Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Forbid

Forbid Quotes (14 quotes)

In primis, hominis est propria VERI inquisitio atque investigato. Itaque cum sumus negotiis necessariis, curisque vacui, tum avemus aliquid videre, audire, ac dicere, cognitionemque rerum, aut occultarum aut admirabilium, ad benè beatéque vivendum necessariam ducimus; —ex quo intelligitur, quod VERUM, simplex, sincerumque sit, id esse naturæ hominis aptissimum. Huic veri videndi cupiditati adjuncta est appetitio quædam principatûs, ut nemini parere animus benè a naturâ informatus velit, nisi præcipienti, aut docenti, aut utilitatis causâ justè et legitimè imperanti: ex quo animi magnitudo existit, et humanarum rerum contemtio.
Before all other things, man is distinguished by his pursuit and investigation of TRUTH. And hence, when free from needful business and cares, we delight to see, to hear, and to communicate, and consider a knowledge of many admirable and abstruse things necessary to the good conduct and happiness of our lives: whence it is clear that whatsoever is TRUE, simple, and direct, the same is most congenial to our nature as men. Closely allied with this earnest longing to see and know the truth, is a kind of dignified and princely sentiment which forbids a mind, naturally well constituted, to submit its faculties to any but those who announce it in precept or in doctrine, or to yield obedience to any orders but such as are at once just, lawful, and founded on utility. From this source spring greatness of mind and contempt of worldly advantages and troubles.
In De Officiis, Book 1. Sect. 13. As given in epigraph to John Frederick William Herschel, A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Announce (13)  |  Business (149)  |  Care (186)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Congenial (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Delight (108)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hear (139)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Longing (19)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precept (10)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Spring (133)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Utility (49)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Yield (81)

A Law of Nature, (Lex Naturalis) is a Precept, or general Rule, found out by Reason, by which a man is forbidden to do, that, which is destructive of his life, or taketh away the means of preserving the same; and to omit, that, by which he thinketh it may be best preserved
Leviathan, ch. 14 (1651).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Destructive (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  General (511)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Omit (11)  |  Precept (10)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)

God forbid that Truth should be confined to Mathematical Demonstration! He who does not know truth at sight is unworthy of Her Notice.
Marginal note (c. 1808) written in his copy of 'Discourse VII', The Works of Sir Joshua Reynolds (1798), beside “…as true as mathematical demonstration…”. As given in William Blake, Edwin John Ellis (ed.) and William Butler Yeats (ed.), The Works of William Blake (1893), Vol. 2, 340.
Science quotes on:  |  Confine (26)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Notice (77)  |  Sight (132)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unworthy (18)

If it were possible to transfer the methods of physical or of biological science directly to the study of man, the transfer would long ago have been made ... We have failed not for lack of hypotheses which equate man with the rest of the universe, but for lack of a hypothesis (short of animism) which provides for the peculiar divergence of man ... Let me now state my belief that the peculiar factor in man which forbids our explaining his actions upon the ordinary plane of biology is a highly specialized and unstable biological complex, and that this factor is none other than language.
Linguistics as a Science (1930), 555.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Complex (188)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Fail (185)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Lack (119)  |  Language (293)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Universe (857)

IN MEMORIAM: FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
She whom we love, our Lady of Compassion,
Can never die, for Love forbids her death.
Love has bent down in his old kindly fashion,
And breathed upon her his immortal breath.
On wounded soldiers, in their anguish lying,
Her gentle spirit shall descend like rain.
Where the white flag with the red cross is flying,
There shall she dwell, the vanquisher of pain.
[In remembrance of 'The Lady of the Lamp' who died 13 Aug 1910.]
In New York Times (29 Aug 1910), 6. Collected in Summer of Love (1911), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (59)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Descend (47)  |  Down (456)  |  Flag (11)  |  Flying (72)  |  Immortal (35)  |  In Memoriam (2)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Love (309)  |  Lying (55)  |  Never (1087)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Old (481)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Rain (62)  |  Remembrance (5)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Spirit (265)  |  White (127)  |  Wound (26)

In the year 1692, James Bernoulli, discussing the logarithmic spiral [or equiangular spiral, ρ = αθ] … shows that it reproduces itself in its evolute, its involute, and its caustics of both reflection and refraction, and then adds: “But since this marvellous spiral, by such a singular and wonderful peculiarity, pleases me so much that I can scarce be satisfied with thinking about it, I have thought that it might not be inelegantly used for a symbolic representation of various matters. For since it always produces a spiral similar to itself, indeed precisely the same spiral, however it may be involved or evolved, or reflected or refracted, it may be taken as an emblem of a progeny always in all things like the parent, simillima filia matri. Or, if it is not forbidden to compare a theorem of eternal truth to the mysteries of our faith, it may be taken as an emblem of the eternal generation of the Son, who as an image of the Father, emanating from him, as light from light, remains ὁμοούσιος with him, howsoever overshadowed. Or, if you prefer, since our spira mirabilis remains, amid all changes, most persistently itself, and exactly the same as ever, it may be used as a symbol, either of fortitude and constancy in adversity, or, of the human body, which after all its changes, even after death, will be restored to its exact and perfect self, so that, indeed, if the fashion of Archimedes were allowed in these days, I should gladly have my tombstone bear this spiral, with the motto, ‘Though changed, I arise again exactly the same, Eadem numero mutata resurgo.’”
In 'The Uses of Mathesis', Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 32, 516-516. [The Latin phrase “simillima filia matri” roughly translates as “the daughter resembles the mother”. “Spira mirabilis” is Latin for “marvellous spiral”. The Greek word (?µ???s???) translates as “consubstantial”, meaning of the same substance or essence (used especially of the three persons of the Trinity in Christian theology). —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Adversity (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bear (159)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Caustic (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Death (388)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Emanate (2)  |  Emblem (4)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evolute (2)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Fortitude (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gladly (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Image (96)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  James (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motto (28)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Overshadow (2)  |  Parent (76)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Please (65)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Produce (104)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representation (53)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Restore (8)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Self (267)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Singular (23)  |  Son (24)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tombstone (2)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

It is now quite lawful for a Catholic woman to avoid pregnancy by a resort to mathematics, though she is still forbidden to resort to physics and chemistry.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pregnancy (9)  |  Resort (8)  |  Still (613)  |  Woman (151)

Let the surgeon take care to regulate the whole regimen of the patient's life for joy and happiness by promising that he will soon be well, by allowing his relatives and special friends to cheer him and by having someone tell him jokes, and let him be solaced also by music on the viol or psaltery. The surgeon must forbid anger, hatred, and sadness in the patient, and remind him that the body grows fat from joy and thin from sadness.
In James Joseph Walsh, Old-Time Makers of Medicine (1911), 270.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anger (20)  |  Body (537)  |  Care (186)  |  Friend (168)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Joke (83)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Music (129)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Soon (186)  |  Special (184)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Tell (340)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Physicians still retain something of their priestly origin; they would gladly do what they forbid.
Quoted in Frank Heynick, Jews and Medicine: An Epic Saga (2002), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Origin (239)  |  Physician (273)  |  Retain (56)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)

Physicists often quote from T. H. White’s epic novel The Once and Future King, where a society of ants declares, “Everything not forbidden is compulsory.” In other words, if there isn't a basic principle of physics forbidding time travel, then time travel is necessarily a physical possibility. (The reason for this is the uncertainty principle. Unless something is forbidden, quantum effects and fluctuations will eventually make it possible if we wait long enough. Thus, unless there is a law forbidding it, it will eventually occur.)
In Parallel Worlds: a Journey Through Creation, Higher Dimensions, and the Future of the Cosmos (2006), 136.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ant (28)  |  Basic (138)  |  Compulsory (7)  |  Declaration (10)  |  Declare (45)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enough (340)  |  Epic (12)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Future (429)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Novel (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physicists (2)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reason (744)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Travel (4)  |  Travel (114)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Wait (58)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Religion cannot object to science on moral grounds. The history of religious intolerance forbids it.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Ground (217)  |  History (673)  |  Intolerance (8)  |  Moral (195)  |  Object (422)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)

The bones of Descartes were returned to France (all except those of the right hand, which were retained by the French Treasurer-General as a souvenir for his skill in engineering the transaction) and were re-entombed in what is now the Pantheon. There was to have been a public oration, but this was hastily forbidden by order of the crown, as the doctrines of Descartes were deemed to be still too hot for handling before the people.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), 51-52. The remains of Descartes were returned to his native France, seventeen years after he died in Stockholm, Sweden.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bone (95)  |  Crown (38)  |  Deem (6)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  France (27)  |  General (511)  |  Hand (143)  |  Handle (28)  |  Hastily (7)  |  Hot (60)  |  Oration (2)  |  Order (632)  |  Pantheon (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Public (96)  |  Retain (56)  |  Return (124)  |  Right (452)  |  Skill (109)  |  Souvenir (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Transaction (13)

The strangest thing of all is that our ulama these days have divided science into two parts. One they call Muslim science, and one European science. Because of this they forbid others to teach some of the useful sciences. They have not understood that science is that noble thing that has no connection with any nation, and is not distinguished by anything but itself. Rather, everything that is known is known by science, and every nation that becomes renowned becomes renowned through science. Men must be related to science, not science to men. How very strange it is that the Muslims study those sciences that are ascribed to Aristotle with the greatest delight, as if Aristotle were one of the pillars of the Muslims. However, if the discussion relates to Galileo, Newton, and Kepler, they consider them infidels. The father and mother of science is proof, and proof is neither Aristotle nor Galileo. The truth is where there is proof, and those who forbid science and knowledge in the belief that they are safeguarding the Islamic religion are really the enemies of that religion. Lecture on Teaching and Learning (1882).
In Nikki R. Keddie, An Islamic Response to Imperialism (1983), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Call (769)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Divided (50)  |  Europe (43)  |  Everything (476)  |  Father (110)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Infidel (3)  |  Islam (2)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mother (114)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Noble (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proof (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strange (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Understood (156)  |  Useful (250)

[1665-09-03] Up, and put on my coloured suit on, very fine, and my new periwig, bought a good while since, but durst not wear, because the plague was in westminster when I bought it; and it is a wonder what will be the fashion after the plague is done as to periwigs, for nobody will dare to buy any haire for fear of the infection - that it had been cut off of heads of people dead of the plague. ... but Lord, to consider the madness of people of the town, who will (because they are forbid) come in crowds along with the dead corps to see them buried. ...
Diary of Samuel Pepys (3 Sep 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (416)  |  Cut (114)  |  Dare (50)  |  Fear (197)  |  Good (889)  |  Infection (27)  |  Lord (93)  |  Madness (33)  |  New (1216)  |  Nobody (104)  |  People (1005)  |  Plague (41)  |  See (1081)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.