Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Stream

Stream Quotes (81 quotes)

1097 … Then at Michaelmas, on the 4th before the Nones of October, an uncommon star appeared shining in the evening, and soon going down: it was seen in the south-west, and the light which streamed from it seemed very long, shining towards the south-east; and it appeared after this manner nearly all the week. Many allowed that it was a comet.
From the The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as translated in The Venerable Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England. Also the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1894), 474. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Comet (54)  |  Down (456)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soon (186)  |  South (38)  |  Star (427)  |  Week (70)

The Mighty Task is Done

At last the mighty task is done;
Resplendent in the western sun
The Bridge looms mountain high;
Its titan piers grip ocean floor,
Its great steel arms link shore with shore,
Its towers pierce the sky.

On its broad decks in rightful pride,
The world in swift parade shall ride,
Throughout all time to be;
Beneath, fleet ships from every port,
Vast landlocked bay, historic fort,
And dwarfing all the sea.

To north, the Redwood Empires gates;
To south, a happy playground waits,
In Rapturous appeal;
Here nature, free since time began,
Yields to the restless moods of man,
Accepts his bonds of steel.

Launched midst a thousand hopes and fears,
Damned by a thousand hostile sneers,
Yet Neer its course was stayed,
But ask of those who met the foe
Who stood alone when faith was low,
Ask them the price they paid.

Ask of the steel, each strut and wire,
Ask of the searching, purging fire,
That marked their natal hour;
Ask of the mind, the hand, the heart,
Ask of each single, stalwart part,
What gave it force and power.

An Honored cause and nobly fought
And that which they so bravely wrought,
Now glorifies their deed,
No selfish urge shall stain its life,
Nor envy, greed, intrigue, nor strife,
Nor false, ignoble creed.

High overhead its lights shall gleam,
Far, far below lifes restless stream,
Unceasingly shall flow;
For this was spun its lithe fine form,
To fear not war, nor time, nor storm,
For Fate had meant it so.

Written upon completion of the building of the Golden Gate Bridge, May 1937. In Allen Brown, Golden Gate: biography of a Bridge (1965), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bay (5)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Bond (45)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Creed (27)  |  Deck (3)  |  Deed (34)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Envy (15)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flow (83)  |  Foe (9)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fort (2)  |  Free (232)  |  Gate (32)  |  Golden Gate Bridge (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greed (14)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Honor (54)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Loom (20)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Parade (3)  |  Playground (6)  |  Poem (96)  |  Power (746)  |  Price (51)  |  Pride (78)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Ride (21)  |  Sea (308)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Ship (62)  |  Shore (24)  |  Single (353)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sneer (9)  |  South (38)  |  Steel (21)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strut (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Task (147)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tower (42)  |  Vast (177)  |  War (225)  |  Western (45)  |  Wire (35)  |  World (1774)  |  Yield (81)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Despair (40)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

A large part of the training of the engineer, civil and military, as far as preparatory studies are concerned; of the builder of every fabric of wood or stone or metal designed to stand upon the earth, or bridge the stream, or resist or float upon the wave; of the surveyor who lays out a building lot in a city, or runs a boundary line between powerful governments across a continent; of the geographer, navigator, hydrographer, and astronomer,—must be derived from the mathematics.
In 'Academical Education', Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions (1870), Vol. 3, 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Build (204)  |  Builder (12)  |  Building (156)  |  City (78)  |  Civil (26)  |  Civil Engineer (4)  |  Concern (228)  |  Continent (76)  |  Derive (65)  |  Design (195)  |  Earth (996)  |  Education (378)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Float (30)  |  Geographer (6)  |  Government (110)  |  Hydrographer (3)  |  Large (394)  |  Line (91)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Metal (84)  |  Military (40)  |  Military Engineer (2)  |  Must (1526)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preparatory (3)  |  Resist (15)  |  Run (174)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Training (80)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wood (92)

A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is.
Essay, 'Mysticism and Logic' in Hibbert Journal (Jul 1914). Collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1919), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Eternal (110)  |  External (57)  |  Image (96)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Outside (141)  |  Regard (305)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Tyrant (9)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

And part of the soil is called to wash away
In storms and streams shave close and gnaw the rocks.
Besides, whatever the earth feeds and grows
Is restored to earth. And since she surely is
The womb of all things and their common grave,
Earth must dwindle, you see and take on growth again.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 255-60, 166.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Dwindle (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Must (1526)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Soil (86)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wash (21)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Womb (24)

Another argument of hope may be drawn from this–that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels.
Translation of Novum Organum, XCII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Channel (21)  |  Color (137)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Forming (42)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Set (394)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)

Another error is a conceit that … the best has still prevailed and suppressed the rest: so as, if a man should begin the labor of a new search, he were but like to light upon somewhat formerly rejected, and by rejection brought into oblivion; as if the multitude, or the wisest for the multitude’s sake, were not ready to give passage rather to that which is popular and superficial, than to that which is substantial and profound: for the truth is, that time seemeth to be of the nature of a river or stream, which carrieth down to us that which is light and blown up, and sinketh and drowneth that which is weighty and solid.
Advancement of Learning, Book 1. Collected in The Works of Francis Bacon (1826), Vol 1, 36.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  Best (459)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  Labor (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Passage (50)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Profound (104)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Rest (280)  |  River (119)  |  Sake (58)  |  Search (162)  |  Solid (116)  |  Still (613)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)

As you sit on the hillside, or lie prone under the trees of the forest, or sprawl wet-legged on the shingly beach of a mountain stream, the great door, that does not look like a door, opens.
The Gentle Art of Tramping (1926), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Beach (21)  |  Door (93)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Lie (364)  |  Look (582)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Prone (7)  |  Shingle (2)  |  Sprawl (2)  |  Tree (246)

Beavers bred in captivity, inhabiting a concrete pool, will, if given the timber, fatuously go through all the motions of damming an ancestral stream.
In short story Work Suspended (1943) collected in Evelyn Waugh: The Complete Short Stories (1998), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Captivity (2)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Dam (6)  |  Fatuous (2)  |  Inhabiting (3)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Motion (310)  |  Pool (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Timber (7)  |  Will (2355)

But if you have seen the soil of India with your own eyes and meditate on its nature - if you consider the rounded stones found in the earth however deeply you dig, stones that are huge near the mountains and where the rivers have a violent current; stones that are of smaller size at greater distance from the mountains, and where the streams flow more slowly; stones that appear pulverised in the shape of sand where the streams begin to stagnate near their mouths and near the sea - if you consider all this, you could scarcely help thinking that India has once been a sea which by degrees has been filled up by the alluvium of the streams.
Alberuni's India, trans. E. C. Sachau (1888), Vol. 1, 198.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Consider (416)  |  Current (118)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dig (21)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flow (83)  |  Greater (288)  |  India (16)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nature (1926)  |  River (119)  |  Sand (62)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Sea (308)  |  Soil (86)  |  Stone (162)  |  Thinking (414)

Consciousness… does not appear to itself chopped up in bits. Such words as “chain” or “train” do not describe it fitly as it presents itself in the first instance. It is nothing jointed; it flows. A “river” or a “stream” are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described. In talking of it hereafter, let us call it the stream of thought, of consciousness, or of subjective life.
Source of the expression “stream of consciousness”.
The Principles of Psychology (1890), Vol. 1, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expression (175)  |  First (1283)  |  Flow (83)  |  Joint (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Present (619)  |  River (119)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Word (619)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Branch (150)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consist (223)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forming (42)  |  High (362)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Level (67)  |  Low (80)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Size (60)  |  System (537)  |  Together (387)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Valley (32)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)

Every well established truth is an addition to the sum of human power, and though it may not find an immediate application to the economy of every day life, we may safely commit it to the stream of time, in the confident anticipation that the world will not fail to realize its beneficial results.
In 'Report of the Secretary', Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution for 1856 (1857), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Application (242)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Commit (41)  |  Confident (25)  |  Economy (55)  |  Fail (185)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Life (1795)  |  Power (746)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Sum (102)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

For a modern ruler the laws of conservation and transformation of energy, when the vivifing stream takes its source, the ways it wends its course in nature, and how, under wisdom and knowledge, it may be intertwined with human destiny, instead of careering headlong to the ocean, are a study at least as pregnant with consequences to life as any lesson taught by the long unscientific history of man.
Science and Life (1920), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Course (409)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Energy (344)  |  Energy Conservation (5)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Study (653)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Unscientific (13)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wisdom (221)

For science, God is simplythe stream of tendency in which all things seek to fulfil the law of their being.
In Literature and Dogma: An Essay Towards a Better Apprehension of the Bible (1873), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  God (757)  |  Law (894)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thing (1915)

For the evolution of science by societies the main requisite is the perfect freedom of communication between each member and anyone of the others who may act as a reagent.
The gaseous condition is exemplified in the soiree, where the members rush about confusedly, and the only communication is during a collision, which in some instances may be prolonged by button-holing.
The opposite condition, the crystalline, is shown in the lecture, where the members sit in rows, while science flows in an uninterrupted stream from a source which we take as the origin. This is radiation of science. Conduction takes place along the series of members seated round a dinner table, and fixed there for several hours, with flowers in the middle to prevent any cross currents.
The condition most favourable to life is an intermediate plastic or colloidal condition, where the order of business is (1) Greetings and confused talk; (2) A short communication from one who has something to say and to show; (3) Remarks on the communication addressed to the Chair, introducing matters irrelevant to the communication but interesting to the members; (4) This lets each member see who is interested in his special hobby, and who is likely to help him; and leads to (5) Confused conversation and examination of objects on the table.
I have not indicated how this programme is to be combined with eating.
Letter to William Grylls Adams (3 Dec 1873). In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 949-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Business (149)  |  Chair (24)  |  Collision (15)  |  Colloid (5)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conduction (8)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Current (118)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Examination (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Flower (106)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Gas (83)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Hobby (5)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Program (52)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Remark (28)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Short (197)  |  Show (346)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Something To Say (4)  |  Special (184)  |  Table (104)  |  Talk (100)  |  Uninterrupted (7)

Gold is found in our own part of the world; not to mention the gold extracted from the earth in India by the ants, and in Scythia by the Griffins. Among us it is procured in three different ways; the first of which is in the shape of dust, found in running streams. … A second mode of obtaining gold is by sinking shafts or seeking among the debris of mountains …. The third method of obtaining gold surpasses the labors of the giants even: by the aid of galleries driven to a long distance, mountains are excavated by the light of torches, the duration of which forms the set times for work, the workmen never seeing the light of day for many months together.
In Pliny and John Bostock (trans.), The Natural History of Pliny (1857), Vol. 6, 99-101.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Ant (28)  |  Debris (7)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dust (64)  |  Earth (996)  |  Excavate (4)  |  Extract (40)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gallery (7)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gold (97)  |  India (16)  |  Labor (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Month (88)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Procure (5)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Shaft (5)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Torch (12)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1774)

Heraclitus somewhere says that all things are in process and nothing stays still, and likening existing things to the stream of a river he says that you would not step twice into the same river.
Plato, Cratylus 402A. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven, and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983),195.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  River (119)  |  Say (984)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)

History is primarily a socio-psychological science. In the conflict between the old and the new tendencies in historical investigation... we are at the turn of the stream, the parting of the ways in historical science.
Historical Development and Present Character of the Science of History (1906), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Investigation (230)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)

I am more and more convinced that the ant colony is not so much composed of separate individuals as that the colony is a sort of individual, and each ant like a loose cell in it. Our own blood stream, for instance, contains hosts of white corpuscles which differ little from free-swimming amoebae. When bacteria invade the blood stream, the white corpuscles, like the ants defending the nest, are drawn mechanically to the infected spot, and will die defending the human cell colony. I admit that the comparison is imperfect, but the attempt to liken the individual human warrior to the individual ant in battle is even more inaccurate and misleading. The colony of ants with its component numbers stands half way, as a mechanical, intuitive, and psychical phenomenon, between our bodies as a collection of cells with separate functions and our armies made up of obedient privates. Until one learns both to deny real individual initiative to the single ant, and at the same time to divorce one's mind from the persuasion that the colony has a headquarters which directs activity … one can make nothing but pretty fallacies out of the polity of the ant heap.
In An Almanac for Moderns (1935), 121
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Ant (28)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Collection (64)  |  Colony (8)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Component (48)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Deny (66)  |  Differ (85)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Free (232)  |  Function (228)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Individual (404)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Learn (629)  |  Little (707)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misleading (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Nest (23)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Persuasion (8)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Polity (2)  |  Private (23)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  Stand (274)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

I found the invention was applicable to painting, and would also contribute to facilitate the study of geography: for I have applied it to some maps, the rivers of which I represented in silver, and in the cities in gold. The rivers appearing, as it were, in silver streams, have a most pleasing effect on the sight, and relieve the eye of that painful search for the course, and origin, of rivers, the minutest branches of which can be splendidly represented this way.
Description of an outcome of her experiments originally investigating 'the possibility of making cloths of gold, silver and other metals by chemical processes.'
Preface to An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), iii-iv. In Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie and Joy Dorothy Harvey, The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science (2000), 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Applied (177)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Course (409)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Geography (36)  |  Gold (97)  |  Invention (369)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Making (300)  |  Map (44)  |  Metal (84)  |  Most (1731)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Represent (155)  |  River (119)  |  Search (162)  |  Sight (132)  |  Silver (46)  |  Study (653)  |  Way (1217)

I should study Nature’s laws in all their crossings and unions; I should follow magnetic streams to their source and follow the shores of our magnetic oceans. I should go among the rays of the aurora, and follow them to their beginnings, and study their dealings and communications with other powers and expressions of matter.
John Muir
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aurora (3)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Communication (94)  |  Crossing (2)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Follow (378)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Ray (114)  |  Shore (24)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Union (51)

I took him [Lawrence Bragg] to a young zoologist working on pattern formation in insect cuticles. The zoologist explained how disturbances introduced into these regular patterns pointed to their formation being governed by some kind of gradient. Bragg listened attentively and then exclaimed: “Your disturbed gradient behaves like a stream of sand running downhill and encountering an obstacle.” “Good heavens,” replied the zoologist, “I had been working on this problem for years before this simple analogy occurred to me and you think of it after twenty minutes.”
As quoted in David Phillips, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1979), 25, 132, citing: Perutz, M.F. 1971 New Sci. & Sci. J. 8 July 1967.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Being (1278)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (13)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Downhill (3)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Formation (96)  |  Good (889)  |  Govern (64)  |  Gradient (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Listen (73)  |  Minute (125)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Regular (46)  |  Running (61)  |  Sand (62)  |  Simple (406)  |  Think (1086)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Zoologist (12)

I venture to maintain, that, if the general culture obtained in the Faculty of Arts were what it ought to be, the student would have quite as much knowledge of the fundamental principles of Physics, of Chemistry, and of Biology, as he needs, before he commenced his special medical studies. Moreover, I would urge, that a thorough study of Human Physiology is, in itself, an education broader and more comprehensive than much that passes under that name. There is no side of the intellect which it does not call into play, no region of human knowledge into which either its roots, or its branches, do not extend; like the Atlantic between the Old and the New Worlds, its waves wash the shores of the two worlds of matter and of mind; its tributary streams flow from both; through its waters, as yet unfurrowed by the keel of any Columbus, lies the road, if such there be, from the one to the other; far away from that Northwest Passage of mere speculation, in which so many brave souls have been hopelessly frozen up.
'Universities: Actual and Ideal' (1874). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 3, 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Biology (216)  |  Both (493)  |  Brave (12)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Extend (128)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Northwest Passage (2)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Principle (507)  |  Root (120)  |  Side (233)  |  Soul (226)  |  Special (184)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Through (849)  |  Tributary (3)  |  Two (937)  |  Wash (21)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  World (1774)

If a mixture of different kinds of electrified atoms is moving along in one stream, then when electric and magnetic forces are applied to the stream simultaneously, the different kinds of atoms are sorted out, and the original stream is divided up into a number of smaller streams separated from each other. The particles in any one of the smaller streams are all of the same kind.
From the Romanes Lecture (10 Jun 1914) delivered in the Sheldonian Theatre, published as The Atomic Theory (1914), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atom (355)  |  Different (577)  |  Divided (50)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrified (2)  |  Force (487)  |  Ion (21)  |  Kind (557)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Mass Spectrometer (2)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Move (216)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Sort (49)

If we do not learn to eliminate waste and to be more productive and more efficient in the ways we use energy, then we will fall short of this goal [for the Nation to derive 20 percent of all the energy we use from the Sun, by 2000]. But if we use our technological imagination, if we can work together to harness the light of the Sun, the power of the wind, and the strength of rushing streams, then we will succeed.
Speech, at dedication of solar panels on the White House roof, 'Solar Energy Remarks Announcing Administration Proposals' (20 Jun 1979).
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  All (4108)  |  Derive (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fall (230)  |  Goal (145)  |  Harness (23)  |  Hydroelectricity (2)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Power (746)  |  Productive (32)  |  Short (197)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Strength (126)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Sun (385)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Together (387)  |  Use (766)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wind Power (9)  |  Work (1351)

If you ask a person, “What were you thinking?” you may get an answer that is richer and more revealing of the human condition than any stream of thoughts a novelist could invent. I try to see through people’s faces into their minds and listen through their words into their lives, and what I find there is beyond imagining.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Condition (356)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Condition (6)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Invent (51)  |  Listen (73)  |  Live (628)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Novelist (6)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rich (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Try (283)  |  Word (619)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Domain (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geology (220)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Master (178)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialize (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Striking (48)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

In one department of his [Joseph Black’s] lecture he exceeded any I have ever known, the neatness and unvarying success with which all the manipulations of his experiments were performed. His correct eye and steady hand contributed to the one; his admirable precautions, foreseeing and providing for every emergency, secured the other. I have seen him pour boiling water or boiling acid from a vessel that had no spout into a tube, holding it at such a distance as made the stream’s diameter small, and so vertical that not a drop was spilt. While he poured he would mention this adaptation of the height to the diameter as a necessary condition of success. I have seen him mix two substances in a receiver into which a gas, as chlorine, had been introduced, the effect of the combustion being perhaps to produce a compound inflammable in its nascent state, and the mixture being effected by drawing some string or wire working through the receiver's sides in an air-tight socket. The long table on which the different processes had been carried on was as clean at the end of the lecture as it had been before the apparatus was planted upon it. Not a drop of liquid, not a grain of dust remained.
In Lives of Men of Letters and Science, Who Flourished in the Time of George III (1845), 346-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acid (83)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Joseph Black (14)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clean (50)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Department (92)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dust (64)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emergency (10)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gas (83)  |  Grain (50)  |  Inflammable (5)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Known (454)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Long (790)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Nascent (3)  |  Neatness (5)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Plant (294)  |  Remain (349)  |  Secured (18)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Spout (2)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Table (104)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Wire (35)

In the infancy of physical science, it was hoped that some discovery might be made that would enable us to emancipate ourselves from the bondage of gravity, and, at least, pay a visit to our neighbour the moon. The poor attempts of the aeronaut have shewn the hopelessness of the enterprise. The success of his achievement depends on the buoyant power of the atmosphere, but the atmosphere extends only a few miles above the earth, and its action cannot reach beyond its own limits. The only machine, independent of the atmosphere, we can conceive of, would be one on the principle of the rocket. The rocket rises in the air, not from the resistance offered by the atmosphere to its fiery stream, but from the internal reaction. The velocity would, indeed, be greater in a vacuum than in the atmosphere, and could we dispense with the comfort of breathing air, we might, with such a machine, transcend the boundaries of our globe, and visit other orbs.
God's Glory in the Heavens (1862, 3rd Ed. 1867) 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bondage (5)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Buoyant (5)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emancipate (2)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extend (128)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Internal (66)  |  Limit (280)  |  Machine (257)  |  Moon (237)  |  Offer (141)  |  Orb (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Poor (136)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Success (302)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Velocity (48)

It is difficult to give an idea of the vast extent of modern mathematics. The word “extent” is not the right one: I mean extent crowded with beautiful detail—not an extent of mere uniformity such as an objectless plain, but of a tract of beautiful country seen at first in the distance, but which will bear to be rambled through and studied in every detail of hillside and valley, stream, rock, wood, and flower.
President’s address (1883) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, in The Collected Mathematical Papers (1895), Vol. 8, xxii.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Country (251)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distance (161)  |  Distant (33)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Plain (33)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Study (653)  |  Through (849)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Valley (32)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Word (619)

Jupiter is the largest of all the solar system’s planets, more than ten times bigger and three hundred times as massive as Earth. Jupiter is so immense it could swallow all the other planets easily. Its Great Red Spot, a storm that has raged for centuries, is itself wider than Earth. And the Spot is merely one feature visible among the innumerable vortexes and streams of Jupiter’s frenetically racing cloud tops. Yet Jupiter is composed mainly of the lightest elements, hydrogen and helium, more like a star than a planet. All that size and mass, yet Jupiter spins on its axis in less than ten hours, so fast that the planet is clearly not spherical: Its poles are noticeably flattened. Jupiter looks like a big, colorfully striped beach ball that’s squashed down as if some invisible child were sitting on it. Spinning that fast, Jupiter’s deep, deep atmosphere is swirled into bands and ribbons of multihued clouds: pale yellow, saffron orange, white, tawny yellow-brown, dark brown, bluish, pink and red. Titanic winds push the clouds across the face of Jupiter at hundreds of kilometers per hour.
Ben Bova
Jupiter
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Axis (9)  |  Ball (62)  |  Band (9)  |  Beach (21)  |  Big (48)  |  Brown (23)  |  Century (310)  |  Child (307)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Compose (17)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deep (233)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easily (35)  |  Element (310)  |  Face (212)  |  Fast (45)  |  Feature (44)  |  Great (1574)  |  Helium (11)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hundreds (6)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Immense (86)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Mass (157)  |  Massive (9)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Orange (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pale (9)  |  Pink (4)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pole (46)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rage (9)  |  Red (35)  |  Ribbon (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Size (60)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solar Systems (3)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Spot (17)  |  Squash (4)  |  Star (427)  |  Storm (51)  |  Stripe (4)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Swirl (10)  |  System (537)  |  Tawny (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Titanic (4)  |  Top (96)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vortex (9)  |  White (127)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yellow (30)

Knowledge is never the exclusive possession of any favoured race; the whole world is inter-dependent and a constant stream of thought had through ages enriched the common heritage of mankind.
From 'Sir J.C. Bose’s Address', Benares Hindu University 1905-1935 (1936), 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Common (436)  |  Constant (144)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Favor (63)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Inter (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Never (1087)  |  Possession (65)  |  Race (268)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Learn to reverence night and to put away the vulgar fear of it, for, with the banishment of night from the experience of man, there vanishes as well a religious emotion, a poetic mood, which gives depth to the adventure of humanity. By day, space is one with the earth and with man - it is his sun that is shining, his clouds that are floating past; at night, space is his no more. When the great earth, abandoning day, rolls up the deeps of the heavens and the universe, a new door opens for the human spirit, and there are few so clownish that some awareness of the mystery of being does not touch them as they gaze. For a moment of night we have a glimpse of ourselves and of our world islanded in its stream of stars - pilgrims of mortality, voyaging between horizons across eternal seas of space and time. Fugitive though the instant be, the spirit of man is, during it, ennobled by a genuine moment of emotional dignity, and poetry makes its own both the human spirit and experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Across (32)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Banishment (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clown (2)  |  Deep (233)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Door (93)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Ennoble (8)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fear (197)  |  Float (30)  |  Fugitive (3)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Give (202)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Instant (45)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mood (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Pilgrim (4)  |  Poetic (7)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Roll (40)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  World (1774)

Myriad small ponds and streams would reflect the full glare of the sun for one or two seconds, then fade away as a new set of water surfaces came into the reflecting position. The effect was as if the land were covered with sparkling jewels.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cover (37)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fade (10)  |  Full (66)  |  Glare (3)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Land (115)  |  Myriad (31)  |  New (1216)  |  Pond (15)  |  Position (77)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Second (62)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)

No known theory can be distorted so as to provide even an approximate explanation [of wave-particle duality]. There must be some fact of which we are entirely ignorant and whose discovery may revolutionize our views of the relations between waves and ether and matter. For the present we have to work on both theories. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays we use the wave theory; on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays we think in streams of flying energy quanta or corpuscles.
'Electrons and Ether Waves', The Robert Boyle Lecture 1921, Scientific Monthly, 1922, 14, 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Both (493)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distort (22)  |  Energy (344)  |  Ether (35)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flying (72)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Known (454)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Particle (194)  |  Present (619)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Revolutionize (8)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wave-Particle Duality (2)  |  Work (1351)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (69)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Door (93)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (47)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Help (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Involve (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Listen (73)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (125)  |  Muse (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (15)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rich (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Roll (40)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strand (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

One must be wary in attributing scientific discovery wholly to any one person. Almost every discovery has a long and precarious history. Someone finds a bit here, another a bit there. A third step succeeds later and thus onward till a genius pieces the bits together and makes the decisive contribution. Science, like the Mississippi, begins in a tiny rivulet in the distant forest. Gradually other streams swell its volume. And the roaring river that bursts the dikes is formed from countless sources.
In 'The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge', Harper’s (Jun/Nov 1939), No. 179, 549
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (61)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bit (22)  |  Burst (39)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Countless (36)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Dike (2)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distant (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  History (673)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Long (790)  |  Mississippi (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Piece (38)  |  Precarious (5)  |  River (119)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Roar (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Source (93)  |  Step (231)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Swell (4)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Together (387)  |  Volume (19)  |  Wary (3)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholly (88)

Our plenteous streams a various race supply,
The bright-eye Perch with fins of Tyrian dye,
The silver Eel, in shining volumes roll’d,
The yellow Carp, in scales bedropp’d with gold,
Swift Trouts, diversified with crimson stains,
And Pykes, the Tyrants of the wat’ry plains.
In poem, 'Windsor Forest', collected in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope (1718), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (79)  |  Crimson (4)  |  Dye (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fin (3)  |  Gold (97)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Perch (7)  |  Race (268)  |  Roll (40)  |  Scale (121)  |  Shining (35)  |  Silver (46)  |  Stain (9)  |  Supply (93)  |  Swift (12)  |  Trout (4)  |  Tyrant (9)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Yellow (30)

Our ultimate task is to find interpretative procedures that will uncover each bias and discredit its claims to universality. When this is done the eighteenth century can be formally closed and a new era that has been here a long time can be officially recognised. The individual human being, stripped of his humanity, is of no use as a conceptual base from which to make a picture of human society. No human exists except steeped in the culture of his time and place. The falsely abstracted individual has been sadly misleading to Western political thought. But now we can start again at a point where major streams of thought converge, at the other end, at the making of culture. Cultural analysis sees the whole tapestry as a whole, the picture and the weaving process, before attending to the individual threads.
As co-author with Baron Isherwood, The World of Goods: Towards an Anthropology of Consumption (1979, 2002), 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bias (20)  |  Century (310)  |  Claim (146)  |  Closed (38)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Converge (8)  |  Culture (143)  |  Discredit (8)  |  End (590)  |  Era (51)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Long (790)  |  Major (84)  |  Making (300)  |  Misleading (21)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Picture (143)  |  Point (580)  |  Political (121)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognise (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Society (326)  |  Start (221)  |  Strip (6)  |  Tapestry (5)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thread (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Universality (22)  |  Use (766)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Western (45)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Palaeontology is the Aladdin’s lamp of the most deserted and lifeless regions of the earth; it touches the rocks and there spring forth in orderly succession the monarchs of the past and the ancient river streams and savannahs wherein they flourished. The rocks usually hide their story in the most difficult and inaccessible places.
In On the Trail of Ancient Man (1926), x.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Desert (56)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Hide (69)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Most (1731)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Past (337)  |  River (119)  |  Rock (161)  |  Spring (133)  |  Story (118)  |  Succession (77)  |  Usually (176)

Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. … We now plough horizontally following the curvatures of the hills and hollows, on the dead level, however crooked the lines may be. Every furrow thus acts as a reservoir to receive and retain the waters, all of which go to the benefit of the growing plant, instead of running off into streams … In point of beauty nothing can exceed that of the waving lines and rows winding along the face of the hills and vallies.
In letter (17 Apr 1813) from Jefferson at Monticello to Charles Willson Peale. Collected in The Jefferson Papers: 1770-1826 (1900), 178-180.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Crooked (3)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Deep (233)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Face (212)  |  Farming (8)  |  Following (16)  |  Furrow (4)  |  Good (889)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hill (20)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  Killing (14)  |  Level (67)  |  Line (91)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plough (13)  |  Ploughing (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Retain (56)  |  Row (9)  |  Running (61)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Valley (32)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Conservation (3)  |  Weed (18)  |  Winding (8)

Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams—they all have different names, but they all contain water. Just as religions do—they all contain truths.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 14
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Contain (68)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Lake (32)  |  Name (333)  |  Pond (15)  |  Religion (361)  |  River (119)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Water (481)

See with what force yon river’s crystal stream
Resists the weight of many a massy beam.
To sink the wood the more we vainly toil,
The higher it rebounds, with swift recoil.
Yet that the beam would of itself ascend
No man will rashly venture to contend.
Thus too the flame has weight, though highly rare,
Nor mounts but when compelled by heavier air.
De Rerum Natura, second book, as quoted in translation in Thomas Young, A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), 12.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Beam (24)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Contend (6)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Flame (40)  |  Force (487)  |  Heavier (2)  |  Higher (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Mount (42)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rashness (2)  |  Rebound (2)  |  Recoil (6)  |  River (119)  |  See (1081)  |  Sink (37)  |  Swift (12)  |  Toil (25)  |  Vain (83)  |  Venture (18)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)

Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical porblems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, however, weakened the connection between mathematics and physics; mathematicians, turning away from their roots of mathematics in intuition, have concentrated on refinement and emphasized the postulated side of mathematics, and at other times have overlooked the unity of their science with physics and other fields. In many cases, physicists have ceased to appreciate the attitudes of mathematicians. This rift is unquestionably a serious threat to science as a whole; the broad stream of scientific development may split into smaller and smaller rivulets and dry out. It seems therefore important to direct our efforts towards reuniting divergent trends by classifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts.
As co-author with David Hilbert, in Methods of Mathematical Physics (1937, 1989), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Century (310)  |  Classification (97)  |  Common (436)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Connection (162)  |  Development (422)  |  Direct (225)  |  Directing (5)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Divergent (6)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Dry (57)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (364)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Overlooking (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recent (77)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Rift (3)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serious (91)  |  Serving (15)  |  Side (233)  |  Source (93)  |  Threat (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trend (22)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unity (78)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Vital (85)  |  Weakening (2)  |  Whole (738)

Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed; if we permit the last virgin forests to be turned into comic books and plastic cigarette cases; if we drive the few remaining members of the wild species into zoos or to extinction; if we pollute the last clean air and dirty the last clean streams and push our paved roads through the last of the silence, so that never again will Americans be free in their own country from the noise, the exhausts, the stinks of human and automotive waste.
Letter (3 Dec 1960) written to David E. Pesonen of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission. Collected in 'Coda: Wilderness Letter', The Sound of Mountain Water: The Changing American West (1969), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  American (46)  |  Book (392)  |  Case (99)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Clean (50)  |  Comic (4)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Drive (55)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Forest (150)  |  Free (232)  |  Human (1468)  |  Last (426)  |  Let (61)  |  Member (41)  |  Never (1087)  |  Noise (37)  |  Pave (8)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Push (62)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Road (64)  |  Silence (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (401)  |  Stink (7)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Virgin (9)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zoo (8)

The 'stream' we call science always flows forward; sometimes reactionary beavers block its flow, but the stream is never defeated by this; it accumulates, gathers strength; its waters get over the barrage and continue on their course. The advancement of science is the advancement of God, for science is nothing but human intelligence, and human intelligence is the most valuable treasure God has bequeathed us.
From the play Galileo Galilei (2001) .
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Barrage (2)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Continue (165)  |  Course (409)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gather (72)  |  God (757)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reactionary (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strength (126)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Water (481)

The blood, the fountain whence the spirits flow,
The generous stream that waters every part,
And motion, vigour, and warm life conveys
To every Particle that moves or lives;
This vital fluid, thro' unnumber'd tubes
Pour'd by the heart, and to the heart again
Refunded; scourg'd forever round and round;
Enrag'd with heat and toil, at last forgets
Its balmy nature; virulent and thin
It grows; and now, but that a thousand gates
Are open to its flight, it would destroy
The parts it cherish' d and repair'd before.
Besides, the flexible and tender tubes
Melt in the mildest, most nectareous tide
That ripening Nature rolls; as in the stream
Its crumbling banks; but what the vital force
Of plastic fluids hourly batters down,
That very force, those plastic particles
Rebuild: so mutable the state of man.
For this the watchful appetite was given,
Daily with fresh materials to repair
This unavoidable expense of life,
This necessary waste of flesh and blood.
Hence the concoctive powers, with various art,
Subdue the cruder aliments to chyle;
The chyle to blood; the foamy purple tide
To liquors, which through finer arteries
To different parts their winding course pursue;
To try new changes, and new forms put on,
Or for the public, or some private use.
The Art of Preserving Health (1744), book 2, I. 12-23, p.15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Appetite (17)  |  Art (657)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Gate (32)  |  Generous (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Particle (194)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Roll (40)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Toil (25)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)  |  Warm (69)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Winding (8)

The books of the great scientists are gathering dust on the shelves of learned libraries. ... While the artist's communication is linked forever with its original form, that of the scientist is modified, amplified, fused with the ideas and results of others and melts into the stream of knowledge and ideas which forms our culture. The scientist has in common with the artist only this: that he can find no better retreat from the world than his work and also no stronger link with the world than his work.
From Nobel Lecture (10 Dec 1969), 'A Physicist's Renewed Look at Biology – Twenty Years Later.' in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 409.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Amplified (6)  |  Artist (90)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Common (436)  |  Communication (94)  |  Culture (143)  |  Dust (64)  |  Find (998)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Fuse (5)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Library (48)  |  Link (43)  |  Melt (16)  |  Modify (15)  |  Original (58)  |  Other (2236)  |  Result (677)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Shelf (8)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The Gombe Stream chimpanzees … in their ability to modify a twig or stick to make it suitable for a definite purpose, provide the first examples of free-ranging nonhuman primates actually making very crude tools.
In 'Chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Reserve', collected in Primate Behavior: Field Studies of Monkeys and Apes (1965), 473.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Actually (27)  |  Animal Behavior (10)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Crude (31)  |  Definite (110)  |  Example (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Free (232)  |  Gombe (2)  |  Making (300)  |  Modify (15)  |  Primate (11)  |  Provide (69)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Stick (24)  |  Tool (117)  |  Twig (14)

The handling of our forests as a continuous, renewable resource means permanent employment and stability to our country life. The forests are also needed for mitigating extreme climatic fluctuations, holding the soil on the slopes, retaining the moisture in the ground, and controlling the equable flow of water in our streams.
From 'A Presidential Statement on Receipt of the Award of the Schlich Forestry Medal' (29 Jan 1935) in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: F.D. Roosevelt, 1935, Volume 4 (1938), 65. Roosevelt was awarded the medal by the Society of American Foresters. This quote continues with the line “The forests are the ‘lungs’ of our land….”
Science quotes on:  |  Continuous (82)  |  Country (251)  |  Employment (32)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Forest (150)  |  Ground (217)  |  Handling (7)  |  Holding (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Need (290)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Renewable (6)  |  Resource (63)  |  Slope (9)  |  Soil (86)  |  Stability (25)  |  Water (481)

The most important object of Civil Engineering is to improve the means of production and of traffic in states, both for external and internal trade. It is applied in the construction and management of roads, bridges, railroads, aqueducts, canals, river navigation, docks and storehouses, for the convenience of internal intercourse and exchange; and in the construction of ports, harbours, moles, breakwaters and lighthouses; and in the navigation by artificial power for the purposes of commerce. It is applied to the protection of property where natural powers are the sources of injury, as by embankments forthe defence of tracts of country from the encroachments of the sea, or the overflowing of rivers; it also directs the means of applying streams and rivers to use, either as powers to work machines, or as supplies for the use of cities and towns, or for irrigation; as well as the means of removing noxious accumulations, as by the drainage of towns and districts to ... secure the public health.
1828
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Applied (177)  |  Aqueduct (4)  |  Both (493)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Canal (17)  |  Civil (26)  |  Civil Engineering (5)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Construction (112)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Country (251)  |  Defence (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Health (193)  |  Injury (36)  |  Internal (66)  |  Irrigation (11)  |  Lighthouse (6)  |  Machine (257)  |  Management (21)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mole (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Object (422)  |  Power (746)  |  Production (183)  |  Property (168)  |  Protection (36)  |  Public Health (10)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Railroad (32)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  State (491)  |  Storehouse (6)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Use (766)  |  Work (1351)

The natural history of these islands is eminently curious, and well deserves attention. Most of the organic productions are aboriginal creations, found nowhere else; there is even a difference between the inhabitants of the different islands; yet all show a marked relationship with those of America, though separated from that continent by an open space of ocean, between 500 and 600 miles in width. The archipelago is a little world within itself, or rather a satellite attached to America, whence it has derived a few stray colonists, and has received the general character of its indigenous productions. Considering the small size of these islands, we feel the more astonished at the number of their aboriginal beings, and at their confined range. Seeing every height crowned with its crater, and the boundaries of most of the lava-streams still distinct, we are led to believe that within a period, geologically recent, the unbroken ocean was here spread out. Hence, both in space and time, we seem to be brought somewhere near to that great fact—that mystery of mysteries—the first appearance of new beings on this earth.
Journal of Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited During the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle Round the World, 2nd edn. (1845), 377-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Aboriginal (2)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Archipelago (7)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Character (243)  |  Colonist (2)  |  Continent (76)  |  Crater (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crown (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Island (46)  |  Lava (9)  |  Little (707)  |  Marked (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Open (274)  |  Organic (158)  |  Period (198)  |  Production (183)  |  Range (99)  |  Recent (77)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Spread (83)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

The oil industry is a stunning example of how science, technology, and mass production can divert an entire group of companies from their main task. ... No oil company gets as excited about the customers in its own backyard as about the oil in the Sahara Desert. ... But the truth is, it seems to me, that the industry begins with the needs of the customer for its products. From that primal position its definition moves steadily back stream to areas of progressively lesser importance until it finally comes to rest at the search for oil.
In 'Marketing Myopia' originally published in Harvard Business Review (). Reprinted in Harvard Business Review Classics: Marketing Myopia (2008), 66-71.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Backyard (4)  |  Begin (260)  |  Company (59)  |  Customer (9)  |  Definition (221)  |  Desert (56)  |  Importance (286)  |  Industry (137)  |  Main (28)  |  Marketing (3)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mass Production (4)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Oil (59)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sahara Desert (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Task (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Truth (1057)

The pleasant’st angling is to see the fish
Cut with her golden oars the silver stream,
And greedily devour the treacherous bait.
In Much Ado About Nothing (1600), Act 3, Scene 1, line 26
Science quotes on:  |  Angling (3)  |  Bait (2)  |  Cut (114)  |  Devour (29)  |  Fish (120)  |  Golden (45)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  See (1081)  |  Silver (46)

The progress of synthesis, or the building up of natural materials from their constituent elements, proceeds apace. Even some of the simpler albuminoids, a class of substances of great importance in the life process, have recently been artificially prepared. ... Innumerable entirely new compounds have been produced in the last century. The artificial dye-stuffs, prepared from materials occurring in coal-tar, make the natural colours blush. Saccharin, which is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, is a purely artificial substance. New explosives, drugs, alloys, photographic substances, essences, scents, solvents, and detergents are being poured out in a continuous stream.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Alloy (4)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blush (3)  |  Building (156)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Coal (57)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Color (137)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Detergent (2)  |  Drug (57)  |  Dye (10)  |  Element (310)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Essence (82)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pour (10)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Progress (465)  |  Purely (109)  |  Recent (77)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Scent (7)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solvent (6)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)

The sea is the source of water and the source of wind; for neither would blasts of wind arise in the clouds and blow out from within them, except for the great sea, nor would the streams of rivers nor the rain-water in the sky exist but for the sea ; but the great sea is the begetter of clouds and winds and rivers.
Quoted in Arthur Fairbanks (ed. And trans.), The First Philosophers of Greece (1898), 69, fragment 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Blast (13)  |  Blow (44)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Exist (443)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sky (161)  |  Water (481)  |  Wind (128)

The specific character of the greater part of the toxins which are known to us (I need only instance such toxins as those of tetanus and diphtheria) would suggest that the substances produced for effecting the correlation of organs within the body, through the intermediation of the blood stream, might also belong to this class, since here also specificity of action must be a distinguishing characteristic. These chemical messengers, however, or 'hormones' (from όρμάω, I excite or arouse), as we might call them, have to be carried from the organ where they are produced to the organ which they affect by means of the blood stream and the continually recurring physiological needs of the organism must determine their repeated production and circulation through the body.
'The Chemical Correlation of the Functions of the Body', The Lancet (1905), ii, 340.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Class (164)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Determine (144)  |  Diphtheria (2)  |  Excite (15)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hormone (10)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Messenger (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Through (849)  |  Toxin (8)

The stream of human knowledge is heading towards a non-mechanical reality. The universe begins to look more like a great thought than a great machine. Mind no longer appears to be an accidental intruder into the realm of matter. We are beginning to suspect that we ought rather to hail it as the creator and governor of this realm.
The Mysterious Universe (1930), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (27)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Creator (91)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)

The stream of thought flows on but most of its segments fall into the bottomless abyss of oblivion. Of some, no memory survives the instant of their passage. Of others, it is confined to a few moments, hours or days. Others, again, leave vestiges which are indestructible, and by means of which they may be recalled as long as life endures.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  Bottomless (6)  |  Confine (26)  |  Endure (20)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flow (83)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indestructible (12)  |  Instant (45)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Recall (10)  |  Segment (6)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vestige (11)

The traditional psychology talks like one who should say a river consists of nothing but pailsful, spoonsful, quartpotsful, barrelsful, and other moulded forms of water. Even were the pails and the pots all actually standing in the stream, still between them the free water would continue to flow. It is just this free water of consciousness that psychologists resolutely overlook. Every definite image in the mind is steeped and dyed in the free water that flows round it. With it goes the sense of its relations, near and remote, the dying echo of whence it came to us, the dawning sense of whither it is to lead.
'On Some Omissions of Introspective Psychology', Mind (1884), 9, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consist (223)  |  Continue (165)  |  Definite (110)  |  Echo (11)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Image (96)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Remote (83)  |  River (119)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Still (613)  |  Water (481)  |  Whither (11)

The United States at this moment occupies a lamentable position as being perhaps the chief offender among civilized nations in permitting the destruction and pollution of nature. Our whole modern civilization is at fault in the matter. But we in America are probably most at fault ... We treasure pictures and sculpture. We regard Attic temples and Roman triumphal arches and Gothic cathedrals as of priceless value. But we are, as a whole, still in that low state of civilization where we do not understand that it is also vandalism wantonly to destroy or permit the destruction of what is beautiful in nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird. Here in the United States we turn our rivers and streams into sewers and dumping-grounds, we pollute the air, we destroy forests and exterminate fishes, birds and mammals'not to speak of vulgarizing charming landscapes with hideous advertisements.
'Our Vanishing Wild Life', The Outlook, 25 Jan 1913. In Donald Davidson (Ed.) The Wisdom of Theodore Roosevelt (2003), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  America (127)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Chief (97)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fault (54)  |  Forest (150)  |  Gothic (4)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hideous (5)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Low (80)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Permit (58)  |  Picture (143)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Priceless (7)  |  Regard (305)  |  River (119)  |  Roman (36)  |  Sewer (5)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Temple (42)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)

The world is desperately imperfect. Even if a quarter of the working people were engrossed in new thoughts and inventions and lived off the others, humanity would still gain tremendously thanks to the constant stream of inventions and intellectual work emerging from this horde of people striving upward.
Manuscript (1918), 'The Genius of the People'.
Science quotes on:  |  Constant (144)  |  Gain (145)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invention (369)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Still (613)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Thought (953)  |  Upward (43)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The world over which early man wandered was to him the theatre of a never-ending conflict, in which were arrayed against him impassable seas, unscalable mountains, gloomy forests peopled by deadly beasts of prey, raging streams and foaming torrents, each and all the haunts of spirits luring him to doom.
In 'The Relations of Geology', Scottish Geographical Magazine (Aug 1902), 19, No. 8, 395-396.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Beast (55)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Doom (32)  |  Early (185)  |  Foam (3)  |  Forest (150)  |  Gloomy (4)  |  Haunt (5)  |  Lure (7)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Never-Ending (3)  |  Prey (13)  |  Raging (2)  |  Sea (308)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Theatre (5)  |  Torrent (5)  |  Wander (35)  |  World (1774)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Sea. It is the Gulf Stream.
Opening paragraph of The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bank (31)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cold (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Drought (13)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Flood (50)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Overflow (9)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Seas. It is the Gulf Stream. There is in the world no other such majestic flow of waters. Its current is more rapid than the Mississippi or the Amazon.
In The Physical Geography of the Sea and Its Meteorology (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (9)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bank (31)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cold (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Drought (13)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flood (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Mississippi (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overflow (9)  |  Rapid (33)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Severe (16)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Time is but a stream I go a-fishing in. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom, and detect how shallow it is. Its thin current slides away, but eternity remains. I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebby with stars.
Walden (1882), Vol. 1, 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Current (118)  |  Detect (44)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Remain (349)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Time (1877)

Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is. Its thin current slides away, but eternity remains.
In 'Where I Lived and What I Lived For', in Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1899), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Current (118)  |  Detect (44)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Sand (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Time (1877)

To appreciate a work of art we need bring with us nothing from life, no knowledge of its ideas and affairs, no familiarity with its emotions. Art transports us from the world of man’s activity to a world of æsthetic exaltation. For a moment we are shut off from human interests; our anticipations and memories are arrested; we are lifted above the stream of life. The pure mathematician rapt in his studies knows a state of mind which I take to be similar, if not identical. He feels an emotion for his speculations which arises from no perceived relation between them and the lives of men, but springs, inhuman or super-human, from the heart of an abstract science. I wonder, sometimes, whether the appreciators of art and of mathematical solutions are not even more closely allied.
In Art (1913), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Exaltation (5)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Feel (367)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shut (41)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Spring (133)  |  State (491)  |  Transport (30)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

To one man a stream is so much water-power, to another a rendezvous for lovers.
In The Principles of Success in Literature (1901), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Lover (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Power (746)  |  Rendezvous (2)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Power (6)

Today there is a wide measure of agreement, which on the physical side of science approaches almost to unanimity, that the stream of knowledge is heading towards a non-mechanical reality; the universe begins to look more like a great thought than like a great machine. Mind no longer appears as an accidental intruder into the realm of matter; we are beginning to suspect that we ought rather to hail it as a creator and governor of the realm of matter. …
In The Mysterious Universe (1930, 1932), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Creator (91)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intruder (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Unanimity (4)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wide (96)

Trees are great promoters of lakes and rivers…; for, since the woods and forests have been grubbed and cleared, all bodies of water are much diminished; so that some streams, that were very considerable a century ago, will not now drive a common mill.
Letter (7 Feb 1776) to Daines Barrington, collected in The Natural History of Selborne (1813), Vol. 1, 348.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Century (310)  |  Clear (100)  |  Common (436)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Drive (55)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Lake (32)  |  Mill (16)  |  Promote (29)  |  River (119)  |  Tree (246)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)

Trees perspire profusely, condense largely, and check evaporation so much that woods are always moist: no wonder, therefore, that they contribute much to pools and streams.
Letter (7 Feb 1776) to Daines Barrington, collected in The Natural History of Selborne (1813), Vol. 1, 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Check (24)  |  Condense (13)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Evaporation (7)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Moist (12)  |  Perspire (2)  |  Pool (15)  |  Profuse (3)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wood (92)

Walking the streets of Tokyo with Hawking in his wheelchair ... I felt as if I were taking a walk through Galilee with Jesus Christ [as] crowds of Japanese silently streamed after us, stretching out their hands to touch Hawking's wheelchair. ... The crowds had streamed after Einstein [on Einstein's visit to Japan in 1922] as they streamed after Hawking seventy years later. ... They showed exquisite choice in their heroes. ... Somehow they understood that Einstein and Hawking were not just great scientists, but great human beings.
Foreward to Alice Calaprice, The Quotable Einstein (1996), xiii-xiv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Choice (110)  |  Christ (17)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Great (1574)  |  Stephen W. Hawking (56)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Japan (8)  |  Japanese (7)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Through (849)  |  Tokyo (3)  |  Touch (141)  |  Understood (156)  |  Walk (124)  |  Year (933)

We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh-and-bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun,—a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal.
John Muir
In My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), 20. Based on Muir’s original journals and sketches of his 1869 stay in the Sierra.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cell (138)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Fill (61)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Glass (92)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Immortality (11)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Kindling (2)  |  Making (300)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Old (481)  |  Pore (7)  |  Quiver (3)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sick (81)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tabernacle (5)  |  Thrill (22)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Tree (246)  |  Truly (116)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wellness (3)  |  Young (227)

We do not live in a time when knowledge can be extended along a pathway smooth and free from obstacles, as at the time of the discovery of the infinitesimal calculus, and in a measure also when in the development of projective geometry obstacles were suddenly removed which, having hemmed progress for a long time, permitted a stream of investigators to pour in upon virgin soil. There is no longer any browsing along the beaten paths; and into the primeval forest only those may venture who are equipped with the sharpest tools.
In 'Mathematisches und wissenschaftliches Denken', Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 55. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Browse (2)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Extend (128)  |  Forest (150)  |  Free (232)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Measure (232)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Path (144)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Progress (465)  |  Projective Geometry (3)  |  Research (664)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Soil (86)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Venture (18)  |  Virgin (9)

We stand by the river and admire the great body of water flowing so sweetly on; could you trace it back to its source, you might find a mere rivulet, but meandering on, joined by other streams and by secret springs, and fed by the rains and dews of heaven, it gathers volume and force, makes its way through the gorges of the mountains, plows, widens and deepens its channel through the provinces, and attains its present majesty.
From Address (1 Aug 1875), 'The Growth of Principles' at Saratoga. Collected in William L. Snyder (ed.), Great Speeches by Great Lawyers: A Collection of Arguments and Speeches (1901), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Channel (21)  |  Deepen (6)  |  Dew (9)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Gather (72)  |  Geology (220)  |  Gorge (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Meander (3)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plow (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Province (35)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Secret (194)  |  Source (93)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Volume (19)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Widen (10)

When the inclination is not obvious, the mind meanders, or maunders, as a stream in a flat meadow.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Flat (33)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Meander (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obvious (126)

[Music as a] language may be the best we have for explaining what we are like to others in space, with least ambiguity. I would vote for Bach, all of Bach, streamed out into space, over and over again … to put the best possible face on at the beginning of such an acquaintance. We can tell the harder truths later.
In 'Ceti', The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguity (17)  |  Bach (7)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Face (212)  |  Language (293)  |  Music (129)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Space (500)  |  Tell (340)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vote (16)

… poets are masters of us ordinary men, in knowledge of the mind, because they drink at streams which we have not yet made accessible to science.
In A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations by Alan L. Mackay (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Drink (53)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Master (178)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Science (3879)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.