Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Follow

Follow Quotes (378 quotes)

... every chemical combination is wholly and solely dependent on two opposing forces, positive and negative electricity, and every chemical compound must be composed of two parts combined by the agency of their electrochemical reaction, since there is no third force. Hence it follows that every compound body, whatever the number of its constituents, can be divided into two parts, one of which is positively and the other negatively electrical.
Essai sur la théorie des proportions chemiques (1819), 98. Quoted by Henry M. Leicester in article on Bessel in Charles Coulston Gillespie (editor), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1981), Vol. 2, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Divided (50)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrochemical (4)  |  Force (487)  |  Ion (21)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Positive (94)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wholly (88)

...there is no prescribed route to follow to arrive at a new idea. You have to make the intuitive leap. But the difference is that once you’ve made the intuitive leap you have to justify it by filling in the intermediate steps. In my case, it often happens that I have an idea, but then I try to fill in the intermediate steps and find that they don’t work, so I have to give it up.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (35)  |  Case (99)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Happen (274)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Justify (24)  |  Leap (53)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Often (106)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Route (15)  |  Step (231)  |  Try (283)  |  Work (1351)

Considerate la vostra semenza:
Fatti non foste a viver come bruti,
Ma per seguir virtute e conoscenza
.
Consider your origins: you were not made to live as brutes, but to follow virtue and knowledge.
Divina Commedia 'Inferno', canto 26, l.118.
Science quotes on:  |  Brute (28)  |  Consider (416)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Origin (239)  |  Virtue (109)

Every teacher certainly should know something of non-euclidean geometry. Thus, it forms one of the few parts of mathematics which, at least in scattered catch-words, is talked about in wide circles, so that any teacher may be asked about it at any moment. … Imagine a teacher of physics who is unable to say anything about Röntgen rays, or about radium. A teacher of mathematics who could give no answer to questions about non-euclidean geometry would not make a better impression.
On the other hand, I should like to advise emphatically against bringing non-euclidean into regular school instruction (i.e., beyond occasional suggestions, upon inquiry by interested pupils), as enthusiasts are always recommending. Let us be satisfied if the preceding advice is followed and if the pupils learn to really understand euclidean geometry. After all, it is in order for the teacher to know a little more than the average pupil.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Advise (7)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Average (82)  |  Better (486)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bring (90)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Circle (110)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Euclidean (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Least (75)  |  Let (61)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Occasional (22)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Precede (23)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Question (621)  |  Radium (25)  |  Ray (114)  |  Really (78)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Regular (46)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  School (219)  |  Something (719)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Talk (100)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Unable (24)  |  Understand (606)  |  Wide (96)  |  Word (619)  |  X-ray (37)

Indiana Jones: Archaeology is the search for fact… not truth. If it’s truth you're looking for, Dr. Tyree’s philosophy class is right down the hall. … So forget any ideas you've got about lost cities, exotic travel, and digging up the world. We do not follow maps to buried treasure, and “X” never, ever marks the spot. Seventy percent of all archaeology is done in the library. Research. Reading.
Spoken by actor Harrison Ford as character Indiana Jones in movie, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Class (164)  |  Digging (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forget (115)  |  Idea (843)  |  Library (48)  |  Looking (189)  |  Map (44)  |  Movie (16)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Search (162)  |  Travel (114)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

La vérité est sur une courbe dont notre ésprit suit éternellement l'asymptote. (Oct 1879)
Truth is on a curve whose asymptote our spirit follows eternally.
In Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 193. As translated in John Arthur Thomson, Introduction to Science (1911), 57,
Science quotes on:  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Asymptote (2)  |  Curve (49)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Truth (1057)

L’homme ne poursuit que des chimères.
Man follows only phantoms.
His true last words, according to De Morgan. As quoted in Augustus De Morgan, Budget of Paradoxes (1915), Vol. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Last Word (10)  |  Man (2251)

Steckt keine Poesie in der Lokomotive, die brausend durch die Nacht zieht und über die zitternde Erde hintobt, als wollte sie Raum und Zeit zermalmen, in dem hastigen, aber wohl geregelten Zucken und Zerren ihrer gewaltigen Glieder, in dem stieren, nur auf ein Ziel losstürmenden Blick ihrer roten Augen, in dem emsigen, willenlosen Gefolge der Wagen, die kreischend und klappernd, aber mit unfehlbarer Sicherheit dem verkörperten Willen aus Eisen und Stahl folge leisten?
Is there no poetry in the locomotive roaring through the night and charging over the quivering earth as if it wanted to crush time and space? Is there no poetry in the hasty but regular jerking and tugging of its powerful limbs, in the stare of its red eyes that never lose sight of their goal? Is there no poetry in the bustling, will-less retinue of cars that follow, screeching and clattering with unmistakable surety, the steel and iron embodiment of will?
Max Eyth
From 'Poesie und Technik' (1904) (Poetry and Technology), in Schweizerische Techniker-Zeitung (1907), Vol 4, 306, as translated in Paul A. Youngman, Black Devil and Iron Angel: The Railway in Nineteenth-Century German Realism (2005), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (71)  |  Crush (18)  |  Earth (996)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Eye (419)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hasty (6)  |  Iron (96)  |  Limb (8)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Lose (159)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Quivering (2)  |  Red (35)  |  Regular (46)  |  Retinue (3)  |  Sight (132)  |  Space (500)  |  Stare (9)  |  Steel (21)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Want (497)  |  Wanted (4)  |  Will (2355)

A closer look at the course followed by developing theory reveals for a start that it is by no means as continuous as one might expect, but full of breaks and at least apparently not along the shortest logical path. Certain methods often afforded the most handsome results only the other day, and many might well have thought that the development of science to infinity would consist in no more than their constant application. Instead, on the contrary, they suddenly reveal themselves as exhausted and the attempt is made to find other quite disparate methods. In that event there may develop a struggle between the followers of the old methods and those of the newer ones. The former's point of view will be termed by their opponents as out-dated and outworn, while its holders in turn belittle the innovators as corrupters of true classical science.
In 'On the Development of the Methods of Theoretical Physics in Recent Times', Populäre Schriften, Essay 14. Address (22 Sep 1899) to the Meeting of Natural Scientists at Munich. Collected in Brian McGuinness (ed.), Ludwig Boltzmann: Theoretical Physics and Philosophical Problems, Selected Writings (1974), 79.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Application (242)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Break (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Classical (45)  |  Closer (43)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Handsome (4)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Look (582)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Old (481)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Start (221)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

A contradiction (between science and religion) is out of the question. What follows from science are, again and again, clear indications of God’s activity which can be so strongly perceived that Kepler dared to say (for us it seems daring, not for him) that he could ‘almost touch God with his hand in the Universe.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Clear (100)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Dare (50)  |  Daring (17)  |  God (757)  |  Hand (143)  |  Indication (33)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Seem (145)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)

A distinguished writer [Siméon Denis Poisson] has thus stated the fundamental definitions of the science:
“The probability of an event is the reason we have to believe that it has taken place, or that it will take place.”
“The measure of the probability of an event is the ratio of the number of cases favourable to that event, to the total number of cases favourable or contrary, and all equally possible” (equally like to happen).
From these definitions it follows that the word probability, in its mathematical acceptation, has reference to the state of our knowledge of the circumstances under which an event may happen or fail. With the degree of information which we possess concerning the circumstances of an event, the reason we have to think that it will occur, or, to use a single term, our expectation of it, will vary. Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge. A perfect acquaintance with all the circumstances affecting the occurrence of an event would change expectation into certainty, and leave neither room nor demand for a theory of probabilities.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 243-244. The Poisson quote is footnoted as from Recherches sur la Probabilité des Jugemens.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Event (216)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Siméon-Denis Poisson (7)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Total (94)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Writer (86)

A good theoretical physicist today might find it useful to have a wide range of physical viewpoints and mathematical expressions of the same theory (for example, of quantum electrodynamics) available to him. This may be asking too much of one man. Then new students should as a class have this. If every individual student follows the same current fashion in expressing and thinking about electrodynamics or field theory, then the variety of hypotheses being generated to understand strong interactions, say, is limited. Perhaps rightly so, for possibly the chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off-chance that it is in another direction—a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory—who will find it?
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Class (164)  |  Current (118)  |  Direction (175)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Generate (16)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Range (99)  |  Say (984)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Today (314)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unfashionable (2)  |  Useful (250)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

A good title should aim at making what follows as far as possible superfluous to those who know anything of the subject.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Good (889)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  Possible (552)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Title (18)

A hundred years ago … an engineer, Herbert Spencer, was willing to expound every aspect of life, with an effect on his admiring readers which has not worn off today.
Things do not happen quite in this way nowadays. This, we are told, is an age of specialists. The pursuit of knowledge has become a profession. The time when a man could master several sciences is past. He must now, they say, put all his efforts into one subject. And presumably, he must get all his ideas from this one subject. The world, to be sure, needs men who will follow such a rule with enthusiasm. It needs the greatest numbers of the ablest technicians. But apart from them it also needs men who will converse and think and even work in more than one science and know how to combine or connect them. Such men, I believe, are still to be found today. They are still as glad to exchange ideas as they have been in the past. But we cannot say that our way of life is well-fitted to help them. Why is this?
In 'The Unification of Biology', New Scientist (11 Jan 1962), 13, No. 269, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Become (815)  |  Combine (57)  |  Connect (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Help (105)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Past (337)  |  Profession (99)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Several (32)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Technician (9)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Sigmund Freud quote: A layman will no doubt find it hard to understand how pathological disorders of the body and mind can be el
A layman will no doubt find it hard to understand how pathological disorders of the body and mind can be eliminated by 'mere' words. He will feel that he is being asked to believe in magic. And he will not be so very wrong, for the words which we use in our everyday speech are nothing other than watered-down magic. But we shall have to follow a roundabout path in order to explain how science sets about restoring to words a part at least of their former magical power.
Psychical (or Mental) Treatment (1905), In James Strachey (ed.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (1953), Vol. 7, 283.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Down (456)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Explain (322)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Hard (243)  |  Layman (21)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Power (746)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Speech (61)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

A vital phenomenon can only be regarded as explained if it has been proven that it appears as the result of the material components of living organisms interacting according to the laws which those same components follow in their interactions outside of living systems.
Gesammelte Schriften (1904), Vol. 3, 767. Trans. Paul F. Cranefield, 'The Organic Physics of 1847 and the Biophysics of Today', Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 1957, 12, 410.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Component (48)  |  Explain (322)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Organism (220)  |  Outside (141)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  System (537)  |  Vital (85)

Accordingly the primordial state of things which I picture is an even distribution of protons and electrons, extremely diffuse and filling all (spherical) space, remaining nearly balanced for an exceedingly long time until its inherent instability prevails. We shall see later that the density of this distribution can be calculated; it was about one proton and electron per litre. There is no hurry for anything to begin to happen. But at last small irregular tendencies accumulate, and evolution gets under way. The first stage is the formation of condensations ultimately to become the galaxies; this, as we have seen, started off an expansion, which then automatically increased in speed until it is now manifested to us in the recession of the spiral nebulae.
As the matter drew closer together in the condensations, the various evolutionary processes followed—evolution of stars, evolution of the more complex elements, evolution of planets and life.
The Expanding Universe (1933), 56-57.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Closer (43)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Density (25)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Electron (93)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Expansion (41)  |  First (1283)  |  Formation (96)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Picture (143)  |  Planet (356)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Proton (21)  |  Remaining (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Stage (143)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Start (221)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)

After I had addressed myself to this very difficult and almost insoluble problem, the suggestion at length came to me how it could be solved with fewer and much simpler constructions than were formerly used, if some assumptions (which are called axioms) were granted me. They follow in this order.
There is no one center of all the celestial circles or spheres.
The center of the earth is not the center of the universe, but only of gravity and of the lunar sphere.
All the spheres revolve about the sun as their mid-point, and therefore the sun is the center of the universe.
The ratio of the earth's distance from the sun to the height of the firmament is so much smaller than the ratio of the earth's radius to its distance from the sun that the distance from the earth to the sun is imperceptible in comparison with the height of the firmament.
Whatever motion appears in the firmament arises not from any motion of the firmament, but from the earth's motion. The earth together with its circumjacent elements performs a complete rotation on its fixed poles in a daily motion, while the firmament and highest heaven abide unchanged.
What appears to us as motions of the sun arise not from its motion but from the motion of the earth and our sphere, with which we revolve about the sun like any other planet. The earth has, then, more than one motion.
The apparent retrograde and direct motion of the planets arises not from their motion but from the earth's. The motion of the earth alone, therefore, suffices to explain so many apparent inequalities in the heavens.
'The Commentariolus', in Three Copernican Treatises (c.1510), trans. E. Rosen (1939), 58-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Call (769)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Circle (110)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complete (204)  |  Construction (112)  |  Daily (87)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Explain (322)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Grant (73)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myself (212)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Pole (46)  |  Problem (676)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Retrograde (8)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Sun (385)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whatever (234)

All err the more dangerously because each follows a truth. Their mistake lies not in following a falsehood but in not following another truth.
From Pensées, as translated in W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms (1966), 325. From the original French, “Tous errent d'autant plus dangereusement qu’ils suivent chacun une vérité. Leur faute n’est pas de suivre une fausseté, mais de ne pas suivre une autre vérité,” in Oeuvres Complètes (1864), Vol. 1, 363.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Error (321)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Truth (1057)

All human affairs follow nature's great analogue, the growth of vegetation. There are three periods of growth in every plant. The first, and slowest, is the invisible growth by the root; the second and much accelerated is the visible growth by the stem; but when root and stem have gathered their forces, there comes the third period, in which the plant quickly flashes into blossom and rushes into fruit.
The beginnings of moral enterprises in this world are never to be measured by any apparent growth. ... At length comes the sudden ripeness and the full success, and he who is called in at the final moment deems this success his own. He is but the reaper and not the labourer. Other men sowed and tilled and he but enters into their labours.
Life Thoughts (1858), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogue (7)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entering (3)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Gather (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Laborer (7)  |  Labour (98)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Moment (253)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reaper (3)  |  Research (664)  |  Ripeness (2)  |  Root (120)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Soil (86)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Stem (31)  |  Success (302)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Visible (84)  |  World (1774)

All our knowledge has been built communally; there would be no astrophysics, there would be no history, there would not even be language, if man were a solitary animal. What follows? It follows that we must be able to rely on other people; we must be able to trust their word. That is, it follows that there is a principle, which binds society together because without it the individual would be helpless to tell the truth from the false. This principle is truthfulness.
In Lecture at M.I.T. (19 Mar 1953), collected in 'The Sense of Human Dignity', Science and Human Values (1956, 1990), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Bind (25)  |  Build (204)  |  Communal (7)  |  False (100)  |  Helpless (11)  |  History (673)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rely (11)  |  Society (326)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Tell (340)  |  Together (387)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

All that comes above that surface [of the globe] lies within the province of Geography. All that comes below that surface lies inside the realm of Geology. The surface of the earth is that which, so to speak, divides them and at the same time “binds them together in indissoluble union.” We may, perhaps, put the case metaphorically. The relationships of the two are rather like that of man and wife. Geography, like a prudent woman, has followed the sage advice of Shakespeare and taken unto her “an elder than herself;” but she does not trespass on the domain of her consort, nor could she possibly maintain the respect of her children were she to flaunt before the world the assertion that she is “a woman with a past.”
From Anniversary Address to Geological Society of London (20 Feb 1903), 'The Relations of Geology', published in Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London (22 May 1903), 59, Part 2, lxxviii. As reprinted in Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution (1904), 373.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Children (200)  |  Divide (75)  |  Domain (69)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elder (8)  |  Geography (36)  |  Geology (220)  |  Lie (364)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Past (337)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Province (35)  |  Realm (85)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sage (23)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Speak (232)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Trespass (5)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Wife (41)  |  Woman (151)  |  World (1774)

All that we can hope from these inspirations, which are the fruits of unconscious work, is to obtain points of departure for such calculations. As for the calculations themselves, they must be made in the second period of conscious work which follows the inspiration, and in which the results of the inspiration are verified and the consequences deduced.
Science and Method (1914, 2003), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Departure (9)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Hope (299)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Period (198)  |  Point (580)  |  Result (677)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Verification (31)  |  Work (1351)

Always be suspicious of conclusions that reinforce uncritical hope and follow comforting traditions of Western thought.
From The Flamingo's Smile (1987), 401.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Hope (299)  |  Reinforce (5)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Uncritical (3)  |  Western (45)

America has always been greatest when we dared to be great. We can reach for greatness again. We can follow our dreams to distant stars, living and working in space for peaceful, economic, and scientific gain. Tonight, I am directing NASA to develop a permanently manned space station and to do it within a decade.
From State of the Union Address (25 Jan 1984).
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Dare (50)  |  Decade (59)  |  Develop (268)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distant (33)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Economic (81)  |  Gain (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  NASA (11)  |  Peaceful (5)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Station (4)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Station (29)  |  Tonight (9)  |  United States (23)  |  Work (1351)

Among all highly civilized peoples the golden age of art has always been closely coincident with the golden age of the pure sciences, particularly with mathematics, the most ancient among them.
This coincidence must not be looked upon as accidental, but as natural, due to an inner necessity. Just as art can thrive only when the artist, relieved of the anxieties of existence, can listen to the inspirations of his spirit and follow in their lead, so mathematics, the most ideal of the sciences, will yield its choicest blossoms only when life’s dismal phantom dissolves and fades away, when the striving after naked truth alone predominates, conditions which prevail only in nations while in the prime of their development.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 191-192. From the original German, “Bei allen Kulturvölkern ist die Blüthezeit der Kunst auch immer zeitlich eng verbunden mit einer Blüthezeit der reinen Wissenschaften, insbesondere der ältesten unter ihnen, der Mathematik.
Dieses Zusammentreffen dürfte auch nicht ein zufälliges, sondern ein natürliches, ein Ergebniss innerer Notwendigkeit sein. Wie die Kunst nur gedeihen kann, wenn der Künstler, unbekümmert um die Bedrängnisse des Daseins, den Eingebungen seines Geistes lauschen und ihnen folgen kann, so kann die idealste Wissenschaft, die Mathematik, erst dann ihre schönsten Blüthen treiben, wenn des Erdenlebens schweres Traumbild sinkt und sinkt und sinkt, wenn das Streben nach der nackten Wahrheit allein bestimmend ist, was nur bei Nationen in der Vollkraft ihrer Entwickelung vorkommt.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Condition (356)  |  Development (422)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Due (141)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fade (10)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Inner (71)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessity (191)  |  People (1005)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Prime (11)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Relieve (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strive (46)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

Among natural bodies some have, and some have not, life; and by life we mean the faculties of self-nourishment, self-growth and self-decay. Thus every natural body partaking of life may be regarded as an essential existence; … but then it is an existence only in combination. … And since the organism is such a combination, being possessed of life, it cannot be the Vital Principle. Therefore it follows that the Vital Principle most be an essence, as being the form of a natural body, holding life in potentiality; but essence is a reality (entetechie). The Vital Principle is the original reality of a natural body endowed with potential life; this, however, is to be understood only of a body which may be organized. Thus the parts even of plants are organs, but they are organs that are altogether simple; as the leaf which is the covering of the pericarp, the pericarp of the fruit. If, then, there be any general formula for every kind of Vital Principle, it is—tthe primary reality of an organism.
Aristotle
In George Henry Lewes, Aristotle (1864), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Combination (144)  |  Covering (14)  |  Decay (53)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Essence (82)  |  Essential (199)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Fruit (102)  |  General (511)  |  Growth (187)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organism (220)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Potential (69)  |  Potentiality (9)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Self (267)  |  Simple (406)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vital (85)

And from this such small difference of eight minutes [of arc] it is clear why Ptolemy, since he was working with bisection [of the linear eccentricity], accepted a fixed equant point… . For Ptolemy set out that he actually did not get below ten minutes [of arc], that is a sixth of a degree, in making observations. To us, on whom Divine benevolence has bestowed the most diligent of observers, Tycho Brahe, from whose observations this eight-minute error of Ptolemy’s in regard to Mars is deduced, it is fitting that we accept with grateful minds this gift from God, and both acknowledge and build upon it. So let us work upon it so as to at last track down the real form of celestial motions (these arguments giving support to our belief that the assumptions are incorrect). This is the path I shall, in my own way, strike out in what follows. For if I thought the eight minutes in [ecliptic] longitude were unimportant, I could make a sufficient correction (by bisecting the [linear] eccentricity) to the hypothesis found in Chapter 16. Now, because they could not be disregarded, these eight minutes alone will lead us along a path to the reform of the whole of Astronomy, and they are the matter for a great part of this work.
Astronomia Nova, New Astronomy (1609), ch. 19, 113-4, Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937-), Vol. 3, 177-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arc (12)  |  Argument (138)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Both (493)  |  Tycho Brahe (23)  |  Build (204)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Correction (40)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difference (337)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Divine (112)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  Form (959)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Linear (13)  |  Longitude (6)  |  Making (300)  |  Mars (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observation (555)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Reform (22)  |  Regard (305)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Strike (68)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Support (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

And from true lordship it follows that the true God is living, intelligent, and powerful; from the other perfections, that he is supreme, or supremely perfect. He is eternal and infinite, omnipotent and omniscient; that is, he endures from eternity to eternity; and he is present from infinity to infinity; he rules all things, and he knows all things that happen or can happen.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), General Scholium, 941.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Endure (20)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eternity (63)  |  God (757)  |  Happen (274)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  Omnipotent (12)  |  Omniscient (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Rule (294)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Thing (1915)

And this grey spirit yearning in desire, To follow knowledge like a sinking star, beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
From poem, 'Ulysses', collected in The Complete Poetical Works of Tennyson (1909), Vol. 2, 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bound (119)  |  Desire (204)  |  Grey (10)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Thought (953)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

And this is a miracle of nature in part known, namely, that iron follows the part of a magnet that touches it, and flies from the other part of the same magnet. And the iron turns itself after moving to the part of the heavens conformed to the part of the magnet which it touched.
Science quotes on:  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Iron (96)  |  Known (454)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Touch (141)  |  Turn (447)

As a teenage fisherman, I watched and followed terns to find fish. Later I studied terns for my Ph.D. During those studies I came to see and love other seabirds. Albatrosses are the biggest, so they get your attention.
In 'Field Notes', National Geographic (Dec 2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Biggest (8)  |  Find (998)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Love (309)  |  Other (2236)  |  See (1081)  |  Study (653)  |  Tern (2)  |  Watch (109)

As ideas are preserved and communicated by means of words, it necessarily follows that we cannot improve the language of any science, without at the same time improving the science itself; neither can we, on the other hand, improve a science without improving the language or nomenclature which belongs to it.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, Preface, xiv-v.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Communication (94)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improve (58)  |  Language (293)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)  |  Word (619)

As mineralogy constitutes a part of chemistry, it is clear that this arrangement [of minerals] must derive its principles from chemistry. The most perfect mode of arrangement would certainly be to allow bodies to follow each other according to the order of their electro-chemical properties, from the most electro-negative, oxygen, to the most electro-positive, potassium; and to place every compound body according to its most electro-positive ingredient.
An Attempt to Establish a Pure Scientific System of Mineralogy (1814), trans. J. Black, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Body (537)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Classification (97)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Derive (65)  |  Electrochemistry (5)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Positive (94)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Principle (507)

As we discern a fine line between crank and genius, so also (and unfortunately) we must acknowledge an equally graded trajectory from crank to demagogue. When people learn no tools of judgment and merely follow their hopes, the seeds of political manipulation are sown.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Crank (18)  |  Discern (33)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fine (33)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grade (11)  |  Hope (299)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Learn (629)  |  Line (91)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Political (121)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sow (11)  |  Tool (117)  |  Trajectory (5)  |  Unfortunately (38)

Before delivering your lectures, the manuscript should be in such a perfect form that, if need be, it could be set in type. Whether you follow the manuscript during the delivery of the lecture is purely incidental. The essential point is that you are thus master of the subject matter.
Advice to his son. As quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side Of Scientists (1975), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Delivery (6)  |  Essential (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Master (178)  |  Matter (798)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Purely (109)  |  Set (394)  |  Subject (521)  |  Type (167)

Before his [Sir Astley Cooper’s] time, operations were too often frightful alternatives or hazardous compromises; and they were not seldom considered rather as the resource of despair than as a means of remedy; he always made them follow, as it were, in the natural course of treatment; he gave them a scientific character; and he moreover, succeeded, in a great degree, in divesting them of their terrors, by performing them unostentatiously, simply, confidently, and cheerfully, and thereby inspiring the patient with hope of relief, where previously resignation under misfortune had too often been all that could be expected from the sufferer.
In John Forbes (ed.), British and Foreign Medical Review (Jul 1840), 10, No. 19, 104. In Bransby Blake Cooper, The Life of Sir Astley Cooper (1843), Vol. 2, 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Character (243)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Consider (416)  |  Sir Astley Paston Cooper (13)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Despair (40)  |  Expect (200)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misfortune (12)  |  Natural (796)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Patient (199)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sufferer (7)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Terror (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)

Before Kuhn, most scientists followed the place-a-stone-in-the-bright-temple-of-knowledge tradition, and would have told you that they hoped, above all, to lay many of the bricks, perhaps even the keystone, of truth’s temple. Now most scientists of vision hope to foment revolution. We are, therefore, awash in revolutions, most self-proclaimed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Brick (18)  |  Bright (79)  |  Hope (299)  |  Keystone (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Most (1731)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Stone (162)  |  Tell (340)  |  Temple (42)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vision (123)

Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books.
In 'A Proposal for Amending the Laws of England' (1616). Collected in The Works, with Several Additional Pieces Never Before Printed (1740), Vol. 4, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)

But ... the working scientist ... is not consciously following any prescribed course of action, but feels complete freedom to utilize any method or device whatever which in the particular situation before him seems likely to yield the correct answer. ... No one standing on the outside can predict what the individual scientist will do or what method he will follow.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Answer (366)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Device (70)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feel (367)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Individual (404)  |  Likely (34)  |  Method (505)  |  Outside (141)  |  Particular (76)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seem (145)  |  Situation (113)  |  Stand (274)  |  Utilize (9)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

But no pursuit at Cambridge was followed with nearly so much eagerness or gave me so much pleasure as collecting beetles. It was the mere passion for collecting, for I did not dissect them, and rarely compared their external characters with published descriptions, but got them named anyhow. I will give a proof of my zeal: one day, on tearing off some old bark, I saw two rare beetles, and seized one in each hand; then I saw a third and new kind, which I could not bear to lose, so that I popped the one which I held in my right hand into my mouth. Alas! it ejected some intensely acrid fluid, which burnt my tongue so that I was forced to spit the beetle out, which was lost, as was the third one.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Bark (18)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Burn (87)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Classification (97)  |  Collection (64)  |  Compare (69)  |  Description (84)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Eager (15)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lose (159)  |  Lost (34)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Name (333)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rare (89)  |  Right (452)  |  Saw (160)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zeal (11)

By the fruit one judges the tree; the tree of science grows exceedingly slowly; centuries elapse before one can pluck the ripe fruits; even today it is hardly possible for us to shell and appraise the kernel of the teachings that blossomed in the seventeenth century. He who sows cannot therefore judge the worth of the corn. He must have faith in the fruitfulness of the seed in order that he may follow untiringly his chosen furrow when he casts his ideas to the four winds of heaven.
As quoted in Philipp Frank, Modern Science and its Philosophy (1949), 62, which cites Évolution de la Mécanique (1903).
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Cast (66)  |  Century (310)  |  Choose (112)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Corn (19)  |  Elapse (3)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Fruitfulness (2)  |  Furrow (4)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Idea (843)  |  Judge (108)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Possible (552)  |  Ripe (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seed (93)  |  Shell (63)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Sow (11)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Today (314)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worth (169)

Can the cause be reached from knowledge of the effect with the same certainty as the effect can be shown to follow from its cause? Is it possible for one effect to have many causes? If one determinate cause cannot be reached from the effect, since there is no effect which has not some cause, it follows that an effect, when it has one cause, may have another, and so that there may be several causes of it.
As quoted in Alistair Cameron Crombie, Robert Grosseteste and the Origins of Experimental Science, 1100-1700 (1971), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Determinate (6)  |  Effect (393)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reach (281)  |  Several (32)  |  Show (346)

Characteristically skeptical of the idea that living things would faithfully follow mathematical formulas, [Robert Harper] seized upon factors in corn which seemed to blend in the hybrid—rather than be represented by plus or minus signs, and put several seasons into throwing doubt upon the concept of immutable hypothetical units of inheritance concocted to account for selected results.
In 'Robert Almer Harper', National Academy Biographical Memoirs (1948), 25, 233-234.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Blend (9)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concoct (2)  |  Corn (19)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Factor (46)  |  Formula (98)  |  Robert Harper (2)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minus (7)  |  Plus (43)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Season (47)  |  Seize (15)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Skeptic (8)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)

Consider the hateful brew compounded with gleaming, deadly white lead whose fresh colour is like milk…. Over the victim’s jaws and in the grooves of the gums is plastered an astringent froth, and the furrow of the tongue turns rough on either side, and the depth of the throat grows somewhat dry, and from the pernicious venom follows a dry retching and hawking, for this affliction is severe; meanwhile his spirit sickens and he is worn out with mortal suffering. His body too grows chill, while sometimes his eyes behold strange illusions or else he drowses; nor can he bestir his limbs as heretofore, and he succumbs to the overmastering fatigue.
Nicander
As translated by A.S.F. Gow and A.F. Scholfield in Nicander: The Poems and Portical Fragments (1953), 99.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dry (57)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Grow (238)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lead Poisoning (4)  |  Milk (22)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Palsy (3)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Side (233)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strange (157)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Turn (447)  |  Venom (2)  |  Victim (35)  |  White (127)

Contrary to popular parlance, Darwin didn't discover evolution. He uncovered one (most would say the) essential mechanism by which it operates: natural selection. Even then, his brainstorm was incomplete until the Modern Synthesis of the early/mid-20th century when (among other things) the complementary role of genetic heredity was fully realized. Thousands upon thousands of studies have followed, providing millions of data points that support this understanding of how life on Earth has come to be as it is.
In online article, 'The Day That Botany Took on Bobby Jindal by Just Being Itself', Huffington Post (5 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Brainstorm (2)  |  Century (310)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Data (156)  |  Discover (553)  |  Early (185)  |  Earth (996)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life On Earth (9)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parlance (2)  |  Point (580)  |  Popular (29)  |  Role (86)  |  Say (984)  |  Selection (128)  |  Study (653)  |  Support (147)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Understanding (513)

Deprived, therefore, as regards this period, of any assistance from history, but relieved at the same time from the embarrassing interference of tradition, the archaeologist is free to follow the methods which have been so successfully pursued in geology—the rude bone and stone implements of bygone ages being to the one what the remains of extinct animals are to the other. The analogy may be pursued even further than this. Many mammalia which are extinct in Europe have representatives still living in other countries. Our fossil pachyderms, for instance, would be almost unintelligible but for the species which still inhabit some parts of Asia and Africa; the secondary marsupials are illustrated by their existing representatives in Australia and South America; and in the same manner, if we wish clearly to understand the antiquities of Europe, we must compare them with the rude implements and weapons still, or until lately, used by the savage races in other parts of the world. In fact, the Van Diemaner and South American are to the antiquary what the opossum and the sloth are to the geologist.
Pre-historic Times, as Illustrated by Ancient Remains, and the Manners and Customs of Modern Savages, (2nd ed. 1869, 1890), 429-430.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  Age (499)  |  America (127)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Animal (617)  |  Antiquary (4)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Australia (8)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Compare (69)  |  Europe (43)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Free (232)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Implement (13)  |  Interference (21)  |  Living (491)  |  Marsupial (2)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opossum (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Savage (29)  |  Sloth (6)  |  South (38)  |  South America (6)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unintelligible (15)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Describing laughter: The sound is produced by a deep inspiration followed by short, interrupted, spasmodic contractions of the chest, and especially the diaphragm... the mouth is open more or less widely, with the corners drawn much backwards, as well as a little upwards; and the upper lip is somewhat raised.
The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals
Science quotes on:  |  Backwards (17)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Corner (57)  |  Deep (233)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Open (274)  |  Produced (187)  |  Short (197)  |  Sound (183)  |  Upward (43)

Discovery follows discovery, each both raising and answering questions, each ending a long search, and each providing the new instruments for a new search.
In 'Prospects in the Arts and Sciences,' in Fifty Famous Essays (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Question (621)  |  Search (162)

Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
Anonymous
In Richard Alan Krieger, Civilization's Quotations: Life's Ideal (2002), 6. Although this source, and a number of others, attribute the quote to Ralph Waldo Emerson, none that the webmaster found have a citation, and a number of other sources treat it as anonymous. Thus, the webmaster references Emerson with doubt. If you know a definitive primary print source, please contact the webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Path (144)  |  Trail (10)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Boston (7)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fail (185)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Institution (69)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

During the last two centuries and a half, physical knowledge has been gradually made to rest upon a basis which it had not before. It has become mathematical. The question now is, not whether this or that hypothesis is better or worse to the pure thought, but whether it accords with observed phenomena in those consequences which can be shown necessarily to follow from it, if it be true
In Augustus De Morgan and Sophia Elizabeth De Morgan (ed.), A Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Century (310)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Question (621)  |  Rest (280)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Worse (24)

Each nerve cell receives connections from other nerve cells at six sites called synapses. But here is an astonishing fact—there are about one million billion connections in the cortical sheet. If you were to count them, one connection (or synapse) per second, you would finish counting some thirty-two million years after you began. Another way of getting a feeling for the numbers of connections in this extraordinary structure is to consider that a large match-head’s worth of your brain contains about a billion connections. Notice that I only mention counting connections. If we consider how connections might be variously combined, the number would be hyperastronomical—on the order of ten followed by millions of zeros. (There are about ten followed by eighty zero’s worth of positively charged particles in the whole known universe!)
Bright and Brilliant Fire, On the Matters of the Mind (1992), 17.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Billion (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Finish (59)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Match (29)  |  Mention (82)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Neurobiology (4)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Receive (114)  |  Structure (344)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)  |  Zero (37)

Education consists in co-operating with what is already inside a child's mind … The best way to learn geometry is to follow the road which the human race originally followed: Do things, make things, notice things, arrange things, and only then reason about things.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 27.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Best (459)  |  Child (307)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Inside (26)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Notice (77)  |  Original (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Road (64)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

Education in my family was not merely emphasized, it was our raison d'être. Virtually all of our aunts and uncles had Ph.D.s in science or engineering, and it was taken for granted that the next generation of Chu's were to follow the family tradition. When the dust had settled, my two brothers and four cousins collected three MDs, four Ph.D.s and a law degree. I could manage only a single advanced degree.
Autobiography in Gösta Ekspong (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1996-2000 (2002), 115.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brother (43)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dust (64)  |  Education (378)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Family (94)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grant (73)  |  Law (894)  |  Manage (23)  |  Merely (316)  |  Next (236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Settled (34)  |  Single (353)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Two (937)

Euler was a believer in God, downright and straightforward. The following story is told by Thiebault, in his Souvenirs de vingt ans de séjour à Berlin, … Thiebault says that he has no personal knowledge of the truth of the story, but that it was believed throughout the whole of the north of Europe. Diderot paid a visit to the Russian Court at the invitation of the Empress. He conversed very freely, and gave the younger members of the Court circle a good deal of lively atheism. The Empress was much amused, but some of her counsellors suggested that it might be desirable to check these expositions of doctrine. The Empress did not like to put a direct muzzle on her guest’s tongue, so the following plot was contrived. Diderot was informed that a learned mathematician was in possession of an algebraical demonstration of the existence of God, and would give it him before all the Court, if he desired to hear it. Diderot gladly consented: though the name of the mathematician is not given, it was Euler. He advanced toward Diderot, and said gravely, and in a tone of perfect conviction:
Monsieur, (a + bn) / n = x, donc Dieu existe; repondez!

Diderot, to whom algebra was Hebrew, was embarrassed and disconcerted; while peals of laughter rose on all sides. He asked permission to return to France at once, which was granted.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1878), 251. [The declaration in French expresses, “therefore God exists; please answer!” This Euler-Diderot anecdote, as embellished by De Morgan, is generally regarded as entirely fictional. Diderot before he became an encyclopedist was an accomplished mathematician and fully capable of recognizing—and responding to—the absurdity of an algebraic expression in proving the existence of God. See B.H. Brown, 'The Euler-Diderot Anecdote', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1942), 49, No. 5, 392-303. —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Amused (3)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atheism (9)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Check (24)  |  Circle (110)  |  Consent (14)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Converse (8)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Court (33)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Denis Diderot (6)  |  Direct (225)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Europe (43)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exposition (15)  |  France (27)  |  Freely (13)  |  Gladly (2)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Guest (5)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Inform (47)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lively (17)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Member (41)  |  Name (333)  |  North (11)  |  Peal (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permission (7)  |  Personal (67)  |  Plot (11)  |  Possession (65)  |  Return (124)  |  Rose (34)  |  Russia (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Side (233)  |  Story (118)  |  Straightforward (10)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tell (340)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tone (22)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Visit (26)  |  Whole (738)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

Even those to whom Providence has allotted greater strength of understanding, can expect only to improve a single science. In every other part of learning, they must be content to follow opinions, which they are not able to examine; and, even in that which they claim as peculiarly their own, can seldom add more than some small particle of knowledge, to the hereditary stock devolved to them from ancient times, the collective labour of a thousand intellects.
In Samuel Johnson and W. Jackson Bate (Ed.), ',The Rambler, No. 121, Tuesday, 14 May 1751.' The Selected Essays from the Rambler, Adventurer, and Idler (1968), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Claim (146)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expect (200)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learning (274)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Providence (18)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Strength (126)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understanding (513)

Every time a significant discovery is being made one sets in motion a tremendous activity in laboratories and industrial enterprises throughout the world. It is like the ant who suddenly finds food and walks back to the anthill while sending out material called food attracting substance. The other ants follow the path immediately in order to benefit from the finding and continue to do so as long as the supply is rich.
Nobel Banquet speech (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Ant (28)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Call (769)  |  Continue (165)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Find (998)  |  Food (199)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Motion (310)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Set (394)  |  Significant (74)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supply (93)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Walk (124)  |  World (1774)

Everyone has talent. What is rare is the courage to follow that talent to dark place where it leads.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Courage (69)  |  Dark (140)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Lead (384)  |  Place (177)  |  Rare (89)  |  Talent (94)

Everything material which is the subject of knowledge has number, order, or position; and these are her first outlines for a sketch of the universe. If our feeble hands cannot follow out the details, still her part has been drawn with an unerring pen, and her work cannot be gainsaid. So wide is the range of mathematical sciences, so indefinitely may it extend beyond our actual powers of manipulation that at some moments we are inclined to fall down with even more than reverence before her majestic presence. But so strictly limited are her promises and powers, about so much that we might wish to know does she offer no information whatever, that at other moments we are fain to call her results but a vain thing, and to reject them as a stone where we had asked for bread. If one aspect of the subject encourages our hopes, so does the other tend to chasten our desires, and he is perhaps the wisest, and in the long run the happiest, among his fellows, who has learned not only this science, but also the larger lesson which it directly teaches, namely, to temper our aspirations to that which is possible, to moderate our desires to that which is attainable, to restrict our hopes to that of which accomplishment, if not immediately practicable, is at least distinctly within the range of conception.
From Presidential Address (Aug 1878) to the British Association, Dublin, published in the Report of the 48th Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1878), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Actual (117)  |  Ask (411)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bread (39)  |  Call (769)  |  Chasten (2)  |  Conception (154)  |  Desire (204)  |  Detail (146)  |  Directly (22)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fall (230)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Hand (143)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hope (299)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Least (75)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Long (790)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Material (353)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Namely (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Number (699)  |  Offer (141)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outline (11)  |  Part (222)  |  Pen (20)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Practicable (2)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promise (67)  |  Range (99)  |  Reject (63)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Result (677)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teach (277)  |  Temper (9)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vain (83)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)

Experience is never at fault; it is only your judgment that is in error in promising itself such results from experience as are not caused by our experiments. For having given a beginning, what follows from it must necessarily be a natural development of such a beginning, unless it has been subject to a contrary influence, while, if it is affected by any contrary influence, the result which ought to follow from the aforesaid beginning will be found to partake of this contrary influence in a greater or less degree in proportion as the said influence is more or less powerful than the aforesaid beginning.
'Philosophy', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Degree (276)  |  Development (422)  |  Error (321)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fault (54)  |  Greater (288)  |  Influence (222)  |  Judgment (132)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Result (677)  |  Subject (521)  |  Will (2355)

Fertilization of mammalian eggs is followed by successive cell divisions and progressive differentiation, first into the early embryo and subsequently into all of the cell types that make up the adult animal. Transfer of a single nucleus at a specific stage of development, to an enucleated unfertilized egg, provided an opportunity to investigate whether cellular differentiation to that stage involved irreversible genetic modification. The first offspring to develop from a differentiated cell were born after nuclear transfer from an embryo-derived cell line that had been induced to became quiescent. Using the same procedure, we now report the birth of live lambs from three new cell populations established from adult mammary gland, fetus and embryo. The fact that a lamb was derived from an adult cell confirms that differentiation of that cell did not involve the irreversible modification of genetic material required far development to term. The birth of lambs from differentiated fetal and adult cells also reinforces previous speculation that by inducing donor cells to became quiescent it will be possible to obtain normal development from a wide variety of differentiated cells.
[Co-author of paper announcing the cloned sheep, ‘Dolly’.]
In I. Wilmut, A. E. Schnieke, J. McWhir, et al., 'Viable Offspring Derived from Petal and Adult Mammalian Cells', Nature (1997), 385, 810.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Author (167)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Clone (8)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Division (65)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Early (185)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Gland (14)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Modification (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Reinforce (5)  |  Required (108)  |  Single (353)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stage (143)  |  Successive (73)  |  Term (349)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Finally, since I thought that we could have all the same thoughts, while asleep, as we have while we are awake, although none of them is true at that time, I decided to pretend that nothing that ever entered my mind was any more true than the illusions of my dreams. But I noticed, immediately afterwards, that while I thus wished to think that everything was false, it was necessarily the case that I, who was thinking this, was something. When I noticed that this truth “I think, therefore I am” was so firm and certain that all the most extravagant assumptions of the sceptics were unable to shake it, I judged that I could accept it without scruple as the first principle of the philosophy for which I was searching. Then, when I was examining what I was, I realized that I could pretend that I had no body, and that there was no world nor any place in which I was present, but I could not pretend in the same way that I did not exist. On the contrary, from the very fact that I was thinking of doubting the truth of other things, it followed very evidently and very certainly that I existed; whereas if I merely ceased to think, even if all the rest of what I had ever imagined were true, I would have no reason to believe that I existed. I knew from this that I was a substance, the whole essence or nature of which was to think and which, in order to exist, has no need of any place and does not depend on anything material. Thus this self—that is, the soul by which I am what I am—is completely distinct from the body and is even easier to know than it, and even if the body did not exist the soul would still be everything that it is.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 4, 24-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Awake (19)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Depend (228)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Dream (208)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enter (141)  |  Essence (82)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Self (267)  |  Shake (41)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

First follow Nature, and your judgment frame
By her just standard, which is still the same:
Unerring nature, still divinely bright,
One clear, unchanged, and universal light,
Life, force, and beauty must to all impart,
At once the source, and end, and test of art.
#039;Essay On Criticism#039;, Miscellaneous Poems and Translations: by Several Hands (1720), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bright (79)  |  Change (593)  |  Clear (100)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Frame (26)  |  Impart (23)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Source (93)  |  Standard (57)  |  Still (613)  |  Test (211)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Universal (189)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Framework (31)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (23)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proper (144)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rigid (24)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Solid (116)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (300)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Swing (11)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Transition (26)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Follow Descartes! Do not give up the religion of your youth until you get a better one.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Do (1908)  |  Religion (361)  |  Youth (101)

Following the example of Archimedes who wished his tomb decorated with his most beautiful discovery in geometry and ordered it inscribed with a cylinder circumscribed by a sphere, James Bernoulli requested that his tomb be inscribed with his logarithmic spiral together with the words, “Eadem mutata resurgo,” a happy allusion to the hope of the Christians, which is in a way symbolized by the properties of that curve.
From 'Eloge de M. Bernoulli', Oeuvres de Fontenelle, t. 5 (1768), 112. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 143-144. [The Latin phrase, Eadem numero mutata resurgo means as “Though changed, I arise again exactly the same”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Allusion (2)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Christian (43)  |  Circumscribe (2)  |  Curve (49)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Decorate (2)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Example (94)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hope (299)  |  Inscribe (4)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1731)  |  Order (632)  |  Property (168)  |  Request (7)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Together (387)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)

Following the light of the sun, we left the Old World.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Leave (130)  |  Light (607)  |  Old (481)  |  Old World (8)  |  Sun (385)  |  World (1774)

For chemistry is no science form’d à priori; ’tis no production of the human mind, framed by reasoning and deduction: it took its rise from a number of experiments casually made, without any expectation of what follow’d; and was only reduced into an art or system, by collecting and comparing the effects of such unpremeditated experiments, and observing the uniform tendency thereof. So far, then, as a number of experimenters agree to establish any undoubted truth; so far they may be consider'd as constituting the theory of chemistry.
From 'The Author's Preface', in A New Method of Chemistry (1727), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Effect (393)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Number (699)  |  Production (183)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)

For it is too bad that there are so few who seek the truth and so few who do not follow a mistaken method in philosophy. This is not, however, the place to lament the misery of our century, but to rejoice with you over such beautiful ideas for proving the truth. So I add only, and I promise, that I shall read your book at leisure; for I am certain that I shall find the noblest things in it. And this I shall do the more gladly, because I accepted the view of Copernicus many years ago, and from this standpoint I have discovered from their origins many natural phenomena, which doubtless cannot be explained on the basis of the more commonly accepted hypothesis.
Letter (4 Aug 1597) to Kepler, expressing thanks and interest in the book Kepler sent him. As quoted in translation in Jackson J. Spielvogel, Western Civilization: Alternate Volume: Since 1300 (2010), Vol. 2, 494.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Bad (180)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Book (392)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Common (436)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lament (11)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Method (505)  |  Misery (30)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Origin (239)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Promise (67)  |  Prove (250)  |  Read (287)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Seek (213)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

For it is too bad that there are so few who seek the truth and so few who do not follow a mistaken method in philosophy. This is not, however, the place to lament the misery of our century, but to rejoice with you over such beautiful ideas for proving the truth. So I add only, and I promise, that I shall read your book at leisure; for I am certain that I shall find the noblest things in it. And this I shall do the more gladly, because I accepted the view of Copernicus many years ago, and from this standpoint I have discovered from their origins many natural phenomena, which doubtless cannot be explained on the basis of the more commonly accepted hypothesis.
In Letter to Johannes Kepler. As quoted in The Portable Renaissance Reader (1968), 597.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Bad (180)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Book (392)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lament (11)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Method (505)  |  Misery (30)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Origin (239)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Promise (67)  |  Read (287)  |  Seek (213)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

For the philosopher, order is the entirety of repetitions manifested, in the form of types or of laws, by perceived objects. Order is an intelligible relation. For the biologist, order is a sequence in space and time. However, according to Plato, all things arise out of their opposites. Order was born of the original disorder, and the long evolution responsible for the present biological order necessarily had to engender disorder.
An organism is a molecular society, and biological order is a kind of social order. Social order is opposed to revolution, which is an abrupt change of order, and to anarchy, which is the absence of order.
I am presenting here today both revolution and anarchy, for which I am fortunately not the only one responsible. However, anarchy cannot survive and prosper except in an ordered society, and revolution becomes sooner or later the new order. Viruses have not failed to follow the general law. They are strict parasites which, born of disorder, have created a very remarkable new order to ensure their own perpetuation.
'Interaction Among Virus, Cell, and Organism', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1965). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plato (76)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Type (167)  |  Virus (27)

For the truth of the conclusions of physical science, observation is the supreme Court of Appeal. It does not follow that every item which we confidently accept as physical knowledge has actually been certified by the Court; our confidence is that it would be certified by the Court if it were submitted. But it does follow that every item of physical knowledge is of a form which might be submitted to the Court. It must be such that we can specify (although it may be impracticable to carry out) an observational procedure which would decide whether it is true or not. Clearly a statement cannot be tested by observation unless it is an assertion about the results of observation. Every item of physical knowledge must therefore be an assertion of what has been or would be the result of carrying out a specified observational procedure.
In ’Scientific Epistemology', The Philosophy of Physical Science (1938, 2012), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Carry (127)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Court (33)  |  Form (959)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observational (15)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Statement (142)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)

For there are two modes of acquiring knowledge, namely, by reasoning and experience. Reasoning draws a conclusion and makes us grant the conclusion, but does not make the conclusion certain, nor does it remove doubt so that the mind may rest on the intuition of truth, unless the mind discovers it by the path of experience; since many have the arguments relating to what can be known, but because they lack experience they neglect the arguments, and neither avoid what is harmful nor follow what is good. For if a man who has never seen fire should prove by adequate reasoning that fire burns and injures things and destroys them, his mind would not be satisfied thereby, nor would he avoid fire, until he placed his hand or some combustible substance in the fire, so that he might prove by experience that which reasoning taught. But when he has had actual experience of combustion his mind is made certain and rests in the full light of truth. Therefore reasoning does not suffice, but experience does.
Opus Majus [1266-1268], Part VI, chapter I, trans. R. B. Burke, The Opus Majus of Roger Bacon (1928), Vol. 2, 583.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Argument (138)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Burn (87)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fire (189)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Lack (119)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Path (144)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)

For they are not given to idleness, nor go in a proud habit, or plush and velvet garments, often showing their rings upon their fingers, or wearing swords with silver hilts by their sides, or fine and gay gloves upon their hands, but diligently follow their labours, sweating whole days and nights by their furnaces. They do not spend their time abroad for recreation, but take delight in their laboratory. They wear leather garments with a pouch, and an apron wherewith they wipe their hands. They put their fingers amongst coals, into clay, and filth, not into gold rings. They are sooty and black like smiths and colliers, and do not pride themselves upon clean and beautiful faces.
As translated in Paracelsus and Arthur Edward Waite (ed.), The Hermetic and Alchemical Writings of Paracelsus (1894, 1976), Vol. 1, 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Apron (2)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Clay (9)  |  Clean (50)  |  Coal (57)  |  Day And Night (3)  |  Delight (108)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Face (212)  |  Filth (4)  |  Furnace (12)  |  Garment (13)  |  Glove (4)  |  Gold (97)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Labour (98)  |  Leather (4)  |  Pride (78)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Ring (16)  |  Side (233)  |  Silver (46)  |  Soot (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Sword (15)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Velvet (4)  |  Wear (18)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wipe (6)

From the infinitely great down to the infinitely small, all things are subject to [the laws of nature]. The sun and the planets follow the laws discovered by Newton and Laplace, just as the atoms in their combinations follow the laws of chemistry, as living creatures follow the laws of biology. It is only the imperfections of the human mind which multiply the divisions of the sciences, separating astronomy from physics or chemistry, the natural sciences from the social sciences. In essence, science is one. It is none other than the truth.
In Cours d’Economie Politique (1896-97).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Atom (355)  |  Biology (216)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Combination (144)  |  Creature (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Division (65)  |  Down (456)  |  Essence (82)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Planet (356)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)

From the point of view of the physicist, a theory of matter is a policy rather than a creed; its object is to connect or co-ordinate apparently diverse phenomena, and above all to suggest, stimulate and direct experiment. It ought to furnish a compass which, if followed, will lead the observer further and further into previously unexplored regions.
The Corpuscular Theory of Matter (1907), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Compass (34)  |  Connect (125)  |  Creed (27)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Lead (384)  |  Matter (798)  |  Object (422)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

From this fountain (the free will of God) it is those laws, which we call the laws of nature, have flowed, in which there appear many traces of the most wise contrivance, but not the least shadow of necessity. These therefore we must not seek from uncertain conjectures, but learn them from observations and experimental. He who is presumptuous enough to think that he can find the true principles of physics and the laws of natural things by the force alone of his own mind, and the internal light of his reason, must either suppose the world exists by necessity, and by the same necessity follows the law proposed; or if the order of Nature was established by the will of God, the [man] himself, a miserable reptile, can tell what was fittest to be done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Enough (340)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flow (83)  |  Force (487)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  God (757)  |  Himself (461)  |  Internal (66)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Least (75)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Presumptuous (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trace (103)  |  True (212)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)

From whence it is obvious to conclude that, since our Faculties are not fitted to penetrate into the internal Fabrick and real Essences of Bodies; but yet plainly discover to us the Being of a GOD, and the Knowledge of our selves, enough to lead us into a full and clear discovery of our Duty, and great Concernment, it will become us, as rational Creatures, to imploy those Faculties we have about what they are most adapted to, and follow the direction of Nature, where it seems to point us out the way.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 4, Chapter 12, Section 11, 646.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Creature (233)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Duty (68)  |  Enough (340)  |  Essence (82)  |  Faculty (72)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Internal (66)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Point (580)  |  Rational (90)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Further study of the division phenomena requires a brief discussion of the material which thus far I have called the stainable substance of the nucleus. Since the term nuclear substance could easily result in misinterpretation..., I shall coin the term chromatin for the time being. This does not indicate that this substance must be a chemical compound of a definite composition, remaining the same in all nuclei. Although this may be the case, we simply do not know enough about the nuclear substances to make such an assumption. Therefore, we will designate as chromatin that substance, in the nucleus, which upon treatment with dyes known as nuclear stains does absorb the dye. From my description of the results of staining resting and dividing cells... it follows that the chromatin is distributed throughout the whole resting nucleus, mostly in the nucleoli, the network, and the membrane, but also in the ground-substance. In nuclear division it accumulates exclusively in the thread figures. The term achromatin suggests itself automatically for the unstainable substance of the nucleus. The terms chromatic and achromatic which will be used henceforth are thus explained.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chromatic (4)  |  Chromatin (4)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Definite (110)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dye (10)  |  Enough (340)  |  Explain (322)  |  Figure (160)  |  Ground (217)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Material (353)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Must (1526)  |  Network (21)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thread (32)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

He who ascribes the movement of the seas to the movement of the earth assumes a purely forced movement; but he who lets the seas follow the moon makes this movement in a certain way a natural one.
As quoted in James Bruce Ross and Mary Martin McLaughlin, The Portable Renaissance Reader (1968), 603.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Earth (996)  |  Force (487)  |  Moon (237)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Purely (109)  |  Sea (308)  |  Way (1217)

He who knows not, and knows not he knows not, he is a fool—shun him;
He who knows not, and knows he knows not, he is simple—teach him;
He who knows, and knows not he knows, he is asleep—wake him;
He who knows, and knows he knows, he is wise—follow him.
Anonymous
Hesiod, 'Works and Days,' 293-7. In William White, Notes and Queries (1904), Series 10, Vol. 1, 235, the correspondent H.A. Strong says that the origin of these lines is to be found in Hesiod [Greek, 8th Century B.C.], Works and Days, 293-7; that the passage was very celebrated in antiquity, and is quoted by Aristotle, Nic. Eth., i. 4; and that both Livy (xxii. 29) and Cicero (Pro Cluent., 31) refer to it. Another correspondent (J.H.K.) said it was stated to be an Arab proverb in Lady [Isabel] Burton, Life of [Captain] Sir Richard [F.] Burton (1893), Vol. 1, 548, footnote, with 'Men are four…' added to the beginning of the quote.
Science quotes on:  |  Fool (116)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Shun (4)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)

Hence dusky Iron sleeps in dark abodes,
And ferny foliage nestles in the nodes;
Till with wide lungs the panting bellows blow,
And waked by fire the glittering torrents flow;
Quick whirls the wheel, the ponderous hammer falls,
Loud anvils ring amid the trembling walls,
Strokes follow strokes, the sparkling ingot shines,
Flows the red slag, the lengthening bar refines;
Cold waves, immersed, the glowing mass congeal,
And turn to adamant the hissing Steel.
Science quotes on:  |  Adamant (3)  |  Anvil (3)  |  Bellows (5)  |  Blow (44)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dusky (4)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flow (83)  |  Foliage (5)  |  Furnace (12)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Ingot (2)  |  Iron (96)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Refine (8)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Steel (21)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Wide (96)

His [Marvin Minsky’s] basic interest seemed to be in the workings of the human mind and in making machine models of the mind. Indeed, about that time he and a friend made one of the first electronic machines that could actually teach itself to do something interesting. It monitored electronic “rats” that learned to run mazes. It was being financed by the Navy. On one notable occasion, I remember descending to the basement of Memorial Hall, while Minsky worked on it. It had an illuminated display panel that enabled one to follow the progress of the “rats.” Near the machine was a hamster in a cage. When the machine blinked, the hamster would run around its cage happily. Minsky, with his characteristic elfin grin, remarked that on a previous day the Navy contract officer had been down to see the machine. Noting the man’s interest in the hamster, Minsky had told him laconically, “The next one we build will look like a bird.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basic (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Build (204)  |  Cage (12)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Display (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Electronic (12)  |  First (1283)  |  Friend (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Maze (10)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Marvin Minsky (10)  |  Model (102)  |  Monitor (7)  |  Navy (9)  |  Next (236)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Officer (12)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rat (37)  |  Remember (179)  |  Run (174)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

How often people speak of art and science as though they were two entirely different things, with no interconnection. An artist is emotional, they think, and uses only his intuition; he sees all at once and has no need of reason. A scientist is cold, they think, and uses only his reason; he argues carefully step by step, and needs no imagination. That is all wrong. The true artist is quite rational as well as imaginative and knows what he is doing; if he does not, his art suffers. The true scientist is quite imaginative as well as rational, and sometimes leaps to solutions where reason can follow only slowly; if he does not, his science suffers.
'Prometheus.' The Roving Mind (1983), Chap 25.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cold (112)  |  Different (577)  |  Doing (280)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leap (53)  |  People (1005)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Speak (232)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Wrong (234)

Human society is made up of partialities. Each citizen has an interest and a view of his own, which, if followed out to the extreme, would leave no room for any other citizen.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (51)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Interest (386)  |  Other (2236)  |  Partiality (3)  |  Society (326)  |  View (488)

I always tried to live up to Leo Szilard's commandment, “don't lie if you don't have to.” I had to. I filled up pages with words and plans I knew I would not follow. When I go home from my laboratory in the late afternoon, I often do not know what I am going to do the next day. I expect to think that up during the night. How could I tell them what I would do a year hence?
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Filling (6)  |  Following (16)  |  Home (170)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Late (118)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Page (30)  |  Plan (117)  |  Leo Szilard (6)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

I am a believer in unconscious cerebration. The brain is working all the time, though we do not know it. At night it follows up what we think in the daytime. When I have worked a long time on one thing, I make it a point to bring all the facts regarding it together before I retire; I have often been surprised at the results… We are thinking all the time; it is impossible not to think.
In Orison Swett Marden, 'Bell Telephone Talk: Hints on Success by Alexander G. Bell', How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (1901), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Brain (270)  |  Daytime (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Night (120)  |  Point (580)  |  Result (677)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Work (1351)

I am a strong advocate for free thought on all subjects, yet it appears to me (whether rightly or wrongly) that direct arguments against christianity & theism produce hardly any effect on the public; & freedom of thought is best promoted by the gradual illumination of men's minds, which follow[s] from the advance of science. It has, therefore, been always my object to avoid writing on religion, & I have confined myself to science. I may, however, have been unduly biassed by the pain which it would give some members of my family, if I aided in any way direct attacks on religion.
Letter to E.B. Aveling (13 Oct 1880).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advocate (18)  |  Against (332)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attack (84)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Best (459)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effect (393)  |  Family (94)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Object (422)  |  Pain (136)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strong (174)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Way (1217)  |  Writing (189)

I am told that the wall paintings which we had the happiness of admiring in all their beauty and freshness [in the chapel she discovered at Abu Simbel] are already much injured. Such is the fate of every Egyptian monument, great or small. The tourist carves it over with names and dates, and in some instances with caricatures. The student of Egyptology, by taking wet paper “squeezes” sponges away every vestige of the original colour. The “Collector” buys and carries off everything of value that he can, and the Arab steals it for him. The work of destruction, meanwhile goes on apace. The Museums of Berlin, of Turin, of Florence are rich in spoils which tell their lamentable tale. When science leads the way, is it wonderful that ignorance should follow?
Quoted in Margaret S. Drower, The Early Years, in T.G.H. James, (ed.), Excavating in Egypt: The Egypt Exploration Society, 1882-1982 (1982), 10. As cited in Wendy M.K. Shaw, Possessors and Possessed: Museums, Archaeology, and the Visualization of History in the Late Ottoman Empire (2003), 37. Also quoted in Margaret S. Drower, Flinders Petrie: A Life in Archaeology (1995), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Arab (4)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Buy (20)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Carry (127)  |  Carve (5)  |  Collector (9)  |  Color (137)  |  Date (13)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Discover (553)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Egyptology (3)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fate (72)  |  Freshness (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Injure (3)  |  Instance (33)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Lead (384)  |  Monument (45)  |  Museum (31)  |  Name (333)  |  Original (58)  |  Painting (44)  |  Paper (182)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Steal (13)  |  Student (300)  |  Tale (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tourist (6)  |  Turin (3)  |  Value (365)  |  Vestige (11)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fall (230)  |  Final (118)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Omit (11)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Review (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scope (45)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I cannot find anything showing early aptitude for acquiring languages; but that he [Clifford] had it and was fond of exercising it in later life is certain. One practical reason for it was the desire of being able to read mathematical papers in foreign journals; but this would not account for his taking up Spanish, of which he acquired a competent knowledge in the course of a tour to the Pyrenees. When he was at Algiers in 1876 he began Arabic, and made progress enough to follow in a general way a course of lessons given in that language. He read modern Greek fluently, and at one time he was furious about Sanskrit. He even spent some time on hieroglyphics. A new language is a riddle before it is conquered, a power in the hand afterwards: to Clifford every riddle was a challenge, and every chance of new power a divine opportunity to be seized. Hence he was likewise interested in the various modes of conveying and expressing language invented for special purposes, such as the Morse alphabet and shorthand. … I have forgotten to mention his command of French and German, the former of which he knew very well, and the latter quite sufficiently; …
In paper, 'William Kingdon Clifford', The Fortnightly Review (1879), 31, 671. Published in advance of Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Clifford’s Lectures and Essays (1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 9. The 'Introduction' was written by Pollock.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Arabic (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Command (58)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Course (409)  |  Desire (204)  |  Divine (112)  |  Early (185)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Former (137)  |  French (20)  |  General (511)  |  German (36)  |  Greek (107)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  Interest (386)  |  Journal (30)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Modern (385)  |  New (1216)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progress (465)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Shorthand (5)  |  Special (184)  |  Spent (85)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tour (2)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)

I cannot serve as an example for younger scientists to follow. What I teach cannot be learned. I have never been a “100 percent scientist.” My reading has always been shamefully nonprofessional. I do not own an attaché case, and therefore cannot carry it home at night, full of journals and papers to read. I like long vacations, and a catalogue of my activities in general would be a scandal in the ears of the apostles of cost-effectiveness. I do not play the recorder, nor do I like to attend NATO workshops on a Greek island or a Sicilian mountain top; this shows that I am not even a molecular biologist. In fact, the list of what I have not got makes up the American Dream. Readers, if any, will conclude rightly that the Gradus ad Parnassum will have to be learned at somebody else’s feet.
In Heraclitean Fire: Sketches from a Life before Nature (1978), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attend (65)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Carry (127)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Cost (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Ear (68)  |  Effectiveness (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  Greek (107)  |  Home (170)  |  Island (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Long (790)  |  Molecular Biologist (2)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Paper (182)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Teach (277)  |  Top (96)  |  Will (2355)  |  Workshop (14)  |  Younger (21)

I consider it extremely doubtful whether the happiness of the human race has been enhanced by the technical and industrial developments that followed in the wake of rapidly progressing natural science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (416)  |  Development (422)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Industrial Development (4)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Progress (465)  |  Race (268)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Technical (43)  |  Wake (13)

I do not intend to go deeply into the question how far mathematical studies, as the representatives of conscious logical reasoning, should take a more important place in school education. But it is, in reality, one of the questions of the day. In proportion as the range of science extends, its system and organization must be improved, and it must inevitably come about that individual students will find themselves compelled to go through a stricter course of training than grammar is in a position to supply. What strikes me in my own experience with students who pass from our classical schools to scientific and medical studies, is first, a certain laxity in the application of strictly universal laws. The grammatical rules, in which they have been exercised, are for the most part followed by long lists of exceptions; accordingly they are not in the habit of relying implicitly on the certainty of a legitimate deduction from a strictly universal law. Secondly, I find them for the most part too much inclined to trust to authority, even in cases where they might form an independent judgment. In fact, in philological studies, inasmuch as it is seldom possible to take in the whole of the premises at a glance, and inasmuch as the decision of disputed questions often depends on an aesthetic feeling for beauty of expression, or for the genius of the language, attainable only by long training, it must often happen that the student is referred to authorities even by the best teachers. Both faults are traceable to certain indolence and vagueness of thought, the sad effects of which are not confined to subsequent scientific studies. But certainly the best remedy for both is to be found in mathematics, where there is absolute certainty in the reasoning, and no authority is recognized but that of one’s own intelligence.
In 'On the Relation of Natural Science to Science in general', Popular Lectures on Scientific Subjects, translated by E. Atkinson (1900), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Application (242)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Authority (95)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Classical (45)  |  Compel (30)  |  Confine (26)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Course (409)  |  Decision (91)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Fault (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glance (34)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Grammatical (2)  |  Habit (168)  |  Happen (274)  |  Important (209)  |  Improve (58)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intend (16)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Laxity (2)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  List (10)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medical (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Often (106)  |  Organization (114)  |  Part (222)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philological (3)  |  Place (177)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Refer (14)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sadness (35)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Strict (17)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Supply (93)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Traceable (5)  |  Training (80)  |  Trust (66)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

I do not think that G. H. Hardy was talking nonsense when he insisted that the mathematician was discovering rather than creating, nor was it wholly nonsense for Kepler to exult that he was thinking God's thoughts after him. The world for me is a necessary system, and in the degree to which the thinker can surrender his thought to that system and follow it, he is in a sense participating in that which is timeless or eternal.
'Reply to Lewis Edwin Hahn', The Philosophy of Brand Blanshard (1980), 901.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eternal (110)  |  God (757)  |  G. H. Hardy (71)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Sense (770)  |  Surrender (20)  |  System (537)  |  Talking (76)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Timeless (8)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)

I had a feeling of exhilaration that the 'gadget' had gone off properly followed by one of deep relief. I wouldn't have to go to the tower to see what had gone wrong.
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (233)  |  Exhilaration (6)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Relief (30)  |  See (1081)  |  Tower (42)  |  Wrong (234)

I had … during many years, followed a golden rule, namely, that whenever a published fact, a new observation or thought came across me, which was opposed by my general results, to make a memorandum of it without fail and at once; for I had found by experience that such facts and thoughts were far more apt to escape from memory than favorable ones.
In The Autobiography of Charles Darwin with original omissions restored, edited by Nora Barlow (1958).
Science quotes on:  |  Escape (80)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Favorable (24)  |  General (511)  |  Golden (45)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Year (933)

I have always felt that astronomical hypotheses should not be regarded as articles of faith, but should only serve as a framework for astronomical calculations, so that it does not matter whether they were right or wrong, as long as the phenomena can be characterized precisely. For who could possibly be certain as to whether the uneven movement of the sun, if we follow the hypotheses of Ptolemy, can be explained by assuming an epicycle or eccentricity. Both assumptions are plausible. That’s why I would consider it quite desirable for you to tell something about that in the preface. In this way you would appease the Aristotelians and the theologians, whose opposition you dread.
From surviving fragment of a Letter (20 Apr 1541) answering a query from Copernicus as to whether he should publish his book (De Revolutionibus). From the German in Leopold Friedrich Prowe, Nicolaus Coppernicus (1883), Vol. 1, Part 2, 521-522. Translated from Prowe by Webmaster using web resources. Original German: “Hypothesen nicht als Glaubens-Artikel zu betrachten seien, sondern nur als Grundlage für die astronomischen Rechnungen zu dienen hätten, so dass es nicht darauf ankomme, ob sie richtig oder falsch seien, wofern sich nur die Erscheinungen dadurch genau bestimmen liessen. »Denn wer dürfte uns wohl darüber sichere Auskunft geben, ob die ungleiche Bewegung der Sonne, wenn wir den Hypothesen des Ptolemaeus folgen, durch Annahme eines Epicykels oder der Ekcentricität zu erklären sei. Beide Annahmen sind gestattet. Daher würde ich—so schliesst Osiander—es für recht wünschenswerth erachten, wenn Du hierüber in der Vorrede etwas beibrächtest. Auf diese Weise würdest Du die Aristoteliker und die Theologen milder stimmen, von denen Du befürchtest, dass sie heftigen Widerspruch kundthun werden.«” Compare Latin text, from Johannes Kepler, 'Apologia Tychonia', Astronomi Opera Omnia (1858), Vol. 1, 246: “De hypothesibus ego sic sensi semper, non esse articulos fidei, sed fundamenta calculi ita ut, etiamsi falsae sint, modo motuum φαινομενα exacte exhibeant, nihil referat; quis enim nos certiores reddet, an Solis inaequalis motus nomine epicycli an nomine eccentricitatis contingat, si Ptolemaei hypotheses sequamur, cum id possit utrumque. Quare plausibile fore videretur, si hac de re in praefatione nonnihil attingeres. Sic enim placidiores redderes peripatheticos et theologos, quos contradicturos metuis.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Allowable (2)  |  Appease (6)  |  Aristotelian (2)  |  Article (22)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Consider (416)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Eccentricity (3)  |  Epicycle (4)  |  Explain (322)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fear (197)  |  Framework (31)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Movement (155)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Preface (8)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Regard (305)  |  Right (452)  |  Something (719)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Vehement (2)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wrong (234)

I have mentioned mathematics as a way to settle in the mind a habit of reasoning closely and in train; not that I think it necessary that all men should be deep mathematicians, but that, having got the way of reasoning which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion. For in all sorts of reasoning, every single argument should be managed as a mathematical demonstration; the connection and dependence of ideas should be followed till the mind is brought to the source on which it bottoms, and observes the coherence all along; …
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bring (90)  |  Closely (12)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Connection (162)  |  Deep (233)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Settle (19)  |  Single (353)  |  Sort (49)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Train (114)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Way (1217)

I have now said enough to show you that it is indispensable for this country to have a scientific education in connexion with manufacturers, if we wish to outstrip the intellectual competition which now, happily for the world, prevails in all departments of industry. As surely as darkness follows the setting of the sun, so surely will England recede as a manufacturing nation, unless her industrial population become much more conversant with science than they are now.
In 'The Study of Abstract Science Essential to the Progress of Industry', Records of the School of Mines (1852) 1, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Competition (39)  |  Connection (162)  |  Conversant (6)  |  Country (251)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Department (92)  |  Education (378)  |  England (40)  |  Enough (340)  |  Industry (137)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Manufacturer (10)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Outstrip (3)  |  Population (110)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Recede (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Setting (44)  |  Show (346)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surely (101)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

I have said that the investigation for which the teeth of the shark had furnished an opportunity, was very near an end... But thereafter, while I was examining more carefully these details of both places and bodies [sedimentary deposits and shells], these day by day presented points of doubt to me as they followed one another in indissoluble connection, so that I saw myself again and again brought back to the starting-place, as it were, when I thought I was nearest the goal. I might compare those doubts to the heads of the Lernean Hydra, since when one of them had been got rid of, numberless others were born; at any rate, I saw that I was wandering about in a sort of labyrinth, where the nearer one approaches the exit, the wider circuits does one tread.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Care (186)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Compare (69)  |  Connection (162)  |  Detail (146)  |  Doubt (304)  |  End (590)  |  Examination (98)  |  Exit (4)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hydra (2)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sediment (8)  |  Shark (10)  |  Shell (63)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Tread (17)  |  Wandering (5)

I immediately loved working with flies. They fascinated me, and followed me around in my dreams.
1995 Nobel Prize - Nobel Autobiography
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (208)  |  Fruit Fly (6)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Immediately (114)

I knew, however, that it would cost ten times what I had available in order to build a molecular beam machine. I decided to follow a byway, rather than the highway. It is a procedure I have subsequently recommended to beginning scientists in this country, where research strategy is best modelled on that used by Wolfe at the Plains of Abraham.
(British General James Wolfe defeated the French defending Quebec in 1759 after scaling a cliff for a surprise attack.)
'A Scientist and the World He Lives In', Speech to the Empire Club of Canada (27 Nov 1986) in C. Frank Turner and Tim Dickson (eds.), The Empire Club of Canada Speeches 1986-1987 (1987), 149-161.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Available (78)  |  Beam (24)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  British (41)  |  Build (204)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Cost (86)  |  Country (251)  |  Defeat (29)  |  General (511)  |  Machine (257)  |  Order (632)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)

I like to summarize what I regard as the pedestal-smashing messages of Darwin’s revolution in the following statement, which might be chanted several times a day, like a Hare Krishna mantra, to encourage penetration into the soul: Humans are not the end result of predictable evolutionary progress, but rather a fortuitous cosmic afterthought, a tiny little twig on the enormously arborescent bush of life, which, if replanted from seed, would almost surely not grow this twig again, or perhaps any twig with any property that we would care to call consciousness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Bush (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Care (186)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Encourage (40)  |  End (590)  |  Enormously (4)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hare (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Message (49)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Progress (465)  |  Property (168)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Seed (93)  |  Several (32)  |  Soul (226)  |  Statement (142)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Twig (14)

I notice that, in the lecture … which Prof. Lowry gave recently, in Paris … he brought forward certain freak formulae for tartaric acid, in which hydrogen figures as bigamist … I may say, he but follows the loose example set by certain Uesanians, especially one G. N. Lewis, a Californian thermodynamiter, who has chosen to disregard the fundamental canons of chemistry—for no obvious reason other than that of indulging in premature speculation upon electrons as the cause of valency…
'Bigamist Hydrogen. A Protest', Nature (1926), 117, 553.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Electron (93)  |  Figure (160)  |  Forward (102)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Notice (77)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Valency (4)

I regret that it has been necessary for me in this lecture to administer such a large dose of four-dimensional geometry. I do not apologize, because I am really not responsible for the fact that nature in its most fundamental aspect is four-dimensional. Things are what they are; and it is useless to disguise the fact that “what things are” is often very difficult for our intellects to follow.
From The Concept of Nature (1920, 1964), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Administer (3)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dose (16)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Large (394)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Regret (30)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Thing (1915)

I remember my first look at the great treatise of Maxwell’s when I was a young man… I saw that it was great, greater and greatest, with prodigious possibilities in its power… I was determined to master the book and set to work. I was very ignorant. I had no knowledge of mathematical analysis (having learned only school algebra and trigonometry which I had largely forgotten) and thus my work was laid out for me. It took me several years before I could understand as much as I possibly could. Then I set Maxwell aside and followed my own course. And I progressed much more quickly… It will be understood that I preach the gospel according to my interpretation of Maxwell.
From translations of a letter (24 Feb 1918), cited in Paul J. Nahin, Oliver Heaviside: The Life, Work, and Times of an Electrical Genius of the Victorian Age (2002), 24. Nahin footnotes that the words are not verbatim, but are the result of two translations. Heaviside's original letter in English was quoted, translated in to French by J. Bethenode, for the obituary he wrote, "Oliver Heaviside", in Annales des Posies Telegraphs (1925), 14, 521-538. The quote was retranslated back to English in Nadin's book. Bethenode footnoted that he made the original translation "as literally as possible in order not to change the meaning." Nadin assures that the retranslation was done likewise. Heaviside studyied Maxwell's two-volume Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Book (392)  |  Course (409)  |  Determination (78)  |  First (1283)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  More (2559)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Power (746)  |  Preach (11)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remember (179)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

I see with much pleasure that you are working on a large work on the integral Calculus [ ... ] The reconciliation of the methods which you are planning to make, serves to clarify them mutually, and what they have in common contains very often their true metaphysics; this is why that metaphysics is almost the last thing that one discovers. The spirit arrives at the results as if by instinct; it is only on reflecting upon the route that it and others have followed that it succeeds in generalising the methods and in discovering its metaphysics.
Letter to S. F. Lacroix, 1792. Quoted in S. F. Lacroix, Traité du calcul differentiel et du calcul integral (1797), Vol. 1, xxiv, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculus (65)  |  Clarification (7)  |  Common (436)  |  Discover (553)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Integral (26)  |  Integral Calculus (6)  |  Integration (19)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planning (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Result (677)  |  Route (15)  |  See (1081)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

I shall never forget my first encounter with gorillas. Sound preceded sight. Odor preceded sound in the form of an overwhelming, musky-barnyard, humanlike scent. The air was suddenly rent by a high-pitched series of screams followed by the rhythmic rondo of sharp pok-pok chestbeats from a great silverbacked male obscured behind what seemed an impenetrable wall of vegetation.
Describing her 1963 trip to Kabara in Gorillas in the Mist (1983), 3. (The screams and chest-beating were of alarm, not ferocity.)
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Barnyard (2)  |  Behind (137)  |  Encounter (22)  |  First (1283)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Impenetrable (5)  |  Musk (2)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Odor (10)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Scent (7)  |  Scream (6)  |  Series (149)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Sight (132)  |  Silverback (2)  |  Sound (183)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Wall (67)

I should study Nature’s laws in all their crossings and unions; I should follow magnetic streams to their source and follow the shores of our magnetic oceans. I should go among the rays of the aurora, and follow them to their beginnings, and study their dealings and communications with other powers and expressions of matter.
John Muir
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aurora (3)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Communication (94)  |  Crossing (2)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Ray (114)  |  Shore (24)  |  Source (93)  |  Stream (81)  |  Study (653)  |  Union (51)

I think it perfectly just, that he who, from the love of experiment, quits an approved for an uncertain practice, should suffer the full penalty of Egyptian law against medical innovation; as I would consign to the pillory, the wretch, who out of regard to his character, that is, to his fees, should follow the routine, when, from constant experience he is sure that his patient will die under it, provided any, not inhuman, deviation would give his patient a chance.
From his researches in Fever, 196. In John Edmonds Stock, Memoirs of the life of Thomas Beddoes (1810), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Consign (2)  |  Constant (144)  |  Death (388)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fee (9)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Justice (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Love (309)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Regard (305)  |  Routine (25)  |  Think (1086)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wretch (5)

I think, and I am not the only one who does, that it is important never to introduce any conception which may not be completely defined by a finite number of words. Whatever may be the remedy adopted, we can promise ourselves the joy of the physician called in to follow a beautiful pathological case [beau cas pathologique].
From address read at the general session of the Fourth International Congress of Mathematicians in Rome (10 Apr 1908). As translated in 'The Future of Mathematics: by Henri Poincaré', General Appendix, Annual Report of the Boars of Regents of The Smithsonian Institution: For the Year Ending June 1909 (1910), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conception (154)  |  Define (49)  |  Finite (59)  |  Important (209)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Joy (107)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Physician (273)  |  Promise (67)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Think (1086)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Word (619)

I thought it was a miracle that I got this faculty appointment and was so happy to be there for a few years that I just wanted to follow what was exciting for me. I didn’t have expectations of getting tenure. So this was an aspect of gender inequality that was extremely positive. It allowed me to be fearless.
As quoted in Anna Azvolinsky, 'Fearless About Folding', The Scientist (Jan 2016).
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Appointment (12)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fearless (6)  |  Gender (3)  |  Happy (105)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Positive (94)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Want (497)  |  Year (933)

I undertake my scientific research with the confident assumption that the earth follows the laws of nature which God established at creation. … My studies are performed with the confidence that God will not capriciously confound scientific results by “slipping in” a miracle.
Quoted in Lenny Flank, Deception by Design: The Intelligent Design Movement in America (2007), 81. Also seen as cited from Arthur Newell Strahler, Science and Earth History: the Evolution/Creation Controversy (1987), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Confident (25)  |  Confound (21)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Establish (57)  |  Following (16)  |  God (757)  |  Law (894)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Slip (5)  |  Study (653)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Will (2355)

I venture to assert that the feelings one has when the beautiful symbolism of the infinitesimal calculus first gets a meaning, or when the delicate analysis of Fourier has been mastered, or while one follows Clerk Maxwell or Thomson into the strange world of electricity, now growing so rapidly in form and being, or can almost feel with Stokes the pulsations of light that gives nature to our eyes, or track with Clausius the courses of molecules we can measure, even if we know with certainty that we can never see them I venture to assert that these feelings are altogether comparable to those aroused in us by an exquisite poem or a lofty thought.
In paper (May 1891) read before Bath Branch of the Teachers’ Guild, published in The Practical Teacher (July 1891), reprinted as 'Geometry', in Frederic Spencer, Chapters on the Aims and Practice of Teaching (1897), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Assert (66)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Rudolf Clausius (9)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Course (409)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Growing (98)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Infinitesimal Calculus (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pulsation (4)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  See (1081)  |  Sir George Gabriel Stokes (3)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbolism (3)  |  Sir J.J. Thomson (18)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  World (1774)

Ideas are like stars: You will not succeed in touching them with your hands, but like the seafaring man on the ocean desert of waters, you choose them as your guides, and following them, you reach your destiny.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (112)  |  Desert (56)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hand (143)  |  Idea (843)  |  Man (2251)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Reach (281)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Touch (141)  |  Touching (16)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

If a lunatic scribbles a jumble of mathematical symbols it does not follow that the writing means anything merely because to the inexpert eye it is indistinguishable from higher mathematics.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), Vol. 2, 232. Also in J.R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics (1956, 1960), Vol. 1, 308.
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (419)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Indistinguishable (2)  |  Inexpert (2)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Lunatic (9)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Scribble (5)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Writing (189)

If feeling be not a property of matter, but owing to a superior principle, it must follow, that the motions of the heart, and other muscles of animals, after being separated from their bodies, are to be ascribed to this principle; and that any difficulties which may appear in this matter are owing to our ignorance of the nature of the soul, of the manner of its existence, and of its wonderful union with, and action upon the body.
In An Essay on the Vital and Other Involuntary Motions of Animals (1751), 389-390.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Heart (229)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Soul (226)  |  Superior (81)  |  Union (51)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Betterment (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Despair (40)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fit (134)  |  Former (137)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Help (105)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humble (50)  |  Humility (28)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Industry (137)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Race (268)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

If I set out to prove something, I am no real scientist—I have to learn to follow where the facts lead me—I have to learn to whip my prejudices.
Attributed, as cited in Peter McDonald (ed.), Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 95. Quoted earlier without citation as “If I want to find truth, I must have an open mind. I have to learn to follow where the facts lead me—I have to learn to whip my prejudices,” in World Order (1948), 14, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Prove (250)  |  Real (149)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Something (719)

If I would follow your advice and Jesus could perceive it, he, as a Jewish teacher, surely would not approve of such behavior.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Approve (3)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Jesus (9)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Surely (101)  |  Teacher (143)

If it was the warmth of the sun, and not its light, that produced this operation, it would follow, that, by warming the water near the fire about as much as it would have been in the sun, this very air would be produced; but this is far from being the case.
In Tobias George Smollett (ed.), 'Experiments Upon Vegetables', The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature (1779), 48, 336.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Being (1278)  |  Fire (189)  |  Light (607)  |  Operation (213)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sun (385)  |  Warming (23)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Water (481)

If on occasion Mr. Casson exhibits an insularity of judgment when it comes to the evaluation of the contribution made by various men to the development of modern anthropology, he may be forgiven upon the ground that, where anthropology is concerned, he is only following an old English custom!
In 'Review: The Discovery of Man by Stanley Casson', Isis (Jun 1941), 33, No. 2, 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Stanley Casson (2)  |  Concern (228)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Custom (42)  |  Development (422)  |  English (35)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Forgive (12)  |  Ground (217)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Modern (385)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Various (200)

If the man of science chose to follow the example of historians and pulpit-orators, and to obscure strange and peculiar phenomena by employing a hollow pomp of big and sounding words, this would be his opportunity; for we have approached one of the greatest mysteries which surround the problem of animated nature and distinguish it above all other problems of science. To discover the relations of man and woman to the egg-cell would be almost equivalent of the egg-cell in the body of the mother, the transfer to it by means of the seed, of the physical and mental characteristics of the father, affect all the questions which the human mind has ever raised in regard to existence.
Quoted in Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel, The Evolution of Man (1897), vol 1, 148.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Body (537)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Existence (456)  |  Father (110)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Historian (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physical (508)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seed (93)  |  Strange (157)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Woman (151)  |  Word (619)

If the Weismann idea triumphs, it will be in a sense a triumph of fatalism; for, according to it, while we may indefinitely improve the forces of our education and surroundings, and this civilizing nurture will improve the individuals of each generation, its actual effects will not be cumulative as regards the race itself, but only as regards the environment of the race; each new generation must start de novo, receiving no increment of the moral and intellectual advance made during the lifetime of its predecessors. It would follow that one deep, almost instinctive motive for a higher life would be removed if the race were only superficially benefited by its nurture, and the only possible channel of actual improvement were in the selection of the fittest chains of race plasma.
'The Present Problem of Heredity', The Atlantic Monthly (1891), 57, 363.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Chain (50)  |  Channel (21)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Deep (233)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fatalism (2)  |  Fit (134)  |  Force (487)  |  Generation (242)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increment (2)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Moral (195)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Plasma (8)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Removal (11)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sense (770)  |  Start (221)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Triumph (73)  |  August Weismann (11)  |  Will (2355)

If the world has begun with a single quantum, the notions of space and would altogether fail to have any meaning at the beginning; they would only begin to have a sensible meaning when the original quantum had been divided into a sufficient number of quanta. If this suggestion is correct, the beginning of the world happened a little before the beginning of space and time. I think that such a beginning of the world is far enough from the present order of Nature to be not at all repugnant. It may be difficult to follow up the idea in detail as we are not yet able to count the quantum packets in every case. For example, it may be that an atomic nucleus must be counted as a unique quantum, the atomic number acting as a kind of quantum number. If the future development of quantum theory happens to turn in that direction, we could conceive the beginning of the universe in the form of a unique atom, the atomic weight of which is the total mass of the universe. This highly unstable atom would divide in smaller and smaller atoms by a kind of super-radioactive process.
In 'The Beginning of the World from the Point of View of Quantum Theory', Nature (1931), 127, 706.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Number (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Count (105)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Mass (157)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Number (2)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unique (67)  |  Universe (857)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

If the world may be thought of as a certain definite quantity of force and as a certain definite number of centers of force—and every other representation remains indefinite and therefore useless—it follows that, in the great dice game of existence, it must pass through calculable number of combinations. In infinite time, every possible combination would at some time or another be realized; more: it would be realized an infinite number of times. And since between every combination and its next recurrence all other possible combinations would have to take place, and each of these combination conditions of the entire sequence of combinations in the same series, a circular movement of absolutely identical series is thus demonstrated: the world as a circular movement that has already repeated itself infinitely often and plays its game in infinitum. This conception is not simply a mechanistic conception; for if it were that, it would not condition an infinite recurrence of identical cases, but a final state. Because the world has not reached this, mechanistic theory must be considered an imperfect and merely provisional hypothesis.
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 4, no. 1066. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 549.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circular (19)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conception (154)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Definite (110)  |  Dice (21)  |  Existence (456)  |  Final (118)  |  Force (487)  |  Game (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Identical (53)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possible (552)  |  Provisional (7)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representation (53)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Series (149)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useless (33)  |  World (1774)

If we betake ourselves to the statistical method, we do so confessing that we are unable to follow the details of each individual case, and expecting that the effects of widespread causes, though very different in each individual, will produce an average result on the whole nation, from a study of which we may estimate the character and propensities of an imaginary being called the Mean Man.
'Does the Progress of Physical Science tend to give any advantage to the opinion of necessity (or determinism) over that of the continuency of Events and the Freedom of the Will?' In P. M. Hannan (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 818.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Character (243)  |  Confession (8)  |  Detail (146)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Method (505)  |  Nation (193)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Result (677)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Whole (738)  |  Widespread (22)  |  Will (2355)

If we had nothing but pecuniary rewards and worldly honours to look to, our profession would not be one to be desired. But in its practice you will find it to be attended with peculiar privileges, second to none in intense interest and pure pleasures. It is our proud office to tend the fleshly tabernacle of the immortal spirit, and our path, rightly followed, will be guided by unfettered truth and love unfeigned. In the pursuit of this noble and holy calling I wish you all God-speed.
Conclusion of Graduation Address, University of Edinburgh (1876). In John Vaughan, 'Lord Lister', The Living Age (1918), 297, 361.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attend (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Flesh (27)  |  God (757)  |  Holy (34)  |  Honour (56)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Interest (386)  |  Look (582)  |  Love (309)  |  Noble (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Path (144)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pecuniary (2)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Practice (204)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Profession (99)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reward (68)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Tabernacle (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

If we succeed in giving the love of learning, the learning itself is sure to follow.
The Pleasures of Life (1887, 2007), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (378)  |  Learning (274)  |  Love (309)  |  Succeed (109)

If … the motion of the earth were circular, it would be violent and contrary to nature, and could not be eternal since … nothing violent is eternal. ... It follows, therefore, that the earth is not moved with a circular motion.
In Commentaria in Libros Aristotelis de Caelo et Mundo (c. 1270).
Science quotes on:  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)

In acute diseases the physician must conduct his inquiries in the following way. First he must examine the face of the patient, and see whether it is like the faces of healthy people, and especially whether it is like its usual self. Such likeness will be the best sign, and the greatest unlikeness will be the most dangerous sign. The latter will be as follows. Nose sharp, eyes hollow, temples sunken, ears cold and contracted with their lobes turned outwards, the skin about the face hard and tense and parched, the colour of the face as a whole being yellow or black.
Prognostic, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 2, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Cold (112)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Ear (68)  |  Examine (78)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1283)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hard (243)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Likeness (18)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Physician (273)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Skin (47)  |  Temple (42)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yellow (30)

In all disciplines in which there is systematic knowledge of things with principles, causes, or elements, it arises from a grasp of those: we think we have knowledge of a thing when we have found its primary causes and principles, and followed it back to its elements. Clearly, then, systematic knowledge of nature must start with an attempt to settle questions about principles.
Aristotle
In Physics Book 1, Chap 1, as translated in J.L. Ackrill, A New Aristotle Reader (1988), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Cause (541)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Element (310)  |  Find (998)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Settle (19)  |  Start (221)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)

In defining an element let us not take an external boundary, Let us say, e.g., the smallest ponderable quantity of yttrium is an assemblage of ultimate atoms almost infinitely more like each other than they are to the atoms of any other approximating element. It does not necessarily follow that the atoms shall all be absolutely alike among themselves. The atomic weight which we ascribe to yttrium, therefore, merely represents a mean value around which the actual weights of the individual atoms of the “element” range within certain limits. But if my conjecture is tenable, could we separate atom from atom, we should find them varying within narrow limits on each side of the mean.
Address to Annual General Meeting of the Chemical Society (28 Mar 1888), printed in Journal of the Chemical Society (1888), 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (117)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Atom (355)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Element (310)  |  External (57)  |  Find (998)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mean (809)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ponderable (4)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Range (99)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Separate (143)  |  Side (233)  |  Smallest (9)  |  Tenable (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Value (365)  |  Variation (90)  |  Weight (134)  |  Yttrium (3)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Domain (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  Geology (220)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Master (178)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialize (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stream (81)  |  Striking (48)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

In no subject is there a rule, compliance with which will lead to new knowledge or better understanding. Skilful observations, ingenious ideas, cunning tricks, daring suggestions, laborious calculations, all these may be required to advance a subject. Occasionally the conventional approach in a subject has to be studiously followed; on other occasions it has to be ruthlessly disregarded. Which of these methods, or in what order they should be employed is generally unpredictable. Analogies drawn from the history of science are frequently claimed to be a guide; but, as with forecasting the next game of roulette, the existence of the best analogy to the present is no guide whatever to the future. The most valuable lesson to be learnt from the history of scientific progress is how misleading and strangling such analogies have been, and how success has come to those who ignored them.
'Cosmology', in Arthur Beer (ed.), Vistas in Astronomy (1956), Vol. 2, 1722.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Approach (108)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Daring (17)  |  Employ (113)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Future (429)  |  Game (101)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Required (108)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Trick (35)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unpredictable (17)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

In one of my lectures many years ago I used the phrase “following the trail of light”. The word “light” was not meant in its literal sense, but in the sense of following an intellectual concept or idea to where it might lead. My interest in living things is probably a fundamental motivation for the scientific work in the laboratory, and we created here in Berkeley one of the first and foremost interdisciplinary laboratories in the world.
In autobiography, Following the Trail of Light: A Scientific Odyssey (1992), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Berkeley (3)  |  Concept (221)  |  Create (235)  |  First (1283)  |  Foremost (11)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interdisciplinary (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Literal (11)  |  Living (491)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trail (10)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

In place of infinity we usually put some really big number, like 15.
Perhaps referring to the programmer’s hexadecimal counting scheme which has 16 digits (0-9 followed by digits A-F), useful in binary context as a power of 2.
Anonymous
Attributed to a Computer Science Professor on various web pages. Webmaster has found no print source for this wording and comments, but its originality makes it worthy of inclusion here. Webmaster comments: perhaps one of those infinite number of monkeys typed it! Please make contact if you know a primary print source.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Binary (12)  |  Computer (127)  |  Context (29)  |  Counting (26)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usually (176)

In reality, all Arguments from Experience are founded on the Similarity which we discover among natural Objects, and by which we are induc'd to expect effects similar to those which we have found to follow from such Objects. And tho' none but a Fool or Madman will ever pretend to dispute the Authority of Experience, or to reject that great Guide of human Life, it may surely be allow'd a Philosopher to have so much Curiosity at least as to examine the Principle of human Nature, which gives this mighty Authority to Experience, and makes us draw Advantage from that Similarity which Nature has plac'd among different Objects. From Causes which appear similar we expect similar Effects. This is the Sum of our experimental Conclusions.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fool (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Life (1795)  |  Madman (6)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reject (63)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Sum (102)  |  Surely (101)  |  Will (2355)

In science, attempts at formulating hierarchies are always doomed to eventual failure. A Newton will always be followed by an Einstein, a Stahl by a Lavoisier; and who can say who will come after us? What the human mind has fabricated must be subject to all the changes—which are not progress—that the human mind must undergo. The 'last words' of the sciences are often replaced, more often forgotten. Science is a relentlessly dialectical process, though it suffers continuously under the necessary relativation of equally indispensable absolutes. It is, however, possible that the ever-growing intellectual and moral pollution of our scientific atmosphere will bring this process to a standstill. The immense library of ancient Alexandria was both symptom and cause of the ossification of the Greek intellect. Even now I know of some who feel that we know too much about the wrong things.
Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science (1979), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Doom (32)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Equally (130)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Greek (107)  |  Growing (98)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Word (10)  |  Last Words (6)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Library (48)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

In the beginning (if there was such a thing), God created Newton’s laws of motion together with the necessary masses and forces. This is all; everything beyond this follows from the development of appropriate mathematical methods by means of deduction.
Autobiographical Notes (1946), 19. In Albert Einstein, Alice Calaprice, Freeman Dyson , The Ultimate Quotable Einstein (2011), 397.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Development (422)  |  Everything (476)  |  Following (16)  |  Force (487)  |  God (757)  |  Law (894)  |  Laws Of Motion (10)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Motion (310)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)

In the benzene nucleus we have been given a soil out of which we can see with surprise the already-known realm of organic chemistry multiply, not once or twice but three, four, five or six times just like an equivalent number of trees. What an amount of work had suddenly become necessary, and how quickly were busy hands found to carry it out! First the eye moves up the six stems opening out from the tremendous benzene trunk. But already the branches of the neighbouring stems have become intertwined, and a canopy of leaves has developed which becomes more spacious as the giant soars upwards into the air. The top of the tree rises into the clouds where the eye cannot yet follow it. And to what an extent is this wonderful benzene tree thronged with blossoms! Everywhere in the sea of leaves one can spy the slender hydroxyl bud: hardly rarer is the forked blossom [Gabelblüte] which we call the amine group, the most frequent is the beautiful cross-shaped blossom we call the methyl group. And inside this embellishment of blossoms, what a richness of fruit, some of them shining in a wonderful blaze of color, others giving off an overwhelming fragrance.
A. W. Hofmann, after-dinner speech at Kekulé Benzolfest (Mar 1890). Trans. in W. H. Brock, O. Theodor Benfrey and Susanne Stark, 'Hofmann's Benzene Tree at the Kekulé Festivities', Journal of Chemical Education (1991), 68, 887-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Amine (2)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Develop (268)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Giant (67)  |  Known (454)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Radical (25)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stem (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

In the course of normal speaking the inhibitory function of the will is continuously directed to bringing the course of ideas and the articulatory movements into harmony with each other. If the expressive movement which which follows the idea is retarded through mechanical causes, as is the case in writing ... such anticipations make their appearance with particular ease.
Folk Psychology (1900)
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Direct (225)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Function (228)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Movement (155)  |  Other (2236)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writing (189)

In the great debates of early-nineteenth century geology, catastrophists followed the stereotypical method of objective science-empirical literalism. They believed what they saw, interpolated nothing, and read the record of the rocks directly.
'The Stinkstones of Oeningen', In Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes (1983), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Debate (38)  |  Early (185)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Method (505)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observation (555)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Rock (161)  |  Saw (160)  |  Science (3879)

In the main, Bacon prophesied the direction of subsequent progress. But he “anticipated” the advance. He did not see that the new science was for a long time to be worked in the interest of old ends of human exploitation. He thought that it would rapidly give man new ends. Instead, it put at the disposal of a class the means to secure their old ends of aggrandizement at the expense of another class. The industrial revolution followed, as he foresaw, upon a revolution in scientific method. But it is taking the revolution many centuries to produce a new mind.
In Democracy and Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 330-331.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Aggrandizement (2)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Century (310)  |  Class (164)  |  Direction (175)  |  End (590)  |  Expense (16)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Human (1468)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Interest (386)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Produce (104)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Secure (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

In the past we see that periods of great intellectual activity have followed certain events which have acted by freeing the mind from dogma, extending the domain in which knowledge can be sought, and stimulating the imagination. … [For example,] the development of the cell theory and the theory of evolution.
From address, 'A Medical Retrospect'. Published in Yale Medical Journal (Oct 1910), 17, No. 2, 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Cell Theory (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Development (422)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Domain (69)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Free (232)  |  Freeing (6)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Evolution (3)

In the preface to his great History of Europe, H. A. L. Fisher wrote: “Men wiser than and more learned than I have discerned in history a plot, a rhythm, a predetermined pattern. These harmonies are concealed from me. I can see only one emergency following upon another as wave follows upon wave …” It seems to me that the same is true of the much older [geological stratigraphical] history of Europe.
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Concealed (25)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Emergency (10)  |  Following (16)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  History (673)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  More (2559)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Plot (11)  |  Predetermined (3)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  See (1081)  |  Stratigraphy (7)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wisdom (221)

In the twenties the late Dr. Glenn Frank, an eminent social scientist, developed a new statement of the scientific code, which has been referred to as the “Five Fingers of the Scientific Method.” It may be outlined as follows: find the facts; filter the facts; focus the facts; face the facts; follow the facts. The facts or truths are found by experimentation; the motivation is material. The facts are filtered by research into the literature; the motivation is material. The facts are focused by the publication of results; again the motivation is material. Thus the first three-fifths of the scientific method have a material motivation. It is about time scientists acknowledge that there is more to the scientific convention than the material aspect. Returning to the fourth and fifth fingers of Dr. Frank's conception of the scientific method, the facts should be faced by the proper interpretation of them for society. In other words, a scientist must assume social responsibility for his discoveries, which means that he must have a moral motivation. Finally, in the fifth definition of the scientific method, the facts are to be followed by their proper application to everyday life in society, which means moral motivation through responsibility to society.
From 'Scientists and Society', American Scientist (Jul 1954), 42, No. 3, 495.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  Application (242)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Code (31)  |  Conception (154)  |  Definition (221)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Filter (9)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Focus (35)  |  Glenn Frank (3)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literature (103)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proper (144)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Responsibility (3)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Statement (142)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

In the world’s history certain inventions and discoveries occurred of peculiar value, on account of their great efficiency in facilitating all other inventions and discoveries. Of these were the art of writing and of printing, the discovery of America, and the introduction of patent laws. The date of the first … is unknown; but it certainly was as much as fifteen hundred years before the Christian era; the second—printing—came in 1436, or nearly three thousand years after the first. The others followed more rapidly—the discovery of America in 1492, and the first patent laws in 1624.
Lecture 'Discoveries, Inventions and Improvements' (22 Feb 1860) in John George Nicolay and John Hay (eds.), Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln (1894), Vol. 5, 109-10.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Art (657)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Christian (43)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Era (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Invention (369)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patent (33)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Printing (22)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  World (1774)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

In the year of our Lord 729, two comets appeared around the sun, striking terror into all who saw them. One comet rose early and preceded the sun, while the other followed the setting sun at evening, seeming to portend awful calamity to east and west alike. Or else, since one comet was the precursor of day and the other of night, they indicated that mankind was menaced by evils at both times. They appeared in the month of January, and remained visible for about a fortnight, pointing their fiery torches northward as though to set the welkin aflame. At this time, a swarm of Saracens ravaged Gaul with horrible slaughter; … Both the outset and course of Ceolwulfs reign were filled by so many grave disturbances that it is quite impossible to know what to write about them or what the outcome will be.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII., as translated by Leo Sherley-Price, revised by R.E. Latham, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (1955, 1990), 323. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Awful (8)  |  Both (493)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comet (54)  |  Course (409)  |  Day (42)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Early (185)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fiery (5)  |  Fortnight (3)  |  Grave (52)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Menace (5)  |  Month (88)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portend (2)  |  Precursor (5)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reign (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rose (34)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Saw (160)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Striking (48)  |  Sun (385)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Terror (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torch (12)  |  Two (937)  |  Visible (84)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 729, two comets appeared about the sun, to the great terror of the beholders. One of them went before the rising sun in the morning, the other followed him when he set at night, as it were presaging much destruction to the east and west; one was the forerunner of the day, and the other of the night, to signify that mortals were threatened with calamities at both times. They carried their flaming tails towards the north, as it were ready to set the world on fire. They appeared in January, and continued nearly a fortnight. At which time a dreadful plague of Saracens ravaged France with miserable slaughter; … the beginning and progress of Ceolwulf’s reign were so filled with commotions, that it cannot yet be known what is to be said concerning them, or what end they will have.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of England. Also the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1894), 291-292. The editor reprinted the translation based on the 1723 work of John Stevens into modern English. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appear (118)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beholder (2)  |  Both (493)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comet (54)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  End (590)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Fortnight (3)  |  France (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Known (454)  |  Lord (93)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plague (41)  |  Progress (465)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reign (23)  |  Rising (44)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Set (394)  |  Signify (17)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tail (18)  |  Terror (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

In these researches I followed the principles of the experimental method that we have established, i.e., that, in presence of a well-noted, new fact which contradicts a theory, instead of keeping the theory and abandoning the fact, I should keep and study the fact, and I hastened to give up the theory.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Following (16)  |  Give Up (7)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Method (505)  |  New (1216)  |  Presence (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)

In this lecture I would like to conclude with … some characteristics [of] gravity … The most impressive fact is that gravity is simple. It is simple to state the principles completely and not have left any vagueness for anybody to change the ideas of the law. It is simple, and therefore it is beautiful. It is simple in its pattern. I do not mean it is simple in its action—the motions of the various planets and the perturbations of one on the other can be quite complicated to work out, and to follow how all those stars in a globular cluster move is quite beyond our ability. It is complicated in its actions, but the basic pattern or the system beneath the whole thing is simple. This is common to all our laws; they all turn out to be simple things, although complex in their actual actions.
In 'The Law of Gravitation, as Example of Physical Law', the first of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 33-34.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Basic (138)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Law (894)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Simple (406)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

In time, manufacturing will to a great extent follow the sun.
[Speculating that with development of solar power the deserts would become great industrial areas.]
As quoted in Rene Bache, 'Harnessing the Sun', Popular Mechanics (Apr 1928), 602.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Desert (56)  |  Development (422)  |  Extent (139)  |  Great (1574)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Power (746)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Solar Power (9)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

Inexact method of observation, as I believe, is one flaw in clinical pathology to-day. Prematurity of conclusion is another, and in part follows from the first; but in chief part an unusual craving and veneration for hypothesis, which besets the minds of most medical men, is responsible. Except in those sciences which deal with the intangible or with events of long past ages, no treatises are to be found in which hypothesis figures as it does in medical writings. The purity of a science is to be judged by the paucity of its recorded hypotheses. Hypothesis has its right place, it forms a working basis; but it is an acknowledged makeshift, and, at the best, of purpose unaccomplished. Hypothesis is the heart which no man with right purpose wears willingly upon his sleeve. He who vaunts his lady love, ere yet she is won, is apt to display himself as frivolous or his lady a wanton.
The Mechanism and Graphic Registration of the Heart Beat (1920), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Basis (173)  |  Best (459)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Craving (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Display (56)  |  Event (216)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inexact (3)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Past (337)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Paucity (3)  |  Physician (273)  |  Premature (20)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Record (154)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Wanton (2)  |  Writing (189)

INSECTIVORA, n.
'See,' cries the chorus of admiring preachers,
'How Providence provides for all His creatures!"'
'His care,' the gnat said, 'even the insects follows: For us
He has provided wrens and swallows.'
[Under pen-name Sempen Railey.]
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  169.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Creature (233)  |  Humour (116)  |  Insect (77)  |  Name (333)  |  Pen (20)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Providence (18)  |  See (1081)  |  Swallow (29)

Instead of saying that a man behaves because of the consequences which are to follow his behavior, we simply say that he behaves because of the consequences which have followed similar behavior in the past. This is, of course, the Law of Effect or operant conditioning.
In Science and Human Behavior (1953), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (84)  |  Conditioning (3)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Effect (393)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Past (337)  |  Say (984)

Is evolution a theory, a system or a hypothesis? It is much more: it is a general condition to which all theories, all hypotheses, all systems must bow and which they must satisfy henceforth if they are to be thinkable and true. Evolution is a light illuminating all facts, a curve that all lines must follow. ... The consciousness of each of us is evolution looking at itself and reflecting upon itself....Man is not the center of the universe as once we thought in our simplicity, but something much more wonderful—the arrow pointing the way to the final unification of the world in terms of life. Man alone constitutes the last-born, the freshest, the most complicated, the most subtle of all the successive layers of life. ... The universe has always been in motion and at this moment continues to be in motion. But will it still be in motion tomorrow? ... What makes the world in which we live specifically modern is our discovery in it and around it of evolution. ... Thus in all probability, between our modern earth and the ultimate earth, there stretches an immense period, characterized not by a slowing-down but a speeding up and by the definitive florescence of the forces of evolution along the line of the human shoot.
In The Phenomenon of Man (1975), pp 218, 220, 223, 227, 228, 277.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arrow (20)  |  Bow (14)  |  Center (33)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continue (165)  |  Curve (49)  |  Definitive (3)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Final (118)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Immense (86)  |  Last (426)  |  Layer (40)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Line (91)  |  Live (628)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Period (198)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Probability (130)  |  Reflecting (3)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Successive (73)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinkable (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  True (212)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unification (11)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)

It does not follow that because something can be counted it therefore should be counted.
In a speech to the Society for College and University Planning, September 1975.
Science quotes on:  |  Count (105)  |  Something (719)

It follows from the supreme perfection of God, that in creating the universe has chosen the best possible plan, in which there is the greatest variety together with the greatest order; the best arranged ground, place, time; the most results produced in the most simple ways; the most of power, knowledge, happiness and goodness the creatures that the universe could permit. For since all the possibles in I understanding of God laid claim to existence in proportion to their perfections, the actual world, as the resultant of all these claims, must be the most perfect possible. And without this it would not be possible to give a reason why things have turned out so rather than otherwise.
The Principles of Nature and Grace (1714), The Philosophical Works of Leibnitz (1890), ed. G. M. Duncan, 213-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creature (233)  |  Existence (456)  |  God (757)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Permit (58)  |  Plan (117)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

It follows from the theory of relativity that mass and energy are both different manifestations of the same thing—a somewhat unfamiliar conception for the average man. Furthermore E=MC2, in which energy is put equal to mass multiplied with the square of the velocity of light, showed that a very small amount of mass may be converted into a very large amount of energy... the mass and energy were in fact equivalent.
As expressed in the Einstein film, produced by Nova Television (1979). Quoted in Alice Calaprice, The Quotable Einstein (1996), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Average (82)  |  Both (493)  |  Conception (154)  |  Different (577)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Large (394)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mass (157)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Square (70)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Velocity (48)

It has been said that no science is established on a firm basis unless its generalisations can be expressed in terms of number, and it is the special province of mathematics to assist the investigator in finding numerical relations between phenomena. After experiment, then mathematics. While a science is in the experimental or observational stage, there is little scope for discerning numerical relations. It is only after the different workers have “collected data” that the mathematician is able to deduce the required generalisation. Thus a Maxwell followed Faraday and a Newton completed Kepler.
In Higher Mathematics for Students of Chemistry and Physics (1902), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Assist (9)  |  Basis (173)  |  Collect (16)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completed (30)  |  Data (156)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Different (577)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Establish (57)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Express (186)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Firm (47)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observational (15)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Province (35)  |  Relation (157)  |  Required (108)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Special (184)  |  Stage (143)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Worker (31)

It is a serious question whether America, following England’s lead, has not gone into problem-solving too extensively. Certain it is that we are producing no text-books in which the theory is presented in the delightful style which characterizes many of the French works … , or those of the recent Italian school, or, indeed, those of the continental writers in general.
In The Teaching of Elementary Mathematics (1902), 219.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  America (127)  |  Book (392)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Continental (2)  |  Delightful (17)  |  England (40)  |  Extensive (33)  |  French (20)  |  General (511)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Italian (12)  |  Lead (384)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Problem-Solving (3)  |  Produce (104)  |  Question (621)  |  Recent (77)  |  School (219)  |  Serious (91)  |  Style (23)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

It is admitted by all that a finished or even a competent reasoner is not the work of nature alone; the experience of every day makes it evident that education develops faculties which would otherwise never have manifested their existence. It is, therefore, as necessary to learn to reason before we can expect to be able to reason, as it is to learn to swim or fence, in order to attain either of those arts. Now, something must be reasoned upon, it matters not much what it is, provided it can be reasoned upon with certainty. The properties of mind or matter, or the study of languages, mathematics, or natural history, may be chosen for this purpose. Now of all these, it is desirable to choose the one which admits of the reasoning being verified, that is, in which we can find out by other means, such as measurement and ocular demonstration of all sorts, whether the results are true or not. When the guiding property of the loadstone was first ascertained, and it was necessary to learn how to use this new discovery, and to find out how far it might be relied on, it would have been thought advisable to make many passages between ports that were well known before attempting a voyage of discovery. So it is with our reasoning faculties: it is desirable that their powers should be exerted upon objects of such a nature, that we can tell by other means whether the results which we obtain are true or false, and this before it is safe to trust entirely to reason. Now the mathematics are peculiarly well adapted for this purpose, on the following grounds:
1. Every term is distinctly explained, and has but one meaning, and it is rarely that two words are employed to mean the same thing.
2. The first principles are self-evident, and, though derived from observation, do not require more of it than has been made by children in general.
3. The demonstration is strictly logical, taking nothing for granted except self-evident first principles, resting nothing upon probability, and entirely independent of authority and opinion.
4. When the conclusion is obtained by reasoning, its truth or falsehood can be ascertained, in geometry by actual measurement, in algebra by common arithmetical calculation. This gives confidence, and is absolutely necessary, if, as was said before, reason is not to be the instructor, but the pupil.
5. There are no words whose meanings are so much alike that the ideas which they stand for may be confounded. Between the meaning of terms there is no distinction, except a total distinction, and all adjectives and adverbs expressing difference of degrees are avoided.
In On the Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1898), chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (117)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adjective (2)  |  Admit (45)  |  Adverb (2)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Choose (112)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Confound (21)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Derive (65)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Employ (113)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exert (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Faculty (72)  |  False (100)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Far (154)  |  Fence (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Grant (73)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ocular (3)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Property (168)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rely (11)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Safe (54)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Something (719)  |  Sort (49)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Study (653)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Total (94)  |  True (212)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Verify (23)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is almost as difficult to make a man unlearn his errors, as his knowledge. Mal-information is more hopeless than non-information: for error is always more busy than ignorance. Ignorance is a blank sheet on which we may write; but error is a scribbled one on which we first erase. Ignorance is contented to stand still with her back to the truth; but error is more presumptuous, and proceeds, in the same direction. Ignorance has no light, but error follows a false one. The consequence is, that error, when she retraces her footsteps, has farther to go, before we can arrive at the truth, than ignorance.
Reflection 1, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Error (321)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unlearn (11)  |  Write (230)

It is because simplicity and vastness are both beautiful that we seek by preference simple facts and vast facts; that we take delight, now in following the giant courses of the stars, now in scrutinizing the microscope that prodigious smallness which is also a vastness, and now in seeking in geological ages the traces of a past that attracts us because of its remoteness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Attract (23)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Both (493)  |  Course (409)  |  Delight (108)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geological (11)  |  Giant (67)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Past (337)  |  Preference (28)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vastness (15)

It is easy for men to give advice, but difficult for one’s self to follow; we have an example in physicians: for their patients they order a strict regime, for themselves, on going to bed, they do all that they have forbidden to others.
Philemon
'The Sicilian.' In Gustave Jules Witkowski, The Evil that Has Been Said of Doctors (1889), 4-5
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easy (204)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Self (267)  |  Themselves (433)

It is easy to follow in the sacred writings of the Jewish people the development of the religion of fear into the moral religion, which is carried further in the New Testament. The religions of all civilized peoples, especially those of the Orient, are principally moral religions. An important advance in the life of a people is the transformation of the religion of fear into the moral religion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Carry (127)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Especially (31)  |  Far (154)  |  Fear (197)  |  Important (209)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1216)  |  New Testament (3)  |  Orient (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Principally (2)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Writing (189)  |  Writings (6)

It is interesting thus to follow the intellectual truths of analysis in the phenomena of nature. This correspondence, of which the system of the world will offer us numerous examples, makes one of the greatest charms attached to mathematical speculations.
Exposition du système du monde (1799)
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Charm (51)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Offer (141)  |  Speculation (126)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
Concluding remarks in final chapter, The Origin of Species (1859), 490. In the second edition, Darwin changed “breathed” to “breathed by the Creator”.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bank (31)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breath (59)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Construct (124)  |  Death (388)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Famine (15)  |  Food Web (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Singing (19)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Worm (42)

It is interesting to transport one’s self back to the times when Astronomy began; to observe how discoveries were connected together, how errors have got mixed up with truth, have delayed the knowledge of it, and retarded its progress; and, after having followed the various epochs and traversed every climate, finally to contemplate the edifice founded on the labours of successive centuries and of various nations.
Description of Bailly’s plan when writing his history of astronomy books, quoted by François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, in 'Bailly', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 114. Arago first presented this biography of Bailly when he read it to the Academy of Sciences (26 Feb 1844).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Century (310)  |  Climate (97)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Delay (20)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Error (321)  |  Founded (20)  |  History Of Astronomy (2)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Mixed (6)  |  Nation (193)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Progress (465)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Self (267)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Transport (30)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)

It is known that there are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there is an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However, not every one of them is inhabited. Therefore, there must be a finite number of inhabited worlds. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near to nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole Universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely the products of a deranged imagination.
In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980, 2005), 142-143. Slightly revised from 'Fit the Fifth', The Original Hitchhiker Radio Scripts (1985), 102. The show was recorded for the BBC on 21 Feb 1978.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Average (82)  |  Deranged (3)  |  Divided (50)  |  Division (65)  |  Finite (59)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Known (454)  |  Meet (31)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Population (110)  |  Product (160)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Zero (37)

It is not an easy paper to follow, for the items that require retention throughout the analysis are many, and it is fatal to one's understanding to lose track of any of them. Mastery of this paper, however, can give one the strong feeling of being ableto master anything else [one] might have to wrestle within biology.
Describing the paper 'A Correlation of Cytological and Genetic Crossings-over in Zea mays' published by Barbara McClintock and her student Harriet Creighton in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1931).
Classic Papers in Genetics (1959), 156.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Easy (204)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Lose (159)  |  Master (178)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Barbara McClintock (15)  |  Paper (182)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Require (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Track (38)  |  Understanding (513)

It is often claimed that knowledge multiplies so rapidly that nobody can follow it. I believe this is incorrect. At least in science it is not true. The main purpose of science is simplicity and as we understand more things, everything is becoming simpler. This, of course, goes contrary to what everyone accepts.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Belief (578)  |  Claim (146)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Everything (476)  |  Following (16)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Main (28)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simpler (8)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

It is said that the composing of the Lilavati was occasioned by the following circumstance. Lilavati was the name of the author’s daughter, concerning whom it appeared, from the qualities of the ascendant at her birth, that she was destined to pass her life unmarried, and to remain without children. The father ascertained a lucky hour for contracting her in marriage, that she might be firmly connected and have children. It is said that when that hour approached, he brought his daughter and his intended son near him. He left the hour cup on the vessel of water and kept in attendance a time-knowing astrologer, in order that when the cup should subside in the water, those two precious jewels should be united. But, as the intended arrangement was not according to destiny, it happened that the girl, from a curiosity natural to children, looked into the cup, to observe the water coming in at the hole, when by chance a pearl separated from her bridal dress, fell into the cup, and, rolling down to the hole, stopped the influx of water. So the astrologer waited in expectation of the promised hour. When the operation of the cup had thus been delayed beyond all moderate time, the father was in consternation, and examining, he found that a small pearl had stopped the course of the water, and that the long-expected hour was passed. In short, the father, thus disappointed, said to his unfortunate daughter, I will write a book of your name, which shall remain to the latest times—for a good name is a second life, and the ground-work of eternal existence.
In Preface to the Persian translation of the Lilavati by Faizi (1587), itself translated into English by Strachey and quoted in John Taylor (trans.) Lilawati, or, A Treatise on Arithmetic and Geometry by Bhascara Acharya (1816), Introduction, 3. [The Lilavati is the 12th century treatise on mathematics by Indian mathematician, Bhaskara Acharya, born 1114.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approach (108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Author (167)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chance (239)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Coming (114)  |  Compose (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contract (11)  |  Course (409)  |  Cup (7)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Delay (20)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Dress (9)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Examine (78)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fall (230)  |  Father (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hole (16)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indian (27)  |  Influx (2)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Late (118)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Precious (41)  |  Promise (67)  |  Quality (135)  |  Remain (349)  |  Roll (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  Son (24)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subside (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  United (14)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wait (58)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

It is the flash which appears, the thunderbolt will follow.
Translation of the original French, “C'est l'éclair qui paraît, la foudre va partir.” From the play, Oreste, Act 2, Scene 7. Accompanied with the translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Flash (49)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Thunderbolt (7)  |  Will (2355)

It is the modest, not the presumptuous, inquirer who makes a real and safe progress in the discovery of divine truths. One follows Nature and Nature’s God; that is, he follows God in his works and in his word.
Letter to Alexander Pope. As cited in John Bartlett, Familiar Quotations (1875, 10th ed., 1919), 304. The quote has a footnote to compare from Pope’s philosophical poem, Essay on Man (1733-34), epistle iv, lines 331-32: “Slave to no sect, who takes no private road, But looks through Nature up to Nature’s God.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  God (757)  |  Inquirer (9)  |  Modest (15)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presumptuous (3)  |  Progress (465)  |  Real (149)  |  Safe (54)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is very desirable to have a word to express the Availability for work of the heat in a given magazine; a term for that possession, the waste of which is called Dissipation. Unfortunately the excellent word Entropy, which Clausius has introduced in this connexion, is applied by him to the negative of the idea we most naturally wish to express. It would only confuse the student if we were to endeavour to invent another term for our purpose. But the necessity for some such term will be obvious from the beautiful examples which follow. And we take the liberty of using the term Entropy in this altered sense ... The entropy of the universe tends continually to zero.
Sketch of Thermodynamics (1868), 100-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Availability (10)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Call (769)  |  Rudolf Clausius (9)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Connection (162)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dissipation (2)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Heat (174)  |  Idea (843)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Invention (369)  |  Liberty (25)  |  Magazine (24)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Negative (63)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Possession (65)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Sense (770)  |  Student (300)  |  Tend (124)  |  Term (349)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Universe (857)  |  Waste (101)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Zero (37)

It is well to observe the force and virtue and consequence of discoveries, and these are to be seen nowhere more conspicuously than in those three which were unknown to the ancients, and of which the origins, although recent, are obscure and inglorious; namely, printing, gunpowder, and the magnet. For these three have changed the whole face and state of things throughout the world; the first in literature, the second in warfare, the third in navigation; whence have followed innumerable changes, insomuch that no empire, no sect, no star seems to have exerted greater power and influence in human affairs than these mechanical discoveries.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 129. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Change (593)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exert (39)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Invention (369)  |  Literature (103)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Observe (168)  |  Origin (239)  |  Power (746)  |  Printing (22)  |  Recent (77)  |  Star (427)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

It is with our entire past ... that we desire, will and act ... from this survival of the past it follows that consciousness cannot go through the same state twice. The circumstances may still be the same, but they will act no longer on the same person ... that is why our duration is irreversible.
Creative Evolution (1911), trans. Arthur Mitchell, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Desire (204)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Past (337)  |  Person (363)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Survival (94)  |  Through (849)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

It is … genius which has given motion and progress to society; prevented the ossification of the human heart and brain; and though, in its processes, it may not ever have followed the rules laid down in primers, it has, at least, saved history from being the region of geology, and our present society from being a collection of fossil remains.
In 'Genius', Wellman’s Miscellany (Dec 1871), 4, No. 6, 204.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Collection (64)  |  Down (456)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geology (220)  |  Heart (229)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Motion (310)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Region (36)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Save (118)  |  Society (326)

It must be for truth’s sake, and not for the sake of its usefulness to humanity, that the scientific man studies Nature. The application of science to the useful arts requires other abilities, other qualities, other tools than his; and therefore I say that the man of science who follows his studies into their practical application is false to his calling. The practical man stands ever ready to take up the work where the scientific man leaves it, and adapt it to the material wants and uses of daily life.
Methods of Study in Natural History (1863),24.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Art (657)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practical (200)  |  Require (219)  |  Sake (58)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stand (274)  |  Tool (117)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)

It needs scarcely be pointed out that in placing Mathematics at the head of Positive Philosophy, we are only extending the application of the principle which has governed our whole Classification. We are simply carrying back our principle to its first manifestation. Geometrical and Mechanical phenomena are the most general, the most simple, the most abstract of all,— the most irreducible to others, the most independent of them; serving, in fact, as a basis to all others. It follows that the study of them is an indispensable preliminary to that of all others. Therefore must Mathematics hold the first place in the hierarchy of the sciences, and be the point of departure of all Education whether general or special.
In Auguste Comte and Harriet Martineau (trans.), The Positive Philosophy (1858), Introduction, Chap. 2, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Back (390)  |  Basis (173)  |  Carry (127)  |  Classification (97)  |  Departure (9)  |  Education (378)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Govern (64)  |  Head (81)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Hold (95)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Positive (94)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simply (53)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Whole (738)

It was badly received by the generation to which it was first addressed, and the outpouring of angry nonsense to which it gave rise is sad to think upon. But the present generation will probably behave just as badly if another Darwin should arise, and inflict upon them that which the generality of mankind most hate—the necessity of revising their convictions. Let them, then, be charitable to us ancients; and if they behave no better than the men of my day to some new benefactor, let them recollect that, after all, our wrath did not come to much, and vented itself chiefly in the bad language of sanctimonious scolds. Let them as speedily perform a strategic right-about-face, and follow the truth wherever it leads.
'On the Reception of the Origin of Species'. In F. Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter (1888), Vol. 2, 204.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bad (180)  |  Badly (32)  |  Better (486)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1283)  |  Generality (45)  |  Generation (242)  |  Hate (64)  |  Language (293)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  New (1216)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Perform (121)  |  Present (619)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)

It was not alone the striving for universal culture which attracted the great masters of the Renaissance, such as Brunellesco, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo and especially Albrecht Dürer, with irresistible power to the mathematical sciences. They were conscious that, with all the freedom of the individual fantasy, art is subject to necessary laws, and conversely, with all its rigor of logical structure, mathematics follows aesthetic laws.
From Lecture (5 Feb 1891) held at the Rathhaus, Zürich, printed as Ueber den Antheil der mathematischen Wissenschaft an der Kultur der Renaissance (1892), 19. (The Contribution of the Mathematical Sciences to the Culture of the Renaissance.) As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Art (657)  |  Attract (23)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Culture (143)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (87)  |  Albrecht Dürer (5)  |  Especially (31)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Great (1574)  |  Individual (404)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Michelangelo (3)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Raphael (2)  |  Renaissance (14)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strive (46)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subject (521)  |  Universal (189)

It would follow that “significant form” was form behind which we catch a sense of ultimate reality.
In Art (1913), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Catch (31)  |  Form (959)  |  Reality (261)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significant (74)  |  Ultimate (144)

Its [mathematical analysis] chief attribute is clearness; it has no means for expressing confused ideas. It compares the most diverse phenomena and discovers the secret analogies which unite them. If matter escapes us, as that of air and light because of its extreme tenuity, if bodies are placed far from us in the immensity of space, if man wishes to know the aspect of the heavens at successive periods separated by many centuries, if gravity and heat act in the interior of the solid earth at depths which will forever be inaccessible, mathematical analysis is still able to trace the laws of these phenomena. It renders them present and measurable, and appears to be the faculty of the human mind destined to supplement the brevity of life and the imperfection of the senses, and what is even more remarkable, it follows the same course in the study of all phenomena; it explains them in the same language, as if in witness to the unity and simplicity of the plan of the universe, and to make more manifest the unchangeable order which presides over all natural causes.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), Discours Préliminaire, xiv, (Theory of Heat, Introduction), as translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Body (537)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Century (310)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Compare (69)  |  Confused (12)  |  Course (409)  |  Depth (94)  |  Destined (42)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Interior (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurable (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Place (177)  |  Plan (117)  |  Present (619)  |  Preside (3)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Render (93)  |  Same (157)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Tenuity (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Unite (42)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Witness (54)

Jesus tapped me on the shoulder and said, “Bob, why are you resisting me?” I said, “I’m not resisting You!” He said, “You gonna follow Me?” I said, “I’ve never thought about that before!” He said, “When you’re not following Me, you’re resisting Me.”
Bob Dylan
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 156
Science quotes on:  |  Bob (2)  |  Jesus (9)  |  Never (1087)  |  Resist (15)  |  Say (984)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Tap (10)  |  Thought (953)  |  Why (491)

John Dalton was a very singular Man, a quaker by profession & practice: He has none of the manners or ways of the world. A tolerable mathematician He gained his livelihood I believe by teaching the mathematics to young people. He pursued science always with mathematical views. He seemed little attentive to the labours of men except when they countenanced or confirmed his own ideas... He was a very disinterested man, seemed to have no ambition beyond that of being thought a good Philosopher. He was a very coarse Experimenter & almost always found the results he required.—Memory & observation were subordinate qualities in his mind. He followed with ardour analogies & inductions & however his claims to originality may admit of question I have no doubt that he was one of the most original philosophers of his time & one of the most ingenious.
J. Z. Fullmer, 'Davy's Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 133-134.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (43)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biography (240)  |  Claim (146)  |  Confirm (57)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Induction (77)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Labour (98)  |  Little (707)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Practice (204)  |  Profession (99)  |  Question (621)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Singular (23)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Journalism must find the facts, it must not prejudge things in terms of conservatism or liberalism or radicalism; it must not decide in advance that it is to be conformist or non-conformist; it cannot fly in the face of facts without courting ultimate disaster.
Journalism must focus the facts; facts are not important for their own sake; they are important only as a basis for action; journalism must focus the facts it finds upon the issues its readers face.
Journalism must filter the facts; it must with conscientious care separate the facts from admixtures of prejudice, passion, partisanship, and selfish interest; facts that are diluted, colored, or perverted are valueless as a basis for action.
Journalism must face the facts; it must learn that the energy spent in trying to find ways to get around, under, or over the facts is wasted energy; facts have a ruthless way of winning the day sooner or later.
Journalism must follow the facts; journalism must say of facts as Job said, of God: though they slay us, yet shall we trust them; if the facts threaten to upset a paper's cherished policy, it always pays the journalist to re-examine his policy; that way lies realism, and realism is the ultimate good.
From address as president of the Wisconsin local chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, at its first annual Matrix Table (9 Jan 1926). quoted in 'Journalism News and Notes', in Robert S. Crawford (ed.), The Wisconsin Alumni Magazine (Feb 1926), 27, No. 4, 101. If you know any other example of Glenn Frank speaking about his five themes on facts, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Advance (280)  |  Basis (173)  |  Care (186)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Color (137)  |  Conscientious (7)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examine (78)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Filter (9)  |  Find (998)  |  Fly (146)  |  Focus (35)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Issue (42)  |  Job (82)  |  Journalism (3)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paper (182)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pervert (7)  |  Policy (24)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Realism (7)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  Sake (58)  |  Say (984)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Separate (143)  |  Slaying (2)  |  Spent (85)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Trust (66)  |  Trying (144)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Upset (18)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Winning (19)

Just as a tree constitutes a mass arranged in a definite manner, in which, in every single part, in the leaves as in the root, in the trunk as in the blossom, cells are discovered to be the ultimate elements, so is it also with the forms of animal life. Every animal presents itself as a sum of vital unities, every one of which manifests all the characteristics of life. The characteristics and unity of life cannot be limited to anyone particular spot in a highly developed organism (for example, to the brain of man), but are to be found only in the definite, constantly recurring structure, which every individual element displays. Hence it follows that the structural composition of a body of considerable size, a so-called individual, always represents a kind of social arrangement of parts, an arrangement of a social kind, in which a number of individual existences are mutually dependent, but in such a way, that every element has its own special action, and, even though it derive its stimulus to activity from other parts, yet alone effects the actual performance of its duties.
In Lecture I, 'Cells and the Cellular Theory' (1858), Rudolf Virchow and Frank Chance (trans.) ,Cellular Pathology (1860), 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Activity (210)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Composition (84)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Definite (110)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Display (56)  |  Duty (68)  |  Effect (393)  |  Element (310)  |  Existence (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Number (699)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Performance (48)  |  Present (619)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Represent (155)  |  Root (120)  |  Single (353)  |  Size (60)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Special (184)  |  Spot (17)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sum (102)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vital (85)  |  Way (1217)

Keep in mind that new ideas are commonplace, and almost always wrong. Most flashes of insight lead nowhere; statistically, they have a half-life of hours or maybe days. Most experiments to follow up the surviving insights are tedious and consume large amounts of time, only to yield negative or (worse!) ambiguous results.
In Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge (1998, 1999), 60
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Amount (151)  |  Common (436)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Flash (49)  |  Half-Life (2)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insight (102)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Negative (63)  |  New (1216)  |  Result (677)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Yield (81)

Louis Agassiz quote: Lay aside all conceit Learn to read the book of Nature for yourself. Those who have succeeded best have fol
Lay aside all conceit. Learn to read the book of Nature for yourself. Those who have succeeded best have followed for years some slim thread which once in a while has broadened out and disclosed some treasure worth a life-long search.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Book (392)  |  Book Of Nature (12)  |  Broad (27)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Disclosure (6)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifelong (9)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Read (287)  |  Search (162)  |  Slim (2)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Thread (32)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

Leave the beaten track occasionally and dive into the woods. Every time you do so you will be certain to find something that you have never seen before. Of course, it will be a little thing, but do not ignore it. Follow it up, explore all around it: one discovery will lead to another, and before you know it, you will have something worth thinking about to occupy your mind. All really big discoveries are the results of thought.
Address (22 May 1914) to the graduating class of the Friends’ School, Washington, D.C. Printed in 'Discovery and Invention', The National Geographic Magazine (1914), 25, 650.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Course (409)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dive (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Find (998)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Track (38)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Woods (11)  |  Worth (169)

Let us draw an arrow arbitrarily. If as we follow the arrow we find more and more of the random element in the state of the world, then the arrow is pointing towards the future; if the random element decreases the arrow points towards the past … I shall use the phrase “time's arrow” to express this one-way property of time which has no analogue in space.
Gifford Lectures (1927), The Nature of The Physical World (1928), 69.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arrow (20)  |  Draw (137)  |  Element (310)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Express (186)  |  Find (998)  |  Future (429)  |  More (2559)  |  Past (337)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Point (580)  |  Property (168)  |  Random (41)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Let us follow the natural order and begin with the primary facts.
Aristotle
In Ingram Bywater (trans.), Aristotle, On the Art of Poetry (1909), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Order (4)  |  Order (632)  |  Primary (80)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |