Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Fatigue

Fatigue Quotes (12 quotes)

Consider the hateful brew compounded with gleaming, deadly white lead whose fresh colour is like milk…. Over the victim’s jaws and in the grooves of the gums is plastered an astringent froth, and the furrow of the tongue turns rough on either side, and the depth of the throat grows somewhat dry, and from the pernicious venom follows a dry retching and hawking, for this affliction is severe; meanwhile his spirit sickens and he is worn out with mortal suffering. His body too grows chill, while sometimes his eyes behold strange illusions or else he drowses; nor can he bestir his limbs as heretofore, and he succumbs to the overmastering fatigue.
Nicander
As translated by A.S.F. Gow and A.F. Scholfield in Nicander: The Poems and Portical Fragments (1953), 99.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Body (537)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dry (57)  |  Eye (419)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Grow (238)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lead Poisoning (4)  |  Milk (22)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Palsy (3)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Side (233)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strange (157)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Turn (447)  |  Venom (2)  |  Victim (35)  |  White (127)

He who gives a portion of his time and talent to the investigation of mathematical truth will come to all other questions with a decided advantage over his opponents. He will be in argument what the ancient Romans were in the field: to them the day of battle was a day of comparative recreation, because they were ever accustomed to exercise with arms much heavier than they fought; and reviews differed from a real battle in two respects: they encountered more fatigue, but the victory was bloodless.
Reflection 352, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Battle (34)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Decide (41)  |  Differ (85)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Field (364)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portion (84)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Respect (207)  |  Review (26)  |  Roman (36)  |  Talent (94)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Victory (39)  |  Will (2355)

It is the destiny of wine to be drunk, and it is the destiny of glucose to be oxidized. But it was not oxidized immediately: its drinker kept it in his liver for more than a week, well curled up and tranquil, as a reserve aliment for a sudden effort; an effort that he was forced to make the following Sunday, pursuing a bolting horse. Farewell to the hexagonal structure: in the space of a few instants the skein was unwound and became glucose again, and this was dragged by the bloodstream all the way to a minute muscle fiber in the thigh, and here brutally split into two molecules of lactic acid, the grim harbinger of fatigue: only later, some minutes after, the panting of the lungs was able to supply the oxygen necessary to quietly oxidize the latter. So a new molecule of carbon dioxide returned to the atmosphere, and a parcel of the energy that the sun had handed to the vine-shoot passed from the state of chemical energy to that of mechanical energy, and thereafter settled down in the slothful condition of heat, warming up imperceptibly the air moved by the running and the blood of the runner. 'Such is life,' although rarely is it described in this manner: an inserting itself, a drawing off to its advantage, a parasitizing of the downward course of energy, from its noble solar form to the degraded one of low-temperature heat. In this downward course, which leads to equilibrium and thus death, life draws a bend and nests in it.
The Periodic Table (1975), trans. Raymond Rosenthal (1984), 192-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Blood (134)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Energy (3)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effort (227)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Glucose (2)  |  Heat (174)  |  Horse (74)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Lactic Acid (2)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Liver (19)  |  Low (80)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Minute (125)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nest (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Noble (90)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Running (61)  |  Settled (34)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supply (93)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Two (937)  |  Warming (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)  |  Wine (38)

It must happen that in some cases the author is not understood, or is very imperfectly understood; and the question is what is to be done. After giving a reasonable amount of attention to the passage, let the student pass on, reserving the obscurity for future efforts. … The natural tendency of solitary students, I believe, is not to hurry away prematurely from a hard passage, but to hang far too long over it; the just pride that does not like to acknowledge defeat, and the strong will that cannot endure to be thwarted, both urge to a continuance of effort even when success seems hopeless. It is only by experience we gain the conviction that when the mind is thoroughly fatigued it has neither the power to continue with advantage its course in .an assigned direction, nor elasticity to strike out a new path; but that, on the other hand, after being withdrawn for a time from the pursuit, it may return and gain the desired end.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assign (13)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Continuance (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  End (590)  |  Endure (20)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  Hang (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Let (61)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passage (50)  |  Path (144)  |  Power (746)  |  Premature (20)  |  Pride (78)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Seem (145)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strike (68)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Success (302)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Urge (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Withdraw (9)

Nurses, as well as midwives, ought to be of middle age, sober, patient, and discreet, able to bear fatigue and watching, free from external deformity, cutaneous eruptions, and inward complaints that may be troublesome or infectious.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 444.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Bear (159)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Free (232)  |  Inward (6)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Midwife (3)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Patient (199)  |  Sober (9)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Watch (109)

Occasionally and frequently the exercise of the judgment ought to end in absolute reservation. It may be very distasteful, and great fatigue, to suspend a conclusion; but as we are not infallible, so we ought to be cautious; we shall eventually find our advantage, for the man who rests in his position is not so far from right as he who, proceeding in a wrong direction, is ever increasing his distance.
Lecture at the Royal Institution, 'Observations on the Education of the Judgment'. Collected in Edward Livingston Youmans (ed)., Modern Culture (1867), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Caution (24)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  End (590)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Great (1574)  |  Infallible (15)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Man (2251)  |  Occasionally (5)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Reservation (6)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Wrong (234)

Once you have learned to fly your plane, it is far less fatiguing to fly than it is to drive a car. You don’t have to watch every second for cats, dogs, children, lights, road signs, ladies with baby carriages and citizens who drive out in the middle of the block against the lights... Nobody who has not been up in the sky on a glorious morning can possibly imagine the way a pilot feels in free heaven.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Baby (28)  |  Block (12)  |  Car (71)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Cat (47)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Dog (70)  |  Drive (55)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fly (146)  |  Free (232)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Lady (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Middle (16)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Plane (20)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Road (64)  |  Second (62)  |  Sign (58)  |  Sky (161)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1217)

People who are unused to learning, learn little, and that slowly, while those more accustomed do much more and do it more easily. The same thing also happens in connection with research. Those who are altogether unfamiliar with this become blinded and bewildered as soon as their minds begin to work: they readily withdraw from the inquiry, in a state of mental fatigue and exhaustion, much like people who attempt to race without having been trained. He, on the other hand, who is accustomed to research, seeks and penetrates everywhere mentally, passing constantly from one topic to another; nor does he ever give up his investigation; he pursues it not merely for a matter of days, but throughout his whole life. Also by transferring his mind to other ideas which are yet not foreign to the questions at issue, he persists till he reaches the solution.
'On Paralysis'. Quoted in A. J. Brock, Greek Medicine: Being Extracts Illustrative of Medical Writers from Hippocrates to Galen (1929), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Blind (95)  |  Connection (162)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mental (177)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passing (76)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  People (1005)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Research (664)  |  Seek (213)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Topic (21)  |  Train (114)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

The difference between an ordinary mind and the mind of Newton consists principally in this, that the one is capable of a more continuous attention than the other,—that a Newton is able, without fatigue, to connect inference with inference in one long series towards a determinate end; while the man of inferior capacity is soon obliged to break or let full the thread which lie had begun to spin.
In Lectures on Metaphysics and Logic (1860), Vol. 1, 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Break (99)  |  Capable (168)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consist (223)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Difference (337)  |  End (590)  |  Inference (45)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Lie (364)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Series (149)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spin (26)  |  Thread (32)

The incessant driving of the pen over paper causes intense fatigue of the hand and the whole arm because of the continuous ... strain on the muscles and tendons.
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (81)  |  Cause (541)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Driving (28)  |  Health (193)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pen (20)  |  Whole (738)

Though the parallel is not complete, it is safe to say that science will never touch them unaided by its practical applications. Its wonders may be catalogued for purposes of education, they may be illustrated by arresting experiments, by numbers and magnitudes which startle or fatigue the imagination but they will form no familiar portion of the intellectual furniture of ordinary men unless they be connected, however remotely, with the conduct of ordinary life.
Decadence (1908), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Connect (125)  |  Education (378)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Form (959)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Portion (84)  |  Practical (200)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Safe (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Touch (141)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)

“These changes in the body,” he wrote in the review paper he sent to the American Journal of Physiology late in 1913, “are, each one of them, directly serviceable in making the organism more efficient in the struggle which fear or rage or pain may involve; for fear and rage are organic preparations for action, and pain is the most powerful known stimulus to supreme exertion. The organism which with the aid of increased adrenal secretion can best muster its energies, can best call forth sugar to supply the labouring muscles, can best lessen fatigue, and can best send blood to the parts essential in the run or the fight for life, is most likely to survive. Such, according to the view here propounded, is the function of the adrenal medulla at times of great emergency.”
Quoted in S. Benison, A. C. Barger and E. L. Wolfe, Walter B Cannon: The Life and Times of a Young Scientist (1987), 311.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Aid (97)  |  Best (459)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Emergency (10)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fear (197)  |  Function (228)  |  Great (1574)  |  Involve (90)  |  Journal (30)  |  Known (454)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Pain (136)  |  Paper (182)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Review (26)  |  Run (174)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supply (93)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.