Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Eye

Eye Quotes (222 quotes)

'Tis a short sight to limit our faith in laws to those of gravity, of chemistry, of botany, and so forth. Those laws do not stop where our eyes lose them, but push the same geometry and chemistry up into the invisible plane of social and rational life, so that, look where we will, in a boy's game, or in the strifes of races, a perfect reaction, a perpetual judgment keeps watch and ward.
From 'Worship', The Conduct of Life (1860) collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1866), Vol.2, 401.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (51)  |  Boy (46)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Faith (157)  |  Game (61)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Law (515)  |  Life (1131)  |  Limit (126)  |  Look (52)  |  Lose (94)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Perpetual (21)  |  Plane (19)  |  Race (104)  |  Rational (57)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Life (3)  |  Stop (76)  |  Strife (9)  |  Ward (4)  |  Watch (65)

...what would be observed (if not with one’s actual eyes at least with those of the mind) if an eagle, carried by the force of the wind, were to drop a rock from its talons?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (48)  |  Carry (59)  |  Drop (40)  |  Eagle (13)  |  Force (249)  |  Least (74)  |  Mind (760)  |  Observe (76)  |  Rock (125)  |  Talon (2)  |  Wind (80)

Avant Kepler tous les hommes étoent aveugles, Kepler fut borgne, et Newton a eu deux yeux.
Before Kepler, all men were blind, Kepler had one eye, and Newton had two eyes.
From Voltaire’s Notebooks (1952), 63. As translated in Peter Gay, The Enlightenment: The Science of Freedom (1996), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Blind (47)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)

Changements arrivées dans le globe: Quand on a vu de ses yeux une montagne s’avancer dans une plaine, c’est-à-dire un immense rocher de cette montagne se détacher et couvrir des champs, un château tout entier enfoncé dans la terre, un fleuve englouti qui sort ensuite de son abîme, des marques indubitables qu’un vaste amas d’eau inondait autrefois un pays habité aujourd’hui, et cent vestiges d’autres révolutions, on est alors plus disposé à croire les grands changements qui ont altéré la face du monde, que ne l’est une dame de Paris qui sait seulement que la place où est bâtie sa maison était autrefois un champ labourable. Mais une dame de Naples, qui a vu sous terre les ruines d’Herculanum, est encore moins asservie au préjugé qui nous fait croire que tout a toujours été comme il est aujourd’hui.
Changes That Have Occurred in the Globe: When we have seen with our own eyes a mountain progressing into a plain; that is to say, an immense boulder separating from this mountain and covering the fields; an entire castle broken into pieces over the ground; a river swallowed up which then bursts out from its abyss; clear marks of a vast amount of water having once flooded regions now inhabited, and a hundred vestiges of other transformations, then we are much more willing to believe that great changes altered the face of the earth, than a Parisian lady who knows only that the place where her house was built was once a cultivated field. However, a lady from Naples who has seen the buried ruins of Herculaneum, is much less subject to the bias which leads us to believe that everything has always been as it is today.
From article 'Changements arrivées dans le globe', in Dictionnaire philosophique (1764), collected in Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire (1878), Vol. 2, 427-428. Translated by Ian Ellis.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (23)  |  Alteration (25)  |  Belief (504)  |  Bias (16)  |  Boulder (7)  |  Breaking (3)  |  Built (7)  |  Buried (2)  |  Castle (5)  |  Change (364)  |  Country (147)  |  Cover (37)  |  Disappearance (22)  |  Earth (638)  |  Entire (47)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Face (108)  |  Field (171)  |  Flood (36)  |  Geologic History (2)  |  Herculaneum (4)  |  House (43)  |  Inhabitation (2)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Lady (11)  |  Land (115)  |  Mark (42)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Move (94)  |  Paris (11)  |  Place (175)  |  Plain (33)  |  River (79)  |  Rock (125)  |  Ruin (25)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Today (117)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Vast (89)  |  Vestige (5)  |  Water (293)

Dinosaur: I plan to use punctuated equilibrium to turn this zit into a third eye.
Catbert: That's not a natural advantage. You'd better stay away from the fitter dinosaurs.
Dilbert comic strip (30 Aug 2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (77)  |  Dinosaur (23)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Punctuated Equilibrium (2)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (38)

Le seul véritable voyage ... ce ne serait pas d’aller vers de nouveaux paysages, mais d’avoir d’autres yeux, de voir l’univers avec les yeux d’un autre, de cent autres, de voir les cent univers que chacun d’eux voit …
The only true voyage of discovery … would be not to visit new landscapes, but to possess other eyes, to see the universe through the eyes of another, of a hundred others, to see the hundred universes that each of them sees.
[Also often seen translated in the shortened form: 'The only real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes.']
'La Prisonnière', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27). In Roger Shattuck, Proust (1974), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (680)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Landscape (29)  |  See (369)  |  Universe (686)

Non possunt oculi naturam noscere rerum
The eyes cannot know the nature of things.
In De Rerum Natura (c. 55 B.C.), Book 4, line 385. Translated by Rev. John Selby Watson, On the Nature of Things (1851).
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Reality (190)

Omnes scientiae sunt connexae et fovent auxiliis sicut partes ejusdem totius, quarum quaelibet opus suum peragit non propter se sed pro aliis.
All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work, not for itself alone, but for the other parts; as the eye guides the body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place.
Opus Tertium [1266- 1268], chapter 4, Latin text quoted in J. B. Bury, The Idea of Progress (1920), 355 (footnote to page 25). In J. S. Brewer (ed.), Fr. Rogeri Bacon Opera ... inedita (1859), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (42)  |  Body (247)  |  Connect (33)  |  Foot (60)  |  Guide (65)  |  Lead (160)  |  Material (156)  |  Part (222)  |  Place (175)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sustain (23)  |  Whole (192)  |  Work (635)

Quand on demande à nos philosophes à quoi sert ce nombre prodigieux d’étoiles fixes, dont une partie suffirait pour faire ce qu’elles font toutes, ils vous répondent froidement qu’elles servent à leur réjouir la vue.
When our philosophers are asked what is the use of these countless myriads of fixed stars, of which a small part would be sufficient to do what they all do, they coolly tell us that they are made to give delight to their eyes.
In 'Premier Soir', Entretiens Sur La Pluralité Des Mondes (1686, 1863), 29. French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (160)  |  Countless (22)  |  Delight (66)  |  Give (201)  |  Myriad (22)  |  Part (222)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Small (163)  |  Star (336)  |  Tell (110)

Steckt keine Poesie in der Lokomotive, die brausend durch die Nacht zieht und über die zitternde Erde hintobt, als wollte sie Raum und Zeit zermalmen, in dem hastigen, aber wohl geregelten Zucken und Zerren ihrer gewaltigen Glieder, in dem stieren, nur auf ein Ziel losstürmenden Blick ihrer roten Augen, in dem emsigen, willenlosen Gefolge der Wagen, die kreischend und klappernd, aber mit unfehlbarer Sicherheit dem verkörperten Willen aus Eisen und Stahl folge leisten?
Is there no poetry in the locomotive roaring through the night and charging over the quivering earth as if it wanted to crush time and space? Is there no poetry in the hasty but regular jerking and tugging of its powerful limbs, in the stare of its red eyes that never lose sight of their goal? Is there no poetry in the bustling, will-less retinue of cars that follow, screeching and clattering with unmistakable surety, the steel and iron embodiment of will?
Max Eyth
From 'Poesie und Technik' (1904) (Poetry and Technology), in Schweizerische Techniker-Zeitung (1907), Vol 4, 306, as translated in Paul A. Youngman, Black Devil and Iron Angel: The Railway in Nineteenth-Century German Realism (2005), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (27)  |  Crush (7)  |  Earth (638)  |  Embodiment (6)  |  Follow (124)  |  Goal (100)  |  Hasty (6)  |  Iron (65)  |  Limb (7)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Lose (94)  |  Night (118)  |  Poetry (124)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Quivering (2)  |  Red (35)  |  Regular (13)  |  Retinue (2)  |  Sight (48)  |  Space (257)  |  Stare (9)  |  Steel (17)  |  Time (595)  |  Unmistakable (5)  |  Wanted (4)  |  Will (31)

Tel est le privilége du génie: il aperçoit, il saisit des rapports, là où des yeux vulgaires lie voient que des faits isolés.
Such is the privilege of genius; it perceives, it seizes relations where vulgar eyes see only isolated facts.
In François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, 'Fourier', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 412.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (733)  |  Genius (249)  |  Isolation (26)  |  Perception (64)  |  Privilege (26)  |  Relationship (71)  |  See (369)  |  Vulgar (15)

A man who has once looked with the archaeological eye will never see quite normally. He will be wounded by what other men call trifles. It is possible to refine the sense of time until an old shoe in the bunch grass or a pile of nineteenth century beer bottles in an abandoned mining town tolls in one’s head like a hall clock.
The Night Country (1971), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (27)  |  Abandon (48)  |  Archaeology (48)  |  Beer (7)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Clock (29)  |  Grass (35)  |  Hall (5)  |  Head (81)  |  Look (52)  |  Mine (16)  |  Pile (12)  |  Refine (5)  |  See (369)  |  Sense (321)  |  Shoe (9)  |  Time (595)  |  Toll (3)  |  Town (27)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Wound (11)

A physician advised his patient that had sore eyes, that he should abstain from wine; but the patient said, “I think rather, sir, from wine and water; for I have often marked it in blue eyes, and I have seen water come forth, but never wine.”
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 52, 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstain (3)  |  Advice (40)  |  Patient (125)  |  Physician (243)  |  Sore (4)  |  Tear (23)  |  Water (293)  |  Wine (28)

A principle of induction would be a statement with the help of which we could put inductive inferences into a logically acceptable form. In the eyes of the upholders of inductive logic, a principle of induction is of supreme importance for scientific method: “... this principle”, says Reichenbach, “determines the truth of scientific theories. To eliminate it from science would mean nothing less than to deprive science of the power to decide the truth or falsity of its theories. Without it, clearly, science would no longer have the right to distinguish its theories from the fanciful and arbitrary creations of the poet’s mind.” Now this principle of induction cannot be a purely logical truth like a tautology or an analytic statement. Indeed, if there were such a thing as a purely logical principle of induction, there would be no problem of induction; for in this case, all inductive inferences would have to be regarded as purely logical or tautological transformations, just like inferences in inductive logic. Thus the principle of induction must be a synthetic statement; that is, a statement whose negation is not self-contradictory but logically possible. So the question arises why such a principle should be accepted at all, and how we can justify its acceptance on rational grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Acceptable (6)  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Arbitrary (21)  |  Arise (49)  |  Case (99)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Creation (242)  |  Decide (40)  |  Deprive (11)  |  Determine (76)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Falsity (13)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Form (314)  |  Ground (90)  |  Help (103)  |  Importance (218)  |  Induction (60)  |  Inductive (10)  |  Inference (32)  |  Justify (23)  |  Less (102)  |  Logic (260)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (174)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mind (760)  |  Negation (2)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Poet (83)  |  Possible (158)  |  Power (366)  |  Principle (292)  |  Problem (497)  |  Purely (28)  |  Question (404)  |  Rational (57)  |  Regard (95)  |  Right (197)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Statement (76)  |  Supreme (37)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Theory (696)  |  Transformation (54)  |  Truth (928)

A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times, may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably com
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (23)  |  Change (364)  |  Course (84)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Distant (32)  |  Fall (120)  |  Globe (47)  |  Intricate (21)  |  Life (1131)  |  Light (347)  |  Nation (134)  |  Ray (41)  |  Single (120)  |  Star (336)  |  Surface (101)  |  Time (595)  |  Transform (35)  |  Tyrant (9)

About weak points [of the Origin] I agree. The eye to this day gives me a cold shudder, but when I think of the fine known gradations, my reason tells me I ought to conquer the cold shudder.
Letter to Asa Gray, 8 or 9 February 1860. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1860 (1993), Vol. 8, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Origin Of Species (42)

According to Gandhi, the seven sins are wealth without works, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principle. Well, Hubert Humphrey may have sinned in the eyes of God, as we all do, but according to those definitions of Gandhi’s, it was Hubert Humphrey without sin.
Eulogy at funeral of Vice President Hubert Humphrey, St. Paul, Minnesota (16 Jan 1978). In Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter (1978), Vol. 1, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  According (9)  |  Biography (232)  |  Character (118)  |  Commerce (15)  |  Conscience (39)  |  Definition (192)  |  Eulogy (2)  |  God (535)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Morality (42)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Politics (96)  |  Principle (292)  |  Sacrifice (32)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seven (5)  |  Sin (30)  |  Wealth (66)  |  Work (635)  |  Worship (25)

All depends on keeping the eye steadily fixed on the facts of nature and so receiving their images simply as they are.
In Francis Bacon, James Spedding (ed.), Robert Leslie Ellis (ed.), 'The Plan of the Work: The Great Instauration', The Works of Francis Bacon: Translations of the Philosophical Works (1858), Vol. 4, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (90)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fix (25)  |  Image (59)  |  Keep (100)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Receive (60)  |  Simply (53)  |  Steady (16)

All people dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their mind, wake in the morning to find that it was vanity. But the dreamers of the day are dangerous people, for they dream their dreams with open eyes, and make them come true.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dangerous (60)  |  Dream (167)  |  Dreamer (10)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Equally (26)  |  Find (408)  |  Mind (760)  |  Morning (43)  |  Night (118)  |  Open (66)  |  People (390)  |  Recess (7)  |  True (208)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Wake (13)

Almost every major systematic error which has deluded men for thousands of years relied on practical experience. Horoscopes, incantations, oracles, magic, witchcraft, the cures of witch doctors and of medical practitioners before the advent of modern medicine, were all firmly established through the centuries in the eyes of the public by their supposed practical successes. The scientific method was devised precisely for the purpose of elucidating the nature of things under more carefully controlled conditions and by more rigorous criteria than are present in the situations created by practical problems.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Care (95)  |  Century (131)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Control (114)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cure (96)  |  Delusion (22)  |  Devising (7)  |  Elucidation (6)  |  Error (277)  |  Establishment (35)  |  Experience (342)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Incantation (4)  |  Magic (78)  |  Major (32)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Modern (162)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Practicality (6)  |  Practitioner (13)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Problem (497)  |  Public (94)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reliance (10)  |  Rigor (23)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Situation (52)  |  Success (250)  |  Supposition (37)  |  System (191)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Witch Doctor (2)  |  Witchcraft (5)  |  Year (299)

Amoeba has her picture in the book,
Proud Protozoon!—Yet beware of pride,
All she can do is fatten and divide;
She cannot even read, or sew, or cook…
The Worm can crawl
But has no eyes to look.
The Jelly-fish can swim
But lacks a bride.
Essay read at the Heretics Club, Cambridge (May 1922), 'Philosophic Ants', collected in Essays of a Biologist (1923), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Beware (10)  |  Book (257)  |  Cook (16)  |  Crawl (6)  |  Divide (40)  |  Look (52)  |  Picture (77)  |  Pride (64)  |  Read (145)  |  Worm (25)

Among those whom I could never pursuade to rank themselves with idlers, and who speak with indignation of my morning sleeps and nocturnal rambles, one passes the day in catching spiders, that he may count their eyes with a microscope; another exhibits the dust of a marigold separated from the flower with a dexterity worthy of Leuwenhoweck himself. Some turn the wheel of electricity; some suspend rings to a lodestone, and find that what they did yesterday, they can do again to-day.—Some register the changes of the wind, and die fully convinced that the wind is changeable.—There are men yet more profound, who have heard that two colorless liquors may produce a color by union, and that two cold bodies will grow hot of they are mingled: they mingle them, and produce the effect expected, say it is strange, and mingle them again.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Cold (58)  |  Color (99)  |  Dexterity (6)  |  Dust (49)  |  Effect (166)  |  Electricity (136)  |  Energy (214)  |  Enquiry (76)  |  Entomologist (5)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Heat (100)  |  Idleness (9)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Lodestone (6)  |  Magnetism (30)  |  Meteorology (32)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Mingle (7)  |  Observation (450)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Physics (348)  |  Pollen (4)  |  Profound (59)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Repeat (41)  |  Research (590)  |  Sleep (58)  |  Spider (11)  |  Strange (94)  |  Wind (80)

Are God and Nature then at strife,
That Nature lends such evil dreams?
So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life; ...
'So careful of the type', but no.
From scarped cliff and quarried stone
She cries, 'A thousand types are gone:
I care for nothing, all shall go' ...
Man, her last work, who seemed so fair,
Such splendid purpose in his eyes,
Who rolled the psalm to wintry skies,
Who built him fanes of fruitless prayer,
Who trusted God was love indeed
And love Creation's final law—
Tho’ Nature red in tooth and claw
With ravine, shrieked against his creed...
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), Cantos 56-57. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (95)  |  Claw (8)  |  Cliff (11)  |  Creation (242)  |  Creed (11)  |  Cry (18)  |  Dream (167)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fairness (2)  |  Fruitless (6)  |  God (535)  |  Law (515)  |  Love (224)  |  Man (373)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Prayer (23)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Quarry (11)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Red (35)  |  Rolling (3)  |  Scarp (2)  |  Shriek (3)  |  Sky (124)  |  Splendid (12)  |  Stone (76)  |  Strife (9)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Tooth (26)  |  Trust (49)  |  Type (52)  |  Winter (30)  |  Work (635)

As the brain of man is the speck of dust in the universe that thinks, so the leaves—the fern and the needled pine and the latticed frond and the seaweed ribbon—perceive the light in a fundamental and constructive sense. … Their leaves see the light, as my eyes can never do. … They impound its stellar energy, and with that force they make life out of the elements.
In Flowering Earth (1939), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (213)  |  Dust (49)  |  Element (162)  |  Energy (214)  |  Fern (4)  |  Leaf (49)  |  Life (1131)  |  Light (347)  |  Pine (9)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Speck (17)  |  Star (336)  |  Universe (686)

Astronomers have built telescopes which can show myriads of stars unseen before; but when a man looks through a tear in his own eye, that is a lens which opens reaches into the unknown, and reveals orbs which no telescope, however skilfully constructed, could do.
Life Thoughts (1858), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Building (52)  |  Construction (83)  |  Lens (13)  |  Man (373)  |  Myriad (22)  |  Opening (15)  |  Orb (8)  |  Reach (121)  |  Revelation (34)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Showing (6)  |  Skill (66)  |  Star (336)  |  Tear (23)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Unknown (107)  |  Unseen (10)

At the sight of a single bone, of a single piece of bone, I recognize and reconstruct the portion of the whole from which it would have been taken. The whole being to which this fragment belonged appears in my mind's eye.
Cited by Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Comptes-Rendus de l’Académie des Sciences. 1837, 7, 116. Trans. Franck Bourdier, 'Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire versus Cuvier: The Campaign for Paleontological Evolution (1825- 1838)', Cecil J. Schneer (ed.), Toward a History of Geology (1969), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Being (41)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Bone (63)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mind’s Eye (2)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Piece (38)  |  Portion (24)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Reconstruction (13)  |  Sight (48)  |  Single (120)  |  Whole (192)

At this point, however, I have no intention whatever of criticizing the false teachings of Galen, who is easily first among the professors of dissection, for I certainly do not wish to start off by gaining a reputation for impiety toward him, the author of all good things, or by seeming insubordinate to his authority. For I am well aware how upset the practitioners (unlike the followers of Aristotle) invariably become nowadays, when they discover in the course of a single dissection that Galen has departed on two hundred or more occasions from the true description of the harmony, function, and action of the human parts, and how grimly they examine the dissected portions as they strive with all the zeal at their command to defend him. Yet even they, drawn by their love of truth, are gradually calming down and placing more faith in their own not ineffective eyes and reason than in Galen’s writings.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, iv, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), Preface, liv.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Author (62)  |  Authority (66)  |  Criticism (60)  |  Description (84)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Dissection (29)  |  Examine (44)  |  Faith (157)  |  False (99)  |  Follower (10)  |  Galen (19)  |  Harmony (72)  |  Human (550)  |  Ineffective (4)  |  Practitioner (13)  |  Professor (54)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Teaching (108)  |  Truth (928)  |  Writing (81)  |  Zeal (11)

Because words pass away as soon as they strike upon the air, and last no longer than their sound, men have by means of letters formed signs of words. Thus the sounds of the voice are made visible to the eye, not of course as sounds, but by means of certain signs.
In 'Origin of Writing', Christian Doctrine, Book 2, as translated by J.F. Shaw, collected in A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church: Volume II: St. Augustin’s City of God and Christian Doctrine (1907), 536.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Form (314)  |  Last (19)  |  Letter (51)  |  Linguistics (28)  |  Pass (93)  |  Sign (58)  |  Sound (90)  |  Strike (40)  |  Visible (38)  |  Voice (51)  |  Word (302)

Believing, as I do, in the continuity of nature, I cannot stop abruptly where our microscopes cease to be of use. Here the vision of the mind authoritatively supplements the vision of the eye. By a necessity engendered and justified by science I cross the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern in that Matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial Life.
'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast', (19 Aug 1874). Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (6)  |  Belief (504)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Continuity (30)  |  Cover (37)  |  Creator (55)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Engendering (3)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Justification (40)  |  Life (1131)  |  Matter (343)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Notwithstanding (2)  |  Potency (7)  |  Power (366)  |  Professing (2)  |  Promise (38)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (2067)  |  Stop (76)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Terrestrial (24)  |  Vision (94)

But it will be found... that one universal law prevails in all these phenomena. Where two portions of the same light arrive in the eye by different routes, either exactly or very nearly in the same direction, the appearance or disappearance of various colours is determined by the greater or less difference in the lengths of the paths.
Lecture XIV. 'Of Physical Optics'. In A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Natural and Experimental Philosophy (1802), 112-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Color (99)  |  Determination (57)  |  Difference (246)  |  Direction (76)  |  Disappearance (22)  |  Law (515)  |  Length (22)  |  Light (347)  |  Path (84)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Portion (24)  |  Route (15)  |  Universal (105)

Civilized people can talk about anything. For them no subject is taboo…. In civilized societies there will be no intellectual bogeys at sight of which great grown-up babies are expected to hide their eyes
In Civilization: An Essay (1928), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (20)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Expect (44)  |  Great (534)  |  Hide (53)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  People (390)  |  Sight (48)  |  Society (228)  |  Subject (240)  |  Taboo (4)  |  Talk (100)

Curves that have no tangents are the rule. … Those who hear of curves without tangents, or of functions without derivatives, often think at first that Nature presents no such complications. … The contrary however is true. … Consider, for instance, one of the white flakes that are obtained by salting a solution of soap. At a distance its contour may appear sharply defined, but as we draw nearer its sharpness disappears. The eye can no longer draw a tangent at any point. … The use of a magnifying glass or microscope leaves us just as uncertain, for fresh irregularities appear every time we increase the magnification. … An essential characteristic of our flake … is that we suspect … that any scale involves details that absolutely prohibit the fixing of a tangent.
(1906). As quoted “in free translation” in Benoit B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Appear (118)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Complication (24)  |  Contour (3)  |  Curve (33)  |  Defined (4)  |  Derivative (6)  |  Detail (87)  |  Disappear (30)  |  Distance (77)  |  Essential (117)  |  Fixing (2)  |  Flake (6)  |  Fresh (30)  |  Function (131)  |  Increase (146)  |  Involve (48)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Magnification (8)  |  Magnifying Glass (2)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nearer (8)  |  Prohibit (2)  |  Rule (177)  |  Scale (63)  |  Sharply (4)  |  Sharpness (6)  |  Soap (11)  |  Solution (216)  |  Suspect (16)  |  Tangent (5)  |  Uncertain (14)

Dogmatism has only one eye, but bigotry is stone blind.
Aphorism in The Philistine (Mar 1905), 20, No. 4, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Bigotry (4)  |  Blind (47)  |  Dogmatism (10)  |  Stone (76)

Empirical sciences prosecuted purely for their own sake, and without philosophic tendency are like a face without eyes.
The World as Will and Idea translated by Richard Burdon Haldane Haldane, John Kemp (3rd. Ed.,1888), Vol. 2, 318-319.
Science quotes on:  |  Empirical (27)  |  Face (108)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Prosecute (3)  |  Sake (23)  |  Science (2067)  |  Tendency (56)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Anatomy (63)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (28)  |  Bear (67)  |  Become (172)  |  Biology (168)  |  Body (247)  |  Change (364)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (15)  |  Consider (81)  |  Create (153)  |  Dead (57)  |  Deal (49)  |  Describe (57)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (96)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (65)  |  Form (314)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Generate (14)  |  Generation (141)  |  Genesis (17)  |  Grow (99)  |  Inherent (30)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Manner (57)  |  Member (40)  |  Mind (760)  |  Move (94)  |  Number (282)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (242)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (84)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Point (123)  |  Produce (102)  |  Property (126)  |  Relate (20)  |  Relation (154)  |  Reveal (52)  |  Same (156)  |  Space (257)  |  Step (110)  |  Student (203)  |  Transition (18)  |  Treat (34)  |  Understand (340)  |  Variable (16)  |  Write (154)

Every great advance of science opens our eyes to facts which we had failed before to observe, and makes new demands on our powers of interpretation.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Demand (76)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fail (58)  |  Great (534)  |  Interpretation (70)  |  New (496)  |  Observe (76)  |  Open (66)  |  Power (366)  |  Science (2067)

Everyone is aware of the difficult and menacing situation in which human society–shrunk into one community with a common fate–now finds itself, but only a few act accordingly. Most people go on living their every-day life: half frightened, half indifferent, they behold the ghostly tragicomedy which is being performed on the international stage before the eyes and ears of the world. But on that stage, on which the actors under the floodlights play their ordained parts, our fate of tomorrow, life or death of the nations, is being decided.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (7)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Act (117)  |  Actor (6)  |  Aware (31)  |  Behold (18)  |  Common (122)  |  Community (82)  |  Death (302)  |  Decide (40)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Ear (29)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Fate (46)  |  Find (408)  |  Floodlight (2)  |  Half (56)  |  Human Society (5)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  International (23)  |  Life (1131)  |  Live (272)  |  Menace (5)  |  Nation (134)  |  Ordain (4)  |  Part (222)  |  People (390)  |  Perform (38)  |  Play (112)  |  Shrink (15)  |  Situation (52)  |  Stage (55)  |  Tomorrow (39)  |  World (898)

Exits sun; enters moon.
This moon is never alone.
Stars are seen all around.
These twinklers do not make a sound.
The tiny ones shine from their place.
Mother moon watches with a smiling face.
Its light is soothing to the eyes.
Night’s darkness hides its face.
Cool and calm is its light.
Heat and sweat are never felt.
Some days, moon is not seen.
Makes kids wonder, where had it been?
Partial eclipse shades the moon.
In summers it does not arrive soon.
Beautiful is this milky ball.
It is the love of one and all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (106)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Ball (31)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Calm (22)  |  Cool (13)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Eclipse (20)  |  Enter (32)  |  Exit (4)  |  Face (108)  |  Feel (167)  |  Heat (100)  |  Hide (53)  |  Kid (15)  |  Light (347)  |  Love (224)  |  Moon (199)  |  Mother (71)  |  Night (118)  |  Partial (10)  |  Place (175)  |  See (369)  |  Shade (22)  |  Shine (45)  |  Smile (19)  |  Soon (34)  |  Soothing (2)  |  Sound (90)  |  Star (336)  |  Summer (33)  |  Sun (276)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Watch (65)  |  Wonder (169)

Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Feel (167)  |  Heart (139)  |  See (369)

Firefly meteorites blazed against a dark background, and sometimes the lightning was frighteningly brilliant. Like a boy, I gazed open-mouthed at the fireworks, and suddenly, before my eyes, something magical occurred. A greenish radiance poured from Earth directly up to the station, a radiance resembling gigantic phosphorescent organ pipes, whose ends were glowing crimson, and overlapped by waves of swirling green mist.
“Consider yourself very lucky, Vladimir,” I said to myself, “to have watched the northern lights.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Background (30)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Boy (46)  |  Brilliant (28)  |  Consider (81)  |  Crimson (4)  |  Dark (77)  |  Directly (22)  |  Earth (638)  |  End (195)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Firework (2)  |  Gaze (16)  |  Gigantic (23)  |  Glow (14)  |  Green (32)  |  Lightning (33)  |  Lucky (12)  |  Magic (78)  |  Meteorite (8)  |  Mist (9)  |  Myself (36)  |  Northern Lights (2)  |  Occur (43)  |  Organ (64)  |  Overlap (6)  |  Phosphorescent (2)  |  Pipe (7)  |  Pour (10)  |  Radiance (6)  |  Resemble (29)  |  Say (228)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Station (12)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Watch (65)  |  Wave (68)

For all these years you were merely
A smear of light through our telescopes
On the clearest, coldest night; a hint
Of a glint, just a few pixels wide
On even your most perfectly-framed portraits.
But now, now we see you!
Swimming out of the dark - a great
Stone shark, your star-tanned skin pitted
And pocked, scarred after eons of drifting
Silently through the endless ocean of space.
Here on Earth our faces lit up as we saw
You clearly for the first time; eyes wide
With wonder we traced the strangely familiar
Grooves raked across your sides,
Wondering if Rosetta had doubled back to Mars
And raced past Phobos by mistake –
Then you were gone, falling back into the black,
Not to be seen by human eyes again for a thousand
Blue Moons or more. But we know you now,
We know you; you’ll never be just a speck of light again.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Back (104)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Clear (98)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cold (58)  |  Dark (77)  |  Double (15)  |  Drift (13)  |  Earth (638)  |  Endless (28)  |  Eon (11)  |  Face (108)  |  Fall (120)  |  Familiar (43)  |  First Time (10)  |  Glint (2)  |  Great (534)  |  Groove (3)  |  Hint (11)  |  Know (556)  |  Light (347)  |  Mars (34)  |  Merely (82)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Moon (199)  |  Night (118)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Past (152)  |  Pit (13)  |  Pixel (2)  |  Portrait (4)  |  Race (104)  |  Scar (7)  |  See (369)  |  Shark (7)  |  Side (51)  |  Silently (4)  |  Skin (25)  |  Smear (3)  |  Space (257)  |  Speck (17)  |  Stone (76)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Swim (16)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Trace (53)  |  Wide (28)  |  Wonder (169)  |  Year (299)

Geometry is a skill of the eyes and the hands as well as of the mind.
In 'Why We Still Need to Teach Geometry', Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress on Mathematical Education (1983), 159. As quoted and cited in John Del Grande, 'Spacial Sense', The Arithmetic Teacher (Feb 1990), 37, No. 6, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Geometry (232)  |  Hand (142)  |  Mind (760)  |  Skill (66)

God has not revealed all things to man and has entrusted us with but a fragment of His mighty work. But He who directs all things, who has established and laid the foundation of the world, who has clothed Himself with Creation, He is greater and better than that which He has wrought. Hidden from our eyes, He can only be reached by the spirit.
From Quaestiones Naturales as translated in Charles Singer, From Magic to Science (1958), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (242)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Fragment (25)  |  God (535)  |  Hiding (6)  |  Man (373)  |  Reach (121)  |  Revelation (34)  |  Science And God (5)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Thing (37)  |  Trust (49)

Gold-Mines. Gold is not found in quartz alone; its richest lodes are in the eyes and ears of the public, but these are harder to work and to prospect than any quartz vein.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Ear (29)  |  Gold (68)  |  Harder (6)  |  Lode (2)  |  Prospect (22)  |  Public (94)  |  Quartz (2)  |  Rich (61)  |  Vein (13)  |  Work (635)

Good work is no done by “humble” men. It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking “Is what I do worth while?” and “Am I the right person to do it?” will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve. This is not too difficult: it is harder not to make his subject and himself ridiculous by shutting his eyes too tightly.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (23)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Duty (68)  |  Exaggeration (11)  |  Good (345)  |  Harder (6)  |  Humble (31)  |  Importance (218)  |  Ineffective (4)  |  Person (154)  |  Professor (54)  |  Ridiculous (13)  |  Right (197)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Work (635)  |  Worth (99)

Half the joy of life is in little things taken on the run… but let us keep our hearts young and our eyes open that nothing worth our while shall escape us. That nothing worth our while shall escape us. And everything is worth its while if we only grasp it and its significance.
Found quoted without source in The American Journal of Clinical Medicine (1907), 14, 150, and several other publications of that time period. Webmaster invites help pinpointing the primary text.
Science quotes on:  |  Escape (47)  |  Everything (181)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Half (56)  |  Heart (139)  |  Joy (88)  |  Life (1131)  |  Little (188)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Significance (71)  |  Worth (99)  |  Young (100)

Happy the men who made the first essay,
And to celestial regions found the way!
No earthly vices clogg’d their purer souls,
That they could soar so high as touch the poles:
Sublime their thoughts and from pollution clear,
Bacchus and Venus held no revels there;
From vain ambition free; no love of war
Possess’d their minds, nor wranglings at the bar;
No glaring grandeur captivates their eyes,
For such see greater glory in the skies:
Thus these to heaven attain.
In Craufurd Tait Ramage (ed., trans.), Beautiful Thoughts From Latin Authors, with English Translations (1864),
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (34)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Attain (45)  |  Bacchus (2)  |  Captivate (4)  |  Celestial (21)  |  Glare (3)  |  Glory (57)  |  Grandeur (21)  |  Greater (42)  |  Happy (46)  |  Heavens (18)  |  Mind (760)  |  Pole (18)  |  Pollution (43)  |  Revel (5)  |  See (369)  |  Sky (124)  |  Soar (15)  |  Soul (166)  |  Sublime (27)  |  Thought (546)  |  Vain (30)  |  Venus (15)  |  Vice (17)  |  War (161)

He marvelled at the fact that the cats had two holes cut in their fur at precisely the spot where their eyes were.
Aphorisms, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (1990), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Cat (36)  |  Fur (6)

He was so narrow-minded he could see through a keyhole with two eyes.
Black Elk
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Keyhole (5)  |  Narrow-Minded (5)  |  See (369)

Holding then to science with one hand—the left hand—we give the right hand to religion, and cry: ‘Open Thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things, more wondrous than the shining worlds can tell.’ Obedient to the promise, religion does awaken faculties within us, does teach our eyes to the beholding of more wonderful things. Those great worlds blazing like suns die like feeble stars in the glory of the morning, in the presence of this new light. The soul knows that an infinite sea of love is all about it, throbbing through it, everlasting arms of affection lift it, and it bathes itself in the clear consciousness of a Father’s love.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (18)  |  Arm (27)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bathe (3)  |  Behold (18)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Clear (98)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Cry (18)  |  Die (82)  |  Everlasting (8)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Father (60)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Give (201)  |  Glory (57)  |  Great (534)  |  Hand (142)  |  Hold (94)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Know (556)  |  Leave (128)  |  Lift (25)  |  Light (347)  |  Love (224)  |  Morning (43)  |  New (496)  |  Obedient (3)  |  Open (66)  |  Presence (33)  |  Promise (38)  |  Religion (239)  |  Right (197)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sea (188)  |  Shine (45)  |  Soul (166)  |  Star (336)  |  Sun (276)  |  Teach (188)  |  Tell (110)  |  Thou (9)  |  Throb (6)  |  Wonderful (60)  |  Wondrous (9)  |  World (898)

How near one Species to the next is join'd,
The due Gradations please a thinking Mind;
and there are Creatures which no eye can see,
That for a Moment live and breathe like me:
Whom a small Fly in bulk as far exceeds,
As yon tall Cedar does the waving Reeds:
These we can reach—and may we not suppose
There still are Creatures more minute than those.
'The Enquiry'. In Poems Upon Several Occasions (1748), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Breathe (36)  |  Creature (155)  |  Fly (99)  |  Mind (760)  |  Reed (8)  |  Species (221)

How, indeed, can there be a response within to the impression from without when there is nothing within that is in relation of congenial vibration with that which is without? Inattention in such case is insusceptibility; and if this be complete, then to demand attention is very much like demanding of the eye that it should attend to sound-waves, and of the ear that it should attend to light-waves.
As quoted in William W. Speer, Primary Arithmetic: First Year, for the Use of Teachers (1902), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (11)  |  Attention (121)  |  Case (99)  |  Complete (87)  |  Congenial (3)  |  Demand (76)  |  Ear (29)  |  Education (347)  |  Impression (72)  |  Inattention (5)  |  Light (347)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Relation (154)  |  Response (29)  |  Sound (90)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  Vibration (16)  |  Wave (68)

I am willing to believe that my unobtainable sixty seconds within a sponge or a flatworm might not reveal any mental acuity that I would care to ca ll consciousness. But I am also confident ... that vultures and sloths, as close evolutionary relatives with the same basic set of organs, lie on our side of any meaningful (and necessarily fuzzy) border–and that we are therefore not mistaken when we look them in the eye and see a glimmer of emotional and conceptual affinity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acuity (2)  |  Affinity (14)  |  Basic (66)  |  Belief (504)  |  Border (9)  |  Care (95)  |  Close (67)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Confident (9)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Fuzzy (3)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Lie (115)  |  Meaningful (16)  |  Mental (78)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Organ (64)  |  Relative (39)  |  Reveal (52)  |  Same (156)  |  Second (59)  |  See (369)  |  Set (99)  |  Side (51)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Sloth (3)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Vulture (5)

I believe myself to possess a most singular combination of qualities exactly fitted to make me pre-eminently a discoverer of the hidden realities of nature… the belief has been forced upon me…
Firstly: Owing to some peculiarity in my nervous system, I have perceptions of some things, which no one else has… and intuitive perception of… things hidden from eyes, ears, & ordinary senses…
Secondly: my sense reasoning faculties;
Thirdly: my concentration faculty, by which I mean the power not only of throwing my whole energy & existence into whatever I choose, but also of bringing to bear on anyone subject or idea, a vast apparatus from all sorts of apparently irrelevant & extraneous sources…
Well, here I have written what most people would call a remarkably mad letter; & yet certainly one of the most logical, sober-minded, cool, pieces of composition, (I believe), that I ever framed.
Lovelace Papers, Bodleian Library, Oxford University, 42, folio 12 (6 Feb 1841). As quoted and cited in Dorothy Stein (ed.), 'This First Child of Mine', Ada: A Life and a Legacy (1985), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Autobiography (55)  |  Combination (91)  |  Concentration (19)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Ear (29)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Letter (51)  |  Logic (260)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Perception (64)  |  Quality (95)  |  Reality (190)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Sense (321)  |  Subject (240)

I believe with Schopenhauer that one of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one’s own ever shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from personal life into the world of objective perception and thought; this desire may be compared with the townsman’s irresistible longing to escape from his noisy, cramped surroundings into the silence of high mountains, where the eye ranges freely through the still, pure air and fondly traces out the restful contours apparently built for eternity.
Address at The Physical Society, Berlin (1918) for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research', collected in Essays in Science (1934) 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Apparently (19)  |  Belief (504)  |  Built (7)  |  Compared (8)  |  Contour (3)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Desire (142)  |  Dreariness (3)  |  Escape (47)  |  Eternity (49)  |  Everyday (16)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Finely (2)  |  Freely (13)  |  High (153)  |  Hopelessness (5)  |  Irresistible (10)  |  Life (1131)  |  Longing (9)  |  Motive (33)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Noisy (2)  |  Objective (66)  |  Pain (101)  |  Perception (64)  |  Personal (66)  |  Pure (103)  |  Range (57)  |  Restful (2)  |  Arthur Schopenhauer (17)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Silence (43)  |  Strongest (6)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Tempered (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  Trace (53)  |  World (898)

I do not find that any one has doubted that there are four elements. The highest of these is supposed to be fire, and hence proceed the eyes of so many glittering stars. The next is that spirit, which both the Greeks and ourselves call by the same name, air. It is by the force of this vital principle, pervading all things and mingling with all, that the earth, together with the fourth element, water, is balanced in the middle of space.
In The Natural History of Pliny (1855), Vol. 1, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Balance (55)  |  Call (128)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Earth (638)  |  Element (162)  |  Fire (133)  |  Fourth (8)  |  Glittering (2)  |  Greek (73)  |  Middle (16)  |  Mingle (7)  |  Name (170)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Principle (292)  |  Space (257)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Star (336)  |  Vital (39)  |  Water (293)

I have destroyed almost the whole race of frogs, which does not happen in that savage Batrachomyomachia of Homer. For in the anatomy of frogs, which, by favour of my very excellent colleague D. Carolo Fracassato, I had set on foot in order to become more certain about the membranous substance of the lungs, it happened to me to see such things that not undeservedly I can better make use of that [saying] of Homer for the present matter—
“I see with my eyes a work trusty and great.”
For in this (frog anatomy) owing to the simplicity of the structure, and the almost complete transparency of the vessels which admits the eye into the interior, things are more clearly shown so that they will bring the light to other more obscure matters.
De Pulmonibus (1661), trans. James Young, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine (1929-30), 23, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (63)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Frog (33)  |  Great (534)  |  Homer (9)  |  Interior (19)  |  Lung (19)  |  Membrane (12)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  See (369)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Structure (225)  |  Transparency (3)  |  Vessel (28)  |  Work (635)

I have made many mistakes myself; in learning the anatomy of the eye I dare say, I have spoiled a hatfull; the best surgeon, like the best general, is he who makes the fewest mistakes.
Quoted in James Anthony Froude, John Tulloch and Thomas Carlyle, Fraser's Magazine (Nov 1862), 66, 574.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (63)  |  Error (277)  |  Surgeon (45)

I have no knowledge other than that gained through my own eyes.
In De La Pirotechnia (1540). As translated in Pirotechnia (1959), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Gain (70)  |  Knowledge (1306)

I often get letters … from people who say … I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature. … I reply … “Well, it’s funny that the people, when they say that this is evidence of the Almighty, always quote beautiful things … orchids and hummingbirds and butterflies and roses.” But I always have to think too of a little boy sitting on the banks of a river in west Africa who has a worm boring through his eyeball, turning him blind before he’s five years old. And I … say, “Well, presumably the God you speak about created the worm as well,” and now, I find that baffling to credit a merciful God with that action. And therefore it seems to me safer to show things that I know to be truth, truthful and factual, and allow people to make up their own minds about the moralities of this thing, or indeed the theology of this thing.
From BBC TV, Life on Air (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (19)  |  Butterfly (20)  |  Fact (733)  |  Letter (51)  |  Orchid (2)  |  Rose (9)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Truth (928)  |  Worm (25)

I read … that the celebrated Amontons, using a thermometer of his own invention, had discovered that water boils at a fixed degree of heat. I was at once inflamed with a great desire to make for myself a thermometer of the same sort, so that I might with my own eyes perceive this beautiful phenomenon of nature.
From 'Experimenta circa gradum caloris liquorum nonnullorum ebullientium instituta', Philosophical Transactions (1724), 33, 1, as translated in William Francis Magie, A Source Book in Physics (1935), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Guillaume Amontons (3)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Boil (15)  |  Celebrate (14)  |  Degree (82)  |  Desire (142)  |  Discover (199)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Great (534)  |  Heat (100)  |  Inflame (2)  |  Invention (324)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Read (145)  |  Thermometer (9)  |  Water (293)

I searched along the changing edge
Where, sky-pierced now the cloud had broken.
I saw no bird, no blade of wing,
No song was spoken.
I stood, my eyes turned upward still
And drank the air and breathed the light.
Then, like a hawk upon the wind,
I climbed the sky, I made the flight.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Bird (120)  |  Blade (9)  |  Break (54)  |  Breathe (36)  |  Change (364)  |  Climb (34)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Drink (36)  |  Edge (23)  |  Flight (65)  |  Hawk (3)  |  Light (347)  |  Search (105)  |  See (369)  |  Sky (124)  |  Song (27)  |  Speak (92)  |  Stand (108)  |  Turn (118)  |  Upward (11)  |  Wind (80)  |  Wing (48)

I suppose that I tend to be optimistic about the future of physics. And nothing makes me more optimistic than the discovery of broken symmetries. In the seventh book of the Republic, Plato describes prisoners who are chained in a cave and can see only shadows that things outside cast on the cave wall. When released from the cave at first their eyes hurt, and for a while they think that the shadows they saw in the cave are more real than the objects they now see. But eventually their vision clears, and they can understand how beautiful the real world is. We are in such a cave, imprisoned by the limitations on the sorts of experiments we can do. In particular, we can study matter only at relatively low temperatures, where symmetries are likely to be spontaneously broken, so that nature does not appear very simple or unified. We have not been able to get out of this cave, but by looking long and hard at the shadows on the cave wall, we can at least make out the shapes of symmetries, which though broken, are exact principles governing all phenomena, expressions of the beauty of the world outside.
In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1989), 'Conceptual Foundations of the Unified Theory of Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions.' Nobel Lectures: Physics 1971-1980 (1992), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (248)  |  Cave (15)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Expression (110)  |  Limitation (30)  |  Outside (48)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Plato (76)  |  Principle (292)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Reality (190)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Shape (70)  |  Symmetry (37)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Vision (94)  |  Wall (28)  |  World (898)

I trust I may be enabled in the treatment of patients always to act with a single eye to their good.
Letter to his sister Jane (3 Mar 1857). In John Vaughan, 'Lord Lister', The Living Age (1918), 297, 361. Reprinted from The Fortnightly Review (1918), 109, 417- .
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Good (345)  |  Patient (125)  |  Single (120)  |  Treatment (100)

I venture to assert that the feelings one has when the beautiful symbolism of the infinitesimal calculus first gets a meaning, or when the delicate analysis of Fourier has been mastered, or while one follows Clerk Maxwell or Thomson into the strange world of electricity, now growing so rapidly in form and being, or can almost feel with Stokes the pulsations of light that gives nature to our eyes, or track with Clausius the courses of molecules we can measure, even if we know with certainty that we can never see them I venture to assert that these feelings are altogether comparable to those aroused in us by an exquisite poem or a lofty thought.
In paper (May 1891) read before Bath Branch of the Teachers’ Guild, published in The Practical Teacher (July 1891), reprinted as 'Geometry', in Frederic Spencer, Chapters on the Aims and Practice of Teaching (1897), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Arouse (12)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Rudolf Clausius (9)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Delicate (21)  |  Electricity (136)  |  Exquisite (15)  |  Infinitesimal Calculus (2)  |  Light (347)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Measure (104)  |  Molecule (133)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Poem (92)  |  Pulsation (4)  |  Sir George Gabriel Stokes (3)  |  Symbolism (3)  |  Sir J.J. Thomson (18)  |  Thought (546)  |  Track (15)

I Was strolling on the Moon one day.
In the merry, merry month of December … May … May. That’s right. … When much to my surprise, a pair of bonny eyes … be-doop-doo-doo …
Singing while on an extravehicular walk on the moon’s surface (Apollo 17, 12 Dec 1972). With him was Eugene Cernan and joining in singing the second line, and corrected with “May” during the first ellipsis above. From transcript on the nasa.gov website, which notes the song being mimicked was 'While Strolling through the Park One Day' written by Ed Haley (1884).
Science quotes on:  |  December (3)  |  May (2)  |  Merry (3)  |  Month (31)  |  Moon (199)  |  Stroll (2)  |  Surprise (71)

I will lift mine eyes unto the pills. Almost everyone takes them, from the humble aspirin to the multi-coloured, king-sized three deckers, which put you to sleep, wake you up, stimulate and soothe you all in one. It is an age of pills.
1962
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Aspirin (2)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Humble (31)  |  Lift (25)  |  Pill (6)  |  Sleep (58)  |  Soothe (2)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Unto (8)  |  Wake (13)

If a lunatic scribbles a jumble of mathematical symbols it does not follow that the writing means anything merely because to the inexpert eye it is indistinguishable from higher mathematics.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), Vol. 2, 232. Also in J.R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics (1956, 1960), Vol. 1, 308.
Science quotes on:  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Indistinguishable (2)  |  Inexpert (2)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Lunatic (7)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Means (176)  |  Merely (82)  |  Scribble (5)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Writing (81)

If one looks with a cold eye at the mess man has made of history, it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that he has been afflicted by some built-in mental disorder which drives him towards self-destruction.
In The Ghost in the Machine (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Built-In (2)  |  Cold (58)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Drive (55)  |  History (369)  |  Mental Disorder (2)  |  Mess (13)  |  Self-Destruction (2)

If the Humours of the Eye by old Age decay, so as by shrinking to make the Cornea and Coat of the Crystalline Humour grow flatter than before, the Light will not be refracted enough, and for want of a sufficient Refraction will not converge to the bottom of the Eye but to some place beyond it, and by consequence paint in the bottom of the Eye a confused Picture, and according to the Indistinctuess of this Picture the Object will appear confused. This is the reason of the decay of sight in old Men, and shews why their Sight is mended by Spectacles. For those Convex glasses supply the defect of plumpness in the Eye, and by increasing the Refraction make the rays converge sooner, so as to convene distinctly at the bottom of the Eye if the Glass have a due degree of convexity. And the contrary happens in short-sighted Men whose Eyes are too plump. For the Refraction being now too great, the Rays converge and convene in the Eyes before they come at the bottom; and therefore the Picture made in the bottom and the Vision caused thereby will not be distinct, unless the Object be brought so near the Eye as that the place where the converging Rays convene may be removed to the bottom, or that the plumpness of the Eye be taken off and the Refractions diminished by a Concave-glass of a due degree of Concavity, or lastly that by Age the Eye grow flatter till it come to a due Figure: For short-sighted Men see remote Objects best in Old Age, and therefore they are accounted to have the most lasting Eyes.
Opticks (1704), Book 1, Part 1, Axiom VII, 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Concave (3)  |  Convergence (3)  |  Convex (2)  |  Decay (33)  |  Humour (103)  |  Lens (13)  |  Light (347)  |  Ray (41)  |  Refraction (9)  |  Short-Sighted (2)  |  Spectacles (6)  |  Vision (94)

If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark would be without meaning.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Creature (155)  |  Dark (77)  |  Find (408)  |  Know (556)  |  Light (347)  |  Mean (101)  |  Universe (686)  |  Whole (192)

If we look at the problems raised by Aristotle, we are astonished at his gift of observation. What wonderful eyes the Greeks had for many things! Only they committed the mistake of being overhasty, of passing straightway from the phenomenon to the explanation of it, and thereby produced certain theories that are quite inadequate. But this is the mistake of all times, and still made in our own day.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Commit (21)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Gift (61)  |  Greek (73)  |  Hasty (6)  |  Inadequate (14)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Observation (450)  |  Pass (93)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Straightway (2)  |  Theory (696)  |  Wonderful (60)

If we seek for the simplest arrangement, which would enable it [the eye] to receive and discriminate the impressions of the different parts of the spectrum, we may suppose three distinct sensations only to be excited by the rays of the three principal pure colours, falling on any given point of the retina, the red, the green, and the violet; while the rays occupying the intermediate spaces are capable of producing mixed sensations, the yellow those which belong to the red and green, and the blue those which belong to the green and violet.
'Chromatics', in Supplement to the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica (1824), Vol. 3, 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (60)  |  Blue (56)  |  Color (99)  |  Discrimination (5)  |  Green (32)  |  Impression (72)  |  Intermediate (20)  |  Mixed (6)  |  Reception (8)  |  Red (35)  |  Retina (4)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Spectrum (24)  |  Violet (6)  |  Yellow (17)

If you look into their [chimpanzees] eyes, you know you’re looking into a thinking mind. They teach us that we are not the only beings with personalities, minds capable of rational thought, altruism and a sense of humor. That leads to new respect for other animals, respect for the environment and respect for all life.
From interview by Tamar Lewin, 'Wildlife to Tireless Crusader, See Jane Run', New York Times (20 Nov 2000), F35.
Science quotes on:  |  Altruism (7)  |  Animal (359)  |  Capability (37)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Environment (181)  |  Humor (7)  |  Life (1131)  |  Looking (26)  |  Mind (760)  |  Personality (47)  |  Rational (57)  |  Respect (86)  |  Sense (321)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Thought (546)

Imagination is the eye of the soul.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Imagination (275)  |  Soul (166)

In all spheres of science, art, skill, and handicraft it is never doubted that, in order to master them, a considerable amount of trouble must be spent in learning and in being trained. As regards philosophy, on the contrary, there seems still an assumption prevalent that, though every one with eyes and fingers is not on that account in a position to make shoes if he only has leather and a last, yet everybody understands how to philosophize straight away, and pass judgment on philosophy, simply because he possesses the criterion for doing so in his natural reason.
From Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) as translated by J.B. Baillie in 'Preface', The Phenomenology of Mind (1910), Vol. 1, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Assumption (58)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Criterion (18)  |  Finger (44)  |  Handicraft (3)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Learn (288)  |  Leather (4)  |  Natural (173)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Possess (56)  |  Reason (471)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Shoe (9)  |  Skill (66)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Train (45)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Understand (340)

In old age, you realise that while you're divided from your youth by decades, you can close your eyes and summon it at will. As a writer it puts one at a distinct advantage.
Interview with Sarah Crown, in The Guardian (25 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (77)  |  Close (67)  |  Decade (32)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Old Age (21)  |  Summon (6)  |  Writer (46)  |  Youth (77)

In the beginning was the book of Nature. For eon after eon, the pages of the book turned with no human to read them. No eye wondered at the ignition of the sun, the coagulation of the earth, the birth of the moon, the solidification of a terrestrial continent, or the filling of the seas. Yet when the first primitive algae evolved to float on the waters of this ocean, a promise was born—a hope that someday all the richness and variety of the phenomena of the universe would be read with appreciative eyes.
Opening paragraph in Gary G. Tibbetts, How the Great Scientists Reasoned: The Scientific Method in Action (2012), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Algae (5)  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Birth (93)  |  Book (257)  |  Book Of Nature (6)  |  Born (31)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Continent (52)  |  Eon (11)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Filling (6)  |  Float (21)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human (550)  |  Ignition (2)  |  Moon (199)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Page (30)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Primitive (42)  |  Promise (38)  |  Read (145)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sea (188)  |  Solidification (2)  |  Someday (4)  |  Sun (276)  |  Terrestrial (24)  |  Turn (118)  |  Universe (686)  |  Variety (71)  |  Water (293)  |  Wonder (169)

In the end, science as we know it has two basic types of practitioners. One is the educated man who still has a controlled sense of wonder before the universal mystery, whether it hides in a snail’s eye or within the light that impinges on that delicate organ. The second kind of observer is the extreme reductionist who is so busy stripping things apart that the tremendous mystery has been reduced to a trifle, to intangibles not worth troubling one’s head about.
In 'Science and the Sense of the Holy,' The Star Thrower (1978), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (66)  |  Busy (28)  |  Control (114)  |  Delicate (21)  |  Educate (12)  |  End (195)  |  Extreme (56)  |  Head (81)  |  Hide (53)  |  Impinge (3)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Kind (140)  |  Know (556)  |  Light (347)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Observer (42)  |  Organ (64)  |  Practitioner (13)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Science (2067)  |  Second (59)  |  Sense (321)  |  Snail (7)  |  Strip (6)  |  Tremendous (17)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Type (52)  |  Universal (105)  |  Wonder (169)  |  Worth (99)

In the mathematics I can report no deficience, except that it be that men do not sufficiently understand the excellent use of the pure mathematics, in that they do remedy and cure many defects in the wit and faculties intellectual. For if the wit be too dull, they sharpen it; if too wandering, they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it. So that as tennis is a game of no use in itself, but of great use in respect it maketh a quick eye and a body ready to put itself into all postures; so in the mathematics, that use which is collateral and intervenient is no less worthy than that which is principal and intended.
As translated in John Fauvel and Jeremy Gray (eds.) A History of Mathematics: A Reader (1987), 290-291. From De Augmentis, Book 3, The Advancement of Learning (1605), Book 2. Reprinted in The Two Books of Francis Bacon: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human (2009), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (247)  |  Cure (96)  |  Defect (16)  |  Dull (32)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Posture (7)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Quick (13)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Sharpen (16)  |  Tennis (7)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wit (36)

In the mind's eye, a fractal is a way of seeing infinity.
From Chaos (1987), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Fractal (9)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Mind (760)  |  Seeing (47)

In the moonlight
While drinking homemade wine
My sorrow hung heavy
And my heart felt like lead.
The moon was golden yellow
The night soft and mellow.
There was a smell of jasmine
All around.
And I felt the weight of the world
Upon my shoulders.
I looked at the twinkling stars in the sky
So far and wide
Here’s to you
I lifted my wine
And my eyes looked upon the brilliance
Of the moon and stars
From afar...
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afar (6)  |  Brilliance (10)  |  Drink (36)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (167)  |  Golden (14)  |  Hang (24)  |  Heart (139)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Lead (160)  |  Lift (25)  |  Mellow (2)  |  Moon (199)  |  Moonlight (5)  |  Night (118)  |  Shoulder (18)  |  Sky (124)  |  Smell (18)  |  Soft (15)  |  Sorrow (12)  |  Star (336)  |  Twinkle (5)  |  Weight (77)  |  Wide (28)  |  Wine (28)  |  World (898)  |  Yellow (17)

In the presence of infinite might and infinite wisdom, the strength of the strongest man is but weakness, and the keenest of mortal eyes see but dimly.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 167
Science quotes on:  |  Dimly (6)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Keen (10)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Presence (33)  |  See (369)  |  Strength (81)  |  Strong (72)  |  Weakness (36)  |  Wisdom (182)

In the printed page the only real things are the paper and the ink; the white spaces play the same part in aiding the eye to take in the meaning of the print as do the black letters.
From Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Black (42)  |  Black And White (3)  |  Interpretation (70)  |  Letter (51)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Observation (450)  |  Page (30)  |  Part (222)  |  Play (112)  |  Print (17)  |  Space (257)  |  Thing (37)  |  Type (52)  |  White (56)

In the study of this membrane [the retina] I for the first time felt my faith in Darwinism (hypothesis of natural selection) weakened, being amazed and confounded by the supreme constructive ingenuity revealed not only in the retina and in the dioptric apparatus of the vertebrates but even in the meanest insect eye. ... I felt more profoundly than in any other subject of study the shuddering sensation of the unfathomable mystery of life.
Recollections of My Life (1898), 576. Quoted in Sidney Perkowitz, Empire of Light (1999), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Insect (64)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Research (590)  |  Retina (4)  |  Vertebrate (16)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (135)  |  Air (190)  |  Assignment (10)  |  Author (62)  |  Being (41)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Crowd (22)  |  Delight (66)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Earth (638)  |  Employment (24)  |  Equality (22)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (299)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Fly (99)  |  Gratification (17)  |  Happy (46)  |  Insect (64)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (88)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (160)  |  Myriad (22)  |  Nature (1223)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (6)  |  Office (22)  |  Probability (106)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (51)  |  Sport (11)  |  Spring (71)  |  Summer (33)  |  Swarm (13)  |  Teeming (2)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (12)  |  Try (141)  |  Variety (71)  |  View (171)  |  Water (293)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wing (48)  |  World (898)  |  Youth (77)

It is always, our eyes alone, our way of looking at things. Nature alone knows what she means now, and what she had meant in the past.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (106)  |  Know (556)  |  Mean (101)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Past (152)

It is in everything else as it is in colors; bad eyes can distinguish between black and white; better eyes, and eyes much exercised, can distinguish every nicer gradation.
As translated in definition for 'Extreme', A Philosophical Dictionary: From the French (1824), Vol. 3, 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (99)  |  Better (192)  |  Black And White (3)  |  Color (99)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Everything (181)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Gradation (7)  |  Nice (13)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Achievement (150)  |  Administrator (10)  |  Admit (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (42)  |  Alike (22)  |  Alone (106)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Anatomist (17)  |  Application (170)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (25)  |  Attain (45)  |  Author (62)  |  Balance (55)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Call (128)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (34)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Chair (11)  |  Civil (6)  |  Classic (10)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (38)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Creation (242)  |  Creator (55)  |  Current (54)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Deal (49)  |  Degree (82)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (25)  |  Direct (84)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (46)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Division (34)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (20)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (28)  |  Engage (25)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Fact (733)  |  False (99)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (171)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (408)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (16)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (131)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  General (160)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Great (534)  |  Ground (90)  |  Group (72)  |  Hero (35)  |  Hide (53)  |  High (153)  |  Histology (2)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (580)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Immortal (19)  |  Industry (109)  |  Infinitesimal (15)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (237)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Kingdom (38)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (556)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (130)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (51)  |  Logical (55)  |  Major (32)  |  Master (98)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Matter (343)  |  Microscopic (11)  |  Mind (760)  |  Minute (44)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Office (22)  |  Operation (121)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Organize (20)  |  Part (222)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Peace (84)  |  Peer (11)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (76)  |  Practical (133)  |  Prepare (35)  |  Probability (106)  |  Projective Geometry (2)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (103)  |  Range (57)  |  Reality (190)  |  Recess (7)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Relate (20)  |  Render (33)  |  Require (85)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (4)  |  Say (228)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Similarity (21)  |  Single (120)  |  Statesman (18)  |  Structure (225)  |  Surprise (71)  |  Survey (20)  |  Theory (696)  |  Tune (14)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Variety (71)  |  View (171)  |  Vision (94)  |  War (161)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (635)  |  World (898)

It is probably no exaggeration to suppose that in order to improve such an organ as the eye at all, it must be improved in ten different ways at once. And the improbability of any complex organ being produced and brought to perfection in any such way is an improbability of the same kind and degree as that of producing a poem or a mathematical demonstration by throwing letters at random on a table.
[Expressing his reservations about Darwin's proposed evolution of the eye by natural selection.]
Opening address to the Belfast Natural History Society, as given in the 'Belfast Northern Whig,' (19 Nov 1866). As cited by Charles Darwin in The Variation of Animals & Plants Under Domestication (1868), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (90)  |  Complex (95)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Improbability (8)  |  Improve (56)  |  Letter (51)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Organ (64)  |  Perfection (89)  |  Poem (92)  |  Produce (102)  |  Random (25)  |  Throw (43)

It may be unpopular and out-of-date to say—but I do not think that a scientific result which gives us a better understanding of the world and makes it more harmonious in our eyes should be held in lower esteem than, say, an invention which reduces the cost of paving roads, or improves household plumbing.
From final remarks in 'The Semantic Conception of Truth and the Foundations of Semantics' (1944), collected in Leonard Linsky (ed.), Semantics and the Philosophy of Language: A Collection of Readings (1952), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (192)  |  Cost (44)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Household (8)  |  Improve (56)  |  Invention (324)  |  Lower (11)  |  Paving (2)  |  Plumbing (5)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Result (389)  |  Road (64)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Unpopular (3)  |  World (898)

It may truly be said that the eye as much touches the most distant star as that my fingers touch the pen with which I write.
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xlviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Finger (44)  |  Pen (12)  |  Star (336)  |  Touch (77)  |  Write (154)

It needs no dictionary of quotations to remind me that the eyes are the windows of the soul.
In Zuleika Dobson (1911), 54-55.
Science quotes on:  |  Dictionary (14)  |  Need (287)  |  Quotation (8)  |  Remind (13)  |  Soul (166)  |  Window (40)

It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Blot (2)  |  Blue (56)  |  Earth (638)  |  Feel (167)  |  Giant (38)  |  Pea (4)  |  Planet (263)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Shut (9)  |  Small (163)  |  Strike (40)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Thumb (10)  |  Tiny (36)

It was a great thing to open the eyes of a blind man, but it is a greater thing to open the eyes of a blind soul.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 17
Science quotes on:  |  Blind (47)  |  Great (534)  |  Open (66)  |  Soul (166)

It was Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., who likened the bigot to the pupil of the human eye: the more light you expose it to the narrower it grows.
Ashley Montagu (ed.), Science and Creationism (1984), Introduction, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Bigot (4)  |  Expose (16)  |  Grow (99)  |  Oliver Wendell Holmes (31)  |  Human (550)  |  Light (347)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Pupil (36)

Just as our eyes need light in order to see, our minds need ideas in order to conceive.
Recherche de la vérité
Science quotes on:  |  Conceive (39)  |  Idea (580)  |  Light (347)  |  Mind (760)  |  Need (287)  |  Order (242)  |  See (369)

Less in this than meets the eye.
In Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Less (102)  |  Meet (31)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  Alone (106)  |  Amount (31)  |  Ask (160)  |  Attentive (5)  |  Bear (67)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (126)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (98)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Conceive (39)  |  Conception (92)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Declare (27)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (33)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Draw (55)  |  Error (277)  |  Evident (29)  |  Extravagant (4)  |  Fear (142)  |  Fellow (37)  |  First (314)  |  Follow (124)  |  Former (25)  |  Glance (20)  |  Great (534)  |  Hold (94)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (20)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Join (25)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (347)  |  Link (42)  |  Long (174)  |  Mark (42)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (176)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mode (40)  |  Movement (83)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Primary (41)  |  Principle (292)  |  Process (267)  |  Progress (368)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (471)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Remote (42)  |  Rise (70)  |  Run (57)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Second (59)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simple (178)  |  Sound (90)  |  Spring (71)  |  Step (110)  |  Succession (45)  |  Testimony (13)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  True (208)  |  Understand (340)  |  Uninterrupted (3)  |  Vary (26)  |  View (171)  |  Whereby (2)

Man cannot afford to be a naturalist, to look at Nature directly, but only with the side of his eye. He must look through and beyond her, to look at her is fatal as to look at the head of Medusa. It turns the man of science to stone. I feel that I am dissipated by so many observations. I should be the magnet in the midst of all this dust and filings.
From Journal entry (23 Mar 1953), in Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), Journal (1906), Vol. 5, 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (17)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Directly (22)  |  Looking (26)  |  Man (373)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Only (2)  |  Side (51)  |  Through (3)

Man looks aloft, and with erected eyes, beholds his hereditary skies.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aloft (5)  |  Behold (18)  |  Erect (6)  |  Hereditary (7)  |  Sky (124)

Mars tugs at the human imagination like no other planet. With a force mightier than gravity, it attracts the eye to its shimmering red presence in the clear night sky. It is like a glowing ember in a field of ethereal lights, projecting energy and promise. It inspires visions of an approachable world. The mind vaults to thoughts of what might have been (if Mars were a litter closer to the warming Sun) and of what could be (if humans were one day to plant colonies there). Mysterious Mars, alluring Mars, fourth planet from the Sun: so far away and yet, on a cosmic scale, so very near.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alluring (3)  |  Attract (22)  |  Clear (98)  |  Close (67)  |  Colony (7)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Ember (2)  |  Energy (214)  |  Ethereal (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Field (171)  |  Force (249)  |  Fourth (8)  |  Glow (14)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Human (550)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Light (347)  |  Litter (2)  |  Mars (34)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mysterious (33)  |  Night (118)  |  Planet (263)  |  Plant (200)  |  Presence (33)  |  Project (31)  |  Promise (38)  |  Red (35)  |  Scale (63)  |  Shimmering (2)  |  Sky (124)  |  Sun (276)  |  Thought (546)  |  Vault (2)  |  Vision (94)  |  Warm (34)  |  World (898)

Mathematics make the mind attentive to the objects which it considers. This they do by entertaining it with a great variety of truths, which are delightful and evident, but not obvious. Truth is the same thing to the understanding as music to the ear and beauty to the eye. The pursuit of it does really as much gratify a natural faculty implanted in us by our wise Creator as the pleasing of our senses: only in the former case, as the object and faculty are more spiritual, the delight is more pure, free from regret, turpitude, lassitude, and intemperance that commonly attend sensual pleasures.
In An Essay on the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning (1701), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Attentive (5)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Consider (81)  |  Creator (55)  |  Delight (66)  |  Delightful (9)  |  Ear (29)  |  Evident (29)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Free (92)  |  Gratify (3)  |  Implant (4)  |  Intemperance (3)  |  Lassitude (2)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mind (760)  |  Music (106)  |  Natural (173)  |  Object (175)  |  Obvious (83)  |  Please (24)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Pure (103)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Regret (21)  |  Sense (321)  |  Sensual (2)  |  Spiritual (57)  |  Truth (928)  |  Turpitude (2)  |  Understand (340)  |  Variety (71)

Men are not going to embrace eugenics. They are going to embrace the first likely, trim-figured girl with limpid eyes and flashing teeth who comes along, in spite of the fact that her germ plasm is probably reeking with hypertension, cancer, haemophilia, colour blindness, hay fever, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Blindness (10)  |  Cancer (49)  |  Color (99)  |  Embrace (33)  |  Epilepsy (3)  |  Eugenics (4)  |  Fact (733)  |  First (314)  |  Flash (34)  |  Germ (32)  |  Girl (20)  |  Hay Fever (2)  |  Lateral (3)  |  Likely (33)  |  Limpid (3)  |  Plasm (3)  |  Probably (48)  |  Spite (13)  |  Tooth (26)

Modern mathematics, that most astounding of intellectual creations, has projected the mind’s eye through infinite time and the mind's hand into boundless space.
In 'What Knowledge is of Most Worth?', Presidential address to the National Education Association, Denver, Colorado (9 Jul 1895). In Educational Review (Sep 1895), 10, 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Astounding (3)  |  Creation (242)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mind’s Eye (2)  |  Modern Mathematics (38)

Most people regard scientists as explorers … Imagine a handful of people shipwrecked on a strange island and setting out to explore it. One of them cuts a solitary path through the jungle, going on and on until he is exhausted or lost or both. He eventually returns to his companions, and they listen to him with goggling eyes as he describes what he saw; what he fell into, and what bit him. After a rest he demands more supplies and sets off again to explore the unknown. Many of his companions will be doing the same, each choosing his own direction and pursuing his pioneering path.
In The Development of Design (1981), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Companion (13)  |  Direction (76)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Explorer (20)  |  Island (24)  |  Jungle (14)  |  Listening (8)  |  Lost (32)  |  Path (84)  |  Pioneer (27)  |  Regard (95)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Unknown (107)

Mr. Darwin in the Zoological Gardens. Frank Darwin told me his father was once standing near the hippopotamus cage when a little boy and girl, aged four and five, came up. The hippopotamus shut his eyes for a minute. “That bird’s dead,” said the little girl; “come along.”
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 243. Francis Darwin was a son of Charles Darwin.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (120)  |  Boy (46)  |  Cage (8)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Francis Darwin (6)  |  Dead (57)  |  Girl (20)  |  Hippopotamus (2)  |  Zoo (8)

Nature is man’s teacher. She unfolds her treasures to his search, unseals his eye, illumes his mind, and purifies his heart; an influence breathes from all the sights and sounds of her existence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Breathe (36)  |  Existence (299)  |  Heart (139)  |  Influence (140)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Purify (9)  |  Search (105)  |  Sight (48)  |  Sound (90)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Unfold (12)

Neither art nor science knows anything of moral approval or disapproval. Science is out of the reach of morals, for her eyes are fixed upon eternal truths. Art is out of the reach of morals, for her eyes are fixed upon things beautiful and immortal and ever-changing.
In his dialogue 'The Critic As Artist', collected in Intentions (1891), 156. Also collected in Oscariana: Epigrams (1895), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (10)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Change (364)  |  Disapproval (2)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Immortal (19)  |  Moral (124)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Truth (928)

No man ever looks at the world with pristine eyes. He sees it edited by a definite set of customs and institutions and ways of thinking.
In 'The Science of Custom', Patterns of Culture (1934, 2005), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Custom (30)  |  Definite (43)  |  Institution (39)  |  Pristine (4)  |  See (369)  |  Set (99)  |  Thinking (231)  |  World (898)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (16)  |  Behind (38)  |  Caterpillar (3)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (67)  |  Cluster (14)  |  Complex (95)  |  Construct (41)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (199)  |  Ear (29)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (23)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (342)  |  Feel (167)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (63)  |  Grass (35)  |  Hand (142)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Help (103)  |  Include (40)  |  Intricate (21)  |  Involve (48)  |  Large (130)  |  Leaf (49)  |  Leave (128)  |  Lecture (68)  |  Listen (41)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (44)  |  Muse (6)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Observe (76)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (14)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (6)  |  Replace (30)  |  Rhythm (18)  |  Rich (61)  |  Roll (17)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (321)  |  Smell (18)  |  Spider (11)  |  Strand (5)  |  Stream (40)  |  Student (203)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Together (79)  |  Vary (26)  |  Verbal (9)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (65)  |  Water (293)  |  Web (15)  |  Weve (13)  |  Work (635)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Alike (22)  |  Angle (20)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Back (104)  |  Beseech (2)  |  Carry (59)  |  Certain (126)  |  City (48)  |  Command (28)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Death (302)  |  Decline (17)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Dial (4)  |  Draw (55)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Fate (46)  |  Favor (30)  |  Fix (25)  |  Follow (124)  |  Gold (68)  |  Hand (142)  |  Hold (94)  |  Honour (25)  |  Imperfect (20)  |  Inconclusive (3)  |  Incursion (2)  |  Instantly (6)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Intent (8)  |  Kill (52)  |  Kindred (6)  |  Leave (128)  |  Little (188)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Measure (104)  |  Mind (760)  |  Move (94)  |  Murderer (3)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Notice (37)  |  Offer (43)  |  Problem (497)  |  Regard (95)  |  Relate (20)  |  Roman (27)  |  Run (57)  |  See (369)  |  Seek (107)  |  Sight (48)  |  Signal (18)  |  Soldier (15)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Study (476)  |  Subject (240)  |  Sun (276)  |  Sword (15)  |  Think (347)  |  Transport (15)  |  Unexpected (36)  |  Vessel (28)  |  Work (635)  |  Write (154)

Now do you not see that the eye embraces the beauty of the whole world? It counsels and corrects all the arts of mankind... it is the prince of mathematics, and the sciences founded on it are absolutely certain. It has measured the distances and sizes of the stars it has discovered the elements and their location... it has given birth to architecture and to perspective and to the divine art of painting.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Architecture (43)  |  Art (294)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Birth (93)  |  Certain (126)  |  Correct (85)  |  Counsel (7)  |  Discover (199)  |  Distance (77)  |  Divine (61)  |  Element (162)  |  Embrace (33)  |  Founded (20)  |  Give (201)  |  Location (9)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Measure (104)  |  Painting (43)  |  Perspective (22)  |  Prince (13)  |  Science (2067)  |  See (369)  |  Size (60)  |  Star (336)  |  Whole (192)  |  World (898)

Now I will have less distraction.
Quoted as said upon losing the use of his right eye. In Howard Eves, Mathematical Circles (1969). Webmaster has not yet found a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Distraction (6)  |  Less (102)  |  Lose (94)  |  Quote (18)  |  Right (197)  |  Say (228)

Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Frightful (3)  |  Goal (100)  |  Obstacle (31)  |  See (369)

Of several bodies all equally larger and distant, that most brightly illuminated will appear to the eye nearest and largest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Body (247)  |  Brightly (2)  |  Distant (32)  |  Equally (26)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Large (130)  |  Several (31)

On certain occasions, the eyes of the mind can supply the want of the most powerful telescopes, and lead to astronomical discoveries of the highest importance.
In François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, 'Laplace', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 347. This comment refers to the ability of a mathematician to describe a circumstance before an actual observation confirms it.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Importance (218)  |  Mind (760)  |  Occasion (23)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Supply (47)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Want (176)

One way to open your eyes to unnoticed beauty is to ask yourself, “What if I had never seen this before? What if I knew I would never see it again?”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (160)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Know (556)  |  Open (66)  |  See (369)  |  Unnoticed (5)

Only dream I ever have... is it the surface of the Sun? Every time I shut my eyes... it’s always the same.
Movie
Cassie, Sunshine (2007)
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (167)  |  Same (156)  |  Shut (9)  |  Sun (276)  |  Surface (101)  |  Time (595)

Order and regularity are more readily and clearly recognised when exhibited to the eye in a picture than they are when presented to the mind in any other manner.
In The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History (1840), 543.
Science quotes on:  |  Clearly (41)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mind (760)  |  Order (242)  |  Picture (77)  |  Present (176)  |  Readily (10)  |  Recognise (9)  |  Regularity (29)

Our eyes are special detectors. They allows us to register information not only from across the room but from across the universe.
In magazine article, 'Coming to our Senses', Natural History Magazine (Mar 2001). Collected in Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries (2007), 25. This is Tyson’s respectful update of a quote by Edwin P. Hubble in 1954: “Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science.” (See Science Quotations by Edwin Hubble.)
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (44)  |  Detector (4)  |  Information (122)  |  Register (10)  |  Room (39)  |  Special (77)  |  Universe (686)

Our methods of communication with our fellow men take many forms. We share with other animals the ability to transmit information by such diverse means as the posture of our bodies, by the movements of our eyes, head, arms, and hands, and by our utterances of non-specific sounds. But we go far beyond any other species on earth in that we have evolved sophisticated forms of pictorial representation, elaborate spoken and written languages, ingenious methods of recording music and language on discs, on magnetic tape and in a variety of other kinds of code.
As quoted in epigraph before title page in John Wolfenden, Hermann Bondi, et al., The Languages of Science: A Survey of Techniques of Communication (1963), i.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Arm (27)  |  Code (15)  |  Communication (76)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Elaborate (21)  |  Hand (142)  |  Head (81)  |  Information (122)  |  Ingenious (26)  |  Language (228)  |  Magnetic (11)  |  Means (176)  |  Method (239)  |  Movement (83)  |  Music (106)  |  Picture (77)  |  Posture (7)  |  Record (68)  |  Representation (36)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Sound (90)  |  Spoken (3)  |  Tape (5)  |  Utterance (5)  |  Written (6)

People usually consider walking on water or in thin air a miracle. But I think the real miracle is not to walk either on water or in thin air, but to walk on earth. Every day we are engaged in a miracle which we don’t even recognize: a blue sky, white clouds, green leaves, the black, curious eyes of a child - our own two eyes. All is a miracle.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Child (252)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Consider (81)  |  Curious (43)  |  Earth (638)  |  Engage (25)  |  Green (32)  |  Leave (128)  |  Miracle (66)  |  People (390)  |  Real (149)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Sky (124)  |  Thin (16)  |  Think (347)  |  Usually (31)  |  Walk (67)  |  Water (293)  |  White (56)

Philosophy [the universe] is written in that great book which ever lies before our eyes ... We cannot understand it if we do not first learn the language and grasp the symbols in which it is written. The book is written in the mathematical language ... without whose help it is humanly impossible to comprehend a single word of it, and without which one wanders in vain through a dark labyrinth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Dark (77)  |  First (314)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Great (534)  |  Help (103)  |  Humanly (4)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Labyrinth (9)  |  Language (228)  |  Learn (288)  |  Lie (115)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Single (120)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Understand (340)  |  Universe (686)  |  Vain (30)  |  Wander (20)  |  Word (302)  |  Write (154)

Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars—mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is “mere.” I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination—stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern—of which I am a part. … What is the pattern, or the meaning, or the “why?” It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined it. Why do the poets of the present not speak of it? What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?
In 'Astronomy', The Feynman Lectures on Physics (1961), Vol. 1, 3-6, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Ammonia (12)  |  Artist (69)  |  Atom (280)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Desert (38)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Gas (50)  |  Harm (38)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Immense (42)  |  Jupiter (21)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Light (347)  |  Marvelous (19)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Mere (82)  |  Methane (7)  |  Million (111)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Night (118)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Part (222)  |  Past (152)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Poet (83)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Silent (28)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Spinning (8)  |  Star (336)  |  Stretch (20)  |  Truth (928)  |  Vast (89)  |  Vastness (11)  |  Year (299)

Probably the simple facts about health are that all of us form bad dietary habits when we have young stomachs, and continue in them when our stomachs show the natural wear of long use. Stomachs weaken, as do eyes; but we cannot buy spectacles for our stomachs.
In Sinner Sermons: A Selection of the Best Paragraphs of E. W. Howe (1926), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (99)  |  Buy (20)  |  Continue (65)  |  Habit (112)  |  Health (156)  |  Long (174)  |  Natural (173)  |  Spectacles (6)  |  Stomach (25)  |  Weaken (3)  |  Wear (18)  |  Young (100)

Research is four things: brains with which to think, eyes with which to see, machines with which to measure, and fourth, money.
Quoted in obituary by Walter Sullivan, 'Albert Szent-Gyorgyi Dead; Research Isolated Vitamin C', New York Times (25 Oct 1986), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (213)  |  Machine (157)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Money (142)  |  Research (590)  |  See (369)  |  Thinking (231)

Science is often regarded as the most objective and truth-directed of human enterprises, and since direct observation is supposed to be the favored route to factuality, many people equate respectable science with visual scrutiny–just the facts ma’am, and palpably before my eyes. But science is a battery of observational and inferential methods, all directed to the testing of propositions that can, in principle, be definitely proven false ... At all scales, from smallest to largest, quickest to slowest, many well-documented conclusions of science lie beyond the strictly limited domain of direct observation. No one has ever seen an electron or a black hole, the events of a picosecond or a geological eon.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Battery (8)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Black Hole (14)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Direct (84)  |  Domain (42)  |  Electron (72)  |  Enterprise (33)  |  Eon (11)  |  Equate (3)  |  Event (116)  |  Fact (733)  |  Factuality (2)  |  False (99)  |  Favored (5)  |  Geological (11)  |  Human (550)  |  Inferential (2)  |  Large (130)  |  Lie (115)  |  Limit (126)  |  Method (239)  |  Objective (66)  |  Observation (450)  |  Observational (2)  |  Often (106)  |  Palpably (2)  |  People (390)  |  Principle (292)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Prove (109)  |  Quick (13)  |  Regard (95)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Route (15)  |  Scale (63)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scrutiny (14)  |  See (369)  |  Slow (56)  |  Small (163)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Test (125)  |  Visual (15)

Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!
alterest all things with thy peering eyes.
preyest thou thus upon the poet’s heart,
Vulture, whose wings are dull realities?
How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise,
Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering .
To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,
Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing?
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car?
And driven the Hamadryad from the wood
To seek a shelter in some happier star?
Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood,
The Elfin from the green grass, and from me
The summer dread beneath the tamarind tree?
Sonnet, 'To Science' (1829), Saturday Evening Post (11 Sep 1830). In Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (1917), 33, and Notes, 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (23)  |  Daughter (16)  |  Heart (139)  |  Poet (83)  |  Prey (12)  |  Science (2067)  |  Time (595)  |  Vulture (5)

See, thro' this air, this ocean, and this earth,
All matter quick, and bursting into birth.
Above, how high progressive life may go!
Around, how wide! how deep extend below!
Vast chain of being, which from God began,
Natures ethereal, human, angel, man,
Beast, bird, fish, insect! what no eye can see,
No glass can reach! from Infinite to thee,
From thee to Nothing—On superior pow'rs
Were we to press, inferior might on ours:
Or in the full creation leave a void,
Where, one step broken, the great scale's destroy'd:
From Nature's chain whatever link you strike,
Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike.
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Angel (30)  |  Beast (38)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Being (41)  |  Below (24)  |  Bird (120)  |  Birth (93)  |  Break (54)  |  Burst (25)  |  Chain (50)  |  Creation (242)  |  Depth (51)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Earth (638)  |  Ether (24)  |  Extension (31)  |  Glass (44)  |  God (535)  |  High (153)  |  Human (550)  |  Inferiority (7)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Insect (64)  |  Life (1131)  |  Link (42)  |  Man (373)  |  Matter (343)  |  Might (3)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Power (366)  |  Press (21)  |  Progress (368)  |  Quickness (5)  |  Reach (121)  |  Scale (63)  |  Step (110)  |  Strike (40)  |  Superiority (12)  |  Vastness (11)  |  Void (20)  |  Width (5)

Shakespeare says, we are creatures that look before and after; the more surprising that we do not look round a little, and see what is passing under our very eyes.
As quoted, without citation, in John Walker, A Fork in the Road: Answers to Daily Dilemmas from the Teachings of Jesus Christ (2005), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Creature (155)  |  Little (188)  |  Pass (93)  |  Round (26)  |  Say (228)  |  See (369)  |  Shakespeare (5)  |  Surprise (71)

So numerous are the objects which meet our view in the heavens, that we cannot imagine a point of space where some light would not strike the eye;—innumerable stars, thousands of double and multiple systems, clusters in one blaze with their tens of thousands of stars, and the nebulae amazing us by the strangeness of their forms and the incomprehensibility of their nature, till at last, from the limit of our senses, even these thin and airy phantoms vanish in the distance.
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1858), 420.
Science quotes on:  |  Airy (2)  |  Amazement (12)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Cluster (14)  |  Distance (77)  |  Form (314)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Incomprehensibility (2)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Light (347)  |  Limit (126)  |  Multiple (9)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Object (175)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Point (123)  |  Sense (321)  |  Space (257)  |  Star (336)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  System (191)  |  Thin (16)  |  Vanish (18)  |  View (171)

Some of my youthful readers are developing wonderful imaginations. This pleases me. Imagination has brought mankind through the Dark Ages to its present state of civilization. Imagination led Columbus to discover America. Imagination led Franklin to discover electricity. Imagination has given us the steam engine, the telephone, the talking-machine and the automobile, for these things had to be dreamed of before they became realities. So I believe that dreams—day dreams, you know, with your eyes wide open and your brain-machinery whizzing—are likely to lead to the betterment of the world. The imaginative child will become the imaginative man or woman most apt to create, to invent, and therefore to foster civilization. A prominent educator tells me that fairy tales are of untold value in developing imagination in the young. I believe it.
Opening paragraph of preface, 'To My Readers', The Lost Princess of Oz (1917), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  America (87)  |  Apt (9)  |  Automobile (20)  |  Belief (504)  |  Betterment (4)  |  Brain (213)  |  Child (252)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Create (153)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Develop (107)  |  Discover (199)  |  Dream (167)  |  Educator (4)  |  Electricity (136)  |  Fairy Tale (7)  |  Foster (4)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Invent (51)  |  Machine (157)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Please (24)  |  Present (176)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reality (190)  |  State (137)  |  Steam Engine (42)  |  Telephone (23)  |  Untold (6)  |  Value (242)  |  Whiz (2)  |  Woman (111)  |  Wonderful (60)  |  World (898)  |  Young (100)  |  Youth (77)

Some of the worst tyrannies of our day genuinely are ‘vowed’ to the service of mankind, yet can function only by pitting neighbor against neighbor. The all-seeing eye of a totalitarian regime is usually the watchful eye of the next-door neighbor. In a Communist state love of neighbor may be classed as counter-revolutionary.
In 'Brotherhood', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (99)  |  Class (84)  |  Communist (6)  |  Function (131)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Love (224)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Pit (13)  |  Regime (2)  |  Service (64)  |  State (137)  |  Totalitarian (6)  |  Tyranny (8)  |  Usually (31)  |  Vow (4)

Sometimes too hot the eye of Heaven shines.
In Sonnet 18, The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare (1824), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Heaven (153)  |  Hot (20)  |  Shine (45)

Sound … cannot travel across what we call a vacuum. … Light and our eyes that see it deal with the doings of the whole universe; sound belongs to the world only. I may talk of the universe of light, but I can only talk of the world of sound.
In The World of Sound (1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Light (347)  |  Sound (90)  |  Travel (61)  |  Universe (686)  |  Vacuum (34)  |  World (898)

Specialists never contribute anything to their specialty; Helmholtz wasn’t an eye-specialist, but a German army doctor who invented the ophthalmoscope one Saturday afternoon when there wasn’t anything else to do. Incidentally, he rewrote whole chapters of physics, so that the physicists only know him as one of their own. Robert Mayer wasn’t a physicist, but another country doctor; and Pasteur, who made bacteriology, was a tanner’s son or a chemist, as you will.
In Fischerisms (1930), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (4)  |  Army (25)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Chapter (10)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Country (147)  |  Doctor (102)  |  German (11)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (28)  |  Incidental (12)  |  Invented (4)  |  Robert Mayer (9)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Physics (348)  |  Saturday (5)  |  Son (24)  |  Specialist (25)  |  Specialty (10)  |  Whole (192)

Standing beside each other, we feasted our eyes. Above us the cerulean sky deepened to an inky black as the remnants of the atmosphere gave way to the depths of space. The mighty Himalaya were now a sparkling relief map spread out before us and garnished with a gleaming lattice work of swirling glaciers. Even Cho Oyu, Lhotse and Makalu, all 8,000-meter giants, were dwarfed. To the east and west, Kanchenjunga and Shishapangma, two more great sentinels of the Himalaya, stood crystal clear over 100 kilometers away. To the north were the burnished plains of Tibet, and to the south the majestic peaks and lush foothills of Nepal. We stood on the crown jewel of the earth, the curved horizon spinning endlessly around us.
Jo Gambi
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (79)  |  Black (42)  |  Clear (98)  |  Crown (26)  |  Crystal (53)  |  Curve (33)  |  Deepen (6)  |  Depth (51)  |  Dwarf (7)  |  Earth (638)  |  East (18)  |  Endlessly (3)  |  Feast (4)  |  Foothill (3)  |  Garnish (2)  |  Giant (38)  |  Give (201)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Gleam (12)  |  Great (534)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Kilometer (4)  |  Lattice (2)  |  Lush (3)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Map (30)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Nepal (2)  |  North (11)  |  Peak (20)  |  Plain (33)  |  Relief (18)  |  Remnant (6)  |  Sky (124)  |  South (10)  |  Space (257)  |  Sparkle (7)  |  Spin (15)  |  Spread (34)  |  Stand (108)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Tibet (3)  |  West (17)  |  Work (635)

Standing now in diffused light, with the wind at my back, I experience suddenly a feeling of completeness–not a feeling of having achieved something or of being stronger than everyone who was ever here before, not a feeling of having arrived at the ultimate point, not a feeling of supremacy. Just a breath of happiness deep inside my mind and my breast. The summit seemed suddenly to me to be a refuge, and I had not expected to find any refuge up here. Looking at the steep, sharp ridges below us, I have the impression that to have come later would have been too late. Everything we now say to one another, we only say out of embarrassment. I don’t think anymore. As I pull the tape recorder, trancelike, from my rucksack, and switch it on wanting to record a few appropriate phrases, tears again well into my eyes. “Now we are on the summit of Everest,” I begin, “it is so cold that we cannot take photographs…” I cannot go on, I am immediately shaken with sobs. I can neither talk nor think, feeling only how this momentous experience changes everything. To reach only a few meters below the summit would have required the same amount of effort, the same anxiety and burden of sorrow, but a feeling like this, an eruption of feeling, is only possible on the summit itself.
In Everest: Expedition to the Ultimate (1979), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (64)  |  Amount (31)  |  Anxiety (20)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Appropriate (28)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Back (104)  |  Begin (108)  |  Below (24)  |  Breast (9)  |  Breath (32)  |  Burden (27)  |  Change (364)  |  Cold (58)  |  Completeness (15)  |  Deep (124)  |  Diffuse (4)  |  Effort (144)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Eruption (7)  |  Everest (10)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Everything (181)  |  Expect (44)  |  Experience (342)  |  Feel (167)  |  Find (408)  |  Happiness (94)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Impression (72)  |  Inside (26)  |  Late (52)  |  Light (347)  |  Meter (9)  |  Mind (760)  |  Momentous (4)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Phrase (29)  |  Point (123)  |  Possible (158)  |  Pull (22)  |  Reach (121)  |  Record (68)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Refuge (13)  |  Require (85)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Seem (143)  |  Shake (29)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Sorrow (12)  |  Stand (108)  |  Steep (5)  |  Strong (72)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Summit (15)  |  Supremacy (3)  |  Switch (10)  |  Talk (100)  |  Tape (5)  |  Tear (23)  |  Think (347)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Want (176)  |  Wind (80)

Students who have attended my [medical] lectures may remember that I try not only to teach them what we know, but also to realise how little this is: in every direction we seem to travel but a very short way before we are brought to a stop; our eyes are opened to see that our path is beset with doubts, and that even our best-made knowledge comes but too soon to an end.
In Notes on the Composition of Scientific Papers (1904), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (173)  |  Direction (76)  |  Doubt (160)  |  End (195)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Lecture (68)  |  Little (188)  |  Opening (15)  |  Path (84)  |  Realize (90)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Short (51)  |  Stop (76)  |  Student (203)  |  Teaching (108)  |  Travelling (3)  |  Trying (19)

Suddenly, there was an enormous flash of light, the brightest light I have ever seen or that I think anyone has ever seen. It blasted; it pounced; it bored its way into you. It was a vision which was seen with more than the eye. It was seen to last forever. You would wish it would stop; altogether it lasted about two seconds.
[Witnessing the first atomic bomb test explosion.]
Science: the Center of Culture (1970), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (107)  |  Blast (10)  |  Bore (3)  |  Forever (60)  |  Pounce (4)  |  Vision (94)

Television will enormously enlarge the eye's range, and, like radio, will advertise the Elsewhere. Together with the tabs, the mags, and the movies, it will insist that we forget the primary and the near in favor of the secondary and the remote.
In 'Removal' (Jul 1938), collected in One Man's Meat (1942), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Elsewhere (10)  |  Enlarge (27)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Favor (30)  |  Forget (63)  |  Insist (19)  |  Magazine (24)  |  Movie (16)  |  Primary (41)  |  Radio (30)  |  Range (57)  |  Remote (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Tabloid (2)  |  Television (29)

Thanks to the sharp eyes of a Minnesota man, it is possible that two identical snowflakes may finally have been observed. While out snowmobiling, Oley Skotchgaard noticed a snowflake that looked familiar to him. Searching his memory, he realized it was identical to a snowflake he had seen as a child in Vermont. Weather experts, while excited, caution that the match-up will be difficult to verify.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (21)  |  Child (252)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Excite (15)  |  Expert (50)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Identical (19)  |  Memory (106)  |  Observe (76)  |  Possible (158)  |  Realize (90)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Snowflake (13)  |  Thanks (8)  |  Verify (17)  |  Weather (32)

That hemisphere of the moon which faces us is better known than the earth itself; its vast desert plains have been surveyed to within a few acres; its mountains and craters have been measured to within a few yards; while on the earth's surface there are 30,000,000 square kilometres (sixty times the extent of France), upon which the foot of man has never trod, which the eye of man has never seen.
In 'Mars, by the Latest Observations', Popular Science (Dec 1873), 4, 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (7)  |  Crater (7)  |  Desert (38)  |  Earth (638)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Man (373)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Moon (199)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Plain (33)  |  Surface (101)  |  Survey (20)  |  Tread (11)

The anatomist presents to the eye the most hideous and disagreeable objects, but his science is useful to the painter in delineating even a Venus or a Helen.
Inquiry Concerning the Human Understanding collected in The Philosophical Works of David Hume (1826), Vol. 4, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (17)  |  Delineate (2)  |  Disagreeable (2)  |  Hideous (5)  |  Painter (23)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Useful (100)  |  Venus (15)

The ancients devoted a lifetime to the study of arithmetic; it required days to extract a square root or to multiply two numbers together. Is there any harm in skipping all that, in letting the school boy learn multiplication sums, and in starting his more abstract reasoning at a more advanced point? Where would be the harm in letting the boy assume the truth of many propositions of the first four books of Euclid, letting him assume their truth partly by faith, partly by trial? Giving him the whole fifth book of Euclid by simple algebra? Letting him assume the sixth as axiomatic? Letting him, in fact, begin his severer studies where he is now in the habit of leaving off? We do much less orthodox things. Every here and there in one’s mathematical studies one makes exceedingly large assumptions, because the methodical study would be ridiculous even in the eyes of the most pedantic of teachers. I can imagine a whole year devoted to the philosophical study of many things that a student now takes in his stride without trouble. The present method of training the mind of a mathematical teacher causes it to strain at gnats and to swallow camels. Such gnats are most of the propositions of the sixth book of Euclid; propositions generally about incommensurables; the use of arithmetic in geometry; the parallelogram of forces, etc., decimals.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Advance (165)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Ancient (106)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Assume (38)  |  Assumption (58)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Begin (108)  |  Book (257)  |  Camel (11)  |  Cause (285)  |  Decimal (15)  |  Devote (35)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Extract (17)  |  Fact (733)  |  Faith (157)  |  First (314)  |  Generally (15)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Habit (112)  |  Harm (38)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Incommensurable (2)  |  Large (130)  |  Learn (288)  |  Leave (128)  |  Lifetime (28)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Method (239)  |  Methodical (7)  |  Mind (760)  |  Multiplication (23)  |  Multiply (18)  |  Number (282)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Partly (5)  |  Pedantic (3)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Point (123)  |  Present (176)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Reason (471)  |  Require (85)  |  Ridiculous (13)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Severe (16)  |  Simple (178)  |  Skip (4)  |  Square Root (8)  |  Start (97)  |  Strain (11)  |  Stride (9)  |  Student (203)  |  Study (476)  |  Sum (41)  |  Swallow (20)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Together (79)  |  Training (66)  |  Trial (28)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Truth (928)  |  Whole (192)  |  Year (299)

The appearance of Professor Benjamin Peirce, whose long gray hair, straggling grizzled beard and unusually bright eyes sparkling under a soft felt hat, as he walked briskly but rather ungracefully across the college yard, fitted very well with the opinion current among us that we were looking upon a real live genius, who had a touch of the prophet in his make-up.
Writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, a former student of Peirce, in 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Beard (7)  |  Biography (232)  |  Bright (42)  |  Briskly (2)  |  College (35)  |  Genius (249)  |  Gray (8)  |  Hair (25)  |  Hat (9)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Benjamin Peirce (11)  |  Prophet (11)  |  Touch (77)  |  Walk (67)  |  Yard (7)

The best way to study Mars is with two hands, eyes and ears of a geologist, first at a moon orbiting Mars … and then on the surface.
In his article, '40 Years After Apollo 11 Moon Landing, It’s Time for a Mission to Mars', in Washington post (16 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (173)  |  Ear (29)  |  First (314)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Hand (142)  |  Mars (34)  |  Moon (199)  |  Study (476)  |  Surface (101)

The canons of art depend on what they appeal to. Painting appeals to the eye, and is founded on the science of optics. Music appeals to the ear and is founded on the science of acoustics. The drama appeals to human nature, and must have as its ultimate basis the science of psychology and physiology.
In Letter (Jul 1883) to Marie Prescott, in Oscar Wilde, ‎Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly, ‎Lady Wilde, The Writings of Oscar Wilde (1907), Vol. 15, 153-154.
Science quotes on:  |  Acoustic (3)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Art (294)  |  Basis (91)  |  Canon (3)  |  Depend (90)  |  Drama (13)  |  Ear (29)  |  Founded (20)  |  Human Nature (60)  |  Music (106)  |  Optics (20)  |  Painting (43)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Ultimate (84)

The custom of eating the lover after consummation of the nuptials, of making a meal of the exhausted pigmy, who is henceforth good for nothing, is not so difficult to understand, since insects can hardly be accused of sentimentality; but to devour him during the act surpasses anything the most morbid mind could imagine. I have seen the thing with my own eyes, and I have not yet recovered from my surprise.
In Jean-Henri Fabre and B. Miall (trans.), Social Life in the Insect World (1912), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuse (4)  |  Act (117)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Custom (30)  |  Devour (13)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Eat (52)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Insect (64)  |  Lover (11)  |  Meal (16)  |  Mind (760)  |  Morbid (3)  |  Pigmy (3)  |  Recover (11)  |  See (369)  |  Sentimentality (2)  |  Surpass (19)  |  Surprise (71)  |  Understand (340)

The eye is the window of the human body through which it feels its way and enjoys the beauty of the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (248)  |  Enjoy (39)  |  Feel (167)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Window (40)  |  World (898)

The eye transmits its own image through the air to all the objects which face it, and also receives them on its own surface, whence the “sensus communis” takes them and considers them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Consider (81)  |  Face (108)  |  Image (59)  |  Object (175)  |  Receive (60)  |  Surface (101)  |  Transmit (11)

The eye which can appreciate the naked and absolute beauty of a scientific truth is far more rare than that which is attracted by a moral one.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 381.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (98)  |  Appreciation (26)  |  Attraction (36)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Moral (124)  |  Naked (9)  |  Rare (50)  |  Science (2067)  |  Truth (928)

The eye, the window of the soul, is the chief means whereby the understanding can most fully and abundantly appreciate the infinite works of Nature; and the ear is second.
As quoted in Daniel J. Boorstin, The Discoverers (1983), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (26)  |  Ear (29)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Means (176)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Second (59)  |  Soul (166)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Window (40)  |  Work (635)

The eyes of the world now look into space, to the moon and to the planets beyond, and we have vowed that we shall not see it governed by a hostile flag of conquest, but by a banner of freedom and peace. We have vowed that we shall not see space filled with weapons of mass destruction, but with instruments of knowledge and understanding.
Address at Rice University in Houston (12 Sep 1962). On website of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.
Science quotes on:  |  Banner (4)  |  Conquest (19)  |  Flag (11)  |  Freedom (102)  |  Govern (29)  |  Hostility (11)  |  Instrument (95)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Moon (199)  |  Peace (84)  |  Planet (263)  |  Space (257)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Vow (4)  |  Weapon (66)  |  World (898)

The facts, gentlemen, and nothing but the facts, for careful eyes are narrowly watching.
In Fact and Fancy (1962), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (95)  |  Fact (733)  |  Gentleman (18)  |  Narrowly (4)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Watch (65)

The first fundamental rule of historical science and research, when by these is sought a knowledge of the general destinies of mankind, is to keep these and every object connected with them steadily in view, without losing ourselves in the details of special inquiries and particular facts, for the multitude and variety of these subjects is absolutely boundless; and on the ocean of historical science the main subject easily vanishes from the eye.
In Friedrich von Schlegel and James Burton Robertson (trans.), The Philosophy of History (1835), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Destiny (36)  |  Detail (87)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  History Of Science (58)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Research (590)  |  Rule (177)  |  Vanishing (8)

The glorious lamp of heaven, the radiant sun,
Is Nature’s eye.
From 'Ovid's Metamorphoses' (Thirteenth Book), as translated in The Works of the English Poets, Vol. 16: The Poems of Dryden, Vol. 4 (1779), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Glorious (23)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Lamp (17)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Radiant (10)  |  Sun (276)

The human heart feels things the eyes cannot see, and knows what the mind cannot understand.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Feel (167)  |  Heart (139)  |  Human (550)  |  Know (556)  |  Mind (760)  |  See (369)  |  Understand (340)

The light of the body is the eye.
Bible
(circa 325 A.D.)
Science quotes on:  |  Body (247)  |  Light (347)  |  Optics (20)

The man of true genius never lives before his time, he never undertakes impossibilities, and always embarks on his enterprise at the suitable place and period. Though he may catch a glimpse of the coming light as it gilds the mountain top long before it reaches the eyes of his contemporaries, and he may hazard a prediction as to the future, he acts with the present.
Closing Address (19 Mar 1858) at the Exhibition of the Metropolitan Mechanics' Institute, of Washington. Published as a pamphlet by the M.M. Institute (1853). Collected in Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol. 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (117)  |  Coming (10)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Embark (7)  |  Enterprise (33)  |  Future (287)  |  Genius (249)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Hazard (15)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Life (1131)  |  Light (347)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Period (66)  |  Place (175)  |  Prediction (71)  |  Present (176)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Time (595)  |  True (208)  |  Undertake (20)

The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation cannot for a moment entertain the idea of a being who interferes in the course of events–provided, of course, that he takes the hypothesis of causality really seriously. He has no use for the religion of fear and equally little for social or moral religion. A God who rewards and punishes is inconceivable to him for the simple reason that a man’s actions are determined by necessity, external and internal, so that in God’s eyes he cannot be responsible, any more than an inanimate object is responsible for the motions it undergoes. Science has therefore been charged with undermining morality, but the charge is unjust. A man’s ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hopes of reward after death.
From 'Religion And Science', as collected in Ideas And Opinions (1954), 39, given its source as: “Written expressly for the New York Times Magazine. Appeared there November 9, 1930 (pp. 1-4). The German text was published in the Berliner Tageblatt, November 11, 1930.” The NYT Magazine article in full, is reprinted in Edward H. Cotton (ed.), Has Science Discovered God? A Symposium of Modern Scientific Opinion (1931), 101. This original version directly from the magazine has significantly different wording, beginning, “For anyone who is pervaded with the sense of causal law….” See this alternate form on the Albert Einstein Quotes page on this website. As for why the difference, Webmaster speculates the book form editor perhaps used a revised translation from Einstein’s German article.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Base (71)  |  Basis (91)  |  Behavior (60)  |  Causality (10)  |  Charge (35)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Course (84)  |  Death (302)  |  Determine (76)  |  Education (347)  |  Effectually (2)  |  Entertain (8)  |  Equally (26)  |  Ethical (13)  |  Event (116)  |  External (57)  |  Fear (142)  |  God (535)  |  Hope (174)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Idea (580)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Interfere (11)  |  Internal (25)  |  Law Of Causation (2)  |  Little (188)  |  Moment (107)  |  Moral (124)  |  Morality (42)  |  Motion (160)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Need (287)  |  Object (175)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (121)  |  Poor (58)  |  Provide (69)  |  Punish (8)  |  Punishment (11)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (471)  |  Religion (239)  |  Religious (49)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Reward (49)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Simple (178)  |  Social (108)  |  Sympathy (24)  |  Thoroughly (14)  |  Tie (24)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Undermine (6)  |  Universal (105)  |  Unjust (6)

The more we know about this universe, the more mysterious it is. The old world that Job knew was marvelous enough, and his description of its wonders is among the noblest poetry of the race, but today the new science has opened to our eyes vistas of mystery that transcend in their inexplicable marvel anything the ancients ever dreamed.
In 'What Keeps Religion Going?', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Description (84)  |  Dream (167)  |  Inexplicable (6)  |  Job (43)  |  Know (556)  |  Marvel (28)  |  Marvelous (19)  |  Mysterious (33)  |  Mystery (153)  |  New (496)  |  Noblest (5)  |  Old World (5)  |  Opened (2)  |  Poetry (124)  |  Race (104)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Transcend (17)  |  Universe (686)  |  Vista (6)  |  Wonder (169)

The natural attitude of inspection is prone; we do not often observe accurately any object that rises much above the level of the eye.
Concerning observing human nature. In The Characters of Theophrastus: Illustrated With Physionomical Sketches (1881), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurately (7)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Level (67)  |  Natural (173)  |  Observe (76)  |  Prone (7)

The next object which I have observed is the essence or substance of the Milky Way. By the aid of a telescope anyone may behold this in a manner which so distinctly appeals to the senses that all the disputes which have tormented philosophers through so many ages are exploded at once by the irrefragable evidence of our eyes, and we are freed from wordy disputes upon this subject, for the Galaxy is nothing else but a mass of innumerable stars planted together in clusters.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Behold (18)  |  Cluster (14)  |  Essence (55)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Galaxy (46)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Irrefragable (2)  |  Mass (78)  |  Milky Way (24)  |  Observe (76)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Star (336)  |  Substance (87)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Torment (14)

The number of fixed stars which observers have been able to see without artificial powers of sight up to this day can be counted. It is therefore decidedly a great feat to add to their number, and to set distinctly before the eyes other stars in myriads, which have never been seen before, and which surpass the old, previously known stars in number more than ten times.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Artificial (32)  |  Count (49)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Feat (6)  |  Great (534)  |  Myriad (22)  |  Observer (42)  |  Power (366)  |  See (369)  |  Set (99)  |  Sight (48)  |  Star (336)  |  Telescope (82)

The observer is not he who merely sees the thing which is before his eyes, but he who sees what parts the thing is composed of. To do this well is a rare talent. One person, from inattention, or attending only in the wrong place, overlooks half of what he sees; another sets down much more than he sees, confounding it with what he imagines, or with what he infers; another takes note of the kind of all the circumstances, but being inexpert in estimating their degree, leaves the quantity of each vague and uncertain; another sees indeed the whole, but makes such an awkward division of it into parts, throwing into one mass things which require to be separated, and separating others which might more conveniently be considered as one, that the result is much the same, sometimes even worse than if no analysis had been attempted at all.
In A System of Logic Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (166)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Attend (11)  |  Awkward (7)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Composed (3)  |  Confound (14)  |  Consider (81)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Degree (82)  |  Division (34)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Half (56)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Inattention (5)  |  Inexpert (2)  |  Infer (12)  |  Kind (140)  |  Mass (78)  |  Merely (82)  |  Note (34)  |  Observation (450)  |  Observer (42)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (154)  |  Place (175)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Rare (50)  |  Require (85)  |  Result (389)  |  See (369)  |  Separate (74)  |  Set Down (2)  |  Talent (63)  |  Uncertain (14)  |  Vague (26)  |  Whole (192)  |  Worse (24)  |  Wrong (139)

The one who stays in my mind as the ideal man of science is, not Huxley or Tyndall, Hooker or Lubbock, still less my friend, philosopher and guide Herbert Spencer, but Francis Galton, whom I used to observe and listen to—I regret to add, without the least reciprocity—with rapt attention. Even to-day. I can conjure up, from memory’s misty deep, that tall figure with its attitude of perfect physical and mental poise; the clean-shaven face, the thin, compressed mouth with its enigmatical smile; the long upper lip and firm chin, and, as if presiding over the whole personality of the man, the prominent dark eyebrows from beneath which gleamed, with penetrating humour, contemplative grey eyes. Fascinating to me was Francis Galton’s all-embracing but apparently impersonal beneficence. But, to a recent and enthusiastic convert to the scientific method, the most relevant of Galton’s many gifts was the unique contribution of three separate and distinct processes of the intellect; a continuous curiosity about, and rapid apprehension of individual facts, whether common or uncommon; the faculty for ingenious trains of reasoning; and, more admirable than either of these, because the talent was wholly beyond my reach, the capacity for correcting and verifying his own hypotheses, by the statistical handling of masses of data, whether collected by himself or supplied by other students of the problem.
In My Apprenticeship (1926), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Apprehension (16)  |  Attention (121)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Capacity (64)  |  Collected (2)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Convert (22)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Data (120)  |  Deep (124)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Enigma (10)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Face (108)  |  Fact (733)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Fascinating (22)  |  Figure (69)  |  Firm (24)  |  Friend (86)  |  Sir Francis Galton (18)  |  Gift (61)  |  Grey (10)  |  Guide (65)  |  Handling (7)  |  Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (12)  |  Humour (103)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Ideal (72)  |  Impersonal (5)  |  Individual (221)  |  Ingenious (26)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Lip (4)  |  Listen (41)  |  John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) (26)  |  Memory (106)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Mental (78)  |  Method (239)  |  Misty (5)  |  Mouth (21)  |  Observation (450)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Personality (47)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Physical (134)  |  Poise (4)  |  Problem (497)  |  Process (267)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Rapid (32)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Reach (121)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Regret (21)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Separate (74)  |  Smile (19)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Student (203)  |  Talent (63)  |  Tall (9)  |  Thin (16)  |  Train (45)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Unique (41)  |  Upper (4)

The only true voyage of discovery, the only fountain of Eternal Youth, would be not to visit strange lands but to possess other eyes, to behold the universe through the eyes of another, of a hundred others, to behold the hundred universes that each of them beholds, that each of them is.
From La Prisonnière (1923), a volume in the series of novels À la Recherche du Temps Perdu (Remembrance of Things Past). Translated by C.K. Moncrief as The Captive (1929, 1949), 70-71. This text is often seen paraphrased as “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new sights, but in looking with new eyes.” [Note that the context refers to the “eyes” of artists (including composers), and their ability to transport the viewer or listener with “a pair of wings, … which would enable us to traverse infinite space” to see new vistas through their art.]
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Behold (18)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Land (115)  |  Music (106)  |  Possess (56)  |  Strange (94)  |  True (208)  |  Universe (686)  |  Visit (26)  |  Voyage (11)

The results of mathematics are seldom directly applied; it is the definitions that are really useful. Once you learn the concept of a differential equation, you see differential equations all over, no matter what you do. This you cannot see unless you take a course in abstract differential equations. What applies is the cultural background you get from a course in differential equations, not the specific theorems. If you want to learn French, you have to live the life of France, not just memorize thousands of words. If you want to apply mathematics, you have to live the life of differential equations. When you live this life, you can then go back to molecular biology with a new set of eyes that will see things you could not otherwise see.
In 'A Mathematician's Gossip', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 213.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Application (170)  |  Background (30)  |  Concept (146)  |  Course (84)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Definition (192)  |  Differential Equation (13)  |  Directly (22)  |  France (27)  |  French (20)  |  Learn (288)  |  Life (1131)  |  Live (272)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Memorize (4)  |  Molecular Biology (24)  |  New (496)  |  Result (389)  |  See (369)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Specific (37)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Useful (100)  |  Want (176)  |  Word (302)

The sun atom shakes; my eye electron shakes eight minutes later, because of a direct interaction across.
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (280)  |  Electron (72)  |  Interaction (31)  |  Minute (44)  |  Shake (29)  |  Sun (276)

The sun's rays proceed from the sun along straight lines and are reflected from every polished object at equal angles, i.e. the reflected ray subtends, together with the line tangential to the polished object which is in the plane of the reflected ray, two equal angles. Hence it follows that the ray reflected from the spherical surface, together with the circumference of the circle which is in the plane of the ray, subtends two equal angles. From this it also follows that the reflected ray, together with the diameter of the circle, subtends two equal angles. And every ray which is reflected from a polished object to a point produces a certain heating at that point, so that if numerous rays are collected at one point, the heating at that point is multiplied: and if the number of rays increases, the effect of the heat increases accordingly.
Alhazan
In H. J. J. Winter, 'A Discourse of the Concave Spherical Mirror by Ibn Al-Haitham', Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1950, 16, 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Light (347)  |  Mirror (29)  |  Optics (20)  |  Ray (41)  |  Reflection (60)  |  Sun (276)

The voyage of discovery lies not in seeking new horizons, but in seeing with new eyes.
A commonly seen, loose paraphrase shortened from text in La Prisonnière (1923), a volume in the series of novels À la Recherche du Temps Perdu (Remembrance of Things Past). Translated by C.K. Moncrief as The Captive (1929, 1949), 70-71. For more context, see the longer quote which begins, “The only true voyage of discovery,…” on the Marcel Proust Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (680)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Lie (115)  |  New (496)  |  See (369)  |  Seek (107)  |  Voyage (11)

The world is to me my proposition of it; and so is the pig’s world, the pig’s proposition of it; or, to use a common saying, “the pig sees with pig’s eyes.”
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xlviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Pig (8)  |  Proposition (83)  |  French Saying (67)  |  See (369)  |  World (898)

There is always more in one of Ramanujan’s formulae than meets the eye, as anyone who sets to work to verify those which look the easiest will soon discover. In some the interest lies very deep, in others comparatively near the surface; but there is not one which is not curious and entertaining.
Commenting on the formulae in the letters sent by Ramanujan from India, prior to going to England. Footnote in obituary notice by G.H. Hardy in the Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society (2) (1921), 19, xl—lviii. The same notice was printed, with slight changes, in the Proceedings of the Royal Society (A) (1921), 94, xiii—xxix. Reprinted in G.H. Hardy, P.V. Seshu Aiyar and B.M. Wilson (eds.) Collected Papers of Srinivasa Ramanujan (1927), xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Curious (43)  |  Deep (124)  |  Discover (199)  |  Easiest (2)  |  Entertaining (3)  |  Formula (80)  |  Interest (237)  |  Srinivasa Ramanujan (17)  |  Surface (101)  |  Verify (17)  |  Work (635)

There is no art so difficult as the art of observation: it requires a skillful, sober spirit and a well-trained experience, which can only be acquired by practice; for he is not an observer who only sees the thing before him with his eyes, but he who sees of what parts the thing consists, and in what connexion the parts stand to the whole. One person overlooks half from inattention; another relates more than he sees while he confounds it with that which he figures to himself; another sees the parts of the whole, but he throws things together that ought to be separated. ... When the observer has ascertained the foundation of a phenomenon, and he is able to associate its conditions, he then proves while he endeavours to produce the phenomena at his will, the correctness of his observations by experiment. To make a series of experiments is often to decompose an opinion into its individual parts, and to prove it by a sensible phenomenon. The naturalist makes experiments in order to exhibit a phenomenon in all its different parts. When he is able to show of a series of phenomena, that they are all operations of the same cause, he arrives at a simple expression of their significance, which, in this case, is called a Law of Nature. We speak of a simple property as a Law of Nature when it serves for the explanation of one or more natural phenomena.
'The Study of the Natural Sciences: An Introductory Lecture to the Course of Experimental Chemistry in the University of Munich, for the Winter Session of 1852-53,' as translated and republished in The Medical Times and Gazette (22 Jan 1853), N.S. Vol. 6, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Associate (16)  |  Carelessness (4)  |  Cause (285)  |  Component (16)  |  Condition (163)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Decompose (7)  |  Demonstrate (53)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Endeavour (25)  |  Experience (342)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Expression (110)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Inattention (5)  |  Law Of Nature (64)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Observation (450)  |  Observer (42)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Part (222)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Practice (94)  |  Produce (102)  |  Proof (245)  |  Property (126)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Report (37)  |  Result (389)  |  See (369)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Separate (74)  |  Simple (178)  |  Skillful (9)  |  Sober (9)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Test (125)  |  Together (79)  |  Training (66)  |  Truth (928)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Validity (31)  |  Verify (17)  |  Whole (192)

There is no more potent antidote to the corroding influence of mammon than the presence in the community of a body of men devoted to science, living for investigation and caring nothing for the lust of the eyes and the pride of life.
In address at the University of Minnesota, "Teacher and Student" (1892) collected in Aequanimitas: With Other Addresses to Medical Students, Nurses and Practitioners of Medicine (1904), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (6)  |  Care (95)  |  Community (82)  |  Corrosion (4)  |  Influence (140)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Life (1131)  |  Lust (5)  |  Mammon (2)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Potency (7)  |  Presence (33)  |  Pride (64)

There is, it appears, a conspiracy of scientists afoot. Their purpose is to break down religion, propagate immorality, and so reduce mankind to the level of brutes. They are the sworn and sinister agents of Beelzebub, who yearns to conquer the world, and has his eye especially upon Tennessee.
[Report on the Scopes Monkey Trial.]
Baltimore Evening Sun (11 Jul 1925). In H.L. Mencken, S. T. Joshi (Ed.), H.L. Mencken on Religion (2002), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (32)  |  Beelzebub (2)  |  Break (54)  |  Brute (15)  |  Conquer (23)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Immorality (4)  |  Level (67)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Propagation (10)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reduction (41)  |  Religion (239)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (6)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Swear (4)  |  State of Tennessee (3)  |  World (898)  |  Yearn (10)

They were in orbit around the planet now, and its giant curving bulk loomed so huge that he could see nothing else, nothing but the bands and swirls of clouds that raced fiercely across Jupiter’s face. The clouds shifted and flowed before his eyes, spun into eddies the size of Asia, moved and throbbed and pulsed like living creatures. Lightning flashed down there, sudden explosions of light that flickered back and forth across the clouds, like signalling lamps.
Ben Bova
Jupiter
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Asia (5)  |  Back (104)  |  Band (9)  |  Bulk (12)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Creature (155)  |  Curve (33)  |  Down (86)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Explosion (27)  |  Face (108)  |  Flash (34)  |  Flicker (2)  |  Flow (42)  |  Forth (13)  |  Giant (38)  |  Huge (25)  |  Lamp (17)  |  Light (347)  |  Lightning (33)  |  Live (272)  |  Loom (12)  |  Move (94)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Planet (263)  |  Pulse (10)  |  Race (104)  |  See (369)  |  Shift (29)  |  Signal (18)  |  Size (60)  |  Spin (15)  |  Sudden (34)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Throb (6)

This discovery, indeed, is almost of that kind which I call serendipity, a very expressive word, which as I have nothing better to tell you, I shall endeavour to explain to you: you will understand it better by the derivation than by the definition. I once read a silly fairy tale, called The Three Princes of Serendip: as their highnesses travelled, they were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of: for instance, one of them discovered that a mule blind of the right eye had travelled the same road lately, because the grass was eaten only on the left side, where it was worse than on the right—now do you understand serendipity?
Letter to Sir Horace Mann (28 Jan 1754), in W. S. Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith and George L. Lam (eds.), Horace Walpole's Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann (1960), Vol. 20, 407-408.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (66)  |  Blind (47)  |  Definition (192)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Eating (21)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Expressive (3)  |  Fairy (8)  |  Grass (35)  |  Instance (32)  |  Kind (140)  |  Mule (2)  |  Prince (13)  |  Quest (32)  |  Right (197)  |  Road (64)  |  Sagacity (8)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Traveled (2)  |  Understand (340)  |  Word (302)

This fundamental discovery that all bodies owe their origin to arrangements of single initial corpuscular type is the beacon that lights the history of the universe to our eyes. In its own way, matter obeyed from the beginning that great law of biology to which we shall have to recur time and time again, the law of “complexification.”
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 48. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (60)  |  Beacon (6)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Biology (168)  |  Body (247)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Great (534)  |  History (369)  |  Initial (17)  |  Law (515)  |  Light (347)  |  Matter (343)  |  Obey (16)  |  Origin (88)  |  Owe (23)  |  Recur (4)  |  Single (120)  |  Time (595)  |  Type (52)  |  Universe (686)

This very important property of rods, and indeed also of each kind of cone, this limitation of output to a single dimension of change, may be called the Principle of Univariance and stated thus: “The output of a receptor depends upon its quantum catch, but not upon what quanta are caught.” … Young's theory of colour vision may now be stated in terms of cone pigments. “There are three classes of cone each containing a different visual pigment. The output of each cone is univariant, depending simply upon the quantum catch of its pigment. Our sensation of colour depends upon the ratios of these three cone outputs.”
Principle of Univariance, concerning color vision, as stated in Lecture to a meeting of the Physiological Society at Chelsea College, London (17 Apr 1970), and reported in 'Pigments and Signals in Colour Vision', The Journal of Physiology (1972), 220 No. 3, 4P.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (99)  |  Cone (6)  |  Limitation (30)  |  Output (10)  |  Photon (10)  |  Pigment (7)  |  Principle (292)  |  Property (126)  |  Ratio (19)  |  Retina (4)  |  Rod (5)  |  Theory (696)  |  Vision (94)  |  Thomas Young (14)

To look backward for a while is to refresh the eye, to restore it, and to render it more fit for its prime function of looking forward.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Fit (48)  |  Forward (36)  |  Function (131)  |  Prime (11)  |  Refresh (4)  |  Render (33)  |  Restore (8)

To most of us nothing is so invisible as an unpleasant truth. Though it is held before our eyes, pushed under our noses, rammed down our throats- we know it not.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Down (86)  |  Hold (94)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Know (556)  |  Nose (10)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Push (29)  |  Ram (3)  |  Throat (10)  |  Truth (928)  |  Unpleasant (4)

To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest possible degree. When it was first said that the sun stood still and the world turned round, the common sense of mankind declared the doctrine false; but the old saying of Vox populi, vox Dei, as every philosopher knows, cannot be trusted in science. Reason tells me, that if numerous gradations from a perfect and complex eye to one very imperfect and simple, each grade being useful to its possessor, can be shown to exist; if further, the eye does vary ever so slightly, and the variations be inherited, which is certainly the case; and if any variation or modification in the organ be ever useful to an animal under changing conditions of life, then the difficulty of believing that a perfect and complex eye could be formed by natural selection, though insuperable by our imagination, can hardly be considered real.
On The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859, 1882), 143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Origin Of Species (42)

To the eyes of the man of imagination, Nature is Imagination itself.
Letter to Rev. Dr. Trusler (23 Aug 1799). Collected in William Blake and Archibald George Blomefield Russell (ed.), The Letters of William Blake (1906), Vol. 1, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Imagination (275)  |  Nature (1223)

To your care and recommendation am I indebted for having replaced a half-blind mathematician with a mathematician with both eyes, which will especially please the anatomical members of my Academy.
Letter (26 Jul 1766) to Jean le Rond D’Alembert appreciating his recommendation to bring the younger Joseph-Louis Lagrange (age 30) to the Academy of Sciences in Berlin when Leonhart Euler (age 59), vacated the post of director of mathematics. Euler lost the sight of one eye to disease in 1740, and a cataract took the sight of the remaining eye in 1766. As quoted in Florian Cajori, 'Frederick the Great on Mathematics and Mathematicians', The American Mathematical Monthly (Mar 1927), 34, No. 3, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (13)  |  Anatomical (3)  |  Blind (47)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Member (40)  |  Please (24)  |  Recommendation (12)

True wisdom consists not in seeing what is immediately before our eyes, but in foreseeing what is to come.
Terence
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Consist (46)  |  Foresee (13)  |  Immediately (23)  |  See (369)  |  True (208)  |  Wisdom (182)

Truth … and if mine eyes
Can bear its blaze, and trace its symmetries,
Measure its distance, and its advent wait,
I am no prophet—I but calculate.
From poem, 'The Prospects of the Future', collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 447.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Bear (67)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Calculate (33)  |  Distance (77)  |  Measure (104)  |  Prophet (11)  |  Symmetry (37)  |  Trace (53)  |  Truth (928)  |  Wait (58)

Unless the eye had sun-like parts
It could not see the sun and sight us.
In 'Unless the Eye Had Sunlike Parts' (1810), Selected Poems (1998), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Part (222)  |  Sight (48)  |  Sun (276)

Very great charm of shadow and light is to be found in the faces of those who sit in the doors of dark houses. The eye of the spectator sees that part of the face which is in shadow lost in the darkness of the house, and that part of the face which is lit draws its brilliancy from the splendor of the sky. From this intensification of light and shade the face gains greatly in relief and beauty by showing the subtlest shadows in the light part and the subtlest lights in the dark part.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (248)  |  Brilliancy (3)  |  Charm (28)  |  Dark (77)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Door (39)  |  Draw (55)  |  Face (108)  |  Find (408)  |  Gain (70)  |  Great (534)  |  Greatly (12)  |  House (43)  |  Intensification (2)  |  Light (347)  |  Lose (94)  |  Part (222)  |  Relief (18)  |  See (369)  |  Shade (22)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Show (93)  |  Sit (47)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Splendor (13)  |  Subtl (2)

We all pay an involuntary homage to antiquity – a “blind homage,” as Bacon calls it in his “Novum Organum,” which tends greatly to the obstruction of truth. To the great majority of mortal eyes, Time sanctifies everything that he does not destroy. The mere fact of anything being spared by the great foe makes it a favourite with us, who are sure to fall his victims.
From Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions (1841), Vol. 1, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (18)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (181)  |  Blind (47)  |  Call (128)  |  Destroy (80)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fall (120)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Foe (7)  |  Great (534)  |  Homage (4)  |  Involuntary (4)  |  Majority (42)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Obstruction (4)  |  Sanctify (3)  |  Spare (9)  |  Tend (36)  |  Time (595)  |  Truth (928)  |  Victim (13)

We can continue to try and clean up the gutters all over the world and spend all of our resources looking at just the dirty spots and trying to make them clean. Or we can lift our eyes up and look into the skies and move forward in an evolutionary way.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Clean (28)  |  Clean Up (4)  |  Continue (65)  |  Dirty (10)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Forward (36)  |  Gutter (3)  |  Lift (25)  |  Move (94)  |  Resource (62)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spend (43)  |  Spot (17)  |  Try (141)  |  World (898)

We do not draw conclusions with our eyes, but with our reasoning powers, and if the whole of the rest of living nature proclaims with one accord from all sides the evolution of the world of organisms, we cannot assume that the process stopped short of Man. But it follows also that the factors which brought about the development of Man from his Simian ancestry must be the same as those which have brought about the whole of evolution.
Translation of Weismann's work in German, by John Arthur Thomson and Margaret R. Thomson, The Evolution Theory (1904), Vol. 2, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Ancestry (4)  |  Assume (38)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Development (289)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Factor (46)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Organism (150)  |  Process (267)  |  Proclaim (15)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Short (51)  |  Simian (2)  |  Stop (76)  |  Whole (192)

We have to understand that the world can only be grasped by action, not by contemplation. The hand is more important than the eye ... The hand is the cutting edge of the mind.
The Ascent of Man (1973), 115-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Edge (23)  |  Hand (142)  |  Mind (760)  |  Practice (94)  |  Self-Taught (5)  |  Understanding (325)

We live in a glass-soaked civilization, but as for the bird in the Chinese proverb who finds it so difficult to discover air, the substance is almost invisible to us. To use a metaphor drawn from glass, it may be revealing for us to re-focus, to stop looking through glass, and let our eyes dwell on it for a moment to contemplate its wonder. [Co-author with Gerry Martin.]
Glass: A World History (2002), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Bird (120)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Focus (27)  |  Glass (44)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Look (52)  |  Metaphor (25)  |  Wonder (169)

We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (47)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Charm (28)  |  End (195)  |  Full (63)  |  Live (272)  |  Open (66)  |  Seek (107)  |  Wonderful (60)  |  World (898)

We pass with admiration along the great series of mathematicians, by whom the science of theoretical mechanics has been cultivated, from the time of Newton to our own. There is no group of men of science whose fame is higher or brighter. The great discoveries of Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, had fixed all eyes on those portions of human knowledge on which their successors employed their labors. The certainty belonging to this line of speculation seemed to elevate mathematicians above the students of other subjects; and the beauty of mathematical relations and the subtlety of intellect which may be shown in dealing with them, were fitted to win unbounded applause. The successors of Newton and the Bernoullis, as Euler, Clairaut, D’Alembert, Lagrange, Laplace, not to introduce living names, have been some of the most remarkable men of talent which the world has seen.
In History of the Inductive Sciences, Vol. 1, Bk. 4, chap. 6, sect. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Applause (9)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Belong (53)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Bright (42)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Alexis Claude Clairaut (2)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (11)  |  Deal (49)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Employ (35)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Fame (37)  |  Fit (48)  |  Fix (25)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Great (534)  |  Group (72)  |  High (153)  |  Human (550)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Labor (73)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Line (90)  |  Live (272)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mechanic (23)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Name (170)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pass (93)  |  Portion (24)  |  Relation (154)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Science (2067)  |  See (369)  |  Seem (143)  |  Series (51)  |  Show (93)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Student (203)  |  Subject (240)  |  Subtlety (11)  |  Successor (9)  |  Talent (63)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Time (595)  |  Unbounded (5)  |  Win (38)  |  World (898)

We’re very safety conscious, aren’t we? [In 1989,] I did a programme on fossils, Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives, and got a letter from a geologist saying, “You should have been wearing protective goggles when you were hitting that rock. Fragments could have flown into your eye and blinded you. What a bad example you are.” I thought, “Oh, for goodness sake...”
As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (99)  |  Blind (47)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Example (94)  |  Fossil (113)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Hit (20)  |  Letter (51)  |  Live (272)  |  Lost (32)  |  Program (52)  |  Protective (5)  |  Rock (125)  |  Safety (43)  |  Vanish (18)  |  World (898)

What can you conceive more silly and extravagant than to suppose a man racking his brains, and studying night and day how to fly? ... wearying himself with climbing upon every ascent, ... bruising himself with continual falls, and at last breaking his neck? And all this, from an imagination that it would be glorious to have the eyes of people looking up at him, and mighty happy to eat, and drink, and sleep, at the top of the highest trees in the kingdom.
In A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life (1732), 168. This was written before Montgolfier brothers, pioneer balloonists, were born.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Brain (213)  |  Break (54)  |  Climb (34)  |  Day (41)  |  Drink (36)  |  Eating (21)  |  Extravagant (4)  |  Fall (120)  |  Flight (65)  |  Glory (57)  |  Highest (18)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Look (52)  |  Neck (13)  |  Night (118)  |  People (390)  |  Silly (12)  |  Sleep (58)  |  Study (476)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Top (34)  |  Tree (171)

What was most significant about the lunar voyage was not that man set foot on the Moon but that they set eye on the earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (638)  |  Foot (60)  |  Lunar (9)  |  Moon (199)  |  Set (99)  |  Significant (36)  |  Voyage (11)

When I dipt into the future far as human eye could see;
Saw the Vision of the World, and all the wonders that would be.
'Locksley Hall' (1842), collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Dip (3)  |  Future (287)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Vision (94)  |  Wonder (169)  |  World (898)

Where there is an observatory and a telescope, we expect that any eyes will see new worlds at once.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 382-383.
Science quotes on:  |  Expectation (55)  |  New (496)  |  Observatory (12)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Telescope (82)  |  World (898)

Where, precisely, is the location of—a rainbow? In the air? In the eye? In between? Or somewhere else?
In 'Philosophy, Religion, and So Forth', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (1989), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Location (9)  |  Precise (34)  |  Rainbow (10)

While speaking, M. Bertrand is always in motion; now he seems in combat with some outside enemy, now he outlines with a gesture of the hand the figures he studies. Plainly he sees and he is eager to paint, this is why he calls gesture to his aid. With M. Hermite, it is just the opposite; his eyes seem to shun contact with the world; it is not without, it is within he seeks the vision of truth.
From La Valeur de la Science (1904), 14, as translated by George Bruce Halsted (trans.), in The Value of Science (1907), 16. From the French, “Tout en parlant, M. Bertrand est toujours en action; tantôt il semble aux prises avec quelque ennemi extérieur, tantôt il dessine d'un geste de la main les figures qu’il étudie. Évidemment, il voit et il cherche à peindre, c’est pour cela qu’il appelle le geste à son secours. Pour M. Hermite, c’est tout le contraire; ses yeux semblent fuir le contact du monde; ce n’est pas au dehors, c’est au dedans qu’il cherche la vision de la vérité.”
Science quotes on:  |  Joseph Bertrand (6)  |  Combat (13)  |  Contact (34)  |  Eager (15)  |  Enemy (65)  |  Figure (69)  |  Gesture (4)  |  Hand (142)  |  Charles Hermite (10)  |  Inside (26)  |  Motion (160)  |  Opposite (50)  |  Outline (11)  |  Outside (48)  |  Paint (21)  |  See (369)  |  Seek (107)  |  Shun (4)  |  Speak (92)  |  Study (476)  |  Truth (928)  |  Vision (94)  |  World (898)

Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?
Br. M. 278 b. From the original Italian: “Perchè vede piv certa la cosa l’ochio ne’ sogni che colla imaginatione, stando desto?” English and Italian in Jean Paul Richter (trans.), 'Philosophical Maxims: Of Mechanics', The Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci (1883), Vol. 1, Part 2, 287, Note 1144.
Science quotes on:  |  Awake (11)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Dream (167)  |  Imagination (275)  |  See (369)

Why has not Man a microscopic eye?
For this plain reason, Man is not a Fly.
An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 511.
Science quotes on:  |  Fly (99)  |  Man (373)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Plain (33)  |  Reason (471)

Why waste words? Geometry existed before the Creation, is co-eternal with the mind of God, is God himself (what exists in God that is not God himself?); geometry provided God with a model for the Creation and was implanted into man, together with God’s own likeness—and not merely conveyed to his mind through the eyes.
From Harmonice Mundi, Lib. IV, Cap. I, Gesammelte Werke, Vol. VI, as quoted and cited in an epigraph, Jagdish Mehra, Einstein, Hilbert, and The Theory of Gravitation: Historical Origins (1974), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (242)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Exist (148)  |  Geometry (232)  |  God (535)  |  Mind (760)  |  Model (81)

With some people solitariness is an escape not from others but from themselves. For they see in the eyes of others only a reflection of themselves.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Escape (47)  |  People (390)  |  Reflection (60)  |  See (369)  |  Themselves (44)

Years ago I used to worry about the degree to which I specialized. Vision is limited enough, yet I was not really working on vision, for I hardly made contact with visual sensations, except as signals, nor with the nervous pathways, nor the structure of the eye, except the retina. Actually my studies involved only the rods and cones of the retina, and in them only the visual pigments. A sadly limited peripheral business, fit for escapists. But it is as though this were a very narrow window through which at a distance, one can only see a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally looking through the same narrow window one is looking at the universe. It is like the pupil of the eye, an opening only two to three millimetres across in daylight, but yielding a wide angle of view, and manoeuvrable enough to be turned in all directions. I think this is always the way it goes in science, because science is all one. It hardly matters where one enters, provided one can come closer, and then one does not see less and less, but more and more, because one is not dealing with an opaque object, but with a window.
In Scientific American, 1960s, attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Cone (6)  |  Contact (34)  |  Crack (15)  |  Daylight (10)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Direction (76)  |  Distance (77)  |  Enter (32)  |  Light (347)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Opening (15)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Pigment (7)  |  Pupil (36)  |  Really (78)  |  Retina (4)  |  Rod (5)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Sensation (29)  |  Signal (18)  |  Vision (94)  |  Window (40)

Yet as I cast my eye over the whole course of science I behold instances of false science, even more pretentious and popular than that of Einstein gradually fading into ineptitude under the searchlight; and I have no doubt that there will arise a new generation who will look with a wonder and amazement, deeper than now accompany Einstein, at our galaxy of thinkers, men of science, popular critics, authoritative professors and witty dramatists, who have been satisfied to waive their common sense in view of Einstein's absurdities.
In Elizabeth Dilling, A "Who's Who" and Handbook of Radicalism for Patriots (1934), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (22)  |  Accompany (22)  |  Amazement (12)  |  Authority (66)  |  Cast (25)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Course (84)  |  Critic (20)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Dramatist (2)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Fading (3)  |  Falsity (13)  |  Galaxy (46)  |  Generation (141)  |  Ineptitude (2)  |  Instance (32)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  New (496)  |  Popular (29)  |  Pretention (2)  |  Professor (54)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Science (2067)  |  Searchlight (4)  |  Theory Of Relativity (14)  |  View (171)  |  Wit (36)  |  Wonder (169)

You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.
In A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (1889), 422.
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (90)  |  Focus (27)  |  Imagination (275)

Your enemy is never a villain in his own eyes. Keep this in mind; it may offer a way to make him your friend. If not, you can kill him without hate—and quickly.
In 'From the Notebooks of Lazarus Long', Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 259.
Science quotes on:  |  Enemy (65)  |  Friend (86)  |  Hate (38)  |  Keep (100)  |  Kill (52)  |  Mind (760)  |  Offer (43)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Sociology (43)  |  Villain (4)

[A comparison] of the mind of a bigot to the pupil of the eye; the more light you pour on it, the more it contracts.
In The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table (1858), 167. Holmes continued by writing that he was renouncing any claim to being the first to utter that idea, having been shown “that it occurs in a Preface to certain Political Poems of Thomas Moore’s.” He also wrote he was sensitive to charges of plagiarism, but, nevertheless, he asserted that when he uttered it, it was with the belief that it was his own novel idea. But, “It is impossible to tell, in a great many cases, whether a comparison which suddenly suggests itself is a new conception or a recollection.” Moore had written in Corruption and Intolerance (1808) that “The minds of some men, like the pupil of the human eye, contract themselves the more, the stronger light there is shed upon them.”
Science quotes on:  |  Bigot (4)  |  Comparison (64)  |  Contract (11)  |  Light (347)  |  Mind (760)  |  Pupil (36)

[An artist] will sooner and with more certainty, establish the character of skeletons, than the most learned anatomist, whose eye has not been accustomed to seize on every peculiarity.
Asserting his (incorrect) belief that the fossil teeth of the mastodon revealed it was a carnivorous animal.]
In An Historical Disquisition on the Mammoth, or, Great American Incognitum, an Extinct, Immense, Carnivorous Animal, whose Fossil Remains Have Been Found in North America (1903), 38-39, which was published for his London exhibit of a mastodon skeleton. As cited in Michele L. Aldrich article on Peale, in Charles Coulston Gillespie, Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1978), Vol. 15-16, 472.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (9)  |  Anatomist (17)  |  Artist (69)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Character (118)  |  Establishment (35)  |  Mammoth (7)  |  Mastodon (4)  |  Peculiarity (19)  |  Seize (15)  |  Skeleton (20)

[In 1909,] Paris was the center of the aviation world. Aeronautics was neither an industry nor even a science; both were yet to come. It was an “art” and I might say a “passion”. Indeed, at that time it was a miracle. It meant the realization of legends and dreams that had existed for thousands of years and had been pronounced again and again as impossible by scientific authorities. Therefore, even the brief and unsteady flights of that period were deeply impressive. Many times I observed expressions of joy and tears in the eyes of witnesses who for the first time watched a flying machine carrying a man in the air.
In address (16 Nov 1964) presented to the Wings Club, New York City, Recollections and Thoughts of a Pioneer (1964), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (190)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Brief (20)  |  Carry (59)  |  Center (34)  |  Dream (167)  |  Expression (110)  |  Flight (65)  |  Flying Machine (10)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Impressive (20)  |  Industry (109)  |  Joy (88)  |  Legend (10)  |  Man (373)  |  Miracle (66)  |  Observe (76)  |  Paris (11)  |  Passion (71)  |  Realization (37)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Tear (23)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Witness (32)  |  World (898)  |  Year (299)

[To give insight to statistical information] it occurred to me, that making an appeal to the eye when proportion and magnitude are concerned, is the best and readiest method of conveying a distinct idea.
In The Statistical Breviary: Shewing, on a Principle Entirely New, the Resources of Every State and Kingdom in Europe (1801), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Best (173)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Idea (580)  |  Information (122)  |  Magnitude (45)  |  Method (239)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Statistics (147)

[Werhner von Braun] is a human leader whose eyes and thoughts have always been turned toward the stars. It would be foolish to assign rocketry success to one person totally. Components must necessarily be the work of many minds; so must successive stages of development. But because Wernher von Braun joins technical ability, passionate optimism, immense experience and uncanny organizing ability in the elusive power to create a team, he is the greatest human element behind today’s rocketry success
Quoted in 'Reach For The Stars', Time (17 Feb 1958), 71, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Wernher von Braun (29)  |  Create (153)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Experience (342)  |  Foolish (22)  |  Immense (42)  |  Leader (28)  |  Optimism (12)  |  Organize (20)  |  Passionate (14)  |  Power (366)  |  Rocket (34)  |  Star (336)  |  Success (250)  |  Team (8)  |  Technical (42)  |  Thought (546)  |  Uncanny (5)

~~[No known source]~~ Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, there you long return.
Best attributed simply to “Anonymous” because there seems to be no known reliable primary source. Another example of a feral quote that is almost certainly not authentic, yet spreads virally like a lexicographic plague. It must be centuries old, but does not show up in major 19th-century quote collections. It is simply too good to be true. Included here to attach this caution.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (638)  |  Fly (99)  |  Long (174)  |  Return (55)  |  Skyward (2)  |  Turn (118)  |  Walk (67)

~~[Orphan]~~ The truth of a theory is in your mind, not in your eyes.
Attributed, without citation, in Howard W. Eves Mathematical Circles Squared (1972), 57. Webmaster has so far not been able to verify from a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Mind (760)  |  Theory (696)  |  Truth (928)

’Tis the witching hour of night,
Orbed is the moon and bright.
And the stars they glisten, glisten,
Seeming with bright eyes to listen-
For what listen they?
From poem 'Prophecy', collected in The Complete Works of John Keats (1818). Vol. 2, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (42)  |  Hour (71)  |  Listening (8)  |  Moon (199)  |  Night (118)  |  Orb (8)  |  Seeming (9)  |  Star (336)

“She can't do sums a bit!” the Queens said together, with great emphasis.
“Can you do sums?” Alice said, turning suddenly on the White Queen, for she didn't like being found fault with so much.
The Queen gasped and shut her eyes. “I can do Addition, if you give me time-but I can do Subtraction, under any circumstances!”
Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (29)  |  Alice (6)  |  Fault (33)  |  Give (201)  |  Shut (9)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  Sum (41)  |  Time (595)  |  Under (7)  |  White Queen (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.