Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Symptom

Symptom Quotes (34 quotes)

As an adult she had her organs removed one by one. Now she is a mere shell with symptoms where her organs used to be.
Written as an intern on one of his patient's charts; commentary on the result of surgical treatment of non-organic disease.
In Barry G. Firkin, Judith A. Whitworth, Dictionary of Medical Eponyms (1966), 267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disease (328)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organic (158)  |  Patient (199)  |  Result (677)  |  Shell (63)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Treatment (130)

Asthma is a disease that has practically the same symptoms as passion except that with asthma it lasts longer.
Anonymous
Journal of the American Medical Association (1964), 190, 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Last (426)  |  Passion (114)

Being in love with the one parent and hating the other are among the essential constituents of the stock of psychical impulses which is formed at that time and which is of such importance in determining the symptoms of the later neurosis... This discovery is confirmed by a legend that has come down to us from classical antiquity: a legend whose profound and universal power to move can only be understood if the hypothesis I have put forward in regard to the psychology of children has an equally universal validity. What I have in mind is the legend of King Oedipus and Sophocles' drama which bears his name.
The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), In James Strachey (ed.) The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (1953), Vol. 4, 260-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Children (200)  |  Classical (45)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Down (456)  |  Drama (21)  |  Equally (130)  |  Essential (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Forward (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Legend (17)  |  Love (309)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Move (216)  |  Name (333)  |  Neurosis (9)  |  Oedipus (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Regard (305)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universal (189)  |  Validity (47)

By destroying the biological character of phenomena, the use of averages in physiology and medicine usually gives only apparent accuracy to the results. From our point of view, we may distinguish between several kinds of averages: physical averages, chemical averages and physiological and pathological averages. If, for instance, we observe the number of pulsations and the degree of blood pressure by means of the oscillations of a manometer throughout one day, and if we take the average of all our figures to get the true or average blood pressure and to learn the true or average number of pulsations, we shall simply have wrong numbers. In fact, the pulse decreases in number and intensity when we are fasting and increases during digestion or under different influences of movement and rest; all the biological characteristics of the phenomenon disappear in the average. Chemical averages are also often used. If we collect a man's urine during twenty-four hours and mix all this urine to analyze the average, we get an analysis of a urine which simply does not exist; for urine, when fasting, is different from urine during digestion. A startling instance of this kind was invented by a physiologist who took urine from a railroad station urinal where people of all nations passed, and who believed he could thus present an analysis of average European urine! Aside from physical and chemical, there are physiological averages, or what we might call average descriptions of phenomena, which are even more false. Let me assume that a physician collects a great many individual observations of a disease and that he makes an average description of symptoms observed in the individual cases; he will thus have a description that will never be matched in nature. So in physiology, we must never make average descriptions of experiments, because the true relations of phenomena disappear in the average; when dealing with complex and variable experiments, we must study their various circumstances, and then present our most perfect experiment as a type, which, however, still stands for true facts. In the cases just considered, averages must therefore be rejected, because they confuse, while aiming to unify, and distort while aiming to simplify. Averages are applicable only to reducing very slightly varying numerical data about clearly defined and absolutely simple cases.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Average (82)  |  Biological (137)  |  Blood (134)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consider (416)  |  Data (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distort (22)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fasting (3)  |  Figure (160)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pathological (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Stand (274)  |  Startling (15)  |  Station (29)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (167)  |  Unify (6)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Variable (34)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

Certainly it is by their signs and symptoms, that internal diseases are revealed to the physician.
Philosophy of Medical Science, Pt II, Ch. 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Disease (328)  |  Internal (66)  |  Physician (273)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)

Consider the hateful brew compounded with gleaming, deadly white lead whose fresh colour is like milk…. Over the victim’s jaws and in the grooves of the gums is plastered an astringent froth, and the furrow of the tongue turns rough on either side, and the depth of the throat grows somewhat dry, and from the pernicious venom follows a dry retching and hawking, for this affliction is severe; meanwhile his spirit sickens and he is worn out with mortal suffering. His body too grows chill, while sometimes his eyes behold strange illusions or else he drowses; nor can he bestir his limbs as heretofore, and he succumbs to the overmastering fatigue.
Nicander
As translated by A.S.F. Gow and A.F. Scholfield in Nicander: The Poems and Portical Fragments (1953), 99.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dry (57)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Grow (238)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lead Poisoning (4)  |  Milk (22)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Palsy (3)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Side (233)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strange (157)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Turn (447)  |  Venom (2)  |  Victim (35)  |  White (127)

Disease is an abnormal state of the body which primarily and independently produces a disturbance in the normal functions of the body. It may be an abnormality of temperament or form (structure). Symptom is a manifestation of some abnormal state in the body. It may be harmful as a colic pain or harmless as the flushing of cheeks in peripneumonia.
Avicenna
'A Discussion of the Cause of Disease and Symptoms', in The Canon of Medicine, adapted by L. Bakhtiar (1999), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Health (193)  |  Independently (24)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Pain (136)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Temperament (17)

Enthusiasm for the global-warming scare also ensures that heatwaves make headlines, while contrary symptoms, such as this winter’s billion-dollar loss of Californian crops to unusual frost, are relegated to the business pages. The early arrival of migrant birds in spring provides colourful evidence for a recent warming of the northern lands. But did anyone tell you that in east Antarctica the Adélie penguins and Cape petrels are turning up at their spring nesting sites around nine days later than they did 50 years ago? While sea-ice has diminished in the Arctic since 1978, it has grown by 8% in the Southern Ocean.
In 'An experiment that hints we are wrong on climate change', The Sunday Times (11 Feb 2007).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bird (149)  |  Business (149)  |  California (9)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Crop (25)  |  Early (185)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Frost (14)  |  Global (35)  |  Headline (6)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iceberg (4)  |  Loss (110)  |  Migration (11)  |  Nest (23)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Penguin (4)  |  Recent (77)  |  Sea (308)  |  Spring (133)  |  Tell (340)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Warming (23)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

Gynaecologists are very smooth indeed. Because they have to listen to woeful and sordid symptoms they develop an expression of refinement and sympathy.
A Sense of Asher (1972), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Develop (268)  |  Expression (175)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Listen (73)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Sympathy (30)

Hypochondriac symptoms commonly occur and may, if no discernible cause for the symptom is found, be due to exaggerated needs for attention and other psychological desires.
In Benjamin B. Wolman (editor), Handbook of Clinical Psychology (1965), 830-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Cause (541)  |  Desire (204)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Due (141)  |  Hypochondriac (9)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Psychological (42)

In science, attempts at formulating hierarchies are always doomed to eventual failure. A Newton will always be followed by an Einstein, a Stahl by a Lavoisier; and who can say who will come after us? What the human mind has fabricated must be subject to all the changes—which are not progress—that the human mind must undergo. The 'last words' of the sciences are often replaced, more often forgotten. Science is a relentlessly dialectical process, though it suffers continuously under the necessary relativation of equally indispensable absolutes. It is, however, possible that the ever-growing intellectual and moral pollution of our scientific atmosphere will bring this process to a standstill. The immense library of ancient Alexandria was both symptom and cause of the ossification of the Greek intellect. Even now I know of some who feel that we know too much about the wrong things.
Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science (1979), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Doom (32)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Equally (130)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Greek (107)  |  Growing (98)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Word (10)  |  Last Words (6)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Library (48)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

Let me suggest to you a simple test one can apply to scientific activities to determine whether or not they can constitute the practice of physics. Is what you are doing beautiful? Many beautiful things are created without the use of physical knowledge, but I know of no really worthwhile physics that isn’t beautiful. Indeed, one of the most distressing symptoms of scientific illiteracy is the impression so often given to school children that science is a mechanistic activity subject to algorithmic description.
In 'Physics and the APS in 1979', Physics Today (Apr 1980), 33, No. 4, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Algorithm (5)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Children (200)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Determine (144)  |  Doing (280)  |  Illiteracy (7)  |  Impression (114)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practice (204)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Subject (521)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Worthwhile (18)

Logic does not pretend to teach the surgeon what are the symptoms which indicate a violent death. This he must learn from his own experience and observation, or from that of others, his predecessors in his peculiar science. But logic sits in judgment on the sufficiency of that observation and experience to justify his rules, and on the sufficiency of his rules to justify his conduct. It does not give him proofs, but teaches him what makes them proofs, and how he is to judge of them.
In A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence, and the Methods of Scientific Investigation (1843), Vol. 1, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Conduct (69)  |  Death (388)  |  Experience (467)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Justify (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Logic (287)  |  Make (25)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Teach (277)  |  Violent (17)

Medical researchers have discovered a new disease that has no symptoms. It is impossible to detect, and there is no known cure. Fortunately, no cases have been reported thus far.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Cure (122)  |  Detect (44)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fortunately (8)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Known (454)  |  Medical (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Report (38)  |  Researcher (33)

On the 20th of May 1747, I took twelve patients in the scurvy, on board the Salisbury at sea. Their cases were as similar as I could have them. They all in general had putrid gums, the spots and lassitude, with weakness of their knees. They lay together in one place, being a proper apartment for the sick in the fore-hold; and had one diet common to all, viz, water-gruel sweetened with sugar in the morning; fresh mutton-broth often times for dinner; at other times puddings, boiled biscuit with sugar, &c.; and for supper, barley and raisins, rice and currents, sago and wine, or the like.
Two of these were ordered each a quart of cider a-day. Two others took twenty-five gutta of elixir vitriol three times a-day, upon an empty stomach; using a gargle strongly acidulated with it for their mouths. Two others took two spoonfuls of vinegar three times a-day, upon an empty stomach; having their gruels and their other food well acidulated with it, as also the gargle for their mouth. Two of the worst patients, with the tendons in the ham rigid, (a symptom none of the rest had), were put under a course of sea-water. Of this they drank half a pint every day, and sometimes more or less as it operated, by way of gentle physics. The others had each two oranges and one lemon given them every day. These they eat with greediness, at different times, upon an empty stomach. They continued but six days under this course, having consumed the quantity that could be spared. The two remaining patients, took the bigness of a nutmeg three times a-day, of an electuary recommended by an hospital-surgeon, made of garlic, mustard-seed, rad. raphan. balsam of Peru, and gum myrrh; using for common drink, barley-water well acidulated with tamarinds; by a decoction of which, with the addition of cremor tartar, they were gently purged three or four times during the course.
The consequence was, that the most sudden and visible good effects were perceived from the use of the oranges and lemons; one of those who had taken them, being at the end of six days fit for duty. …
Next to the oranges, I thought the cider had the best effects.
A Treatise of the Scurvy (1753), 191-193. Quoted in Carleton Ellis and Annie Louise Macleod, Vital Factors of Foods: Vitamins and Nutrition (1922), 229-230.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cider (3)  |  Common (436)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Current (118)  |  Diet (54)  |  Different (577)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elixir (5)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Fit (134)  |  Food (199)  |  Fresh (67)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Lemon (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Mutton (4)  |  Next (236)  |  Nutmeg (2)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Orange (14)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rice (4)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seaman (3)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sick (81)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supper (10)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vitamin C (3)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wine (38)  |  Worst (57)

One of the symptoms of approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important.
Autobiography
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Work (1351)

Shut your eyes to the medical columns of the newspapers, and you will save yourself many forebodings and symptoms.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Eye (419)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Save (118)  |  Shut (41)  |  Will (2355)

Signs and symptoms indicate the present, past and future states of the three states of the body (health, illness, neutrality). According to Galen, knowledge of the present state is of advantage only to the patient as it helps him to follow the proper course of management. Knowledge of the past state is useful only to the physician inasmuch as its disclosure by him to the patient brings him a greater respect for his professional advice. Knowledge of the future state is useful to both. It gives an opportunity to the patient to be forewarned to adopt necessary preventative measures and it enhances the reputation of the physician by correctly forecasting the future developments.
Avicenna
'The Signs and Symptoms (Diagnosis): General Remarks,' in The Canon of Medicine, adapted by L. Bakhtiar (1999), 259.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Advice (55)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Course (409)  |  Development (422)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disclosure (6)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  Greater (288)  |  Health (193)  |  Illness (34)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Management (21)  |  Measure (232)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Neutrality (5)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Past (337)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Present (619)  |  Professional (70)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Respect (207)  |  State (491)  |  Useful (250)

Suddenly there was an enormous explosion, like a violent volcano. The nuclear reactions had led to overheating in the underground burial grounds. The explosion poured radioactive dust and materials high up into the sky. It was just the wrong weather for such a tragedy. Strong winds blew the radioactive clouds hundreds of miles away. It was difficult to gauge the extent of the disaster immediately, and no evacuation plan was put into operation right away. Many villages and towns were only ordered to evacuate when the symptoms of radiation sickness were already quite apparent. Tens of thousands of people were affected, hundreds dying, though the real figures have never been made public. The large area, where the accident happened, is still considered dangerous and is closed to the public.
'Two Decades of Dissidence', New Scientist (4 Nov 1976), 72, No. 72, 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Affected (3)  |  Already (222)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Area (31)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Burial (7)  |  Closed (38)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Consider (416)  |  Considered (12)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Die (86)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Dust (64)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Extent (139)  |  Figure (160)  |  Gauge (2)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Heat (174)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Large (394)  |  Material (353)  |  Mile (39)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Plan (117)  |  Public (96)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Real (149)  |  Right (452)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Sky (161)  |  Still (613)  |  Strong (174)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Total (94)  |  Town (27)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Underground (11)  |  Village (7)  |  Violent (17)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wrong (234)

Symptoms are the body’s mother tongue; signs are in a foreign language.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Language (293)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Sign (58)  |  Tongue (43)

Technology can relieve the symptoms of a problem without affecting the underlying causes. Faith in technology as the ultimate solution to all problems can thus divert our attention from the most fundamental problem—the problem of growth in a finite system
et al., The Limits to Growth (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Cause (541)  |  Divert (3)  |  Faith (203)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Growth (187)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Relieve (5)  |  Solution (267)  |  System (537)  |  Technology (257)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Underlying (30)

That the Anatomy of the Nerves yields more pleasant and profitable Speculations, than the Theory of any parts besides in the animated Body: for from hence the true and genuine Reasons are drawn of very many Actions and Passions that are wont to happen in our Body, which otherwise seem most difficult and unexplicable; and no less from this Fountain the hidden Causes of Diseases and their Symptoms, which commonly are ascribed to the Incantations of Witches, may be found out and clearly laid open. But as to our observations about the Nerves, from our following Discourse it will plainly appear, that I have not trod the paths or footsteps of others, nor repeated what hath been before told.
In Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves (1664), trans. Samuel Pordage (1681), reprinted in William Peindel (ed.), Thomas Willis: Anatomy of the Brain and Nerves (1965), Vol. 2, 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Disease (328)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Happen (274)  |  Incantation (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  Path (144)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Reason (744)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Theory (970)  |  Will (2355)  |  Witch (4)  |  Yield (81)

The Author of nature has not given laws to the universe, which, like the institutions of men, carry in themselves the elements of their own destruction; he has not permitted in his works any symptom of infancy or of old age, or any sign by which we may estimate either their future or their past duration. He may put an end, as he no doubt gave a beginning, to the present system at some determinate period of time; but we may rest assured, that this great catastrophe will not be brought about by the laws now existing, and that it is not indicated by any thing which we perceive.
'Biographical Account of the Late Dr James Hutton, F.R.S. Edin.' (read 1803), Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1805), 5, 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Author (167)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Carry (127)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Determination (78)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Duration (10)  |  Element (310)  |  End (590)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Estimation (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infancy (12)  |  Institution (69)  |  Law (894)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Past (337)  |  Perception (97)  |  Period (198)  |  Permission (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sign (58)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The basic symptoms which occur in pneumonia and which are never lacking are acute fever, sticking pain in the side, short rapid breaths, serrated pulse, and cough, mostly with sputum.
As quoted in Robert Taylor, White Coat Tales: Medicine's Heroes, Heritage, and Misadventures (2010), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (7)  |  Basic (138)  |  Breath (59)  |  Cough (8)  |  Fever (29)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pneumonia (7)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Short (197)  |  Side (233)  |  Sticking (3)

The cult of individual personalities is always, in my view, unjustified. To be sure, nature distributes her gifts variously among her children. But there are plenty of the well-endowed ones too, thank God, and I am firmly convinced that most of them live quiet, unregarded lives. It strikes me as unfair, and even in bad taste, to select a few of them for boundless admiration, attributing superhuman powers of mind and character to them. This has been my fate, and the contrast between the popular estimate of my powers and achievements and the reality is simply grotesque. The consciousness of this extraordinary state of affairs would be unbearable but for one great consoling thought: it is a welcome symptom in an age which is commonly denounced as materialistic, that it makes heroes of men whose ambitions lie wholly in the intellectual and moral sphere. This proves that knowledge and justice are ranked above wealth and power by a large section of the human race. My experience teaches me that this idealistic outlook is particularly prevalent in America, which is usually decried as a particularly materialistic country.
From Mein Weltbild, as translated by Alan Harris (trans.), 'Some Notes on my American Impressions', The World as I See It (1956, 1993), 37-38.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Age (499)  |  Ambition (43)  |  America (127)  |  Bad (180)  |  Biography (240)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Character (243)  |  Children (200)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consoling (4)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Country (251)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fate (72)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Justice (39)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Power (746)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reality (261)  |  Select (44)  |  Sphere (116)  |  State (491)  |  Strike (68)  |  Superhuman (5)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Usually (176)  |  View (488)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Welcome (16)  |  Wholly (88)

The drinking of litharge causes oppression of the stomach, belly and intestines, with intense griping pains;… it suppresses the urine, while the body swells and acquires an unsightly leaden hue.
As quoted in H.A. Waldron, 'Lead Poisoning in the Ancient World', Medical History (Oct 1973). 17, No. 4, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lead Poisoning (4)  |  Litharge (2)  |  Pain (136)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Urine (16)

The facts obtained in this study may possibly be sufficient proof of the causal relationship, that only the most sceptical can raise the objection that the discovered microorganism is not the cause but only an accompaniment of the disease... It is necessary to obtain a perfect proof to satisfy oneself that the parasite and the disease are ... actually causally related, and that the parasite is the... direct cause of the disease. This can only be done by completely separating the parasite from the diseased organism [and] introducing the isolated parasite into healthy organisms and induce the disease anew with all its characteristic symptoms and properties.
Berliner Klinische Wochenschrift (1882), 393. Quoted in Edward J. Huth and T. Jock Murray (eds.), Medicine in Quotations: Views of Health and Disease Through the Ages (2000), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Cause (541)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Completely (135)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Induce (22)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Objection (32)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Organism (220)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proof (287)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Sceptic (5)  |  Study (653)  |  Sufficient (128)

The greater part of it, I shall show, is nonsense, tricked out with a variety of tedious metaphysical conceits, and its author can be excused of dishonesty only on the grounds that before deceiving others he has taken great pains to deceive himself. … it is the style that creates the illusion of content, and which is a cause as well as merely a symptom of Teilhard's alarming apocalyptic seizures.
Medawar’s acerbic book review of The Phenomenon of Man by Teilhard de Chardin first appeared as 'Critical Notice' in the journal Mind (1961), 70, No. 277, 99. The book review was reprinted in The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967), 71. Medawar thus strongly contradicted other reviewers of the book, which he said was “widely held to be of the utmost profundity and significance; it created something like a sensation upon its publication in France, and some reviewers hereabouts called it the Book of the Year—one, the Book of the Century.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alarming (4)  |  Author (167)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Create (235)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deceiving (5)  |  Dishonesty (9)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Show (346)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (29)  |  Trick (35)  |  Variety (132)

The name chronic alcoholism applies to the collective symptoms of a disordered condition of the mental, motor, and sensory functions of the nervous system, these symptoms assuming a chronic form, and without their being immediately connected with any of those (organic) modifications of the central or peripheric portions of the nervous system which may be detected during life, or discovered after death by ocular inspection; such symptoms, moreover, affecting individuals who have persisted for a considerable length of time in the abuse of alcoholic liquors.
Published in Swedish in 1849. Translation quoted in William Marcet On Chronic Alcoholic Intoxication (1868), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (22)  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Central (80)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Death (388)  |  Detect (44)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Individual (404)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mental (177)  |  Modification (55)  |  Motor (23)  |  Name (333)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Organic (158)  |  Portion (84)  |  Sensory (16)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)

The symptoms of neurosis, as we have learnt, are essentially substitute gratifications for unfulfilled sexual wishes.
In Sigmund Freud and Joan Riviere (trans.), Civilization and Its Discontents (1930, 1994), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Essential (199)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Neurosis (9)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Unfulfilled (3)  |  Wish (212)

The symptoms or the sufferings generally considered to be inevitable and incident to the disease are very often not symptoms of the disease at all, but of something quite different—of the want of fresh air, or of light, or of warmth, or of quiet, or of cleanliness, or of punctuality and care in the administration of diet, of each or of all of these.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Cleanliness (4)  |  Consider (416)  |  Diet (54)  |  Different (577)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Light (607)  |  Punctuality (2)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Something (719)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Want (497)  |  Warmth (21)

These symptoms are formed in such a particular way that they form a disease group in themselves and thus merit being designated and described as a definite disease ... It is this group of symptoms which I wish to designate by the name Alcoholismus chronicus.
Alcoholismus chronicus: Chronisk alcoholisjudkom: Ett bidrag till dyskrasiarnas känndom (1849). Trans. quoted in John William Crowley, William L. White, Drunkard's Refuge (2004), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Definite (110)  |  Disease (328)  |  Form (959)  |  Merit (50)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

To choose a rough example, think of a thorn which has stuck in a finger and produces an inflammation and suppuration. Should the thorn be discharged with the pus, then the finger of another individual may be pricked with it, and the disease may be produced a second time. In this case it would not be the disease, not even its product, that would be transmitted by the thorn, but rather the stimulus which engendered it. Now supposing that the thorn is capable of multiplying in the sick body, or that every smallest part may again become a thorn, then one would be able to excite the same disease, inflammation and suppuration, in other individuals by transmitting any of its smallest parts. The disease is not the parasite but the thorn. Diseases resemble one another, because their causes resemble each other. The contagion in our sense is therefore not the germ or seed of the disease, but rather the cause of the disease. For example, the egg of a taenia is not the product of a worm disease even though the worm disease may have been the cause, which first gave rise to the taenia in the intestinal contents—nor of the individual afflicted with the worm disease, but rather of the parasitic body, which, no matter how it may have come into the world at first, now reproduces itself by means of eggs, and produces the symptoms of the worm disease, at least in part. It is not the seed of the disease; the latter multiplies in the sick organism, and is again excreted at the end of the disease.
'On Miasmata and Contagia', trans. G. Rosen, Bulletin of the Institute of the History of Medicine (1938), 6, 924.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (541)  |  Choose (112)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Disease (328)  |  Egg (69)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Germ (53)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infection (27)  |  Inflammation (7)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Produced (187)  |  Product (160)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Rise (166)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sick (81)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)  |  Worm (42)

[The teaching of Nature] is harsh and wasteful in its operation. Ignorance is visited as sharply as wilful disobedience—incapacity meets with the same punishment as crime. Nature’s discipline is not even a word and a blow, and the blow first; but the blow without the word. It is left to you to find out why your ears are boxed.
The object of what we commonly call education—that education in which man intervenes, and which I shall distinguish as artificial education—is to make good these defects in Nature’s methods; to prepare the child to receive Nature’s education, neither incapably, nor ignorantly, nor with wilful disobedience; and to understand the preliminary symptoms of her displeasure, without waiting for the box on the ear. In short, all artificial education ought to he an anticipation of natural education. And a liberal education is an artificial education, which has not only prepared a man to escape the great evils of disobedience to natural laws, but has trained him to appreciate and to seize upon the rewards, which Nature scatters with as free a hand as her penalties.
From Inaugural Address as Principal, South London Working Men’s College, in 'A Liberal Education; and Where to Find it', Macmillan's Magazine (Mar 1868), 17, 370.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Blow (44)  |  Box (22)  |  Call (769)  |  Child (307)  |  Crime (38)  |  Defect (31)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Ear (68)  |  Education (378)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evil (116)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harsh (8)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Incapacity (3)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Penalty (6)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reward (68)  |  Short (197)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.