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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sociology

Sociology Quotes (31 quotes)

A specter is haunting Europe—the specter of Communism. All the Powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this specter: Pope and Czar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.
Karl Marx
Introductory sentence, The Communist Manifesto (1848). Collected in The Library of Original Sources (1907), Vol. 10, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Alliance (3)  |  Communism (8)  |  Europe (32)  |  France (21)  |  French (12)  |  Germany (9)  |  Haunt (3)  |  Police (2)  |  Pope (4)  |  Power (273)  |  Radical (17)  |  Spy (4)

A sufficient measure of civilization is the influence of good women.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (155)  |  Good (228)  |  Influence (110)  |  Measure (70)  |  Woman (94)

An act cannot be defined by the end sought by the actor, for an identical system of behaviour may be adjustable to too many different ends without altering its nature.
Suicide: A Study in Sociology (1897), trans. J. A. Spaulding and G. Simpson (1952), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Human Nature (51)

As the first monogamian family has improved greatly since the commencement of civilization, and very sensibly in our times, it is at least supposable that it is capable of still further improvement until the equality of the sexes is attained.
As quoted in Charles H. Seaholm, The Kelts and the Vikings (1974), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (155)  |  Equality (21)  |  Family (37)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Sex (48)

Civilization is simply a series of victories over nature.
In Where are We and Whither Tending?: Three Lectures on the Reality and Worth of Human Progress (1886), Lecture 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (155)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Series (38)  |  Victory (24)

Every individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally, or rather necessarily, leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.
In 'Of Restraints upon Importation', An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776), Vol. 2, Book 4, 32
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Employment (22)  |  Exert (9)  |  Individual (177)  |  Money (125)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Society (188)  |  Study (331)

Heaven forming each on other to depend,
A master, or a servant, or a friend,
Bids each on other for assistance call,
Till one man’s weakness grows the strength of all.
In 'Epistle II: Of the Nature and State of Man', collected in Samuel Johnson (ed.), The Works of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland: Vol. 6: The Whole Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Esq. (1800), Vol. 6, 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Assistance (7)  |  Call (68)  |  Depend (56)  |  Forming (6)  |  Friend (63)  |  Grow (66)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Master (55)  |  Servant (11)  |  Strength (63)  |  Weakness (31)

Here is the element or power of conduct, of intellect and knowledge, of beauty, and of social life and manners, and all needful to build up a complete human life. … We have instincts responding to them all, and requiring them all, and we are perfectly civilized only when all these instincts of our nature—all these elements in our civilization have been adequately recognized and satisfied.
Collected in Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors Both Ancient and Modern (1891), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Build (80)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Complete (43)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Element (129)  |  Human (445)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Manner (35)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Perfectly (8)  |  Power (273)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Require (33)  |  Respond (4)  |  Satisfied (14)  |  Social (93)

I see the whole of humankind becoming a single, integrated organism. … I look upon each of us as I would an individual cell in the organism, each of us playing his or her respective role.
From interview with James Reston, Jr., in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 109. Previously published in magazine, Omni (May 1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (125)  |  Humankind (7)  |  Individual (177)  |  Integrated (2)  |  Organism (126)  |  Role (35)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Animal (309)  |  Aristotle (141)  |  Barrier (19)  |  Biology (150)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Classification (79)  |  Coalesce (2)  |  Data (100)  |  Development (228)  |  Difference (208)  |  Divide (24)  |  Domain (21)  |  Geology (187)  |  Indifferent (9)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Master (55)  |  Men Of Science (97)  |  Method (154)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physics (301)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Radioactivity (26)  |  Science (1699)  |  Specialize (2)  |  Treatise (19)

In this great society wide lying around us, a critical analysis would find very few spontaneous actions. It is almost all custom and gross sense.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Critical (34)  |  Custom (24)  |  Gross (5)  |  Sense (240)  |  Society (188)  |  Spontaneous (12)

It is most true that a natural and secret hatred and aversion towards society, in any man, hath somewhat of the savage beast.
Science quotes on:  |  Aversion (7)  |  Beast (32)  |  Hatred (16)  |  Natural (128)  |  Savage (23)  |  Secret (98)  |  Society (188)  |  True (120)

It is only by historical analysis that we can discover what makes up man, since it is only in the course of history that he is formed.
'The Dualism of Human Nature and its Social Conditions' (1914), trans. Charles Blend, in Kurt H. Wolff (ed.), Emile Durkheim, 1858-1917 (1960), 325.

It is the utmost folly to denounce capital. To do so is to undermine civilization, for capital is the first requisite of every social gain, educational, ecclesiastical, political, or other.
In William Graham Sumner and ‎Albert Galloway Keller, The Challenge of Facts: And Other Essays (1914), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Capital (15)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Denounce (2)  |  Ecclesiastical (3)  |  Educational (6)  |  Folly (27)  |  Gain (48)  |  Political (31)  |  Requisite (6)  |  Social (93)  |  Undermine (5)

It seems to me that you are solving a problem which goes beyond the limits of physiology in too simple a way. Physiology has realized its problem with fortitude, breaking man down into endless actions and counteractions and reducing him to a crossing, a vortex of reflex acts. Let it now permit sociology to restore him as a whole. Sociology will wrest man from the anatomical theatre and return him to history.
Letter to his son, Alexander, July-Aug 1868. Trans. Roger Smith, Inhibition: History and Meaning in the Sciences of Mind and Brain (1992), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (345)  |  Physiology (66)

Man is a social animal formed to please in society.
In Day's Collacon: An Encyclopaedia of Prose Quotations (1884), 875.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Form (210)  |  Man (345)  |  Please (10)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)

Man perfected by society is the best of all animals; he is the most terrible of all when he lives without law and without justice.
Aristotle
In Politics, Book 1, 1253a. As given in Maturin Murray Ballou (ed.), Treasury of Thought: Forming an Encyclopædia of Quotations from Ancient and Modern Authors (1872), 323. As translated by Benjamin Jowett, The Politics of Aristotle (1899), 4: “For man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but, when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all.” As translated by Harris Rackham in Aristotle: Politics, 13: “For as man is the best of the animals when perfected, so he is the worst of all when sundered from law and justice.”
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Best (129)  |  Justice (24)  |  Law (418)  |  Live (186)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Society (188)  |  Terrible (14)

Segregation is the offspring of an illicit intercourse between injustice and immorality.
Epigraph, without citation, in Al Condeluci, Interdependence: The Route to Community (1995), 183.

Segregationalists will even argue that God was the first segregationalist. “Red birds and blue birds don't fly together”, they contend. … They turn to some pseudo-scientific writing and argue that the Negro’s brain is smaller than the white man’s brain. They do not know, or they refuse to know that the idea of an inferior or superior race has been refuted by the best evidence of the science of anthropology. Great anthropologists, like Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Melville J. Herskovits, agree that, although there may be inferior and superior individuals within all races, there is no superior or inferior race. And segregationalists refuse to acknowledge that there are four types of blood, and these four types are found within every racial group.
'Love in Action', Strength To Love (1963, 1981), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Bigotry (4)  |  Blood (95)  |  Brain (181)  |  Race (76)

Society is a republic. When an individual endeavors to lift himself above his fellows, he is dragged down by the mass, either by means of ridicule or of calumny. No one shall be more virtuous or more intellectually gifted than others. Whoever, by the irresistible force of genius, rises above the common herd is certain to be ostracized by society, which will pursue him with such merciless derision and detraction that at last he will be compelled to retreat into the solitude of his thoughts.
In Heinrich Heine: His Wit, Wisdom, Poetry (1892), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Calumny (2)  |  Compel (14)  |  Derision (6)  |  Genius (186)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Republic (5)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Society (188)  |  Solitude (10)  |  Thought (374)  |  Virtue (55)

Society is itself a kind of organism, an enormously powerful one, but unfortunately not a very wise one.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Enormously (2)  |  Kind (99)  |  Organism (126)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Society (188)  |  Unfortunately (14)  |  Wise (43)

Society is the union of men and not the men themselves.
In The Spirit of Laws (1750), Vol. 1, 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (345)  |  Society (188)  |  Union (16)

Society itself, which should create Kindness, destroys what little we had got:
To feel for none is the true social art
Of the world’s stoics—men without a heart.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (98)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Heart (110)  |  Kindness (10)  |  Society (188)  |  Stoic (3)

Sociological method as we practice it rests wholly on the basic principle that social facts must be studied as things, that is, as realities external to the individual. There is no principle for which we have received more criticism; but none is more fundamental. Indubitably for sociology to be possible, it must above all have an object all its own. It must take cognizance of a reality which is not in the domain of other sciences... there can be no sociology unless societies exist, and that societies cannot exist if there are only individuals.
Suicide: A Study in Sociology (1897), trans. J. A. Spaulding and G. Simpson (1952), 37-8.

Sociology is the science with the greatest number of methods and the least results.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Great (300)  |  Least (43)  |  Method (154)  |  Number (179)  |  Result (250)  |  Science (1699)

Sociology should... be thought of as a science of action—of the ultimate common value element in its relations to the other elements of action.
The Structure of Social Action (1937), Vol. 1, 440.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Common (92)  |  Element (129)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Value (180)

The great enemy of communication, we find, is the illusion of it. We have talked enough; but we have not listened. And by not listening we have failed to concede the immense complexity of our society–and thus the great gaps between ourselves and those with whom we seek understanding.
In magazine article, 'Is Anybody Listening?', Fortune magazine (Sep 1950), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Communication (58)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Fail (34)  |  Gap (20)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Immense (28)  |  Listen (26)  |  Society (188)  |  Talk (61)  |  Understanding (317)

The meaning of the evolution of culture is no longer a riddle to us. It must present to us the struggle between Eros and Death, between the instincts of life and the instincts of destruction, as it works itself out in the human species.
In Sigmund Freud and Joan Riviere (trans.), Civilization and Its Discontents (1930, 1994), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Culture (85)  |  Death (270)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Human Species (6)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Life (917)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Riddle (18)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Work (457)

The two poles of social and political philosophy seem necessarily to be organization or anarchy; man’s intellect or the forces of nature.
In Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres (1913), 344.
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Those who love fairy-tales do not like it when people speak of the innate tendencies in mankind toward aggression, destruction, and, in addition, cruelty.
In Sigmund Freud and Joan Riviere (trans.), Civilization and Its Discontents (1930, 1994), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggression (6)  |  Cruelty (14)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Fairy Tale (6)  |  Innate (7)  |  Love (164)  |  Mankind (196)  |  People (269)  |  Speak (49)  |  Tendency (40)

Throughout the last four hundred years, during which the growth of science had gradually shown men how to acquire knowledge of the ways of nature and mastery over natural forces, the clergy have fought a losing battle against science, in astronomy and geology, in anatomy and physiology, in biology and psychology and sociology. Ousted from one position, they have taken up another. After being worsted in astronomy, they did their best to prevent the rise of geology; they fought against Darwin in biology, and at the present time they fight against scientific theories of psychology and education. At each stage, they try to make the public forget their earlier obscurantism, in order that their present obscurantism may not be recognized for what it is.
From An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1937, 1943), 6. Collected in The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (2009), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Battle (30)  |  Biology (150)  |  Clergy (3)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Earlier (8)  |  Education (280)  |  Fight (37)  |  Forgeting (2)  |  Geology (187)  |  Growth (111)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Loss (62)  |  Mastery (20)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Obscurantism (2)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Present (103)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Public (82)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Rise (51)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Theory (582)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
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Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
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Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
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- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
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Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
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Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
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- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
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Charles Darwin
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