Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Penetration

Penetration Quotes (18 quotes)

I am of the decided opinion, that mathematical instruction must have for its first aim a deep penetration and complete command of abstract mathematical theory together with a clear insight into the structure of the system, and doubt not that the instruction which accomplishes this is valuable and interesting even if it neglects practical applications. If the instruction sharpens the understanding, if it arouses the scientific interest, whether mathematical or philosophical, if finally it calls into life an esthetic feeling for the beauty of a scientific edifice, the instruction will take on an ethical value as well, provided that with the interest it awakens also the impulse toward scientific activity. I contend, therefore, that even without reference to its applications mathematics in the high schools has a value equal to that of the other subjects of instruction.
In 'Ueber das Lehrziel im mathemalischen Unterricht der höheren Realanstalten', Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, 2, 192. (The Annual Report of the German Mathematical Association. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aim (165)  |  Application (242)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Call (769)  |  Clear (100)  |  Command (58)  |  Complete (204)  |  Contend (6)  |  Decide (41)  |  Deep (233)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Equal (83)  |  Esthetic (3)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Finally (26)  |  First (1283)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Insight (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Practical (200)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reference (33)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Toward (45)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

I have before mentioned mathematics, wherein algebra gives new helps and views to the understanding. If I propose these it is not to make every man a thorough mathematician or deep algebraist; but yet I think the study of them is of infinite use even to grown men; first by experimentally convincing them, that to make anyone reason well, it is not enough to have parts wherewith he is satisfied, and that serve him well enough in his ordinary course. A man in those studies will see, that however good he may think his understanding, yet in many things, and those very visible, it may fail him. This would take off that presumption that most men have of themselves in this part; and they would not be so apt to think their minds wanted no helps to enlarge them, that there could be nothing added to the acuteness and penetration of their understanding.
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apt (9)  |  Convince (41)  |  Course (409)  |  Deep (233)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Help (105)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Part (222)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  See (1081)  |  Serve (59)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

I have long aspired to make our company a noble prototype of industry, penetrating in science, reliable in engineering, creative in aesthetics and wholesomely prosperous in economics.
In Alan R. Earls and Nasrin Rohani, Polaroid (2005), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Aesthetics (5)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Company (59)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Industry (137)  |  Long (790)  |  Noble (90)  |  Prototype (9)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Wholesome (12)

I have satisfied myself that the [cosmic] rays are not generated by the formation of new matter in space, a process which would be like water running up a hill. Nor do they come to any appreciable amount from the stars. According to my investigations the sun emits a radiation of such penetrative power that it is virtually impossible to absorb it in lead or other substances. ... This ray, which I call the primary solar ray, gives rise to a secondary radiation by impact against the cosmic dust scattered through space. It is the secondary radiation which now is commonly called the cosmic ray, and comes, of course, equally from all directions in space. [The article continues: The phenomena of radioactivity are not the result of forces within the radioactive substances but are caused by this ray emitted by the sun. If radium could be screened effectively against this ray it would cease to be radioactive, he said.]
Quoted in 'Tesla, 75, Predicts New Power Source', New York Times (5 Jul 1931), Section 2, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  According (237)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Continue (165)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmic Ray (7)  |  Course (409)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emit (15)  |  Equally (130)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Hill (20)  |  Impact (42)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lead (384)  |  Matter (798)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Primary (80)  |  Process (423)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Radium (25)  |  Ray (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Running (61)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sun (385)  |  Through (849)  |  Water (481)

I like to summarize what I regard as the pedestal-smashing messages of Darwin’s revolution in the following statement, which might be chanted several times a day, like a Hare Krishna mantra, to encourage penetration into the soul: Humans are not the end result of predictable evolutionary progress, but rather a fortuitous cosmic afterthought, a tiny little twig on the enormously arborescent bush of life, which, if replanted from seed, would almost surely not grow this twig again, or perhaps any twig with any property that we would care to call consciousness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Bush (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Care (186)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Encourage (40)  |  End (590)  |  Enormously (4)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hare (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Message (49)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Progress (465)  |  Property (168)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Seed (93)  |  Several (32)  |  Soul (226)  |  Statement (142)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Twig (14)

If you want to penetrate into the heart of physics, then let yourself be initiated into the mysteries of poetry.
Friedrich Schlegel's Lucinde and the Fragments, trans. Peter Firchow (1971), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Heart (229)  |  Initiation (7)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Want (497)

It is unlikely that we will ever see a star being born. Stars are like animals in the wild. We may see the very young, but never their actual birth, which is a veiled and secret event. Stars are born inside thick clouds of dust and gas in the spiral arms of the galaxy, so thick that visible light cannot penetrate them.
Perfect Symmetry: The Search for the Beginning of Time (1985), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Dust (64)  |  Event (216)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Gas (83)  |  Light (607)  |  Never (1087)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thick (6)  |  Veil (26)  |  Visible (84)  |  Visible Light (2)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Countless (36)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Derive (65)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Especially (31)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Flux (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (41)  |  Mood (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (129)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Paint (22)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (16)  |  Stress (22)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transformation (69)  |  True (212)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (132)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

Nothing is really small; whoever is open to the deep penetration of nature knows this.
Victor Hugo and Charles E. Wilbour (trans.), Les Misérables (1862), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Small (477)  |  Whoever (42)

Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas. One seeks the most general ideas of operation which will bring together in simple, logical and unified form the largest possible circle of formal relationships. In this effort toward logical beauty spiritual formulas are discovered necessary for the deeper penetration into the laws of nature.
In letter (1 May 1935), Letters to the Editor, 'The Late Emmy Noether: Professor Einstein Writes in Appreciation of a Fellow-Mathematician', New York Times (4 May 1935), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Circle (110)  |  Deep (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effort (227)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Operation (213)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Quantum theory thus reveals a basic oneness of the universe. It shows that we cannot decompose the world into independently existing smallest units. As we penetrate into matter, nature does not show us any isolated “building blocks,” but rather appears as a complicated web of relations between the various parts of the whole. These relations always include the observer in an essential way. The human observer constitute the final link in the chain of observational processes, and the properties of any atomic object can be understood only in terms of the object’s interaction with the observer.
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Atom (355)  |  Basic (138)  |  Building (156)  |  Building Block (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Essential (199)  |  Final (118)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Independence (34)  |  Independently (24)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Observational (15)  |  Observer (43)  |  Oneness (6)  |  Part (222)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Process (423)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unit (33)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Web (16)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Research may start from definite problems whose importance it recognizes and whose solution is sought more or less directly by all forces. But equally legitimate is the other method of research which only selects the field of its activity and, contrary to the first method, freely reconnoitres in the search for problems which are capable of solution. Different individuals will hold different views as to the relative value of these two methods. If the first method leads to greater penetration it is also easily exposed to the danger of unproductivity. To the second method we owe the acquisition of large and new fields, in which the details of many things remain to be determined and explored by the first method.
In Zum Gedächtniss an Julius Plucker', Göttinger Abhandlungen (1871), 16, Mathematische Classe, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Capable (168)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Danger (115)  |  Definite (110)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Easy (204)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Freely (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hold (95)  |  Importance (286)  |  Individual (404)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Problem (676)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Reconnoitre (2)  |  Relative (39)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Search (162)  |  Select (44)  |  Solution (267)  |  Start (221)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

Scientific Terminology [is] the Scylla's cave which men of science are preparing for themselves to be able to pounce out upon us from it, and into which we cannot penetrate.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (221)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Pounce (4)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Themselves (433)

The soul seems to be a very tenuous substance … [and] seems to be made of a most subtle texture, extremely mobile or active corpuscles, not unlike those of flame or heat; indeed, whether they are spherical, as the authors of atoms propound, or pyramidical as Plato thought, or some other form, they seem from their own motion and penetration through bodies to create the heat which is in the animal.
As quoted in Margaret J. Osler and Paul Lawrence Farber (eds.), Religion, Science, and Worldview: Essays in Honor of Richard S. Westfall (2002), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atom (355)  |  Author (167)  |  Body (537)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Create (235)  |  Flame (40)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Mobile (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plato (76)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Substance (248)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Tenuous (3)  |  Texture (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)

The tool which serves as intermediary between theory and practice, between thought and observation, is mathematics; it is mathematics which builds the linking bridges and gives the ever more reliable forms. From this it has come about that our entire contemporary culture, inasmuch as it is based on the intellectual penetration and the exploitation of nature, has its foundations in mathematics. Already Galileo said: one can understand nature only when one has learned the language and the signs in which it speaks to us; but this language is mathematics and these signs are mathematical figures.
Radio broadcast (8 Sep 1930). As quoted in Michael Fitzgerald and Ioan James, The Mind of the Mathematician (2007), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Based (10)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Build (204)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Culture (143)  |  Entire (47)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intermediary (2)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Practice (204)  |  Reliable (12)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sign (58)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tool (117)  |  Understand (606)

We are like the explorers of a great continent, who have penetrated its margins in most points of the compass and have mapped the major mountain chains and rivers. There are still innumerable details to fill in, but the endless horizons no longer exist.
Stating his belief that within a generation or two, scientific progress was likely to halt. In Presidential Address (28 Dec 1970) to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 'Science: Endless Horizons or Golden Age?', Science (8 Jan 1971), 171, No. 3866, 24. Quoted in obituary by Douglas Martin, New York Times (20 Jan 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Compass (34)  |  Continent (76)  |  Detail (146)  |  Endless (56)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Fill (61)  |  Great (1574)  |  Halt (9)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Major (84)  |  Map (44)  |  Margin (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Point (580)  |  River (119)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Still (613)

What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows from life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. ... What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity—his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. ... [like] the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes. ... And yet he stands in the very front rank of the race
In 'The Scientist', Prejudices: third series (1922), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Praiseworthy (2)  |  Profit (52)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Save (118)  |  Saving (20)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stand (274)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Uncovering (2)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

[From uranium] there are present at least two distinct types of radiation one that is very readily absorbed, which will be termed for convenience the α radiation, and the other of a more penetrative character, which will be termed the β radiation.
Originating the names for these two types of radiation. In 'Uranium Radiation and the Electrical Conduction Produced by It', Philosophical Magazine (1899), 47, 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Alpha Ray (3)  |  Character (243)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Term (349)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.