Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Acknowledge

Acknowledge Quotes (33 quotes)

'Normal science' means research firmly based upon one or more past scientific achievements, achievements that some particular scientific community acknowledges for a time as supplying the foundation for its further practice.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Community (104)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Past (337)  |  Practice (204)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Time (1877)

A complete theory of evolution must acknowledge a balance between ‘external’ forces of environment imposing selection for local adaptation and ‘internal’ forces representing constraints of inheritance and development. Vavilov placed too much emphasis on internal constraints and downgraded the power of selection. But Western Darwinians have erred equally in practically ignoring (while acknowledging in theory) the limits placed on selection by structure and development–what Vavilov and the older biologists would have called ‘laws of form.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Balance (77)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Development (422)  |  Downgrade (2)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Err (4)  |  Evolution (590)  |  External (57)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Ignoring (11)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Internal (66)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Local (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Place (177)  |  Power (746)  |  Practically (10)  |  Represent (155)  |  Selection (128)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Western (45)

And from this such small difference of eight minutes [of arc] it is clear why Ptolemy, since he was working with bisection [of the linear eccentricity], accepted a fixed equant point… . For Ptolemy set out that he actually did not get below ten minutes [of arc], that is a sixth of a degree, in making observations. To us, on whom Divine benevolence has bestowed the most diligent of observers, Tycho Brahe, from whose observations this eight-minute error of Ptolemy’s in regard to Mars is deduced, it is fitting that we accept with grateful minds this gift from God, and both acknowledge and build upon it. So let us work upon it so as to at last track down the real form of celestial motions (these arguments giving support to our belief that the assumptions are incorrect). This is the path I shall, in my own way, strike out in what follows. For if I thought the eight minutes in [ecliptic] longitude were unimportant, I could make a sufficient correction (by bisecting the [linear] eccentricity) to the hypothesis found in Chapter 16. Now, because they could not be disregarded, these eight minutes alone will lead us along a path to the reform of the whole of Astronomy, and they are the matter for a great part of this work.
Astronomia Nova, New Astronomy (1609), ch. 19, 113-4, Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937-), Vol. 3, 177-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arc (12)  |  Argument (138)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Both (493)  |  Tycho Brahe (23)  |  Build (204)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Correction (40)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difference (337)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Divine (112)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Linear (13)  |  Longitude (6)  |  Making (300)  |  Mars (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observation (555)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Reform (22)  |  Regard (305)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Strike (68)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Support (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

As we discern a fine line between crank and genius, so also (and unfortunately) we must acknowledge an equally graded trajectory from crank to demagogue. When people learn no tools of judgment and merely follow their hopes, the seeds of political manipulation are sown.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Crank (18)  |  Discern (33)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fine (33)  |  Follow (378)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grade (11)  |  Hope (299)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Learn (629)  |  Line (91)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Political (121)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sow (11)  |  Tool (117)  |  Trajectory (5)  |  Unfortunately (38)

August 29, 1662. The council and fellows of the Royal Society went in a body to Whitehall to acknowledge his Majesty’s royal grace to granting our charter and vouchsafing to be himself our founder; then the president gave an eloquent speech, to which his Majesty gave a gracious reply and we all kissed his hand. Next day, we went in like manner with our address to my Lord Chancellor, who had much prompted our patent.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Chancellor (8)  |  Charter (4)  |  Council (8)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Founder (26)  |  Funding (19)  |  Grace (31)  |  Himself (461)  |  King (35)  |  Kiss (8)  |  Lord (93)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Next (236)  |  Patent (33)  |  President (31)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Reply (56)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Society (326)  |  Speech (61)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Country (251)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Example (94)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (757)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (143)  |  Heap (14)  |  Hill (20)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Isle (6)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Objection (32)  |  Order (632)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (619)  |  Promontory (3)  |  Protuberance (2)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sight (132)  |  Termination (4)  |  Valley (32)  |  Variety (132)

Difficulties [in defining mathematics with full generality, yet simplicity] are but consequences of our refusal to see that mathematics cannot be defined without acknowledging its most obvious feature: namely, that it is interesting. Nowhere is intellectual beauty so deeply felt and fastidiously appreciated.
In Personal Knowledge (1958, 2012), 200,
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Define (49)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Feature (44)  |  Generality (45)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Refusal (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)

Hereafter we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations whereas species were formerly thus connected.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Compel (30)  |  Connect (125)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Hereafter (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Known (454)  |  Marked (55)  |  Present (619)  |  Species (401)  |  Variety (132)

I hope that in due time the chemists will justify their proceedings by some large generalisations deduced from the infinity of results which they have collected. For me I am left hopelessly behind and I will acknowledge to you that through my bad memory organic chemistry is to me a sealed book. Some of those here, [August] Hoffman for instance, consider all this however as scaffolding, which will disappear when the structure is built. I hope the structure will be worthy of the labour. I should expect a better and a quicker result from the study of the powers of matter, but then I have a predilection that way and am probably prejudiced in judgment.
Letter to Christian Schönbein (9 Dec 1852), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), 209-210.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Behind (137)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Building (156)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Collection (64)  |  Consider (416)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Due (141)  |  Expect (200)  |  Generalization (57)  |  August Wilhelm von Hofmann (7)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Memory (134)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Power (746)  |  Predilection (4)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Quickness (5)  |  Result (677)  |  Seal (18)  |  Sealed Book (2)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)

If Bacon erred here [in valuing mathematics only for its uses], we must acknowledge that we greatly prefer his error to the opposite error of Plato. We have no patience with a philosophy which, like those Roman matrons who swallowed abortives in order to preserve their shapes, takes pains to be barren for fear of being homely.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 396.
Science quotes on:  |  Abortive (2)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Barren (30)  |  Being (1278)  |  Error (321)  |  Fear (197)  |  Homely (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Pain (136)  |  Patience (56)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Roman (36)  |  Shape (72)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)

In the hands of Science and indomitable energy, results the most gigantic and absorbing may be wrought out by skilful combinations of acknowledged data and the simplest means.
From Introduction to Lecture on the Pendulum-Experiments at Harton Pit (1855), iv. The quote comes from the printed Introduction in the published booklet, but was not part of the printed lecture itself. At the request of a “deputation of gentlemen of South Shields,” the printed version of the lecture was written “in extenso, from memory,” after the original talk was given on 24 Oct 1854 at South Shields, County Durham, England.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorbing (3)  |  Combination (144)  |  Data (156)  |  Energy (344)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Hand (143)  |  Indomitable (3)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simplest (10)  |  Skill (109)  |  Wrought (2)

In the twenties the late Dr. Glenn Frank, an eminent social scientist, developed a new statement of the scientific code, which has been referred to as the “Five Fingers of the Scientific Method.” It may be outlined as follows: find the facts; filter the facts; focus the facts; face the facts; follow the facts. The facts or truths are found by experimentation; the motivation is material. The facts are filtered by research into the literature; the motivation is material. The facts are focused by the publication of results; again the motivation is material. Thus the first three-fifths of the scientific method have a material motivation. It is about time scientists acknowledge that there is more to the scientific convention than the material aspect. Returning to the fourth and fifth fingers of Dr. Frank's conception of the scientific method, the facts should be faced by the proper interpretation of them for society. In other words, a scientist must assume social responsibility for his discoveries, which means that he must have a moral motivation. Finally, in the fifth definition of the scientific method, the facts are to be followed by their proper application to everyday life in society, which means moral motivation through responsibility to society.
From 'Scientists and Society', American Scientist (Jul 1954), 42, No. 3, 495.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  Application (242)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Code (31)  |  Conception (154)  |  Definition (221)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Filter (9)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Focus (35)  |  Follow (378)  |  Glenn Frank (3)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literature (103)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proper (144)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Responsibility (3)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Statement (142)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

It is scientists, not sceptics, who are most willing to consider explanations that conflict with their own. And far from quashing dissent, it is the scientists, not the sceptics, who do most to acknowledge gaps in their studies and point out the limitations of their data—which is where sceptics get much of the mud they fling at the scientists. By contrast, the [sceptics] are not trying to build a theory of anything. They have set the bar much lower, and are happy muddying the waters.
Editorial, Nature (28 Jul 2011), 475, 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  Build (204)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Data (156)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Gap (33)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mud (26)  |  Point (580)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Skeptic (8)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Trying (144)  |  Water (481)  |  Willing (44)

It is therefore proper to acknowledge that the first filaments of the chick preexist in the egg and have a deeper origin, exactly as [the embryo] in the eggs of plants.
'On the Formation of the Chick in the Egg' (1673), in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 2, 945.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  Chick (3)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Existence (456)  |  Filament (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plant (294)  |  Proper (144)

It may be observed of mathematicians that they only meddle with such things as are certain, passing by those that are doubtful and unknown. They profess not to know all things, neither do they affect to speak of all things. What they know to be true, and can make good by invincible arguments, that they publish and insert among their theorems. Of other things they are silent and pass no judgment at all, chusing [choosing] rather to acknowledge their ignorance, than affirm anything rashly. They affirm nothing among their arguments or assertions which is not most manifestly known and examined with utmost rigour, rejecting all probable conjectures and little witticisms. They submit nothing to authority, indulge no affection, detest subterfuges of words, and declare their sentiments, as in a Court of Judicature [Justice], without passion, without apology; knowing that their reasons, as Seneca testifies of them, are not brought to persuade, but to compel.
Mathematical Lectures (1734), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Affirm (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Apology (7)  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Certain (550)  |  Choose (112)  |  Compel (30)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Court (33)  |  Declare (45)  |  Detest (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Good (889)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Justice (39)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Little (707)  |  Manifestly (11)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Meddle (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Passion (114)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Probable (20)  |  Profess (20)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rashly (2)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Lucius Annaeus Seneca (20)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Speak (232)  |  Submit (18)  |  Testify (5)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Witticism (2)  |  Word (619)

It must ... be admitted that very simple relations ... exist between the volumes of gaseous substances and the numbers of simple or compound molecules which form them. The first hypothesis to present itself in this connection, and apparently even the only admissible one, is the supposition that the number of integral molecules in any gases is always the same for equal volumes, or always proportional to the volumes. Indeed, if we were to suppose that the number of molecules contained in a given volume were different for different gases, it would scarcely be possible to conceive that the law regulating the distance of molecules could give in all cases relations so simple as those which the facts just detailed compel us to acknowledge between the volume and the number of molecules.
'Essay on a Manner of Determining the Relative Masses of the Elementary Molecules of Bodies, and the Proportions in which they enter into these Compounds', Journal de Physique, 1811, 73, 58-76. In Foundations of the Molecular Theory; Alembic Club Reprints, Number 4 (1923), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Admissible (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Compel (30)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Connection (162)  |  Detail (146)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Integral (26)  |  Law (894)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Simple (406)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)

It must happen that in some cases the author is not understood, or is very imperfectly understood; and the question is what is to be done. After giving a reasonable amount of attention to the passage, let the student pass on, reserving the obscurity for future efforts. … The natural tendency of solitary students, I believe, is not to hurry away prematurely from a hard passage, but to hang far too long over it; the just pride that does not like to acknowledge defeat, and the strong will that cannot endure to be thwarted, both urge to a continuance of effort even when success seems hopeless. It is only by experience we gain the conviction that when the mind is thoroughly fatigued it has neither the power to continue with advantage its course in .an assigned direction, nor elasticity to strike out a new path; but that, on the other hand, after being withdrawn for a time from the pursuit, it may return and gain the desired end.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assign (13)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Continuance (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  End (590)  |  Endure (20)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  Hang (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Let (61)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passage (50)  |  Path (144)  |  Power (746)  |  Premature (20)  |  Pride (78)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Seem (145)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strike (68)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Success (302)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Urge (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Withdraw (9)

Man may be excused for feeling some pride at having risen, though not through his own exertions, to the very summit of the organic scale; and the fact of his having thus risen, instead of having been aboriginally placed there, may give him hopes for a still higher destiny in the distant future. But we are not here concerned with hopes or fears, only with the truth as far as our reason allows us to discover it. I have given the evidence to the best of my ability; and we must acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system—with all these exalted powers—Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.
Concluding remarks. The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Best (459)  |  Concern (228)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Discover (553)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Humblest (4)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Noble (90)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Pride (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Scale (121)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Still (613)  |  Summit (25)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)

Segregationalists will even argue that God was the first segregationalist. “Red birds and blue birds don't fly together”, they contend. … They turn to some pseudo-scientific writing and argue that the Negro’s brain is smaller than the white man’s brain. They do not know, or they refuse to know that the idea of an inferior or superior race has been refuted by the best evidence of the science of anthropology. Great anthropologists, like Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Melville J. Herskovits, agree that, although there may be inferior and superior individuals within all races, there is no superior or inferior race. And segregationalists refuse to acknowledge that there are four types of blood, and these four types are found within every racial group.
'Love in Action', Strength To Love (1963, 1981), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Best (459)  |  Bigotry (4)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blood (134)  |  Brain (270)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evidence (248)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Negro (7)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Race (268)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Superior (81)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Type (167)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writing (189)

The difference between a good observer and one who is not good is that the former is quick to take a hint from the facts, from his early efforts to develop skill in handling them, and quick to acknowledge the need to revise or alter the conceptual framework of his thinking. The other—the poor observer—continues dogmatically onward with his original thesis, lost in a maze of correlations, long after the facts have shrieked in protest against the interpretation put upon them.
In The Social Problems of an Industrial Civilization (1945).
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Alter (62)  |  Continue (165)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Former (137)  |  Framework (31)  |  Good (889)  |  Hint (21)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Protest (9)  |  Skill (109)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Thinking (414)

The discerning man who acknowledges his limitations is not far off perfection.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Man (2251)  |  Perfection (129)

The first difficulty of all is the production of a lamp which shall be thoroughly reliable, and neither complicated nor expensive. All attempts up to the present lamp in this direction are acknowledged to be failures, and, as I have pointed out, there does not seem to be any novelty such as would authorize us to hope for a better success in the present one.
In 'A Scientific View of It: Prof. Henry Morton Not Sanguine About Edison’s Success', New York Times (28 Dec 1879), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Authorize (5)  |  Better (486)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Failure (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Hope (299)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Reliable (12)  |  Success (302)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)

The improver of natural knowledge absolutely refuses to acknowledge authority as such. For him, scepticism is the highest of duties, blind faith the one unpardonable sin. The man of science has learned to believe in justification, not by faith, but by verification.
In Lecture (7 Jan 1866), a Lay Sermon delivered at St. Martin’s Hall, 'Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1872), 18. Previously published in Fortnightly Review.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Authority (95)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blind (95)  |  Duty (68)  |  Faith (203)  |  Improve (58)  |  Justification (48)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sin (42)  |  Verification (31)

The origin of all science is the desire to know causes, and the origin of all false science and imposture is the desire to accept false causes rather than none; or, which is the same thing, in the unwillingness to acknowledge our own ignorance.
From 'Burke and the Edinburgh Phrenologists', The Atlas (15 Feb 1829). Collected in William Hazlitt and Percival Presland Howe (ed.), New Writings by William Hazlitt (2nd Ed., 1925), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Desire (204)  |  False (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imposture (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Origin (239)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unwillingness (4)

The Religion that is afraid of science dishonours God and commits suicide. It acknowledges that it is not equal to the whole of truth, that it legislates, tyrannizes over a village of God's empires but is not the immutable universal law. Every influx of atheism, of skepticism is thus made useful as a mercury pill assaulting and removing a diseased religion and making way for truth.
(4 Mar 1831). In William H. Gilman (ed.) The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Vol III, 1826-1832 (1963), 239.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atheism (9)  |  Commit (41)  |  God (757)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Law (894)  |  Making (300)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Useful (250)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

The secular world is more spiritual than it thinks, just as the ecclesiastical world is more materialist than it cares to acknowledge.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 27
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Ecclesiastical (3)  |  Materialist (4)  |  More (2559)  |  Secular (11)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Think (1086)  |  World (1774)

Thus died Negro Tom [Thomas Fuller], this untaught arithmetician, this untutored scholar. Had his opportunities of improvement been equal to those of thousands of his fellow-men, neither the Royal Society of London, the Academy of Science at Paris, nor even a Newton himself need have been ashamed to acknowledge him a brother in science.
[Thomas Fuller (1710-1790), although enslaved from Africa at age 14, was an arithmetical prodigy. He was known as the Virginia Calculator because of his exceptional ability with arithmetic calculations. His intellectual accomplishments were related by Dr. Benjamin Rush in a letter read to the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery.]
Obituary
From obituary in the Boston Columbian Centinal (29 Dec 1790), 14, No. 31. In George Washington Williams, History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880 (1882), Vol. 1, 400
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Academy (35)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Africa (35)  |  African American (6)  |  Age (499)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Brother (43)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculator (9)  |  Equal (83)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Himself (461)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Known (454)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Negro (7)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Prodigy (5)  |  Read (287)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shame (14)  |  Slave (37)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Society (326)  |  Thousand (331)

To what part of electrical science are we not indebted to Faraday? He has increased our knowledge of the hidden and unknown to such an extent, that all subsequent writers are compelled so frequently to mention his name and quote his papers, that the very repetition becomes monotonous. [How] humiliating it may be to acknowledge so great a share of successful investigation to one man...
In the Second Edition ofElements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (143), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Extent (139)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Humiliation (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indebtedness (4)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mention (82)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  Name (333)  |  Paper (182)  |  Quote (42)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Share (75)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Writer (86)

We must be part not only of the human community, but of the whole community; we must acknowledge some sort of oneness not only with our neighbors, our countrymen and our civilization but also some respect for the natural as well as for the man-made community. Ours is not only “one world” in the sense usually implied by that term. It is also “one earth”. Without some acknowledgement of that fact, men can no more live successfully than they can if they refuse to admit the political and economic interdependency of the various sections of the civilized world. It is not a sentimental but a grimly literal fact that unless we share this terrestrial globe with creatures other than ourselves, we shall not be able to live on it for long.
The Voice of the Desert (1956), 194-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (204)  |  Community (104)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Economic (81)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Human (1468)  |  Literal (11)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man-Made (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Oneness (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Political (121)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Share (75)  |  Term (349)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Usually (176)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

We must painfully acknowledge that, precisely because of its great intellectual developments, the best of man's domesticated animals—the dog—most often becomes the victim of physiological experiments. Only dire necessity can lead one to experiment on cats—on such impatient, loud, malicious animals. During chronic experiments, when the animal, having recovered from its operation, is under lengthy observation, the dog is irreplaceable; moreover, it is extremely touching. It is almost a participant in the experiments conducted upon it, greatly facilitating the success of the research by its understanding and compliance.
'Vivisection' (1893), as translated in Daniel P. Todes, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise (2002), 123.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Cat (47)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Development (422)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dog (70)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Facilitation (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Lead (384)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Malice (5)  |  Malicious (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Pain (136)  |  Participant (6)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Precision (68)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Research (664)  |  Success (302)  |  Touching (16)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Victim (35)

We should therefore, with grace and optimism, embrace NOMA’s tough-minded demand: Acknowledge the personal character of these human struggles about morals and meanings, and stop looking for definite answers in nature’s construction. But many people cannot bear to surrender nature as a ‘transitional object’–a baby’s warm blanket for our adult comfort. But when we do (for we must) , nature can finally emerge in her true form: not as a distorted mirror of our needs, but as our most fascinating comp anion. Only then can we unite the patches built by our separate magisteria into a beautiful and coherent quilt called wisdom.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adult (19)  |  Anion (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Baby (28)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Coherent (13)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Construction (112)  |  Definite (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distort (22)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Finally (26)  |  Form (959)  |  Grace (31)  |  Human (1468)  |  Looking (189)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Patch (8)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  Separate (143)  |  Stop (80)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transitional (2)  |  True (212)  |  Unite (42)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wisdom (221)

[I find it as difficult] to understand a scientist who does not acknowledge the presence of a superior rationality behind the existence of the universe as it is to comprehend a theologian who would deny the advances of science.
Speech, Huntsville Ministerial Association, in Wernher Von Braun and Irene E. Powell-Willhite (ed.), The Voice of Dr. Wernher Von Braun: An Anthology (2007), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Behind (137)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Deny (66)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Existence (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Presence (63)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Superior (81)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)

[Newton wrote to Halley … that he would not give Hooke any credit] That, alas, is vanity. You find it in so many scientists. You know, it has always hurt me to think that Galileo did not acknowledge the work of Kepler.
In I. Bernard Cohen, 'An Interview with Einstein', in Anthony Philip French (ed.), Einstein: A Centenary Volume (1979), 41. Cited in Timothy Ferris, Coming of Age in the Milky Way (2003), 94-95.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Edmond Halley (9)  |  Robert Hooke (20)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Know (1518)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Think (1086)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.