Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sustain

Sustain Quotes (13 quotes)
Sustaining Quotes, Sustained Quotes, Sustains Quotes

Omnes scientiae sunt connexae et fovent auxiliis sicut partes ejusdem totius, quarum quaelibet opus suum peragit non propter se sed pro aliis.
All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work, not for itself alone, but for the other parts; as the eye guides the body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place.
Opus Tertium [1266- 1268], chapter 4, Latin text quoted in J. B. Bury, The Idea of Progress (1920), 355 (footnote to page 25). In J. S. Brewer (ed.), Fr. Rogeri Bacon Opera ... inedita (1859), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (23)  |  Body (193)  |  Connect (15)  |  Eye (159)  |  Foot (39)  |  Guide (46)  |  Lead (101)  |  Material (124)  |  Part (146)  |  Place (111)  |  Science (1699)  |  Whole (122)  |  Work (457)

Every one who has seriously investigated a novel question, who has really interrogated Nature with a view to a distinct answer, will bear me out in saying that it requires intense and sustained effort of imagination.
In The Principles of Success in Literature (1901), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Effort (94)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Intense (11)  |  Interrogation (4)  |  Investigate (49)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Novel (16)  |  Question (315)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Serious (37)  |  View (115)

If a man has a tent made of linen of which the apertures have all been stopped up, and be it twelve bracchia across (over twenty-five feet) and twelve in depth, he will be able to throw himself down from any height without sustaining injury. [His concept of the parachute.]
In Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman, Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 3-4, which notes twelve bracchia is over 25 feet. There are other translations with different units. Da Vinci’s illustration in his notebook showed a pyramid-shaped parachute below which hung a man suspended by a few short cords.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (12)  |  Aperture (4)  |  Injury (14)  |  Linen (4)  |  Tent (4)

In summary, very large populations may differentiate rapidly, but their sustained evolution will be at moderate or slow rates and will be mainly adaptive. Populations of intermediate size provide the best conditions for sustained progressive and branching evolution, adaptive in its main lines, but accompanied by inadaptive fluctuations, especially in characters of little selective importance. Small populations will be virtually incapable of differentiation or branching and will often be dominated by random inadaptive trends and peculiarly liable to extinction, but will be capable of the most rapid evolution as long as this is not cut short by extinction.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (18)  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Branch (61)  |  Capability (35)  |  Character (82)  |  Condition (119)  |  Cut (36)  |  Differentiation (17)  |  Domination (12)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Fluctuation (7)  |  Importance (183)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Intermediate (16)  |  Large (82)  |  Liability (5)  |  Peculiarity (15)  |  Population (71)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Provision (15)  |  Random (21)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Selection (27)  |  Size (47)  |  Small (97)  |  Summary (4)  |  Trend (16)

Mathematics may, like poetry or music, “promote and sustain a lofty habit of mind.”
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Habit (78)  |  Lofty (7)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Music (66)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Promoting (7)

Professor Whitehead has recently restored a seventeenth century phrase—"climate of opinion." The phrase is much needed. Whether arguments command assent or not depends less upon the logic that conveys them than upon the climate of opinion in which they are sustained.
In The Heavenly City of the Eighteenth-Century Philosophers (1932, 2003), 5
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (10)  |  Argument (59)  |  Assent (4)  |  Climate (38)  |  Convey (10)  |  Depend (56)  |  Logic (187)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Alfred North Whitehead (90)

So far as I can see the atomic bomb has deadened the finest feeling that has sustained mankind for ages.
(1946). In William Borman, Gandhi and Non-Violence (1986), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Atomic Bomb (101)  |  Death (270)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Fine (24)  |  Mankind (196)

The confirmation of theories relies on the compact adaption of their parts, by which, like those of an arch or dome, they mutually sustain each other, and form a coherent whole.
Science quotes on:  |  Arch (7)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Confirmation (15)  |  Dome (3)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Theory (582)

The essayist is … sustained by the childish belief that everything he thinks about, everything that happens to him, is of general interest.
First line of Foreword in Essays of E.B. White (1977, 2014), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Childish (5)  |  Essayist (2)  |  General (92)  |  Happen (63)  |  Interest (170)  |  Think (205)

The fact is that up to now the free society has not been good for the intellectual. It has neither accorded him a superior status to sustain his confidence nor made it easy for him to acquire an unquestioned sense of social usefulness. For he derives his sense of usefulness mainly from directing, instructing, and planning-from minding other people’s business-and is bound to feel superfluous and neglected where people believe themselves competent to manage individual and communal affairs, and are impatient of supervision and regulation. A free society is as much a threat to the intellectual’s sense of worth as an automated economy is to the workingman’s sense of worth. Any social order that can function with a minimum of leadership will be anathema to the intellectual.
In 'Concerning Individual Freedom', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Acquire (19)  |  Affair (24)  |  Belief (400)  |  Bind (18)  |  Communal (7)  |  Competent (10)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Derive (18)  |  Direct (44)  |  Easy (56)  |  Economy (46)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feel (93)  |  Free (59)  |  Function (90)  |  Good (228)  |  Impatient (2)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Leadership (5)  |  Mainly (6)  |  Manage (10)  |  Mind (544)  |  Minimum (10)  |  Neglect (23)  |  People (269)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Sense (240)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (188)  |  Status (18)  |  Superfluous (8)  |  Superior (30)  |  Supervision (3)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Threat (24)  |  Unquestioned (4)  |  Usefulness (70)  |  Workingmans (2)  |  Worth (74)

The highway system devours land resources and atmosphere at a rate that is impossible to sustain.
(1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Devour (10)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Highway (10)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Land (83)  |  Rate (22)  |  Resource (47)

The wintry clouds drop spangles on the mountains. If the thing occurred once in a century historians would chronicle and poets would sing of the event; but Nature, prodigal of beauty, rains down her hexagonal ice-stars year by year, forming layers yards in thickness. The summer sun thaws and partially consolidates the mass. Each winter's fall is covered by that of the ensuing one, and thus the snow layer of each year has to sustain an annually augmented weight. It is more and more compacted by the pressure, and ends by being converted into the ice of a true glacier, which stretches its frozen tongue far down beyond the limits of perpetual snow. The glaciers move, and through valleys they move like rivers.
The Glaciers of the Alps & Mountaineering in 1861 (1911), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Annual (5)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Century (94)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Cloud (44)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conversion (14)  |  Cover (23)  |  Drop (27)  |  Event (97)  |  Fall (89)  |  Freezing (11)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Hexagon (4)  |  Historian (30)  |  Ice (29)  |  Layer (14)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Perpetuity (7)  |  Poet (59)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (28)  |  Snow (15)  |  Song (18)  |  Spangle (2)  |  Star (251)  |  Stretch (8)  |  Summer (26)  |  Sun (211)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Tongue (16)  |  Truth (750)  |  Weight (61)  |  Winter (22)  |  Yard (4)  |  Year (214)

The world's forests need to be seen for what they are—giant global utilities, providing essential public services to humanity on a vast scale. They store carbon, which is lost to the atmosphere when they burn, increasing global warming. The life they support cleans the atmosphere of pollutants and feeds it with moisture. They act as a natural thermostat, helping to regulate our climate and sustain the lives of 1.4 billion of the poorest people on this Earth. And they do these things to a degree that is all but impossible to imagine.
Speech (25 Oct 2007) at the World Wildlife Fund gala dinner, Hampton Court Palace, announcing the Prince's Rainforests Project. On the Prince of Wales website.
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Burn (29)  |  Carbon (48)  |  Carbon Cycle (5)  |  Clean (20)  |  Climate (38)  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Essential (87)  |  Forest (88)  |  Giant (28)  |  Global (14)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Increase (107)  |  Life (917)  |  Loss (62)  |  Moisture (10)  |  Natural (128)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Public Service (3)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Store (17)  |  Support (63)  |  Thermostat (2)  |  Utility (23)  |  Vast (56)  |  Warming (3)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.