Eager (15)  |  Education (347)  |  Electricity (136)  |  Epidemic (6)  |  Fad (4)  |  Follower (10)  |  Fraud (14)  |  Freedom (102)  |  General Public (7)  |  Good Intention (2)  |  Hair (25)  |  Healing (18)  |  Idealism (4)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Imposition (5)  |  Impostor (3)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Intelligent Design (4)  |  Laugh (28)  |  Law (515)  |  Literary (12)  |  Magnetic (11)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Miracle (66)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Past (152)  |  Perfectionism (2)  |  Piety (3)  |  Presence (33)  |  Prey (12)  |  Process (267)  |  Quack (15)  |  Quackery (4)  |  Realm (55)  |  Religion (239)  |  Research (590)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Shoe (9)  |  Sole (21)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Stultify (4)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Trained (5)  |  Training (66)  |  Treatment (100)  |  Victim (13)  |  Votary (3)  |  Wise (61)  |  Wise Man (11)  |  Woman (111)  |  Work (635)

She [Nettie Stevens] was a trained expert in the modern sense—in the sense in which biology has ceased to be a playground for the amateur and a plaything for the mystic.
In obituary, 'The Scientific Work of Miss N.M. Steves', Science (11 Oct 1912), 36, No. 928, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (19)  |  Biology (168)  |  Cease (39)  |  Expert (50)  |  Mystic (12)  |  Playground (5)  |  Plaything (3)  |  Sense (321)  |  Nettie Maria Stevens (4)  |  Trained (5)

Sir Edward Bullard maintains that the recent upsurge of keenness in oceanography is correlated with the development of modern sea-sick remedies.
In 'Man Explores the Sea', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (Sep 1963), 111, No. 5086, Footnote, 786.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Edward Bullard (6)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Development (289)  |  Increase (146)  |  Interest (237)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Remedy (54)

So far as modern science is concerned, we have to abandon completely the idea that by going into the realm of the small we shall reach the ultimate foundations of the universe. I believe we can abandon this idea without any regret. The universe is infinite in all directions, not only above us in the large but also below us in the small. If we start from our human scale of existence and explore the content of the universe further and further, we finally arrive, both in the large and in the small, at misty distances where first our senses and then even our concepts fail us.
To the German Society of Scientists and Physicists, Braunschweig, Germany (Sep 1896). As quoted in Anton Z. Capri, Quips, Quotes, and Quanta: An Anecdotal History of Physics (2011), 20. Wiechert was reporting his measurement of the mass of the moving particles in a cathode ray beam (electrons).
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (48)  |  Belief (504)  |  Below (24)  |  Concept (146)  |  Distance (77)  |  Existence (299)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Fail (58)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Human (550)  |  Idea (580)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Large (130)  |  Misty (5)  |  Realm (55)  |  Regret (21)  |  Scale (63)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sense (321)  |  Small (163)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Universe (686)

Some of Feynman’s ideas about cosmology have a modern ring. A good example is his attitude toward the origin of matter. The idea of continuous matter creation in the steady state cosmology does not seriously offend him (and he notes … that the big bang cosmology has a problem just as bad, to explain where all the matter came from in the beginning). … He emphasizes that the total energy of the universe could really be zero, and that matter creation is possible because the rest energy of the matter is actually canceled by its gravitational potential energy. “It is exciting to think that it costs nothing to create a new particle, …”
In John Preskill and Kip S. Thorne, 'Foreword to Feynman Lectures on Gravitation' (15 May 1995). Feynman delivered his lectures in 1962–63.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (59)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Cancel (3)  |  Continuous Creation (2)  |  Cosmology (20)  |  Cost (44)  |  Create (153)  |  Emphasize (12)  |  Energy (214)  |  Exciting (17)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Richard P. Feynman (122)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Idea (580)  |  Matter (343)  |  New (496)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Offend (4)  |  Origin (88)  |  Particle (99)  |  Potential Energy (3)  |  Problem (497)  |  Steady State (3)  |  Think (347)  |  Total (36)  |  Universe (686)  |  Zero (19)

Surely the claim of mathematics to take a place among the liberal arts must now be admitted as fully made good. Whether we look at the advances made in modern geometry, in modern integral calculus, or in modern algebra, in each of these three a free handling of the material employed is now possible, and an almost unlimited scope is left to the regulated play of fancy. It seems to me that the whole of aesthetic (so far as at present revealed) may be regarded as a scheme having four centres, which may be treated as the four apices of a tetrahedron, namely Epic, Music, Plastic, and Mathematic. There will be found a common plane to every three of these, outside of which lies the fourth; and through every two may be drawn a common axis opposite to the axis passing through the other two. So far is certain and demonstrable. I think it also possible that there is a centre of gravity to each set of three, and that the line joining each such centre with the outside apex will intersect in a common point the centre of gravity of the whole body of aesthetic; but what that centre is or must be I have not had time to think out.
In 'Proof of the Hitherto Undemonstrated Fundamental Theorem of Invariants', Collected Mathematical Papers (1909), Vol. 3, 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Body (247)  |  Centre Of Gravity (2)  |  Claim (71)  |  Demonstrate (53)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Integral Calculus (5)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Liberal Arts (3)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Place (175)  |  Plane (19)  |  Point (123)  |  Tetrahedron (4)

Sylvester was incapable of reading mathematics in a purely receptive way. Apparently a subject either fired in his brain a train of active and restless thought, or it would not retain his attention at all. To a man of such a temperament, it would have been peculiarly helpful to live in an atmosphere in which his human associations would have supplied the stimulus which he could not find in mere reading. The great modern work in the theory of functions and in allied disciplines, he never became acquainted with …
What would have been the effect if, in the prime of his powers, he had been surrounded by the influences which prevail in Berlin or in Gottingen? It may be confidently taken for granted that he would have done splendid work in those domains of analysis, which have furnished the laurels of the great mathematicians of Germany and France in the second half of the present century.
In Address delivered at a memorial meeting at the Johns Hopkins University (2 May 1897), published in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Jun 1897), 303. Also in Johns Hopkins University Circulars, 16 (1897), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Active (25)  |  Ally (6)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Apparently (19)  |  Association (21)  |  Atmosphere (79)  |  Attention (121)  |  Become (172)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Brain (213)  |  Century (131)  |  Confidently (2)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Domain (42)  |  Effect (166)  |  Find (408)  |  Fire (133)  |  France (27)  |  Function (131)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Germany (13)  |  Grant (32)  |  Great (534)  |  Half (56)  |  Helpful (15)  |  Human (550)  |  Incapable (17)  |  Influence (140)  |  Laurel (2)  |  Live (272)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mere (82)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Power (366)  |  Present (176)  |  Prevail (17)  |  Prime (11)  |  Purely (28)  |  Read (145)  |  Receptive (4)  |  Restless (11)  |  Retain (19)  |  Second (59)  |  Splendid (12)  |  Stimulus (20)  |  Subject (240)  |  Supply (47)  |  Surround (29)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Temperament (11)  |  Theory (696)  |  Thought (546)  |  Train (45)  |  Work (635)

The anxious precision of modern mathematics is necessary for accuracy, … it is necessary for research. It makes for clearness of thought and for fertility in trying new combinations of ideas. When the initial statements are vague and slipshod, at every subsequent stage of thought, common sense has to step in to limit applications and to explain meanings. Now in creative thought common sense is a bad master. Its sole criterion for judgment is that the new ideas shall look like the old ones, in other words it can only act by suppressing originality.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Act (117)  |  Anxious (3)  |  Application (170)  |  Bad (99)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (91)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Creative (61)  |  Criterion (18)  |  Explain (107)  |  Fertility (15)  |  Idea (580)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Initial (17)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Limit (126)  |  Master (98)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Necessary (154)  |  New (496)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Old (147)  |  Originality (18)  |  Precision (52)  |  Research (590)  |  Sole (21)  |  Stage (55)  |  Statement (76)  |  Step (110)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Suppress (6)  |  Thought (546)  |  Try (141)  |  Vague (26)

The calculus was the first achievement of modern mathematics and it is difficult to overestimate its importance. I think it defines more unequivocally than anything else the inception of modern mathematics; and the system of mathematical analysis, which is its logical development, still constitutes the greatest technical advance in exact thinking.
In 'The Mathematician', Works of the Mind (1947), 1, No. 1. Collected in James Roy Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 4, 2055.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Advance (165)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Define (49)  |  Development (289)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Exact (68)  |  Greatest (63)  |  Importance (218)  |  Inception (2)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematical Analysis (12)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Overestimate (3)  |  System (191)  |  Technical (42)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Unequivocally (2)

The candor of science is the glory of the modern. It does not hide and repress; it confronts, turns on the light.
In Specimen Days & Collect (1882), 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Confront (17)  |  Glory (57)  |  Hide (53)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Light (347)  |  Research (590)  |  Science (2067)

The cell phone has transformed public places into giant phone-a-thons in which callers exist within narcissistic cocoons of private conversations. Like faxes, computer modems and other modern gadgets that have clogged out lives with phony urgency, cell phones represent the 20th Century’s escalation of imaginary need. We didn’t need cell phones until we had them. Clearly, cell phones cause not only a breakdown of courtesy, but the atrophy of basic skills.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (33)  |  Atrophy (6)  |  Basic (66)  |  Breakdown (3)  |  Caller (2)  |  Cause (285)  |  Cell Phone (5)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Clog (5)  |  Cocoon (3)  |  Computer (105)  |  Conversation (26)  |  Courtesy (2)  |  Exist (148)  |  Gadget (2)  |  Giant (38)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Live (272)  |  Modem (3)  |  Narcissistic (2)  |  Need (287)  |  Phony (3)  |  Place (175)  |  Private (21)  |  Public (94)  |  Represent (43)  |  Skill (66)  |  Transform (35)  |  Urgency (8)

The conception of correspondence plays a great part in modern mathematics. It is the fundamental notion in the science of order as distinguished from the science of magnitude. If the older mathematics were mostly dominated by the needs of mensuration, modern mathematics are dominated by the conception of order and arrangement. It may be that this tendency of thought or direction of reasoning goes hand in hand with the modern discovery in physics, that the changes in nature depend not only or not so much on the quantity of mass and energy as on their distribution or arrangement.
In History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1903), Vol. 2, 736.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (60)  |  Change (364)  |  Conception (92)  |  Correspondence (15)  |  Depend (90)  |  Direction (76)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Distribution (29)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Energy (214)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Great (534)  |  Hand In Hand (4)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Need (287)  |  Notion (59)  |  Old (147)  |  Order (242)  |  Part (222)  |  Physics (348)  |  Play (112)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Reason (471)  |  Science (2067)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Thought (546)

The concepts of ‘soul’ or ‘life’ do not occur in atomic physics, and they could not, even indirectly, be derived as complicated consequences of some natural law. Their existence certainly does not indicate the presence of any fundamental substance other than energy, but it shows only the action of other kinds of forms which we cannot match with the mathematical forms of modern atomic physics ... If we want to describe living or mental processes, we shall have to broaden these structures. It may be that we shall have to introduce yet other concepts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Atomic Physics (7)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Concept (146)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Derive (33)  |  Describe (57)  |  Energy (214)  |  Existence (299)  |  Form (314)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Indicate (18)  |  Indirectly (7)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Kind (140)  |  Life (1131)  |  Live (272)  |  Match (16)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mental (78)  |  Natural Law (31)  |  Occur (43)  |  Presence (33)  |  Process (267)  |  Show (93)  |  Soul (166)  |  Structure (225)  |  Substance (87)  |  Want (176)

The constructions of the mathematical mind are at the same time free and necessary. The individual mathematician feels free to define his notions and set up his axioms as he pleases. But the question is will he get his fellow-mathematician interested in the constructs of his imagination. We cannot help the feeling that certain mathematical structures which have evolved through the combined efforts of the mathematical community bear the stamp of a necessity not affected by the accidents of their historical birth. Everybody who looks at the spectacle of modern algebra will be struck by this complementarity of freedom and necessity.
In 'A Half-Century of Mathematics',The American Mathematical Monthly (Oct 1951), 58, No. 8, 538-539.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (66)  |  Affect (19)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Birth (93)  |  Combine (35)  |  Community (82)  |  Complementarity (3)  |  Construction (83)  |  Define (49)  |  Effort (144)  |  Everybody (27)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Free (92)  |  Freedom (102)  |  History (369)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Individual (221)  |  Interest (237)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Notion (59)  |  Please (24)  |  Question (404)  |  Set Up (3)  |  Spectacle (14)  |  Stamp (15)  |  Strike (40)  |  Structure (225)  |  Time (595)

The entire mathematical arsenal that our modern sages command cannot establish facts. Practical people should always keep this in mind when they ask mathematicians for help.
As translated from Literaturnaya Gazeta (5 Dec 1979), 49, 12, in 'Miscellanea', The American Mathematical Monthly (Aug-Sep 1980), 87, No. 7, 589.
Science quotes on:  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Ask (160)  |  Command (28)  |  Entire (47)  |  Establish (56)  |  Fact (733)  |  Help (103)  |  Keep (100)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Person (154)  |  Practical (133)  |  Sage (15)

The essence of modernity is that progress no longer waits on genius; instead we have learned to put our faith in the organized efforts of ordinary men. Science is as old as the race, but the effective organization of science is new. Ancient science, like placer mining, was a pursuit of solitary prospectors. Nuggets of truth were found, but the total wealth of knowledge increased slowly. Modern man began to transform this world when he began to mine the hidden veins of knowledge systematically.
In School and Society (1930), 31, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Effective (30)  |  Effort (144)  |  Essence (55)  |  Faith (157)  |  Finding (30)  |  Genius (249)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Increased (3)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Mining (13)  |  New (496)  |  Nugget (3)  |  Old (147)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Organization (84)  |  Progress (368)  |  Prospector (3)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Race (104)  |  Science (2067)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Total (36)  |  Transform (35)  |  Truth (928)  |  Vein (13)  |  Waiting (9)  |  Wealth (66)  |  World (898)

The Excellence of Modern Geometry is in nothing more evident, than in those full and adequate Solutions it gives to Problems; representing all possible Cases in one view, and in one general Theorem many times comprehending whole Sciences; which deduced at length into Propositions, and demonstrated after the manner of the Ancients, might well become the subjects of large Treatises: For whatsoever Theorem solves the most complicated Problem of the kind, does with a due Reduction reach all the subordinate Cases.
In 'An Instance of the Excellence of Modern Algebra, etc', Philosophical Transactions, 1694, 960.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (25)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Case (99)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Demonstrate (53)  |  Due (20)  |  Evident (29)  |  Excellence (33)  |  Full (63)  |  General (160)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  Kind (140)  |  Large (130)  |  Length (22)  |  Manner (57)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Possible (158)  |  Problem (497)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Reach (121)  |  Reduction (41)  |  Represent (43)  |  Science (2067)  |  Solution (216)  |  Solve (78)  |  Subject (240)  |  Subordinate (9)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Time (595)  |  Treatise (34)  |  View (171)  |  Whatsoever (9)  |  Whole (192)

The fact remains that, if the supply of energy failed, modern civilization would come to an end as abruptly as does the music of an organ deprived of wind.
Matter and Energy (1911), 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (6)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Deprivation (5)  |  End (195)  |  Energy (214)  |  Energy Conservation (3)  |  Failure (138)  |  Future (287)  |  Music (106)  |  Organ (64)  |  Problem (497)  |  Supply (47)  |  Wind (80)

The fading of ideals is sad evidence of the defeat of human endeavour. In the schools of antiquity philosophers aspired to impart wisdom, in modern colleges our humbler aim is to teach subjects
Opening lines of 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (18)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  College (35)  |  Education (347)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Fading (3)  |  Humble (31)  |  Ideal (72)  |  Imparting (3)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Subject (240)  |  Teaching (108)  |  Wisdom (182)

The frillshark has many anatomical features similar to those of the ancient sharks that lived 25 to 30 million years ago. It has too many gills and too few dorsal fins for a modern shark, and its teeth, like those of fossil sharks, are three-pronged and briarlike. Some ichthyologists regard it as a relic derived from very ancient shark ancestors that have died out in the upper waters but, through this single species, are still carrying on their struggle for earthly survival, in the quiet of the deep sea.
(1961).
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (63)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Deep Sea (9)  |  Fin (3)  |  Fossil (113)  |  Gill (3)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Million (111)  |  Relic (6)  |  Shark (7)  |  Struggle (78)  |  Survival (61)  |  Tooth (26)

The ginkgo tree is from the era of dinosaurs, but while the dinosaur has been extinguished, the modern ginkgo has not changed. After the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, the ginkgo was the first tree that came up. It’s amazing.
As quoted in Columbia University Press Release, On Campus (21 Feb 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (21)  |  Atomic Bomb (107)  |  Change (364)  |  Dinosaur (23)  |  Era (18)  |  Extinguish (8)  |  Hiroshima (15)  |  Tree (171)

The institutional goal of science is the extension of certified knowledge. The technical methods employed toward this end provide the relevant definition of knowledge: empirically confirmed and logically consistent predictions. The institutional imperatives (mores) derive from the goal and the methods. The entire structure of technical and moral norms implements the final objective. The technical norm of empirical evidence, adequate, valid and reliable, is a prerequisite for sustained true prediction; the technical norm of logical consistency, a prerequisite for systematic and valid prediction. The mores of science possess a methodologic rationale but they are binding, not only because they are procedurally efficient, but because they are believed right and good. They are moral as well as technical prescriptions. Four sets of institutional imperatives–universalism, communism, disinterestedness, organized scepticism–comprise the ethos of modern science.
Social Theory and Social Structure (1957), 552-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Binding (9)  |  Certification (2)  |  Communism (10)  |  Consistency (23)  |  Definition (192)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Efficiency (30)  |  Empiricism (19)  |  Extension (31)  |  Goal (100)  |  Good (345)  |  Imperative (11)  |  Institution (39)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Method (239)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Moral (124)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Prediction (71)  |  Prerequisite (7)  |  Prescription (16)  |  Procedure (25)  |  Rationale (5)  |  Relevance (14)  |  Reliability (15)  |  Right (197)  |  Skepticism (21)  |  Technical (42)  |  Validity (31)

The large collection of problems which our modern Cambridge books supply will be found to be almost an exclusive peculiarity of these books; such collections scarcely exist in foreign treatises on mathematics, nor even in English treatises of an earlier date. This fact shows, I think, that a knowledge of mathematics may be gained without the perpetual working of examples. … Do not trouble yourselves with the examples, make it your main business, I might almost say your exclusive business, to understand the text of your author.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (62)  |  Book (257)  |  Business (84)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Collection (44)  |  Date (13)  |  Early (62)  |  English (35)  |  Example (94)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  Exist (148)  |  Fact (733)  |  Find (408)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Gain (70)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Large (130)  |  Main (28)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Peculiarity (19)  |  Perpetual (21)  |  Problem (497)  |  Say (228)  |  Scarcely (13)  |  Show (93)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Supply (47)  |  Text (14)  |  Think (347)  |  Treatise (34)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Understand (340)  |  Work (635)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Act (117)  |  Age (178)  |  America (87)  |  Authority (66)  |  Become (172)  |  Begin (108)  |  Beginnings (4)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (84)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (15)  |  Common (122)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Dislike (13)  |  Domestic (13)  |  Emergency (7)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Emphasize (12)  |  Enterprise (33)  |  Era (18)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Extreme (56)  |  Face (108)  |  Fear (142)  |  Federal (6)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (201)  |  Great (534)  |  Growth (124)  |  Ideology (12)  |  Important (205)  |  Individualism (2)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Intense (19)  |  Large (130)  |  Largely (13)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (104)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (29)  |  National (25)  |  Native (15)  |  Number (282)  |  Organization (84)  |  Original (57)  |  Part (222)  |  Portray (3)  |  Possible (158)  |  Power (366)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (42)  |  Private (21)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Public (94)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Recent (30)  |  Regulation (20)  |  Relax (2)  |  Repeat (41)  |  Resistance (26)  |  Response (29)  |  Result (389)  |  Right (197)  |  Save (56)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (228)  |  State (137)  |  Step (110)  |  Stress (12)  |  Substantial (14)  |  Suspicion (28)  |  Time (595)  |  Toward (45)  |  Trend (17)  |  Try (141)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (9)  |  Value (242)  |  Widespread (11)  |  Work (635)  |  Worth (99)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (299)

The modern airplane creates a new geographical dimension. A navigable ocean of air blankets the whole surface of the globe. There are no distant places any longer: the world is small and the world is one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Airplane (38)  |  Blanket (9)  |  Create (153)  |  Dimension (38)  |  Distant (32)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Long (174)  |  New (496)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Place (175)  |  Small (163)  |  Surface (101)  |  Whole (192)  |  World (898)

The modern physicist is a quantum theorist on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and a student of gravitational relativity theory on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. On Sunday he is neither, but is praying to his God that someone, preferably himself, will find the reconciliation between the two views.
In I Am a Mathematician, the Later Life of a Prodigy (1956), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (408)  |  God (535)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Monday (3)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Pray (16)  |  Quantum Theory (57)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Saturday (5)  |  Student (203)  |  Sunday (7)  |  Theory Of Relativity (14)  |  Tuesday (3)  |  View (171)  |  Wednesday (2)

The Modern Theory of Functions—that stateliest of all the pure creations of the human intellect.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (242)  |  Function (131)  |  Human Intellect (10)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Pure (103)  |  Stately (9)  |  Theory (696)

The modern, and to my mind true, theory is that mathematics is the abstract form of the natural sciences; and that it is valuable as a training of the reasoning powers not because it is abstract, but because it is a representation of actual things.
From 'Introduction', Mathematical Teaching and its Modern Methods (1886), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Actual (48)  |  Form (314)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Power (366)  |  Reason (471)  |  Representation (36)  |  Theory (696)  |  Training (66)  |  True (208)  |  Value (242)

The momentous laws of induction between currents and between currents and magnets were discovered by Michael Faraday in 1831-32. Faraday was asked: “What is the use of this discovery?” He answered: “What is the use of a child—it grows to be a man.” Faraday’s child has grown to be a man and is now the basis of all the modern applications of electricity.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 34-35.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Application (170)  |  Ask (160)  |  Basis (91)  |  Child (252)  |  Current (54)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Electricity (136)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Grow (99)  |  Induction (60)  |  Law (515)  |  Magnet (10)  |  Momentous (4)

The notion, which is really the fundamental one (and I cannot too strongly emphasise the assertion), underlying and pervading the whole of modern analysis and geometry, is that of imaginary magnitude in analysis and of imaginary space in geometry.
In Presidential Address, in Collected Works, Vol. 11, 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (166)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Emphasize (12)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Notion (59)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Space (257)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Underlying (18)  |  Whole (192)

The picture of scientific method drafted by modern philosophy is very different from traditional conceptions. Gone is the ideal of a universe whose course follows strict rules, a predetermined cosmos that unwinds itself like an unwinding clock. Gone is the ideal of the scientist who knows the absolute truth. The happenings of nature are like rolling dice rather than like revolving stars; they are controlled by probability laws, not by causality, and the scientist resembles a gambler more than a prophet. He can tell you only his best posits—he never knows beforehand whether they will come true. He is a better gambler, though, than the man at the green table, because his statistical methods are superior. And his goal is staked higher—the goal of foretelling the rolling dice of the cosmos. If he is asked why he follows his methods, with what title he makes his predictions, he cannot answer that he has an irrefutable knowledge of the future; he can only lay his best bets. But he can prove that they are best bets, that making them is the best he can do—and if a man does his best, what else can you ask of him?
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951, 1973), 248-9. Collected in James Louis Jarrett and Sterling M. McMurrin (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy: A Book of Readings (1954), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Absoluteness (3)  |  Asking (23)  |  Best (173)  |  Bet (10)  |  Causality (10)  |  Clock (29)  |  Conception (92)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Course (84)  |  Dice (18)  |  Difference (246)  |  Draft (6)  |  Foretelling (4)  |  Future (287)  |  Gambler (7)  |  Goal (100)  |  Happening (32)  |  Ideal (72)  |  Irrefutable (4)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Method (239)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Picture (77)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (71)  |  Probability (106)  |  Proof (245)  |  Prophet (11)  |  Roll (17)  |  Rule (177)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Stake (19)  |  Star (336)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Superiority (12)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Truth (928)  |  Universe (686)

The problem of modern democracy is not that the people have lost their power, but that they have lost their appreciation for the extraordinary power they wield. Consider one astonishing truth: Famine has never struck a democracy.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (26)  |  Astonishing (11)  |  Democracy (26)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Famine (10)  |  Lose (94)  |  People (390)  |  Power (366)  |  Problem (497)  |  Strike (40)  |  Truth (928)

The school of Plato has advanced the interests of the race as much through geometry as through philosophy. The modern engineer, the navigator, the astronomer, built on the truths which those early Greeks discovered in their purely speculative investigations. And if the poetry, statesmanship, oratory, and philosophy of our day owe much to Plato’s divine Dialogues, our commerce, our manufactures, and our science are equally indebted to his Conic Sections. Later instances may be abundantly quoted, to show that the labors of the mathematician have outlasted those of the statesman, and wrought mightier changes in the condition of the world. Not that we would rank the geometer above the patriot, but we claim that he is worthy of equal honor.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Build (117)  |  Change (364)  |  Claim (71)  |  Commerce (15)  |  Condition (163)  |  Conic Section (8)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Discover (199)  |  Divine (61)  |  Early (62)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equally (26)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Greek (73)  |  Honor (31)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Instance (32)  |  Interest (237)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Labor (73)  |  Late (52)  |  Manufacture (15)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Owe (23)  |  Patriot (4)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Plato (76)  |  Poetry (124)  |  Purely (28)  |  Quote (18)  |  Race (104)  |  Rank (32)  |  School (119)  |  Science (2067)  |  Show (93)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Statesman (18)  |  Statesmanship (2)  |  Truth (928)  |  Work (635)  |  World (898)  |  Worthy (34)

The ultimate aim of the modern movement in biology is in fact to explain all biology in terms of physics and chemistry.
In 'The Nature of Vitalism', Of Molecules and Men (1966), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (89)  |  Biology (168)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Explain (107)  |  Physics (348)  |  Ultimate (84)

The world is anxious to admire that apex and culmination of modern mathematics: a theorem so perfectly general that no particular application of it is feasible.
In 'A Story With a Moral', Mathematical Gazette (Jun 1973), 57, No. 400, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Anxiety (20)  |  Application (170)  |  Culmination (3)  |  Feasibility (3)  |  Generality (34)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perfection (89)  |  Theorem (90)  |  World (898)

There is as much difference between a collection of mentally free citizens and a community molded by modern methods of propaganda as there is between a heap of raw materials and a battleship.
From An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1937, 1943), 9. Collected in The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (2009), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (31)  |  Collection (44)  |  Community (82)  |  Difference (246)  |  Free (92)  |  Heap (14)  |  Material (156)  |  Mental (78)  |  Method (239)  |  Mold (26)  |  Propaganda (12)  |  Raw (13)

There is thus a possibility that the ancient dream of philosophers to connect all Nature with the properties of whole numbers will some day be realized. To do so physics will have to develop a long way to establish the details of how the correspondence is to be made. One hint for this development seems pretty obvious, namely, the study of whole numbers in modern mathematics is inextricably bound up with the theory of functions of a complex variable, which theory we have already seen has a good chance of forming the basis of the physics of the future. The working out of this idea would lead to a connection between atomic theory and cosmology.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Atomic Theory (13)  |  Basis (91)  |  Complex (95)  |  Connect (33)  |  Connection (111)  |  Correspondence (15)  |  Cosmology (20)  |  Detail (87)  |  Develop (107)  |  Dream (167)  |  Establish (56)  |  Function (131)  |  Future (287)  |  Idea (580)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Physics (348)  |  Property (126)  |  Realize (90)  |  Study (476)  |  Theory (696)  |  Variable (16)

This is an age of science. ... All important fields of activity from the breeding of bees to the administration of an empire, call for an understanding of the spirit and the technique of modern science. The nations that do not cultivate the sciences cannot hold their own.
From Rose's private notebook (1924?), as quoted by Stanley Coben in 'The Scientific Establishment and the Transmission of Quantum Mechanics to the United States, 1919-32', The American Historical Review (Apr 1971), 76, No. 2, 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (135)  |  Administration (11)  |  Age Of Science (2)  |  Bee (27)  |  Breeding (11)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Empire (14)  |  Field (171)  |  Hold (94)  |  Important (205)  |  Nation (134)  |  Science (2067)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Technique (49)  |  Understanding (325)

This is one of the greatest advantages of modern geometry over the ancient, to be able, through the consideration of positive and negative quantities, to include in a single enunciation the several cases which the same theorem may present by a change in the relative position of the different parts of a figure. Thus in our day the nine principal problems and the numerous particular cases, which form the object of eighty-three theorems in the two books De sectione determinata of Appolonius constitute only one problem which is resolved by a single equation.
In Histoire de la Géométrie, chap. 1, sect. 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (77)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Book (257)  |  Case (99)  |  Change (364)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Different (186)  |  Enunciation (5)  |  Equation (96)  |  Figure (69)  |  Form (314)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Great (534)  |  Include (40)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)  |  Negative (34)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Object (175)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Position (76)  |  Positive (44)  |  Present (176)  |  Principal (28)  |  Problem (497)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Relative (39)  |  Resolve (19)  |  Same (156)  |  Several (31)  |  Single (120)  |  Theorem (90)

This new integral of Lebesgue is proving itself a wonderful tool. I might compare it with a modern Krupp gun, so easily does it penetrate barriers which were impregnable.
In 'Current Tendencies of Mathematical Research', Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Oct 1916), 23, 7. Previously given as an address read at the Quarter Centennial of the University of Chicago, before a conference of the mathematical, physical and astronomical departments.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrier (23)  |  Compare (38)  |  Easily (35)  |  Gun (9)  |  Impregnable (2)  |  Integral (15)  |  Henri-Léon Lebesgue (2)  |  New (496)  |  Penetrate (30)  |  Prove (109)  |  Tool (87)  |  Wonderful (60)

Those who came before us made certain that this country rode the first waves of the industrial revolution, the first waves of modern invention, and the first wave of nuclear power, and this generation does not intend to founder in the backwash of the coming age of space. We mean to be a part of it—we mean to lead it.
Address at Rice University in Houston (12 Sep 1962). On website of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (126)  |  First (314)  |  Founder (16)  |  Generation (141)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Intend (16)  |  Invention (324)  |  Lead (160)  |  Nuclear Power (11)  |  Space Age (3)  |  United States (31)  |  Wave (68)

To Monsieur Eiffel the Engineer, the brave builder of so gigantic and original a specimen of modern Engineering from one who has the greatest respect and admiration for all Engineers including the Great Engineer the Bon Dieu.
As stated by Joseph Harriss in The Tallest Tower (2004), 95. The author wrote that Edison was displaying his phonograph at the Paris World's Fair for which the Eiffel Tower was built as a centrepiece. On one of his visits to ascend the tower, Edison presented to Eiffel a phograph and a recording of “The Marseillaise.” On that occasion, Edison signed the guest book with the quoted remark.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Brave (5)  |  Builder (12)  |  Gustave Eiffel (10)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Gigantic (23)  |  Original (57)  |  Respect (86)  |  Specimen (18)

True optimization is the revolutionary contribution of modern research to decision processes.
In Eberhard Zeidler, Applied Functional Analysis: main principles and their applications (1995), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Contribution (60)  |  Research (590)  |  Revolutionary (16)  |  True (208)

Two extreme views have always been held as to the use of mathematics. To some, mathematics is only measuring and calculating instruments, and their interest ceases as soon as discussions arise which cannot benefit those who use the instruments for the purposes of application in mechanics, astronomy, physics, statistics, and other sciences. At the other extreme we have those who are animated exclusively by the love of pure science. To them pure mathematics, with the theory of numbers at the head, is the only real and genuine science, and the applications have only an interest in so far as they contain or suggest problems in pure mathematics.
Of the two greatest mathematicians of modern tunes, Newton and Gauss, the former can be considered as a representative of the first, the latter of the second class; neither of them was exclusively so, and Newton’s inventions in the science of pure mathematics were probably equal to Gauss’s work in applied mathematics. Newton’s reluctance to publish the method of fluxions invented and used by him may perhaps be attributed to the fact that he was not satisfied with the logical foundations of the Calculus; and Gauss is known to have abandoned his electro-dynamic speculations, as he could not find a satisfying physical basis. …
Newton’s greatest work, the Principia, laid the foundation of mathematical physics; Gauss’s greatest work, the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, that of higher arithmetic as distinguished from algebra. Both works, written in the synthetic style of the ancients, are difficult, if not deterrent, in their form, neither of them leading the reader by easy steps to the results. It took twenty or more years before either of these works received due recognition; neither found favour at once before that great tribunal of mathematical thought, the Paris Academy of Sciences. …
The country of Newton is still pre-eminent for its culture of mathematical physics, that of Gauss for the most abstract work in mathematics.
In History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1903), 630.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (48)  |  Abstract (86)  |  Academy Of Sciences (4)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Animated (5)  |  Application (170)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (49)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Basis (91)  |  Benefit (73)  |  Both (81)  |  Calculate (33)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Cease (39)  |  Class (84)  |  Consider (81)  |  Contain (67)  |  Country (147)  |  Culture (104)  |  Deterrent (2)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Discussion (48)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Due (20)  |  Easy (102)  |  Equal (83)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Extreme (56)  |  Fact (733)  |  Far (154)  |  Favor (30)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Fluxions (2)  |  Form (314)  |  Former (25)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genuine (26)  |  Great (534)  |  Head (81)  |  High (153)  |  Hold (94)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Interest (237)  |  Invent (51)  |  Invention (324)  |  Know (556)  |  Laid (7)  |  Latter (21)  |  Lead (160)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (224)  |  Mathematical Physics (9)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Measure (104)  |  Mechanic (23)  |  Method (239)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Paris (11)  |  Physical (134)  |  Physics (348)  |  Preeminent (5)  |  Principia (10)  |  Probably (48)  |  Problem (497)  |  Publish (34)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Pure Science (24)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reader (40)  |  Real (149)  |  Receive (60)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Representative (14)  |  Result (389)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (2067)  |  Second (59)  |  Snake (16)  |  Soon (34)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Step (110)  |  Style (22)  |  Suggest (33)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Theory Of Numbers (5)  |  Thought (546)  |  Tribunal (2)  |  Tune (14)  |  View (171)  |  Work (635)  |  Write (154)  |  Year (299)

Wallace’s error on human intellect arose from the in adequacy of his rigid selectionism, not from a failure to apply it. And his argument repays our study today, since its flaw persists as the weak link in many of the most ‘modern’ evolutionary speculations of our current literature. For Wallace’s rigid selectionism is much closer than Darwin’s pluralism to the attitude embodied in our favored theory today, which, ironically in this context, goes by the name of ‘Neo-Darwinism.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Apply (77)  |  Argument (82)  |  Arise (49)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Close (67)  |  Context (22)  |  Current (54)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Embody (16)  |  Error (277)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Failure (138)  |  Favored (5)  |  Flaw (10)  |  Human Intellect (10)  |  Ironically (2)  |  Link (42)  |  Literature (79)  |  Name (170)  |  Persist (11)  |  Pluralism (3)  |  Repay (3)  |  Rigid (13)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Study (476)  |  Theory (696)  |  Today (117)  |  Weak (44)

We are too prone to make technological instruments the scapegoats for the sins of those who wield them. The products of modern science are not in themselves good or bad; it is the way they are used that determines their value.
Acceptance speech for an honorary degree from the University of Notre Dame. In Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man? (2nd Ed.,1964), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (99)  |  Determination (57)  |  Good (345)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Product (82)  |  Prone (7)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sin (30)  |  Technology (222)  |  Use (76)  |  Value (242)  |  Wield (10)

We can assuredly build a socialist state with modern industry, modern agriculture, and modern science and culture.
In The Wisdom of Mao (2002), 210.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (66)  |  Culture (104)  |  Industry (109)  |  Modern Science (17)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  Socialist (2)  |  State (137)

We forget how strained and paradoxical is the view of nature which modern science imposes on our thoughts.
In Science and the Modern World (1925), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Imposition (5)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Paradoxical (3)  |  Science (2067)  |  Strain (11)  |  Thought (546)  |  View (171)

We have before us the restoration of that ancient land whose name was a synonym for abundance, prosperity, and grandeur for many generations. Records as old as those of Egypt and as well attested tell of fertile lands and teeming populations, mighty kings and warriors, sages and wise men, over periods of thousands of years. ... A land such as this is worth resuscitating. Once we have apprehended the true cause of its present desolate and abandoned condition, we are on our way to restoring it to its ancient fertility. A land which so readily responded to ancient science, and gave a return which sufficed for the maintenance of a Persian Court in all its splendor, will surely respond to the efforts of modern science and return manifold the money and talent spent on its regeneration.
From The Restoration of the Ancient Irrigation Works on the Tigris: or, The Re-creation of Chaldea (1903), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (48)  |  Abundance (21)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Apprehend (5)  |  Attest (3)  |  Cause (285)  |  Condition (163)  |  Court (20)  |  Desolation (3)  |  Egypt (22)  |  Fertility (15)  |  Generation (141)  |  Grandeur (21)  |  King (35)  |  Land (115)  |  Maintenance (14)  |  Manifold (9)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Money (142)  |  Name (170)  |  Persian (2)  |  Population (79)  |  Prosperity (15)  |  Record (68)  |  Regeneration (4)  |  Restoration (4)  |  Return (55)  |  Sage (15)  |  Science (2067)  |  Splendor (13)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Synonym (2)  |  Talent (63)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Wise (61)  |  Year (299)

We in the modern world expect that tomorrow will be better than today.
In Day the Universe Changed (1985), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (192)  |  Expectation (55)  |  Future (287)  |  Present (176)  |  Today (117)  |  Tomorrow (39)  |  World (898)

We may safely say, that the whole form of modern mathematical thinking was created by Euler. It is only with the greatest difficulty that one is able to follow the writings of any author immediately preceding Euler, because it was not yet known how to let the formulas speak for themselves. This art Euler was the first one to teach.
As quoted in W. Ahrens Scherz und Ernst in der Mathematik (1904), 251. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Author (62)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  First (314)  |  Follow (124)  |  Formula (80)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Precede (23)  |  Speak (92)  |  Teach (188)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Writing (81)

We may therefore say in the future, strictly within the limits of observation, that in certain respects the fossil species of a class traverse in their historical succession metamorphoses similar to those which the embryos undergo in themselves. … The development of a class in the history of the earth offers, in many respects, the greatest analogy with the development of an individual at different periods of his life. The demonstration of this truth is one of the most beautiful results of modern paleontology.
Carl Vogt
From Embryologie des Salmones, collected in L. Agassiz, Poissons d'Eau Douce de l’Europe Centrale (1842), 260. Translated by Webmaster using Google Translate, from the original French, “On pourra donc dire à l'avenir, en restant rigoureusement dans les limites de l'observation, qu'à certains égards, les espèces fossiles d'une classe parcourent dans leur succession historique des métamorphoses semblables à celles que subissent les embryons en se développant … Le développement d’une classe dans l’histoire de la terre offre, à divers égards, la plus grande analogie avec le dévelopment d’un individu aux différentes époques de sa vie. La démonstration de cette vérité est un des plus beaux résultat de la paléontologie moderne.”
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (60)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Classification (87)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Development (289)  |  Different (186)  |  Embryo (23)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fossil (113)  |  History Of The Earth (3)  |  Individual (221)  |  Life (1131)  |  Metamorphosis (5)  |  Observation (450)  |  Paleontology (30)  |  Period (66)  |  Result (389)  |  Species (221)  |  Succession (45)  |  Truth (928)

We must preach up traveling … as the first, second, and third requisites for a modern geologist, in the present adolescent stage of the science.
Letter (12 Jan 1829) to Roderick Murchison, collected in Katherine Murray Lyell (ed.), Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. (1881), Vol. 1, 233-234.
Science quotes on:  |  Adolescent (4)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Geology (201)  |  Preach (11)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Stage (55)  |  Travel (61)

We regard as 'scientific' a method based on deep analysis of facts, theories, and views, presupposing unprejudiced, unfearing open discussion and conclusions. The complexity and diversity of all the phenomena of modern life, the great possibilities and dangers linked with the scientific-technical revolution and with a number of social tendencies demand precisely such an approach, as has been acknowledged in a number of official statements.
Progress, Coexistence and Intellectual Freedom (1968), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (11)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Approach (54)  |  Danger (78)  |  Demand (76)  |  Fact (733)  |  Life (1131)  |  Method (239)  |  Official (6)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Science (2067)  |  Society (228)  |  Statement (76)  |  Technology (222)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Theory (696)  |  View (171)

We see a universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws, but only dimly understand these laws. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that moves the constellations. I am fascinated by Spinoza’s pantheism, but admire even more his contributions to modern thought because he is the first philosopher to deal with the soul and the body as one, not two separate things.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Arrange (20)  |  Body (247)  |  Certain (126)  |  Constellation (15)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Deal (49)  |  Dimly (6)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  First (314)  |  Force (249)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Law (515)  |  Limit (126)  |  Mind (760)  |  Move (94)  |  Mysterious (33)  |  Obey (16)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  See (369)  |  Separate (74)  |  Soul (166)  |  Spinozas (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  Understand (340)  |  Universe (686)

Were the Greeks scientists? Then so are the modern chiropractors. What they had of exact knowledge, in fact, was mainly borrowed, and most of it was spoiled in the borrowing.
From book review (of The Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. V), in the American Mercury (Oct 1927), 254-55. Collected in A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Borrow (16)  |  Exact (68)  |  Fact (733)  |  Greek (73)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Spoil (7)

What Art was to the ancient world, Science is to the modern: the distinctive faculty. In the minds of men the useful has succeeded to the beautiful. … There are great truths to tell, if we had either the courage to announce them or the temper to receive them.
In Coningsby: or the New Generation (1844), Vol. 2, Book 4, Chap. 1, 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient World (3)  |  Announce (9)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Courage (55)  |  Distinctive (14)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Great (534)  |  Mind (760)  |  Receive (60)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Succeed (27)  |  Tell (110)  |  Temper (9)  |  Truth (928)  |  Useful (100)

Whatever the common-sense of earlier generations may have held in this respect, modern common-sense holds that the scientist’s answer is the only ultimately true one. In the last resort enlightened common-sense sticks by the opaque truth and refuses to go behind the returns given by the tangible facts.
From 'The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation', American Journal of Sociology (Mar 1906), 11, collected in The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation and Other Essays (1919), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Early (62)  |  Enlighten (4)  |  Fact (733)  |  Generation (141)  |  Opaque (3)  |  Refuse (23)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Triangle (11)  |  Truth (928)  |  Ultimate (84)

When I observe the luminous progress and expansion of natural science in modern times, I seem to myself like a traveller going eastwards at dawn, and gazing at the growing light with joy, but also with impatience; looking forward with longing to the advent of the full and final light, but, nevertheless, having to turn away his eyes when the sun appeared, unable to bear the splendour he had awaited with so much desire.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 197-198.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Await (5)  |  Bear (67)  |  Dawn (16)  |  Desire (142)  |  East (18)  |  Expansion (26)  |  Gaze (16)  |  Growing (15)  |  Impatience (12)  |  Joy (88)  |  Light (347)  |  Luminous (11)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Observe (76)  |  Progress (368)  |  Splendor (13)  |  Traveler (26)  |  Turn (118)  |  Unable (24)

When we look back beyond one hundred years over the long trails of history, we see immediately why the age we live in differs from all other ages in human annals. … It remained stationary in India and in China for thousands of years. But now it is moving very fast. … A priest from Thebes would probably have felt more at home at the council of Trent, two thousand years after Thebes had vanished, than Sir Isaac Newton at a modern undergraduate physical society, or George Stephenson in the Institute of Electrical Engineers. The changes have have been so sudden and so gigantic, that no period in history can be compared with the last century. The past no longer enables us even dimly to measure the future.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (27)  |  20th Century (33)  |  Age (178)  |  Annal (3)  |  Back (104)  |  Century (131)  |  Change (364)  |  China (20)  |  Compared (8)  |  Council (3)  |  Differ (22)  |  Dimly (6)  |  Electrical (13)  |  Electrical Engineering (9)  |  Enable (46)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Fast (44)  |  Future (287)  |  Gigantic (23)  |  History (369)  |  Home (84)  |  Human (550)  |  Hundred (64)  |  India (16)  |  Institute (7)  |  Live (272)  |  Long (174)  |  Measure (104)  |  Moving (11)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Past (152)  |  Period (66)  |  Physical (134)  |  Priest (21)  |  Probably (48)  |  Remained (2)  |  See (369)  |  Society (228)  |  Stationary (4)  |  George Stephenson (10)  |  Sudden (34)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Trail (10)  |  Undergraduate (9)  |  Vanished (3)  |  Year (299)

[Consider] a fence or gate erected across a road] The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, “I don't see the use of this; let us clear it away.” To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: “If you don't see the use of it, I certainly won't let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it.”
In The Thing (1929). Excerpt in Gilbert Keith Chesterton and Alvaro De Silva (ed.), Brave New Family: G.K. Chesterton on Men and Women, Children, Sex, Divorce (1990), 53. Note: This passage may be the source which John F. Kennedy had in mind when he wrote in his personal notebook, “Don't ever take a fence down until you know the reason why it was put up.” (see John F. Kennedy quotes on this site). The words in that terse paraphrase are those of Kennedy, and are neither those of Chesterton, or, as often attributed, Robert Frost (q.v.).
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (44)  |  Answer (249)  |  Clear (98)  |  Destroy (80)  |  Fence (9)  |  Gate (12)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reformer (5)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Use (76)

[Jethro Tull] was the first Englishman—perhaps the first writer, ancient and modern—who has attempted, with any tolerable degree of success, to reduce the art of agriculture to certain and uniform principles; and it must be acknowledged that he has done more towards establishing a rational and practical method of husbandry than all the writers who have gone before him.
Anonymous
In Letter (18 Oct 1764), signed only “D.Y.” from Hungerford, in Sylvanus Urban (ed.), 'Observations on the late Improvements in Agriculture', The Gentleman’s Magazine (Nov 1764), 525.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (66)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Art (294)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Certain (126)  |  Englishman (3)  |  Establishing (7)  |  First (314)  |  Method (239)  |  Practical (133)  |  Principle (292)  |  Rational (57)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Success (250)  |  Jethro Tull (2)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Writer (46)

[Physical fitness is] the provision of antidotes to the consequences of modern existence.
As quoted in obituary, 'Sir Aldophe Abrahams, O.B.E. M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P.', The British Medical Journal (23 Dec 1967), 4, No. 5581, 748.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (6)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Existence (299)  |  Physical Fitness (2)  |  Provision (16)

[Public cynicism towards professional expertise is] entirely wrong, and it’s the road back to the cave. The way we got out of the caves and into modern civilisation is through the process of understanding and thinking. Those things were not done by gut instinct. Being an expert does not mean that you are someone with a vested interest in something; it means you spend your life studying something. You’re not necessarily right–but you’re more likely to be right than someone who’s not spent their life studying it.
Brian Cox
As quoted in interview with Decca Aitkenhead, 'Prof Brian Cox: Being anti-expert – that’s the way back to the cave', The Guardian (2 Jul 2016)
Science quotes on:  |  Back (104)  |  Cave (15)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Cynicism (4)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Expert (50)  |  Expertise (6)  |  Gut Instinct (2)  |  Interest (237)  |  Life (1131)  |  Process (267)  |  Professional (37)  |  Public (94)  |  Right (197)  |  Road (64)  |  Studying (10)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Wrong (139)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.