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Home > Dictionary of Science Quotations > Scientist Names Index R > Bernardino Ramazzini Quotes

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Bernardino Ramazzini
(3 Nov 1633 - 5 Nov 1714)

Italian physician who first noted connections between workers' illnesses and their work environment. He is considered one of the founders of occupational medicine.


Science Quotes by Bernardino Ramazzini (12 quotes)

...those who sit at their work and are therefore called 'chair workers,' such as cobblers and tailors, suffer from their own particular diseases ... [T]hese workers ... suffer from general ill-health and an excessive accumulation of unwholesome humors caused by their sedentary life ... so to some extent counteract the harm done by many days of sedentary life.
On the association between chronic inactivity and poor health. Ramazzini urged that workers should at least exercise on holidays
— Bernardino Ramazzini
'Sedentary Workers and Their Diseases', Diseases of Workers (1713) Translated by WC Wright (1964),281-285). Quoted in Physical Activity and Health: a Report of the Surgeon General (1996).
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Association (46)  |  Call (769)  |  Chair (24)  |  Disease (328)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extent (139)  |  General (511)  |  Health (193)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Inactivity (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Poor (136)  |  Work (1351)

All sedentary workers ... suffer from the itch, are a bad colour, and in poor condition ... for when the body is not kept moving the blood becomes tainted, its waste matter lodges in the skin, and the condition of the whole body deteriorates. (1700)
— Bernardino Ramazzini
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Become (815)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disease (328)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Itch (10)  |  Matter (798)  |  Poor (136)  |  Skin (47)  |  Taint (10)  |  Tainted (5)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)

An acquaintance of mine, a notary by profession, who, by perpetual writing, began first to complain of an excessive wariness of his whole right arm which could be removed by no medicines, and which was at last succeeded by a perfect palsy of the whole arm. He learned to write with his left hand, which was soon thereafter seized with the same disorder.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
Concerning a notary, a scribe skilled in rapid writing, in a translation published by the University of Chicago Press (1940).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Arm (81)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Excessive (23)  |  First (1283)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mine (76)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Profession (99)  |  Right (452)  |  Soon (186)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I have noticed bakers with swelled hands, and painful, too; in fact the hands of all such workers become much thickened by the constant pressure of kneading the dough.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
concerning repetitive hand motions translation published by the University of Chicago Press, 1940
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Constant (144)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Health (193)  |  Pressure (63)

Not only in antiquity but in our own times also laws have been passed...to secure good conditions for workers; so it is right that the art of medicine should contribute its portion for the benefit and relief of those for whom the law has shown such foresight...[We] ought to show peculiar zeal...in taking precautions for their safety. I for one have done all that lay in my power, and have not thought it beneath me to step into workshops of the meaner sort now and again and study the obscure operations of mechanical arts.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (1713). Translation by W.C.Wright, in A.L.Birmingham Classics of Medicine Library (1983). Quoted in Edward J. Huth, T. J. Murray (eds.), Medicine in Quotations: Views of Health and Disease Through the Ages
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The incessant driving of the pen over paper causes intense fatigue of the hand and the whole arm because of the continuous ... strain on the muscles and tendons.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (81)  |  Cause (541)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Driving (28)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Health (193)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pen (20)  |  Whole (738)

The maladies that affect the clerks aforesaid arise from three causes. First, constant sitting, secondly, the incessant movement of the the hand and always in the same direction, thirdly, the strain on the mind from the effort not to disfigure the books by errors or cause loss to their employers when they add, subtract, or do other sums in arithmetic. The diseases brought about by sitting constantly are easily understood; they are obstructions of the viscera, e.g. the liver and spleen, indigestion in the stomach, numbness of the legs, a considerable hindrance in the circulation of the blood, and an unhealthy habit.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
De Morbis Artificum (1713), supplement, ch. 2, translated by W.C. Wright (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Blood (134)  |  Book (392)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constant (144)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Error (321)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Health (193)  |  Indigestion (5)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liver (19)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Movement (155)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sum (102)  |  Understood (156)  |  Viscera (2)

The mortality of those who dig minerals is very great, and women who marry men of this sort marry again and again. According to Agricola, at the mines in the Carpathian mountains, women have been known to marry seven times.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
Diseases of Workers, translated by W. C. Wright, preface.
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Those who work standing ... carpenters, sawyers, carvers, blacksmiths, masons ... are liable to varicose veins ... [because] the strain on the muscles is such that the circulation of the blood is retarded. Standing even for a short time proves exhausting compared with walking and running though it be for a long time ... Nature delights and is restored by alternating and varied actions.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
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When a doctor arrives to attend some patient of the working class, he ought not to feel his pulse the moment he enters, as is nearly always done without regard to the circumstances of the man who lies sick; he should not remain standing while he considers what he ought to do, as though the fate of a human being were a mere trifle; rather let him condescend to sit down for awhile.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (1713) Trans. by W.C. Wright in A.L. Birmingham, Classics of Medicine Library (1983). Quoted in Edward J. Huth and T. J. Murray. Medicine in Quotations: Views of Health and Disease Through the Ages (2006), 288.
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When a doctor arrives to attend some patient of the working class...let him condescend to sit down...if not on a gilded chair...one a three-legged stool... He should question the patient carefully... So says Hippocrates in his work 'Affections.' I may venture to add one more question: What occupation does he follow?
— Bernardino Ramazzini
De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (1713) Trans. by W.C. Wright in A.L. Birmingham, Classics of Medicine Library (1983). Quoted in Edward J. Huth and T. J. Murray. Medicine in Quotations: Views of Health and Disease Through the Ages (2006), 276.
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[I have seen] workers in whom certain morbid affections gradually arise from some particular posture of the limbs or unnatural movements of the body called for while they work. Such are the workers who all day stand or sit, stoop or are bent double, who run or ride or exercise their bodies in all sorts of [excess] ways. ... the harvest of diseases reaped by certain workers ... [from] irregular motions in unnatural postures of the body.
— Bernardino Ramazzini
translation published by the University of Chicago Press, 1940
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Disease (328)  |  Excess (22)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Reap (17)  |  Ride (21)  |  Run (174)  |  Stand (274)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)


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  • 3 Nov - short biography, births, deaths and events on date of Ramazzini's birth.

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