Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Lecture

Lecture Quotes (105 quotes)

A formative influence on my undergraduate self was the response of a respected elder statesmen of the Oxford Zoology Department when an American visitor had just publicly disproved his favourite theory. The old man strode to the front of the lecture hall, shook the American warmly by the hand and declared in ringing, emotional tones: ‘My dear fellow, I wish to thank you. I have been wrong these fifteen years.’ And we clapped our hands red. Can you imagine a Government Minister being cheered in the House of Commons for a similar admission? “Resign, Resign” is a much more likely response!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (17)  |  American (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Clap (3)  |  Common (436)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Department (92)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Elder (8)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Formative (2)  |  Front (16)  |  Government (110)  |  Hand (143)  |  House (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Influence (222)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Likely (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minister (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Red (35)  |  Resign (4)  |  Respect (207)  |  Response (53)  |  Ring (16)  |  Self (267)  |  Shake (41)  |  Similar (36)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Stride (15)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tone (22)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)  |  Zoology (36)

A lecture is a process by which the notes of the professor become the notes of the student without passing through the minds of either.
Quoted, without source, in Des MacHale, Wit (1999, 2003), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Note (34)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Professor (128)  |  Student (300)  |  Through (849)

A lecture is much more of a dialogue than many of you probably realize.
From speech given at an anti-war teach-in at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, (4 Mar 1969) 'A Generation in Search of a Future', as edited by Ron Dorfman for Chicago Journalism Review, (May 1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Dialogue (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)

A map of the moon... should be in every geological lecture room; for no where can we have a more complete or more magnificent illustration of volcanic operations. Our sublimest volcanoes would rank among the smaller lunar eminences; and our Etnas are but spitting furnaces.
'On the Volcanoes of the Moon', American Journal of Science, 1846, 2 (2nd Series), 347.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Etna (5)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Map (44)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Rank (67)  |  Volcano (39)

Always preoccupied with his profound researches, the great Newton showed in the ordinary-affairs of life an absence of mind which has become proverbial. It is related that one day, wishing to find the number of seconds necessary for the boiling of an egg, he perceived, after waiting a minute, that he held the egg in his hand, and had placed his seconds watch (an instrument of great value on account of its mathematical precision) to boil!
This absence of mind reminds one of the mathematician Ampere, who one day, as he was going to his course of lectures, noticed a little pebble on the road; he picked it up, and examined with admiration the mottled veins. All at once the lecture which he ought to be attending to returned to his mind; he drew out his watch; perceiving that the hour approached, he hastily doubled his pace, carefully placed the pebble in his pocket, and threw his watch over the parapet of the Pont des Arts.
Popular Astronomy: a General Description of the Heavens (1884), translated by J. Ellard Gore, (1907), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Approach (108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Boil (23)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Egg (69)  |  Find (998)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hastily (7)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pace (14)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Precision (68)  |  Profound (104)  |  Proverbial (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Return (124)  |  Show (346)  |  Value (365)  |  Vein (25)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Watch (109)

An announcement of [Christopher] Zeeman’s lecture at Northwestern University in the spring of 1977 contains a quote describing catastrophe theory as the most important development in mathematics since the invention of calculus 300 years ago.
In book review of Catastrophe Theory: Collected Papers, 1972-1977, in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Nov 1978), 84, No. 6, 1360. Reprinted in Stephen Smale, Roderick Wong(ed.), The Collected Papers of Stephen Smale (2000), Vol. 2, 814.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Catastrophe Theory (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Important (209)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Quote (42)  |  Spring (133)  |  Theory (970)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)  |  Sir Erik Christopher Zeeman (4)

And indeed I am not humming,
Thus to sing of Cl-ke and C-ming,
Who all the universe surpasses
in cutting up and making gases;
With anatomy and chemics,
Metaphysics and polemics,
Analyzing and chirugery,
And scientific surgery …
H-slow's lectures on the cabbage
Useful are as roots of Babbage;
Fluxions and beet-root botany,
Some would call pure monotony.
Magazine
Punch in Cambridge (28 Jan 1834). In Mark Weatherall, Gentlemen, Scientists, and Medicine at Cambridge 1800-1940 (2000), Vol. 3,77. The professors named were William Clark (anatomy), James Cumming (chemistry) and Johns Stephens Henslow (botany).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Charles Babbage (54)  |  Botany (57)  |  Cabbage (5)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cutting (6)  |  Fluxion (7)  |  Gas (83)  |  John Stevens Henslow (2)  |  Humming (5)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Making (300)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Monotony (3)  |  Poem (96)  |  Polemic (3)  |  Pure (291)  |  Root (120)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Slow (101)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

Before delivering your lectures, the manuscript should be in such a perfect form that, if need be, it could be set in type. Whether you follow the manuscript during the delivery of the lecture is purely incidental. The essential point is that you are thus master of the subject matter.
Advice to his son. As quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side Of Scientists (1975), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Delivery (6)  |  Essential (199)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Master (178)  |  Matter (798)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Purely (109)  |  Set (394)  |  Subject (521)  |  Type (167)

Before I came here I was confused about this subject. Having listened to your lecture I am still confused. But on a higher level.
In A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations by Alan L. Mackay (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Listen (73)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)

Bertrand Russell had given a talk on the then new quantum mechanics, of whose wonders he was most appreciative. He spoke hard and earnestly in the New Lecture Hall. And when he was done, Professor Whitehead, who presided, thanked him for his efforts, and not least for “leaving the vast darkness of the subject unobscured.”
Quoted in Robert Oppenheimer, The Open Mind (1955), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Earnestness (3)  |  Effort (227)  |  Hard (243)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thank (46)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wonder (236)

But nothing of a nature foreign to the duties of my profession [clergyman] engaged my attention while I was at Leeds so much as the, prosecution of my experiments relating to electricity, and especially the doctrine of air. The last I was led into a consequence of inhabiting a house adjoining to a public brewery, where first amused myself with making experiments on fixed air [carbon dioxide] which found ready made in the process of fermentation. When I removed from that house, I was under the necessity making the fixed air for myself; and one experiment leading to another, as I have distinctly and faithfully noted in my various publications on the subject, I by degrees contrived a convenient apparatus for the purpose, but of the cheapest kind. When I began these experiments I knew very little of chemistry, and had in a manner no idea on the subject before I attended a course of chymical lectures delivered in the Academy at Warrington by Dr. Turner of Liverpool. But I have often thought that upon the whole, this circumstance was no disadvantage to me; as in this situation I was led to devise an apparatus and processes of my own, adapted to my peculiar views. Whereas, if I had been previously accustomed to the usual chemical processes, I should not have so easily thought of any other; and without new modes of operation I should hardly have discovered anything materially new.
Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Priestley, in the Year 1795 (1806), Vol. 1, 61-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adjoining (3)  |  Air (347)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Duty (68)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Fixed Air (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mode (41)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Process (423)  |  Profession (99)  |  Publication (101)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Situation (113)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

But, because my private lectures and domestic pupils are a great hinderance and interruption of my studies, I wish to live entirely exempt from the former, and in great measure from the latter. … in short, I should wish to gain my bread from my writings.
Reply upon being offered a professorship. Quoted in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei (1832), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Bread (39)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Former (137)  |  Gain (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interruption (5)  |  Live (628)  |  Measure (232)  |  Money (170)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Research (664)  |  Short (197)  |  Wish (212)  |  Writing (189)

Chlorine is a poisonous gas. In case I should fall over unconscious in the following demonstration involving chlorine, please pick me up and carry me into the open air. Should this happen, the lecture for the day will be concluded.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Fall (230)  |  Gas (83)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Open (274)  |  Please (65)  |  Poisonous (3)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Will (2355)

Coming to the question of life being found on other planets, Professor Haldane apologized for discoursing, as a mere biologist, on a subject on which we had been expecting a lecture by a physicist [J. D. Bernal]. He mentioned three hypotheses:
(a) That life had a supernatural origin,
(b) That it originated from inorganic materials, and (c) That life is a constituent of the Universe and can only arise from pre-existing life. The first hypothesis, he said, should be taken seriously, and he would proceed to do so. From the fact that there are 400,000 species of beetle on this planet, but only 8,000 species of mammals, he concluded that the Creator, if he exists, has a special preference for beetles, and so we might be more likely to meet them than any other type of animal on a planet which would support life.
In Mark Williamson, 'Haldane’s Special Preference', The Linnean, 1992, 8, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Coming (114)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Planet (356)  |  Preference (28)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  Support (147)  |  Type (167)  |  Universe (857)

Consciously and systematically Klein sought to enthrall me with the problems of mathematical physics, and to win me over to his conception of these problems as developed it in lecture courses in previous years. I have always regarded Klein as my real teacher only in things mathematical, but also in mathematical physics and in my conception of mechanics.
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 526. Cited from 'Autobiographische Skizze', Gesammelte Schriften, Vol 4, 673–682.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Conception (154)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Real (149)  |  Regard (305)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Win (52)  |  Year (933)

Dewar’s rule in his laboratory was as absolute as that of a Pharaoh, and he showed deference to no one except the ghost of Faraday whom he met occasionally all night in the gallery behind the lecture room.
In The Quest for Absolute Zero (1945, 1966), 73.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Sir James Dewar (2)  |  Gallery (7)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Pharaoh (4)  |  Rule (294)  |  Show (346)

During Alfvén's visit he gave a lecture at the University of Chicago, which was attended by [Enrico] Fermi. As Alfvén described his work, Fermi nodded his head and said, 'Of course.' The next day the entire world of physics said. 'Oh, of course.'
Quoted in Anthony L. Peratt, 'Dean of the Plasma Dissidents', Washington Times, supplement: The World and I (May 1988), 195.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Hannes Alfvén (12)  |  Attend (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Description (84)  |  Enrico Fermi (19)  |  Next (236)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

During my second year at Edinburgh [1826-27] I attended Jameson's lectures on Geology and Zoology, but they were incredible dull. The sole effect they produced on me was the determination never as long as I lived to read a book on Geology.
Charles Darwin, His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter and a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1892), 15. In Patrick Wyse Jackson, Four Centuries of Geological Travel (2007), 32.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attend (65)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Determination (78)  |  Dull (54)  |  Effect (393)  |  Geology (220)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Robert Jameson (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Never (1087)  |  Produced (187)  |  Read (287)  |  Sole (49)  |  Year (933)  |  Zoology (36)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Best (459)  |  Best Friend (4)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Dog (70)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Friend (168)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Literature (103)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Objective (91)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Progress (465)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Purely (109)  |  Religion (361)  |  Representative (14)  |  Resource (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Still (613)  |  Strictness (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Wrap (7)

Every lecture should state one main point and repeat it over and over, like a theme with variations. An audience is like a herd of cows, moving slowly in the direction they are being driven towards. If we make one point, we have a good chance that the audience will take the right direction; if we make several points, then the cows will scatter all over the field. The audience will lose interest and everyone will go back to the thoughts they interrupted in order to come to our lecture.
In 'Ten Lessons I Wish I Had Been Taught', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Audience (26)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cow (39)  |  Direction (175)  |  Drive (55)  |  Field (364)  |  Good (889)  |  Herd (15)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interrupt (6)  |  Lose (159)  |  Main (28)  |  Move (216)  |  Order (632)  |  Point (580)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Right (452)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Slowly (18)  |  State (491)  |  Theme (17)  |  Thought (953)  |  Toward (45)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)

For the evolution of science by societies the main requisite is the perfect freedom of communication between each member and anyone of the others who may act as a reagent.
The gaseous condition is exemplified in the soiree, where the members rush about confusedly, and the only communication is during a collision, which in some instances may be prolonged by button-holing.
The opposite condition, the crystalline, is shown in the lecture, where the members sit in rows, while science flows in an uninterrupted stream from a source which we take as the origin. This is radiation of science. Conduction takes place along the series of members seated round a dinner table, and fixed there for several hours, with flowers in the middle to prevent any cross currents.
The condition most favourable to life is an intermediate plastic or colloidal condition, where the order of business is (1) Greetings and confused talk; (2) A short communication from one who has something to say and to show; (3) Remarks on the communication addressed to the Chair, introducing matters irrelevant to the communication but interesting to the members; (4) This lets each member see who is interested in his special hobby, and who is likely to help him; and leads to (5) Confused conversation and examination of objects on the table.
I have not indicated how this programme is to be combined with eating.
Letter to William Grylls Adams (3 Dec 1873). In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 949-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Business (149)  |  Chair (24)  |  Collision (15)  |  Colloid (5)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conduction (8)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Current (118)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Examination (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Flower (106)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Gas (83)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Hobby (5)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Program (52)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Remark (28)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Short (197)  |  Show (346)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Something To Say (4)  |  Special (184)  |  Stream (81)  |  Table (104)  |  Talk (100)  |  Uninterrupted (7)

His [J.J. Sylvester’s] lectures were generally the result of his thought for the preceding day or two, and often were suggested by ideas that came to him while talking. The one great advantage that this method had for his students was that everything was fresh, and we saw, as it were, the very genesis of his ideas. One could not help being inspired by such teaching.
As quoted by Florian Cajori, in Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 267-268.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Being (1278)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Method (505)  |  Result (677)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Student (300)  |  Suggest (34)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)

I ... express a wish that you may, in your generation, be fit to compare to a candle; that you may, like it, shine as lights to those about you; that, in all your actions, you may justify the beauty of the taper by making your deeds honourable and effectual in the discharge of your duty to your fellow-men.
[Concluding remarks for the final lecture (Christmas 1860-61) for children at the Royal Institution. These six lectures were the first series in the tradition of Christmas lectures continued to the present day.]
A Course of Six Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (1861), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Candle (30)  |  Children (200)  |  Christmas (11)  |  Compare (69)  |  Deed (34)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Express (186)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Generation (242)  |  Institution (69)  |  Light (607)  |  Making (300)  |  Present (619)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Institution (4)  |  Series (149)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Wish (212)

I am giving this winter two courses of lectures to three students, of which one is only moderately prepared, the other less than moderately, and the third lacks both preparation and ability. Such are the onera of a mathematical profession.
Letter to Friedrich Bessel (4 Dec 1808). In Gauss-Bessel Briefwechsel (1880), 107. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Both (493)  |  Course (409)  |  Education (378)  |  Lack (119)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Profession (99)  |  Student (300)  |  Two (937)  |  Winter (44)

I attended Davy's lectures to renew my stock of metaphors.
In 1802 Coleridge attended an entire course of Humphry Davy's lectures at the Royal Institution, and took over 60 pages of notes.
Quoted in Sir Harold Hartley, Humphry Davy (1971), 45.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attend (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Institution (69)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Renew (19)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Institution (4)

I believe that the useful methods of mathematics are easily to be learned by quite young persons, just as languages are easily learned in youth. What a wondrous philosophy and history underlie the use of almost every word in every language—yet the child learns to use the word unconsciously. No doubt when such a word was first invented it was studied over and lectured upon, just as one might lecture now upon the idea of a rate, or the use of Cartesian co-ordinates, and we may depend upon it that children of the future will use the idea of the calculus, and use squared paper as readily as they now cipher. … When Egyptian and Chaldean philosophers spent years in difficult calculations, which would now be thought easy by young children, doubtless they had the same notions of the depth of their knowledge that Sir William Thomson might now have of his. How is it, then, that Thomson gained his immense knowledge in the time taken by a Chaldean philosopher to acquire a simple knowledge of arithmetic? The reason is plain. Thomson, when a child, was taught in a few years more than all that was known three thousand years ago of the properties of numbers. When it is found essential to a boy’s future that machinery should be given to his brain, it is given to him; he is taught to use it, and his bright memory makes the use of it a second nature to him; but it is not till after-life that he makes a close investigation of what there actually is in his brain which has enabled him to do so much. It is taken because the child has much faith. In after years he will accept nothing without careful consideration. The machinery given to the brain of children is getting more and more complicated as time goes on; but there is really no reason why it should not be taken in as early, and used as readily, as were the axioms of childish education in ancient Chaldea.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Actually (27)  |  Afterlife (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boy (94)  |  Brain (270)  |  Bright (79)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Children (200)  |  Cipher (2)  |  Close (69)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Coordinate (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Depth (94)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Paper (182)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plain (33)  |  Property (168)  |  Rate (29)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Square (70)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I cannot afford to waste my time making money.
A reply to an offer of a lecture tour.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Making (300)  |  Money (170)  |  Offer (141)  |  Reply (56)  |  Time (1877)  |  Waste (101)

I have a true aversion to teaching. The perennial business of a professor of mathematics is only to teach the ABC of his science; most of the few pupils who go a step further, and usually to keep the metaphor, remain in the process of gathering information, become only Halbwisser [one who has superficial knowledge of the subject], for the rarer talents do not want to have themselves educated by lecture courses, but train themselves. And with this thankless work the professor loses his precious time.
Letter to Heinrich Olbers (26 Oct 1802). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 414.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Business (149)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Precious (41)  |  Process (423)  |  Professor (128)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Step (231)  |  Subject (521)  |  Talent (94)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Usually (176)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)

I have never had any student or pupil under me to aid me with assistance; but have always prepared and made my experiments with my own hands, working & thinking at the same time. I do not think I could work in company, or think aloud, or explain my thoughts at the time. Sometimes I and my assistant have been in the Laboratory for hours & days together, he preparing some lecture apparatus or cleaning up, & scarcely a word has passed between us; — all this being a consequence of the solitary & isolated system of investigation; in contradistinction to that pursued by a Professor with his aids & pupils as in your Universities.
Letter to C. Ransteed, 16 Dec 1857. In L. Pearce Williams (ed.), The Selected Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1971), Vol. 2, 888.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cleaning (7)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Company (59)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Hour (186)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pass (238)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Professor (128)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Research (664)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Student (300)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

I have seen many phases of life; I have moved in imperial circles, I have been a Minister of State; but if I had to live my life again, I would always remain in my laboratory, for the greatest joy of my life has been to accomplish original scientific work, and, next to that, to lecture to a set of intelligent students.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Circle (110)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imperial (2)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Joy (107)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Next (236)  |  Phase (36)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Work (1351)

I heard Professor Cannon lecture last night, going partly on your account. His subject was a physiological substitute for war—which is international sports and I suppose motorcycle races—to encourage the secretion of the adrenal glands!
Letter from James McKeen Cattell to his son, McKeen. In S. Benison, A. C. Barger and E. L. Wolfe, Walter B Cannon: The Life and Times of a Young Scientist (1987), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Walter Bradford Cannon (12)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Gland (14)  |  International (37)  |  Last (426)  |  Motorcycle (2)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Professor (128)  |  Race (268)  |  Sport (22)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Suppose (156)  |  War (225)

I make many of my friends by lecturing. I keep the lectures informal, if I can, with lots of discussion, and I never give the same one twice—I’d die of boredom if I did.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Boredom (11)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Friend (168)  |  Informal (4)  |  Keep (101)  |  Lot (151)  |  Never (1087)

I notice that, in the lecture … which Prof. Lowry gave recently, in Paris … he brought forward certain freak formulae for tartaric acid, in which hydrogen figures as bigamist … I may say, he but follows the loose example set by certain Uesanians, especially one G. N. Lewis, a Californian thermodynamiter, who has chosen to disregard the fundamental canons of chemistry—for no obvious reason other than that of indulging in premature speculation upon electrons as the cause of valency…
'Bigamist Hydrogen. A Protest', Nature (1926), 117, 553.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Electron (93)  |  Figure (160)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forward (102)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Notice (77)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Valency (4)

I purpose, in return for the honour you do us by coming to see what are our proceedings here, to bring before you, in the course of these lectures, the Chemical History of a Candle. I have taken this subject on a former occasion; and were it left to my own will, I should prefer to repeat it almost every year—so abundant is the interest that attaches itself to the subject, so wonderful are the varieties of outlet which it offers into the various departments of philosophy. There is not a law under which any part of this universe is governed which does not come into play, and is touched upon in these phenomena. There is no better, there is no more open door by which you can enter the study of natural philosophy, than by considering the physical phenomena of a candle.
A Course of Six Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (1861), 13-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Better (486)  |  Candle (30)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coming (114)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Enter (141)  |  Former (137)  |  Govern (64)  |  History (673)  |  Honour (56)  |  Interest (386)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Return (124)  |  See (1081)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

I recall once saying that when I had given the same lecture several times I couldn’t help feeling that they really ought to know it by now.
In A Mathematician’s Miscellany (1953), reissued as Béla Bollobás, Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Feeling (250)  |  Know (1518)  |  Time (1877)

I regret that it has been necessary for me in this lecture to administer such a large dose of four-dimensional geometry. I do not apologize, because I am really not responsible for the fact that nature in its most fundamental aspect is four-dimensional. Things are what they are; and it is useless to disguise the fact that “what things are” is often very difficult for our intellects to follow.
From The Concept of Nature (1920, 1964), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Administer (3)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dose (16)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Large (394)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Regret (30)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Thing (1915)

I wish the lecturers to treat their subject as a strictly natural science, the greatest of all possible sciences, indeed, in one sense, the only science, that of Infinite Being, without reference to or reliance upon any supposed special exception or so-called miraculous revelation. I wish it considered just as astronomy or chemistry is.
Statement in deed of foundation of the Gifford Lectures on natural theology (1885).
Quoted in Michael A. Arbib and Mary B. Hesse, The Construction of Reality (1986), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deed (34)  |  Exception (73)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Possible (552)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sense (770)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Special (184)  |  Statement (142)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theology (52)  |  Wish (212)

If I knew something about it, I wouldn’t lecture on it!
As quoted in David C. Cassidy, Beyond Uncertainty: Heisenberg, Quantum Physics, and the Bomb (2009), 86. According to Cassidy, this was the response when Sommerfeld was “once asked how he could lecture on a subject he did not understand.” Footnoted as “WH [Werner Heisenberg] to his father, 15 May 1918.”
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Something (719)

If we can get kids talking about conservation and doing it, they can have a great influence on their parents by lecturing them and pointing the finger.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Doing (280)  |  Finger (44)  |  Great (1574)  |  Influence (222)  |  Kid (15)  |  Parent (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)

In 1944 Erwin Schroedinger, stimulated intellectually by Max Delbruck, published a little book called What is life? It was an inspiration to the first of the molecular biologists, and has been, along with Delbruck himself, credited for directing the research during the next decade that solved the mystery of how 'like begat like.' Max was awarded this Prize in 1969, and rejoicing in it, he also lamented that the work for which he was honored before all the peoples of the world was not something which he felt he could share with more than a handful. Samuel Beckett's contributions to literature, being honored at the same time, seemed to Max somehow universally accessible to anyone. But not his. In his lecture here Max imagined his imprisonment in an ivory tower of science.
'The Polymerase Chain Reaction', Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1993). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1991-1995 (1997), 103.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Award (13)  |  Samuel Beckett (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Credit (20)  |  Decade (59)  |  Max Ludwig Henning Delbrück (8)  |  First (1283)  |  Handful (13)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imprisonment (2)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Ivory Tower (5)  |  Lament (11)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literature (103)  |  Little (707)  |  Molecular Biologist (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Next (236)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  People (1005)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Erwin Schrödinger (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Share (75)  |  Simulation (7)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tower (42)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

In all our academies we attempt far too much. ... In earlier times lectures were delivered upon chemistry and botany as branches of medicine, and the medical student learned enough of them. Now, however, chemistry and botany are become sciences of themselves, incapable of comprehension by a hasty survey, and each demanding the study of a whole life, yet we expect the medical student to understand them. He who is prudent, accordingly declines all distracting claims upon his time, and limits himself to a single branch and becomes expert in one thing.
Quoted in Johann Hermann Baas, Henry Ebenezer Handerson (trans.), Outlines of the History of Medicine and the Medical Profession (1889), 842-843.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Botany (57)  |  Branch (150)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Claim (146)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Decline (26)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Education (378)  |  Enough (340)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expert (65)  |  Himself (461)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Survey (33)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Whole (738)

In one department of his [Joseph Black’s] lecture he exceeded any I have ever known, the neatness and unvarying success with which all the manipulations of his experiments were performed. His correct eye and steady hand contributed to the one; his admirable precautions, foreseeing and providing for every emergency, secured the other. I have seen him pour boiling water or boiling acid from a vessel that had no spout into a tube, holding it at such a distance as made the stream’s diameter small, and so vertical that not a drop was spilt. While he poured he would mention this adaptation of the height to the diameter as a necessary condition of success. I have seen him mix two substances in a receiver into which a gas, as chlorine, had been introduced, the effect of the combustion being perhaps to produce a compound inflammable in its nascent state, and the mixture being effected by drawing some string or wire working through the receiver's sides in an air-tight socket. The long table on which the different processes had been carried on was as clean at the end of the lecture as it had been before the apparatus was planted upon it. Not a drop of liquid, not a grain of dust remained.
In Lives of Men of Letters and Science, Who Flourished in the Time of George III (1845), 346-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acid (83)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Joseph Black (14)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clean (50)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Department (92)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dust (64)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emergency (10)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gas (83)  |  Grain (50)  |  Inflammable (5)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Known (454)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Long (790)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Nascent (3)  |  Neatness (5)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Plant (294)  |  Remain (349)  |  Secured (18)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Spout (2)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Stream (81)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Table (104)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Wire (35)

In one of my lectures many years ago I used the phrase “following the trail of light”. The word “light” was not meant in its literal sense, but in the sense of following an intellectual concept or idea to where it might lead. My interest in living things is probably a fundamental motivation for the scientific work in the laboratory, and we created here in Berkeley one of the first and foremost interdisciplinary laboratories in the world.
In autobiography, Following the Trail of Light: A Scientific Odyssey (1992), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Berkeley (3)  |  Concept (221)  |  Create (235)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foremost (11)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interdisciplinary (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Literal (11)  |  Living (491)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trail (10)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

In the early days of dealing with climate change, I wouldn’t go out on a limb one way or another, because I don’t have the qualifications there. But I do have the qualifications to measure the scientific community and see what the consensus is about climate change. I remember the moment when I suddenly thought it was incontrovertible. There was a lecture given by a distinguished American expert in atmospheric science and he showed a series of graphs about the temperature changes in the upper atmosphere. He plotted time against population growth and industrialisation. It was incontrovertible, and once you think it’s really totally incontrovertible, then you have a responsibility to say so.
From interview with Brian Cox and Robert Ince, in 'A Life Measured in Heartbeats', New Statesman (21 Dec 2012), 141, No. 5138, 32.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Community (104)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Do (1908)  |  Early (185)  |  Expert (65)  |  Graph (7)  |  Growth (187)  |  Incontrovertible (8)  |  Industrialisation (2)  |  Measure (232)  |  Moment (253)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Remember (179)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Show (346)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

In the fall of 1967, [I was invited] to a conference … on pulsars. … In my talk, I argued that we should consider the possibility that the center of a pulsar is a gravitationally completely collapsed object. I remarked that one couldn't keep saying “gravitationally completely collapsed object” over and over. One needed a shorter descriptive phrase. “How about black hole?” asked someone in the audience. I had been searching for the right term for months, mulling it over in bed, in the bathtub, in my car, whenever I had quiet moments. Suddenly this name seemed exactly right. When I gave a more formal Sigma Xi-Phi Beta Kappa lecture … on December 29, 1967, I used the term, and then included it in the written version of the lecture published in the spring of 1968. (As it turned out, a pulsar is powered by “merely” a neutron star, not a black hole.)
[Although John Wheeler is often identified as coining the term “black hole,” he in fact merely popularized the expression. In his own words, this is his explanation of the true origin: a suggestion from an unidentified person in a conference audience.]
In Geons, Black Holes, and Quantum Foam (2000), 296-297.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Audience (26)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Car (71)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conference (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fall (230)  |  Merely (316)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Neutron Star (3)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Object (422)  |  Origin (239)  |  Person (363)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (746)  |  Pulsar (3)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Right (452)  |  Small (477)  |  Spring (133)  |  Star (427)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Term (349)  |  Turn (447)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Word (619)

In this lecture I would like to conclude with … some characteristics [of] gravity … The most impressive fact is that gravity is simple. It is simple to state the principles completely and not have left any vagueness for anybody to change the ideas of the law. It is simple, and therefore it is beautiful. It is simple in its pattern. I do not mean it is simple in its action—the motions of the various planets and the perturbations of one on the other can be quite complicated to work out, and to follow how all those stars in a globular cluster move is quite beyond our ability. It is complicated in its actions, but the basic pattern or the system beneath the whole thing is simple. This is common to all our laws; they all turn out to be simple things, although complex in their actual actions.
In 'The Law of Gravitation, as Example of Physical Law', the first of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 33-34.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Basic (138)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Law (894)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perturbation (7)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Simple (406)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? This value of science remains unsung by singers: you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it. This is not yet a scientific age.
Perhaps one of the reasons for this silence is that you have to know how to read music. For instance, the scientific article may say, “The radioactive phosphorus content of the cerebrum of the rat decreases to one-half in a period of two weeks.” Now what does that mean?
It means that phosphorus that is in the brain of a rat—and also in mine, and yours—is not the same phosphorus as it was two weeks ago. It means the atoms that are in the brain are being replaced: the ones that were there before have gone away.
So what is this mind of ours: what are these atoms with consciousness? Last week’s potatoes! They now can remember what was going on in my mind a year ago—a mind which has long ago been replaced. To note that the thing I call my individuality is only a pattern or dance, that is what it means when one discovers how long it takes for the atoms of the brain to be replaced by other atoms. The atoms come into my brain, dance a dance, and then go out—there are always new atoms, but always doing the same dance, remembering what the dance was yesterday.
'What do You Care What Other People Think?' Further Adventures of a Curious Character (1988), 244.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Cerebrum (10)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Dance (32)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doing (280)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  Music (129)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Period (198)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Picture (143)  |  Poem (96)  |  Present (619)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Rat (37)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Silence (56)  |  Song (37)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unsung (4)  |  Value (365)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)  |  Yesterday (36)

It has been said that [William Gull] “seldom delivered a lecture which was not remarkable for some phrase full of wise teaching, which from its point and conciseness became almost a proverb amongst his pupils.”
Stated in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Concise (8)  |  Conciseness (3)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Sir William Withey Gull (39)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Point (580)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Wise (131)

It is only those who know a little of nature, who fancy they know much. I have heard a young man say, after hearing a few popular chemical lectures, and seeing a few bottle and squirt experiments: Oh, water—water is only oxygen and hydrogen!—as if he knew all about it. While the true chemist would smile sadly enough at the the youth's hasty conceit, and say in his heart: 'Well, he is a lucky fellow.'
'Thoughts in a Gravel Pit', a lecture delivered at the Mechanics' Institute, Odiham (1857). The Works of Charles Kingsley (1880), 284.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Smile (31)  |  Water (481)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

It was his [Leibnitz’s] love of method and order, and the conviction that such order and harmony existed in the real world, and that our success in understanding it depended upon the degree and order which we could attain in our own thoughts, that originally was probably nothing more than a habit which by degrees grew into a formal rule. This habit was acquired by early occupation with legal and mathematical questions. We have seen how the theory of combinations and arrangements of elements had a special interest for him. We also saw how mathematical calculations served him as a type and model of clear and orderly reasoning, and how he tried to introduce method and system into logical discussions, by reducing to a small number of terms the multitude of compound notions he had to deal with. This tendency increased in strength, and even in those early years he elaborated the idea of a general arithmetic, with a universal language of symbols, or a characteristic which would be applicable to all reasoning processes, and reduce philosophical investigations to that simplicity and certainty which the use of algebraic symbols had introduced into mathematics.
A mental attitude such as this is always highly favorable for mathematical as well as for philosophical investigations. Wherever progress depends upon precision and clearness of thought, and wherever such can be gained by reducing a variety of investigations to a general method, by bringing a multitude of notions under a common term or symbol, it proves inestimable. It necessarily imports the special qualities of number—viz., their continuity, infinity and infinite divisibility—like mathematical quantities—and destroys the notion that irreconcilable contrasts exist in nature, or gaps which cannot be bridged over. Thus, in his letter to Arnaud, Leibnitz expresses it as his opinion that geometry, or the philosophy of space, forms a step to the philosophy of motion—i.e., of corporeal things—and the philosophy of motion a step to the philosophy of mind.
In Leibnitz (1884), 44-45. [The first sentence is reworded to better introduce the quotation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Algebraic (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bring (90)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corporeal (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grow (238)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Highly (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Import (5)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Legal (8)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Original (58)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precision (68)  |  Probable (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Real World (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Step (231)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Type (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It’s pretty hard for me to lecture in French. I had to go to the Riviera afterwards to recuperate; I don’t know what the audience had to do.
Referring to his eight lectures to l’Institute Henri Poincaré in May 1939. From Oral History interview with Charles Weiner and Gloria Lubkin, American Institute of Physics (28 Feb 1966). Quoted in his obituary, Brebis Bleaney, 'John Hasbrouck van Vleck Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1982), 28, 643.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Audience (26)  |  Do (1908)  |  French (20)  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)

Langmuir is the most convincing lecturer that I have ever heard. I have heard him talk to an audience of chemists when I knew they did not understand more than one-third of what he was saying; but they thought they did. It’s very easy to be swept off one's feet by Langmuir. You remember in [Kipling’s novel] Kim that the water jar was broken and Lurgan Sahib was trying to hypnotise Kim into seeing it whole again. Kim saved himself by saying the multiplication table [so] I have heard Langmuir lecture when I knew he was wrong, but I had to repeat to myself: “He is wrong; I know he is wrong; he is wrong”, or I should have believed like the others.
In 'How to Ripen Time', Journal of Physical Chemistry 1931, 35, 1917.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Audience (26)  |  Broken (56)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Easy (204)  |  Error (321)  |  Himself (461)  |  Rudyard Kipling (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Irving Langmuir (7)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Myself (212)  |  Novel (32)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remember (179)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wrong (234)

Lord Kelvin, unable to meet his classes one day, posted the following notice on the door of his lecture room, “Professor Thomson will not meet his classes today.” The disappointed class decided to play a joke on the professor. Erasing the “c” they left the legend to read, “Professor Thomson will not meet his lasses today.” When the class assembled the next day in anticipation of the effect of their joke, they were astonished and chagrined to find that the professor had outwitted them. The legend of yesterday was now found to read, “Professor Thomson will not meet his asses today.”
From Address (2 Nov 1908) at the University of Washington. Footnote: E.T. Bell attributes the same anecdote to J.S. Blackie, Professor of Greek at Aberdeen and Edinburgh. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Ass (5)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Chagrin (2)  |  Class (164)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Door (93)  |  Effect (393)  |  Erase (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Joke (83)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Legend (17)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Next (236)  |  Notice (77)  |  Outwit (6)  |  Professor (128)  |  Read (287)  |  Today (314)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yesterday (36)

Maybe the situation is hopeless. Television is just the wrong medium, at least in prime time, to teach science. I think it is hopeless if it insists on behaving like television… The people who produce these programs always respond to such complaints by insisting that no one would watch a program consisting of real scientists giving real lectures to real students. If they are right, then this sort of program is just another form of entertainment.
(1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Form (959)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  People (1005)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Situation (113)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Television (30)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wrong (234)

Melvin [Calvin]’s marvellous technique for delivering a scientific lecture was unique. His mind must have roamed constantly, especially in planning lectures. His remarkable memory enabled him to formulate a lecture or manuscript with no breaks in the sequence of his thoughts. His lectures usually began hesitatingly, as if he had little idea of how to begin or what to say. This completely disarmed his audiences, who would try to guess what he might have to say. Soon enough, however, his ideas would coalesce, to be delivered like an approaching freight train, reaching a crescendo of information at breakneck speed and leaving his rapt audience nearly overwhelmed.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Audience (26)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biography (240)  |  Break (99)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Completely (135)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Enough (340)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Freight (3)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Little (707)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Planning (20)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Roam (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speed (65)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Try (283)  |  Unique (67)  |  Usually (176)

Modern science gives lectures on botany, to show there is no such thing as a flower; on humanity, to show there is no such thing as a man; and on theology, to show there is no such thing as a God. No such thing as a man, but only a mechanism, No such thing as a God, but only a series of forces.
Letter V (1 May 1871) collected in Fors Clavigera: Letters to the Workmen and Labourers of Great Britain (1894), Vol. 1, 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (57)  |  Flower (106)  |  Force (487)  |  God (757)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Series (149)  |  Show (346)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)

Mr. Dalton's aspect and manner were repulsive. There was no gracefulness belonging to him. His voice was harsh and brawling; his gait stiff and awkward; his style of writing and conversation dry and almost crabbed. In person he was tall, bony, and slender. He never could learn to swim: on investigating this circumstance he found that his spec. grav. as a mass was greater than that of water; and he mentioned this in his lectures on natural philosophy in illustration of the capability of different persons for attaining the art of swimming. Independence and simplicity of manner and originality were his best qualities. Though in comparatively humble circumstances he maintained the dignity of the philosophical character. As the first distinct promulgator of the doctrine that the elements of bodies unite in definite proportions to form chemical compounds, he has acquired an undying fame.
Dr John Davy's (brother of Humphry Davy) impressions of Dalton written in c.1830-31 in Malta.
John Davy
Quoted in W. C. Henry, Memoirs of the Life and Scientific Researches of John Dalton (1854), 217-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Art (657)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Best (459)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brother (43)  |  Capability (41)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conversation (43)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Definite (110)  |  Different (577)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Dry (57)  |  Element (310)  |  Fame (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Greater (288)  |  Humble (50)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Impression (114)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Learn (629)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mention (82)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Writing (189)

Much of his [Clifford’s] best work was actually spoken before it was written. He gave most of his public lectures with no visible preparation beyond very short notes, and the outline seemed to be filled in without effort or hesitation. Afterwards he would revise the lecture from a shorthand writer’s report, or sometimes write down from memory almost exactly what he had said. It fell out now and then, however, that neither of these things was done; in such cases there is now no record of the lecture at all.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Down (456)  |  Effort (227)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Note (34)  |  Outline (11)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Record (154)  |  Revise (6)  |  Short (197)  |  Shorthand (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Visible (84)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)

My lectures were highly esteemed, but I am of opinion my operations rather kept down my practice, than increased it.
Quoted in Bransby Blake Cooper, The Life of Sir Astley Cooper (1843), Vol. 2, 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Down (456)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Practice (204)

Newton lectured now and then to the few students who chose to hear him; and it is recorded that very frequently he came to the lecture-room and found it empty. On such occasions he would remain fifteen minutes, and then, if no one came, return to his apartments.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Apartment (4)  |  Choose (112)  |  Empty (80)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Hear (139)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Minute (125)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Record (154)  |  Remain (349)  |  Return (124)  |  Student (300)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (69)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Door (93)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (47)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Help (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Involve (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Leave (130)  |  Listen (73)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (125)  |  Muse (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (15)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rich (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Roll (40)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strand (9)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (300)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Nothing could be more admirable than the manner in which for forty years he [Joseph Black] performed this useful and dignified office. His style of lecturing was as nearly perfect as can well be conceived; for it had all the simplicity which is so entirely suited to scientific discourse, while it partook largely of the elegance which characterized all he said or did … I have heard the greatest understandings of the age giving forth their efforts in its most eloquent tongues—have heard the commanding periods of Pitt’s majestic oratory—the vehemence of Fox’s burning declamation—have followed the close-compacted chain of Grant’s pure reasoning—been carried away by the mingled fancy, epigram, and argumentation of Plunket; but I should without hesitation prefer, for mere intellectual gratification (though aware how much of it is derived from association), to be once more allowed the privilege which I in those days enjoyed of being present while the first philosopher of his age was the historian of his own discoveries, and be an eyewitness of those experiments by which he had formerly made them, once more performed with his own hands.
In 'Philosophers of the Time of George III', The Works of Henry, Lord Brougham, F.R.S. (1855), Vol. I, 19-21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Joseph Black (14)  |  Burning (48)  |  Compact (13)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fancy (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Grant (73)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Historian (54)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Office (71)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Period (198)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Present (619)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Useful (250)  |  Year (933)

Once when lecturing to a class he [Lord Kelvin] used the word “mathematician,” and then interrupting himself asked his class: “Do you know what a mathematician is?” Stepping to the blackboard he wrote upon it:— [an integral expression equal to the square root of pi]
Then putting his finger on what he had written, he turned to his class and said: “A mathematician is one to whom that is as obvious as that twice two makes four is to you. Liouville was a mathematician.”
In Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), 1139.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Class (164)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equal (83)  |  Expression (175)  |  Finger (44)  |  Himself (461)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interrupt (6)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Pi (13)  |  Root (120)  |  Say (984)  |  Square (70)  |  Square Root (12)  |  Step (231)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twice (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

One of my friends, reading the title of these lectures [The Whence and Whither of Man] said: “Of man's origin you know nothing, of his future you know less.”
From the Introduction to The Whence and Whither of Man; a Brief History of his Origin and Development through Conformity to Environment; being the Morse Lectures of 1895. (1896), ix. The Morse lectureship was founded by Prof. Samuel F.B. Morse in 1865 at Union Theological Seminary, the lectures to deal with “the relation of the Bible to any of the sciences.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Friend (168)  |  Future (429)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Less (103)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Origin (239)  |  Reading (133)  |  Title (18)  |  Whither (11)

People have now a-days got a strange opinion that every thing should be taught by lectures. Now, I cannot see that lectures can do as much good as reading the books from which the lectures are taken.
Entry for Feb 1776. In George Birkbeck-Hill (ed.), Boswell's Life of Johnson (1934-50), Vol. 2, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Opinion (281)  |  People (1005)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thing (1915)

People have now-a-days got a strange opinion that everything should be taught by lectures. Now, I cannot see that lectures can do so much good as reading the books from which the lectures are taken. I know nothing that can best be taught by lectures, except where experiments are to be shewn. You may teach chemistry by lectures.
Elements of Chemistry (1830)
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Book (392)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Good (889)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opinion (281)  |  People (1005)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Strange (157)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)

People were pretty well spellbound by what Bohr said… While I was very much impressed by [him], his arguments were mainly of a qualitative nature, and I was not able to really pinpoint the facts behind them. What I wanted was statements which could be expressed in terms of equations, and Bohr's work very seldom provided such statements. I am really not sure how much later my work was influenced by these lectures of Bohr's... He certainly did not have a direct influence because he did not stimulate one to think of new equations.
Recalling the occasion in May 1925 (a year before receiving his Ph.D.) when he met Niels Bohr who was in Cambridge to give a talk on the fundamental difficulties of the quantum theory.
In History of Twentieth Century Physics (1977), 109. In A. Pais, 'Playing With Equations, the Dirac Way'. Behram N. Kursunoglu (Ed.) and Eugene Paul Wigner (Ed.), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist (1990), 94.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Argument (138)  |  Behind (137)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Direct (225)  |  Equation (132)  |  Express (186)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Influence (222)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occasion (85)  |  People (1005)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Statement (142)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Professor Sylvester’s first high class at the new university Johns Hopkins consisted of only one student, G. B. Halsted, who had persisted in urging Sylvester to lecture on the modem algebra. The attempt to lecture on this subject led him into new investigations in quantics.
In Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 264.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Class (164)  |  Consist (223)  |  First (1283)  |  George B. Halsted (8)  |  High (362)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Johns Hopkins (7)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modem (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Persist (11)  |  Professor (128)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  University (121)  |  Urge (17)

Proposals for forming a Public Institution for diffusing the knowledge of Mechanical Inventions, and for teaching, by Philosophical Lectures and Experiments, the application of Science to the common purposes of life.
Title of the pamphlet (Apr 1799) in which he proposed what is now the Royal Institution. As named in a notice under 'A Correct List of New Publications', The Monthly Magazine: Part 1 for 1799 from January to June, inclusive (Apr 1799), 7, Part 1, 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Common (436)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Forming (42)  |  Institution (69)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Royal Institution (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teaching (188)

Remember this, the rule for giving an extempore lecture is—let the the mind rest from the subject entirely for an interval preceding the lecture, after the notes are prepared; the thoughts will ferment without your knowing it, and enter into new combinations; but if you keep the mind active upon the subject up to the moment, the subject will not ferment but stupefy.
In Letter (10 Jul 1854) to William Rowan Hamilton, collected in Robert Perceval Graves, Life of Sir William Rowan Hamilton (1882-89), Vol. 3, 487.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Combination (144)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Ferment (5)  |  Give (202)  |  Interval (13)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Let (61)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Note (34)  |  Precede (23)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rule (294)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)

Science ... must be absorbed in order to inculcate that wonderful humility before the facts of nature that comes from close attention to a textbook, and that unwillingness to learn from Authority that comes from making almost verbatim lecture notes and handing them back to the professor.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Attention (190)  |  Authority (95)  |  Back (390)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Humility (28)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Making (300)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Note (34)  |  Order (632)  |  Professor (128)  |  Science (3879)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Unwillingness (4)  |  Verbatim (4)  |  Wonderful (149)

Science appears to us with a very different aspect after we have found out that it is not in lecture rooms only, and by means of the electric light projected on a screen, that we may witness physical phenomena, but that we may find illustrations of the highest doctrines of science in games and gymnastics, in travelling by land and by water, in storms of the air and of the sea, and wherever there is matter in motion.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics' (1871). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Different (577)  |  Electric (76)  |  Find (998)  |  Game (101)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Motion (310)  |  Physical (508)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Water (481)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Witness (54)

Sir Adolph Abrams, the physician, in a lecture entitled Amanuensis, described a case history as an amalgam of false memories, rumour, innuendo and downright lies, and on these we are expected to make a diagnosis.
Myre Sim
Quoted in book review by Myre Sim about 'Ending the Cycle of Abuse', The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry (May 1997), 42:4, 424-425. Webmaster believes the correct name should be Sir Adolphe Abrahams of Westminster Hospital.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Adolphe Abrahams (6)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Expect (200)  |  History (673)  |  Lie (364)  |  Physician (273)

Some experience of popular lecturing had convinced me that the necessity of making things plain to uninstructed people, was one of the very best means of clearing up the obscure corners in one's own mind.
'Preface'. In Man's Place in Nature and Other Anthropological Essays. Collected Essays (1894), Vol. 7, Preface, ix.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Best (459)  |  Corner (57)  |  Experience (467)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Obscure (62)  |  People (1005)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)

Students who have attended my [medical] lectures may remember that I try not only to teach them what we know, but also to realise how little this is: in every direction we seem to travel but a very short way before we are brought to a stop; our eyes are opened to see that our path is beset with doubts, and that even our best-made knowledge comes but too soon to an end.
In Notes on the Composition of Scientific Papers (1904), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Best (459)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doubt (304)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Path (144)  |  Realize (147)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stop (80)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Way (1217)

The advanced course in physics began with Rutherford’s lectures. I was the only woman student who attended them and the regulations required that women should sit by themselves in the front row. There had been a time when a chaperone was necessary but mercifully that day was past. At every lecture Rutherford would gaze at me pointedly, as I sat by myself under his very nose, and would begin in his stentorian voice: “Ladies and Gentlemen”. All the boys regularly greeted this witticism with thunderous applause, stamping with their feet in the traditional manner, and at every lecture I wished I could sink into the earth. To this day I instinctively take my place as far back as possible in a lecture room.
In Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections (1996), 118.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Applause (9)  |  Attend (65)  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Boy (94)  |  Course (409)  |  Earth (996)  |  Foot (60)  |  Front (16)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Lady (11)  |  Manner (58)  |  Myself (212)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Past (337)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Regulations (3)  |  Required (108)  |  Row (9)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Sink (37)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Student (300)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Voice (52)  |  Wish (212)  |  Witticism (2)  |  Woman (151)

The automatic computing engine now being designed at N. P. L. [National Physics Laboratory] is atypical large scale electronic digital computing machine. In a single lecture it will not be possible to give much technical detail of this machine, and most of what I shall say will apply equally to any other machine of this type now being planned. From the point of view of the mathematician the property of being digital should be of greater interest than that of being electronic. That it is electronic is certainly important because these machines owe their high speed to this, and without the speed it is doubtful if financial support for their construction would be forthcoming. But this is virtually all that there is to be said on that subject. That the machine is digital however has more subtle significance. It means firstly that numbers are represented by sequences of digits which can be as long as one wishes. One can therefore work to any desired degree of accuracy. This accuracy is not obtained by more careful machining of parts, control of temperature variations, and such means, but by a slight increase in the amount of equipment in the machine.
Lecture to the London Mathematical Society, 20 February 1947. Quoted in B. E. Carpenter and R. W. Doran (eds.), A. M. Turing's Ace Report of 1946 and Other Papers (1986), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atypical (3)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (127)  |  Construction (112)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Designed (3)  |  Desired (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Digital (10)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equally (130)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interest (386)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significance (113)  |  Single (353)  |  Speed (65)  |  Subject (521)  |  Support (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Type (167)  |  Variation (90)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The automatic computing engine now being designed at N.P.L. [National Physics Laboratory] is atypical large scale electronic digital computing machine. In a single lecture it will not be possible to give much technical detail of this machine, and most of what I shall say will apply equally to any other machine of this type now being planned. From the point of view of the mathematician the property of being digital should be of greater interest than that of being electronic. That it is electronic is certainly important because these machines owe their high speed to this, and without the speed it is doubtful if financial support for their construction would be forthcoming. But this is virtually all that there is to be said on that subject. That the machine is digital however has more subtle significance. It means firstly that numbers are represented by sequences of digits which can be as long as one wishes. One can therefore work to any desired degree of accuracy. This accuracy is not obtained by more careful machining of parts, control of temperature variations, and such means, but by a slight increase in the amount of equipment in the machine.
Lecture to the London Mathematical Society, 20 February 1947. Quoted in B. E. Carpenter and R. W. Doran (eds.), A. M. Turing's Ace Report of 1946 and Other Papers (1986), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atypical (3)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (127)  |  Construction (112)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Designed (3)  |  Desired (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Digital (10)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equally (130)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interest (386)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significance (113)  |  Single (353)  |  Speed (65)  |  Subject (521)  |  Support (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Type (167)  |  Variation (90)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The Bohr atom was introduced to us by Bohr himself. I still have the notes I took during his lectures … His discourse was rendered almost incomprehensible by his accent; there were endless references to what I recorded as “soup groups”, only later emended to “sub-groups”.
In Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections (1996), 116-117.
Science quotes on:  |  Accent (5)  |  Atom (355)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Endless (56)  |  Himself (461)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Note (34)  |  Record (154)  |  Reference (33)  |  Render (93)  |  Soup (9)  |  Still (613)

The kind of lecture which I have been so kindly invited to give, and which now appears in book form, gives one a rare opportunity to allow the bees in one's bonnet to buzz even more noisily than usual.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), v.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Allow (45)  |  Appear (118)  |  Bee (40)  |  Book (392)  |  Buzz (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Give (202)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Kind (557)  |  More (2559)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Rare (89)

THE OATH. I swear by Apollo [the healing God], the physician and Aesclepius [son of Apollo], and Health [Hygeia], and All-heal [Panacea], and all the gods and goddesses, that, according to my ability and judgment, I will keep this Oath and this stipulation—to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring in the same footing as my own brothers, and to teach them this art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and, further, from the seduction of females or males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my professional practice or not, in connection with it, I see or hear, in the life of men, which ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this Oath unviolated, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the art, respected by all men, in all times! But should I trespass and violate this Oath, may the reverse be my lot!
The Genuine Works of Hippocrates, trans. Francis Adams (1886), Vol. 2, 344-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Abortion (4)  |  Abroad (18)  |  Abstain (7)  |  According (237)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Bound (119)  |  Brother (43)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continue (165)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Cut (114)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Enter (141)  |  Equally (130)  |  Female (50)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  Grant (73)  |  Healing (25)  |  Health (193)  |  Hear (139)  |  Holiness (6)  |  House (140)  |  Impart (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Mischievous (11)  |  Oath (10)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pass (238)  |  Patient (199)  |  Person (363)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Precept (10)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Required (108)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seduction (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Sick (81)  |  Slave (37)  |  Stone (162)  |  Substance (248)  |  Swear (6)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespass (5)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)

The personal views of the lecturer may seem to be brought forward with undue exclusiveness, but, as it is his business to give a clear exposition of the actual state of the science which he treats, he is obliged to define with precision the principles, the correctness of which he has proved by his own experience.
Cellular Pathology, translated by Frank Chance (1860), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Business (149)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forward (102)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Precision (68)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  View (488)

The story is told of Lord Kelvin, a famous Scotch physicist of the last century, that after he had given a lecture on atoms and molecules, one of his students came to him with the question, “Professor, what is your idea of the structure of the atom.”
“What,” said Kelvin, “The structure of the atom? Why, don’t you know, the very word ‘atom’ means the thing that can’t be cut. How then can it have a structure?”
“That,” remarked the facetious young man, “shows the disadvantage of knowing Greek.”
As described in 'Assault on Atoms' (Read 23 Apr 1931 at Symposium—The Changing World) Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1931), 70, No. 3, 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Century (310)  |  Cut (114)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Facetious (2)  |  Greek (107)  |  Idea (843)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Last (426)  |  Lord (93)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Scottish (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Story (118)  |  Structure (344)  |  Student (300)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)  |  Young (227)

The strangest thing of all is that our ulama these days have divided science into two parts. One they call Muslim science, and one European science. Because of this they forbid others to teach some of the useful sciences. They have not understood that science is that noble thing that has no connection with any nation, and is not distinguished by anything but itself. Rather, everything that is known is known by science, and every nation that becomes renowned becomes renowned through science. Men must be related to science, not science to men. How very strange it is that the Muslims study those sciences that are ascribed to Aristotle with the greatest delight, as if Aristotle were one of the pillars of the Muslims. However, if the discussion relates to Galileo, Newton, and Kepler, they consider them infidels. The father and mother of science is proof, and proof is neither Aristotle nor Galileo. The truth is where there is proof, and those who forbid science and knowledge in the belief that they are safeguarding the Islamic religion are really the enemies of that religion. Lecture on Teaching and Learning (1882).
In Nikki R. Keddie, An Islamic Response to Imperialism (1983), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Call (769)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Divided (50)  |  Europe (43)  |  Everything (476)  |  Father (110)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Infidel (3)  |  Islam (2)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mother (114)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Noble (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proof (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strange (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Understood (156)  |  Useful (250)

The subject, cosmic physics, of her inaugural lecture was reported as 'cosmetic physics' in the press (more plausible with a female Dozent!).
Anonymous
Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (1970), 16, 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmetic (4)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Female (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Press (21)  |  Report (38)  |  Subject (521)

The worst primary school scolding I ever received was for ridiculing a classmate who asked, ‘What’s an atom?’ To my third grader’s mind, the question betrayed a level of ignorance more befitting a preschooler, but the teacher disagreed and banned me from recess for a week. I had forgotten the incident until a few years ago, while sitting in on a quantum mechanics class taught by a Nobel Prizewinning physicist. Midway through a brutally abstract lecture on the hydrogen atom, a plucky sophomore raised his hand and asked the very same question. To the astonishment of all, our speaker fell silent. He stared out the window for what seemed like an eternity before answering, ‘I don’t know.’
'The Secret Life of Atoms'. Discover (Jun 2007), 28:6, 52.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Atom (355)  |  Bad (180)  |  Ban (9)  |  Betray (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Disagreed (4)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fall (230)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Incident (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Level (67)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Midway (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Primary (80)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recess (8)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Same (157)  |  School (219)  |  Scold (6)  |  Seem (145)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Star (427)  |  Stare (9)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Third (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Week (70)  |  Window (58)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

The young specialist in English Lit, having quoted me, went on to lecture me severely on the fact that in every century people have thought they understood the Universe at last, and in every century they were proved to be wrong. It follows that the one thing we can say about our modern “knowledge” is that it is wrong.
The young man then quoted with approval what Socrates had said on learning that the Delphic oracle had proclaimed him the wisest man in Greece. “If I am the wisest man,” said Socrates, “it is because I alone know that I know nothing.” The implication was that I was very foolish because I was under the impression I knew a great deal.
Alas, none of this was new to me. (There is very little that is new to me; I wish my correspondents would realize this.) This particular theme was addressed to me a quarter of a century ago by John Campbell, who specialized in irritating me. He also told me that all theories are proven wrong in time.
My answer to him was, “John, when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical, they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together.”
In The Relativity of Wrong (1989), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Both (493)  |  Century (310)  |  Deal (188)  |  Delphic (4)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flat (33)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impression (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Realize (147)  |  Say (984)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Theme (17)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Young (227)

Then one day Lagrange took out of his pocket a paper which he read at the Académe, and which contained a demonstration of the famous Postulatum of Euclid, relative to the theory of parallels. This demonstration rested on an obvious paralogism, which appeared as such to everybody; and probably Lagrange also recognised it such during his lecture. For, when he had finished, he put the paper back in his pocket, and spoke no more of it. A moment of universal silence followed, and one passed immediately to other concerns.
Quoting Lagrange at a meeting of the class of mathematical and physical sciences at the Institut de France (3 Feb 1806) in Journal des Savants (1837), 84, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Concern (228)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Finish (59)  |  Follow (378)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Pass (238)  |  Read (287)  |  Rest (280)  |  Silence (56)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universal (189)

There is a story that once, not long after he came to Berlin, Planck forgot which room had been assigned to him for a lecture and stopped at the entrance office of the university to find out. Please tell me, he asked the elderly man in charge, 'In which room does Professor Planck lecture today?' The old man patted him on the shoulder 'Don't go there, young fellow,' he said 'You are much too young to understand the lectures of our learned Professor Planck'.
Anonymous
In Barbara Lovett Cline, Men Who Made a New Physics: Physicists and the Quantum Theory (1987), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Charge (59)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Find (998)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Office (71)  |  Old (481)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Please (65)  |  Professor (128)  |  Room (40)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Story (118)  |  Tell (340)  |  Today (314)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  University (121)  |  Young (227)

There is in the chemist a form of thought by which all ideas become visible in the mind as strains of an imagined piece of music. This form of thought is developed in Faraday in the highest degree, whence it arises that to one who is not acquainted with this method of thinking, his scientific works seem barren and dry, and merely a series of researches strung together, while his oral discourse when he teaches or explains is intellectual, elegant, and of wonderful clearness.
Autobiography, 257-358. Quoted in William H. Brock, Justus Von Liebig (2002), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dry (57)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Explain (322)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Music (129)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Series (149)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

To the distracting occupations belong especially my lecture courses which I am holding this winter for the first time, and which now cost much more of my time than I like. Meanwhile I hope that the second time this expenditure of time will be much less, otherwise I would never be able to reconcile myself to it, even practical (astronomical) work must give far more satisfaction than if one brings up to B a couple more mediocre heads which otherwise would have stopped at A.
Letter to Friedrich Bessel (4 Dec 1808). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Cost (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Education (378)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Hope (299)  |  Mediocre (14)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Practical (200)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Winter (44)  |  Work (1351)

We call that fire of the black thunder-cloud “electricity,” and lecture learnedly about it, and grind the like of it out of glass and silk: but what is it? What made it? Whence comes it? Whither goes it?
The Carlyle Anthology (1876), 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Fire (189)  |  Glass (92)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Silk (13)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Whither (11)

Whatever be the detail with which you cram your student, the chance of his meeting in after life exactly that detail is almost infinitesimal; and if he does meet it, he will probably have forgotten what you taught him about it. The really useful training yields a comprehension of a few general principles with a thorough grounding in the way they apply to a variety of concrete details. In subsequent practice the men will have forgotten your particular details; but they will remember by an unconscious common sense how to apply principles to immediate circumstances. Your learning is useless to you till you have lost your textbooks, burnt your lecture notes, and forgotten the minutiae which you learned by heart for the examination. What, in the way of detail, you continually require will stick in your memory as obvious facts like the sun and the moon; and what you casually require can be looked up in any work of reference. The function of a University is to enable you to shed details in favor of principles. When I speak of principles I am hardly even thinking of verbal formulations. A principle which has thoroughly soaked into you is rather a mental habit than a formal statement. It becomes the way the mind reacts to the appropriate stimulus in the form of illustrative circumstances. Nobody goes about with his knowledge clearly and consciously before him. Mental cultivation is nothing else than the satisfactory way in which the mind will function when it is poked up into activity.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Cram (5)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Favor (63)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Form (959)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minutiae (7)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remember (179)  |  Require (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Student (300)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sun (385)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Training (80)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.
In Leaves of Grass (1881, 1882), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Applause (9)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Chart (6)  |  Column (15)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Divide (75)  |  Figure (160)  |  Learn (629)  |  Look (582)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Moist (12)  |  Myself (212)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rising (44)  |  Sick (81)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tired (13)  |  Wander (35)

When I was in college studying science, I found the experience fundamentally unsatisfying. I was continually oppressed by the feeling that my only role was to “shut up and learn.” I felt there was nothing I could say to my instructors that they would find interesting. … As I sat in the science lecture hall, I was utterly silent. That’s not a good state to be in when you are 19 years old.
In Understanding the Universe: An Inquiry Approach to Astronomy and the Nature of Scientific Research (2013), ix.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  College (66)  |  Continually (16)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Oppressed (2)  |  Role (86)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shut (41)  |  Shut Up (2)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sit (48)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Unsatisfying (3)  |  Utterly (15)  |  Year (933)

Whenever a textbook is written of real educational worth, you may be quite certain that some reviewer will say that it will be difficult to teach from it. Of course it will be difficult to teach from it. It it were easy, the book ought to be burned; for it cannot be educational. In education as elsewhere, the broad primrose path leads to a nasty place. This evil path is represented by a book or a set of lectures which will practically enable the student to learn by heart all the questions likely to be asked at the next external examination.
In 'The Aims of Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Book (392)  |  Burn (87)  |  Certain (550)  |  Course (409)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easy (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Evil (116)  |  Examination (98)  |  Heart (229)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Next (236)  |  Path (144)  |  Question (621)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)

Whereas what knowledge we derive from lectures, reading and conversation, is but the copy of other men’s men's ideas; that is, the picture of a picture; and ’tis one remove farther from the original.
In Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments (1793), Vols 3-4, Vol 4, 72-73.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Copy (33)  |  Derive (65)  |  Farther (51)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Observation (555)  |  Original (58)  |  Other (2236)  |  Picture (143)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Remove (45)

[Benjamin Peirce's] lectures were not easy to follow. They were never carefully prepared. The work with which he rapidly covered the blackboard was very illegible, marred with frequent erasures, and not infrequent mistakes (he worked too fast for accuracy). He was always ready to digress from the straight path and explore some sidetrack that had suddenly attracted his attention, but which was likely to have led nowhere when the college bell announced the close of the hour and we filed out, leaving him abstractedly staring at his work, still with chalk and eraser in his hands, entirely oblivious of his departing class.
Writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, a former student of Peirce, in 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attracted (3)  |  Bell (35)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Close (69)  |  College (66)  |  Covered (5)  |  Departing (2)  |  Easy (204)  |  Eraser (2)  |  Fast (45)  |  Follow (378)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infrequent (2)  |  Marred (3)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Path (144)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Staring (3)  |  Still (613)  |  Straight (73)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Work (1351)

[Davy's] March of Glory, which he has run for the last six weeks—within which time by the aid and application of his own great discovery, of the identity of electricity and chemical attractions, he has placed all the elements and all their inanimate combinations in the power of man; having decomposed both the Alkalies, and three of the Earths, discovered as the base of the Alkalies a new metal... Davy supposes there is only one power in the world of the senses; which in particles acts as chemical attractions, in specific masses as electricity, & on matter in general, as planetary Gravitation... when this has been proved, it will then only remain to resolve this into some Law of vital Intellect—and all human knowledge will be Science and Metaphysics the only Science.
In November 1807 Davy gave his famous Second Bakerian Lecture at the Royal Society, in which he used Voltaic batteries to “decompose, isolate and name” several new chemical elements, notably sodium and potassium.
Letter to Dorothy Wordsworth, 24 November 1807. In Earl Leslie Griggs (ed.), The Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1956), Vol. 3, 38.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (493)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  General (511)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Identity (19)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  March (46)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metal (84)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Power (746)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Specific (95)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vital (85)  |  Voltaic (9)  |  Week (70)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

[De Morgan relates that some person had made up 800 anagrams on his name, of which he had seen about 650. Commenting on these he says:]
Two of these I have joined in the title-page:
[Ut agendo surgamus arguendo gustamus.]
A few of the others are personal remarks.
Great gun! do us a sum!
is a sneer at my pursuit; but,
Go! great sum! [integral of a to the power u to the power n with respect to u] is more dignified. …
Adsum, nugator, suge!
is addressed to a student who continues talking after the lecture has commenced: …
Graduatus sum! nego
applies to one who declined to subscribe for an M.A. degree.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 82. [The Latin phrases translate as, respectively, “Such action will start arguing with taste”, “Here babbler suck!” and “I graduate! I reject.” —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Address (12)  |  Anagram (9)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argue (23)  |  Babble (2)  |  Commence (5)  |  Comment (11)  |  Continue (165)  |  Decline (26)  |  Degree (276)  |  Augustus De Morgan (45)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Great (1574)  |  Gun (9)  |  Integral (26)  |  Join (26)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Page (30)  |  Person (363)  |  Personal (67)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Relate (21)  |  Remark (28)  |  Respect (207)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Sneer (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Subscribe (2)  |  Suck (8)  |  Sum (102)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Title (18)  |  Two (937)

[I] browsed far outside science in my reading and attended public lectures - Bertrand Russell, H. G. Wells, Huxley, and Shaw being my favorite speakers. (The last, in a meeting at King's College, converted me to vegetarianism - for most of two years!).
Autobiography collected in Gardner Lindzey (ed.), A History of Psychology in Autobiography (1973), Vol. 6, 64.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attended (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  College (66)  |  Converted (2)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Aldous (Leonard) Huxley (25)  |  Last (426)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Most (1731)  |  Outside (141)  |  Reading (133)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Science (3879)  |  George Bernard Shaw (84)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Two (937)  |  Vegetarianism (2)  |  Herbert George (H.G.) Wells (38)  |  Year (933)

[J.J.] Sylvester’s methods! He had none. “Three lectures will be delivered on a New Universal Algebra,” he would say; then, “The course must be extended to twelve.” It did last all the rest of that year. The following year the course was to be Substitutions-Théorie, by Netto. We all got the text. He lectured about three times, following the text closely and stopping sharp at the end of the hour. Then he began to think about matrices again. “I must give one lecture a week on those,” he said. He could not confine himself to the hour, nor to the one lecture a week. Two weeks were passed, and Netto was forgotten entirely and never mentioned again. Statements like the following were not unfrequent in his lectures: “I haven’t proved this, but I am as sure as I can be of anything that it must be so. From this it will follow, etc.” At the next lecture it turned out that what he was so sure of was false. Never mind, he kept on forever guessing and trying, and presently a wonderful discovery followed, then another and another. Afterward he would go back and work it all over again, and surprise us with all sorts of side lights. He then made another leap in the dark, more treasures were discovered, and so on forever.
As quoted by Florian Cajori, in Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 265-266.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Confine (26)  |  Course (409)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  False (100)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forever (103)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Go Back (2)  |  Guess (61)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (186)  |  Keep (101)  |  Last (426)  |  Leap (53)  |  Light (607)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mentioned (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rest (280)  |  Say (984)  |  Side (233)  |  Statement (142)  |  Surprise (86)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Week (70)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

[Lecturing:] This has been done elegantly by Minkowski; but chalk is cheaper than grey matter, and we will do it as it comes.
Via George Pólya, present at an early lecture on Special Relativity by Einstein, who at the time preferred to show his own old formulation, not yet embracing Minkowski’s geometrical reformulation. Quote given as Pólya’s recollection in J.E. Littlewood, A Mathematician’s Miscellany, (1953). Also in the expanded edition, Béla Bollobás (ed.), 'Odds and Ends', Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Cheap (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Matter (798)  |  Hermann Minkowski (4)  |  Special Relativity (5)  |  Will (2355)

[Richard Feynman] would be standing in front of the hall smiling at us all as we came in, his fingers tapping out a complicated rhythm on the black top of the demonstration bench that crossed the front of the lecture hall. As latecomers took their seats, he picked up the chalk and began spinning it rapidly through his fingers in a manner of a professional gambler playing with a poker chip, still smiling happily as if at some secret joke. And then—still smiling—he talked to us about physics, his diagrams and equations helping us to share his understanding. It was no secret joke that brought the smile and the sparkle in his eye, it was physics. The joy of physics!
Describing his experience as a student attending Feynman lectures, in Introduction to Richard P. Feynman Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! : Adventures of a Curious Character (1986, 2010), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bench (8)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Equation (132)  |  Eye (419)  |  Joke (83)  |  Joy (107)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Playing (42)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Secret (194)  |  Share (75)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Understanding (513)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.