Celebrating 17 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Bone

Bone Quotes (40 quotes)

Question: Explain how to determine the time of vibration of a given tuning-fork, and state what apparatus you would require for the purpose.
Answer: For this determination I should require an accurate watch beating seconds, and a sensitive ear. I mount the fork on a suitable stand, and then, as the second hand of my watch passes the figure 60 on the dial, I draw the bow neatly across one of its prongs. I wait. I listen intently. The throbbing air particles are receiving the pulsations; the beating prongs are giving up their original force; and slowly yet surely the sound dies away. Still I can hear it, but faintly and with close attention; and now only by pressing the bones of my head against its prongs. Finally the last trace disappears. I look at the time and leave the room, having determined the time of vibration of the common “pitch” fork. This process deteriorates the fork considerably, hence a different operation must be performed on a fork which is only lent.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 176-7, Question 4. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (47)  |  Answer (119)  |  Apparatus (23)  |  Attention (53)  |  Beat (9)  |  Bow (5)  |  Close (14)  |  Deterioration (4)  |  Determination (46)  |  Dial (3)  |  Difference (167)  |  Disappearance (20)  |  Drawing (17)  |  Ear (16)  |  Examination (55)  |  Explanation (128)  |  Faint (3)  |  Force (108)  |  Head (32)  |  Hearing (26)  |  Howler (15)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Looking (23)  |  Operation (72)  |  Original (22)  |  Performance (21)  |  Question (202)  |  Room (13)  |  Second (15)  |  Sensitivity (5)  |  Slow (13)  |  Sound (34)  |  Stand (32)  |  State (50)  |  Sure (13)  |  Time (252)  |  Vibration (10)  |  Watch (20)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1987), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (24)  |  Act (40)  |  Alone (19)  |  Analysis (102)  |  Balance (29)  |  Building (49)  |  Butcher (5)  |  Change (186)  |  Comfort (29)  |  Computer (62)  |  Cooking (7)  |  Cooperation (19)  |  Death (219)  |  Design (64)  |  Efficiency (22)  |  Equation (57)  |  Fight (13)  |  Hog (3)  |  Human (225)  |  Insect (48)  |  Invasion (6)  |  Manure (6)  |  Meal (11)  |  New (178)  |  Order (90)  |  Pitch (5)  |  Plan (53)  |  Problem (240)  |  Program (10)  |  Set (18)  |  Ship (23)  |  Solution (136)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Specialization (12)  |  Wall (16)  |  Writing (70)

A most vile face! and yet she spends me forty pound a year in Mercury and Hogs Bones. All her teeth were made in the Black-Fryars, both her Eyebrows i’ the Strand, and her Hair in Silver-street. Every part of Town owns a Piece of her.
A reference to artificial teeth by character Otter, speaking of his wife, in Epicoene: or, The Silent Woman (1609), Act IV, Sc. 2, 64. Also, True-wit makes a specific reference to “false Teeth” in Act I, Sc. 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Dentistry (3)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Hair (13)  |  Hog (3)  |  Mercury (33)  |  Stand (32)  |  Tooth (13)

And as for other men, who worked in tank-rooms full of steam, and in some of which there were open vats near the level of the floor, their peculiar trouble was that they fell into the vats; and when they were fished out, there was never enough of them left to be worth exhibiting,—sometimes they would be overlooked for days, till all but the bones of them had gone out into the world as Durham's Pure Leaf Lard! This contributed to the passing of the Pure Food Act of 1906.
The Jungle (1906), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Fall (46)  |  Floor (9)  |  Law (334)  |  Overlook (6)  |  Steam (19)  |  Tank (2)

At the sight of a single bone, of a single piece of bone, I recognize and reconstruct the portion of the whole from which it would have been taken. The whole being to which this fragment belonged appears in my mind's eye.
Cited by Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Comptes-Rendus de l’Académie des Sciences. 1837, 7, 116. Trans. Franck Bourdier, 'Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire versus Cuvier: The Campaign for Paleontological Evolution (1825- 1838)', Cecil J. Schneer (ed.), Toward a History of Geology (1969), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (64)  |  Being (37)  |  Belonging (12)  |  Eye (105)  |  Fragment (18)  |  Mind (346)  |  Mind’s Eye (2)  |  Morphology (15)  |  Piece (20)  |  Portion (7)  |  Recognition (51)  |  Reconstruction (10)  |  Sight (16)  |  Single (36)  |  Whole (62)

Does it seem all but incredible to you that intelligence should travel for two thousand miles, along those slender copper lines, far down in the all but fathomless Atlantic; never before penetrated … save when some foundering vessel has plunged with her hapless company to the eternal silence and darkness of the abyss? Does it seem … but a miracle … that the thoughts of living men … should burn over the cold, green bones of men and women, whose hearts, once as warm as ours, burst as the eternal gulfs closed and roared over them centuries ago?
A tribute to the Atlantic telegraph cable by Edward Everett, one of the topics included in his inauguration address at the Washington University of St. Louis (22 Apr 1857). In Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions: Volume 3 (1870), 509-511.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (13)  |  Atlantic Ocean (3)  |  Burn (15)  |  Burst (13)  |  Century (61)  |  Cold (29)  |  Copper (14)  |  Fathomless (2)  |  Foundering (2)  |  Green (14)  |  Gulf (7)  |  Heart (68)  |  Incredible (12)  |  Intelligence (99)  |  Line (25)  |  Living (35)  |  Mile (16)  |  Miracle (32)  |  Shipwreck (2)  |  Thought (237)  |  Thousand (58)  |  Travel (20)  |  Vessel (14)  |  Warm (8)

From a man’s hat, or a horse’s tail, we can reconstruct the age we live in, like that scientist, you remember, who reconstructed a mastodon from its funny-bone.
In paper, 'For Love of Beasts', Pall Mall Gazette (1912). Collected and cited in A Sheaf (1916), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (90)  |  Hat (6)  |  Horse (29)  |  Mastodon (2)  |  Reconstruction (10)  |  Scientist (306)  |  Tail (5)

I did try “to make things clear,” first to myself (an important point) and then to my students and somehow to make “these dry bones live.”
His response on his 80th birthday (1929) recognition of his mathematical contributions and teachings by his former students. As quoted by R.T. Glazebrook in Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society (Dec 1935), 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (209)  |  Clarity (27)  |  Explanation (128)  |  Mathematics (471)  |  Teaching (87)

I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild duck; and this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parents.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (15)  |  Change (186)  |  Domestic (6)  |  Duck (3)  |  Find (100)  |  Fly (39)  |  Leg (10)  |  Parent (30)  |  Proportion (35)  |  Skeleton (10)  |  Walk (31)  |  Weight (49)  |  Whole (62)  |  Wild (18)  |  Wing (23)

In the case of those solids, whether of earth, or rock, which enclose on all sides and contain crystals, selenites, marcasites, plants and their parts, bones and the shells of animals, and other bodies of this kind which are possessed of a smooth surface, these same bodies had already become hard at the time when the matter of the earth and rock containing them was still fluid. And not only did the earth and rock not produce the bodies contained in them, but they did not even exist as such when those bodies were produced in them.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (199)  |  Crystal (38)  |  Earth (313)  |  Enclosure (2)  |  Existence (180)  |  Fluid (13)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Hardness (2)  |  Matter (176)  |  Part (74)  |  Plant (124)  |  Production (81)  |  Rock (68)  |  Side (18)  |  Smooth (9)  |  Solid (24)  |  Surface (47)

It isn't easy to become a fossil. ... Only about one bone in a billion, it is thought, becomes fossilized. If that is so, it means that the complete fossil legacy of all the Americans alive today - that's 270 million people with 206 bones each - will only be about 50 bones, one-quarter of a complete skeleton. That's not to say, of course, that any of these bones will ever actually be found.
In A Short History of Nearly Everything (2003), 321-322.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (29)  |  Find (100)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Legacy (3)  |  People (77)  |  Quarter (2)  |  Skeleton (10)

It... [can] be easily shown:
1. That all present mountains did not exist from the beginning of things.
2. That there is no growing of mountains.
3. That the rocks or mountains have nothing in common with the bones of animals except a certain resemblance in hardness, since they agree in neither matter nor manner of production, nor in composition, nor in function, if one may be permitted to affirm aught about a subject otherwise so little known as are the functions of things.
4. That the extension of crests of mountains, or chains, as some prefer to call them, along the lines of certain definite zones of the earth, accords with neither reason nor experience.
5. That mountains can be overthrown, and fields carried over from one side of a high road across to the other; that peaks of mountains can be raised and lowered, that the earth can be opened and closed again, and that other things of this kind occur which those who in their reading of history wish to escape the name of credulous, consider myths.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 232-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (199)  |  Beginning (93)  |  Composition (38)  |  Existence (180)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Function (63)  |  Growth (90)  |  Mountain (85)  |  Myth (29)  |  Production (81)  |  Resemblance (17)  |  Rock (68)

Let him who so wishes take pleasure in boring us with all the wonders of nature: let one spend his life observing insects, another counting the tiny bones in the hearing membrane of certain fish, even in measuring, if you will, how far a flea can jump, not to mention so many other wretched objects of study; for myself, who am curious only about philosophy, who am sorry only not to be able to extend its horizons, active nature will always be my sole point of view; I love to see it from afar, in its breadth and its entirety, and not in specifics or in little details, which, although to some extent necessary in all the sciences, are generally the mark of little genius among those who devote themselves to them.
'L'Homme Plante', in Oeuvres Philosophiques de La Mettrie (1796), Vol. 2, 70-1. Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, edited by Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Ear (16)  |  Flea (6)  |  Genius (137)  |  Insect (48)  |  Measurement (136)  |  Nature (688)  |  Observation (339)  |  Philosophy (164)

Man is the Reasoning Animal. Such is the claim. I think it is open to dispute. Indeed, my experiments have proven to me that he is the Unreasoning Animal. Note his history, as sketched above. It seems plain to me that whatever he is he is not a reasoning animal. His record is the fantastic record of a maniac. I consider that the strongest count against his intelligence is the fact that with that record back of him he blandly sets himself up as the head animal of the lot: whereas by his own standards he is the bottom one.
In truth, man is incurably foolish. Simple things which the other animals easily learn, he is incapable of learning. Among my experiments was this. In an hour I taught a cat and a dog to be friends. I put them in a cage. In another hour I taught them to be friends with a rabbit. In the course of two days I was able to add a fox, a goose, a squirrel and some doves. Finally a monkey. They lived together in peace; even affectionately.
Next, in another cage I confined an Irish Catholic from Tipperary, and as soon as he seemed tame I added a Scotch Presbyterian from Aberdeen. Next a Turk from Constantinople; a Greek Christian from Crete; an Armenian; a Methodist from the wilds of Arkansas; a Buddhist from China; a Brahman from Benares. Finally, a Salvation Army Colonel from Wapping. Then I stayed away two whole days. When I came back to note results, the cage of Higher Animals was all right, but in the other there was but a chaos of gory odds and ends of turbans and fezzes and plaids and bones and flesh—not a specimen left alive. These Reasoning Animals had disagreed on a theological detail and carried the matter to a Higher Court.
In Letters from the Earth: Uncensored Writings (),
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (199)  |  Bottom (15)  |  Brahman (2)  |  Cage (4)  |  Cat (20)  |  Catholic (3)  |  Chaos (46)  |  China (11)  |  Christian (9)  |  Disagreement (10)  |  Dispute (7)  |  Dog (31)  |  Dove (2)  |  Experiment (460)  |  Fact (414)  |  Flesh (14)  |  Fool (45)  |  Fox (4)  |  Friend (37)  |  Goose (7)  |  Greek (28)  |  Intelligence (99)  |  Ireland (4)  |  Learning (163)  |  Monkey (28)  |  Peace (38)  |  Proof (162)  |  Rabbit (6)  |  Reasoning (70)  |  Record (37)  |  Squirrel (6)  |  Theology (25)  |  Think (31)  |  Truth (573)  |  Wild (18)

Many Species of Animals have been lost out of the World, which Philosophers and Divines are unwilling to admit, esteeming the Destruction of anyone Species a Dismembring of the Universe, and rendring the World imperfect; whereas they think the Divine Providence is especially concerned, and solicitous to secure and preserve the Works of the Creation. And truly so it is, as appears, in that it was so careful to lodge all Land Animals in the Ark at the Time of the general Deluge; and in that, of all Animals recorded in Natural Histories, we cannot say that there hath been anyone Species lost, no not of the most infirm, and most exposed to Injury and Ravine. Moreover, it is likely, that as there neither is nor can be any new Species of Animals produced, all proceeding from Seeds at first created; so Providence, without which one individual Sparrow falls not to the ground, doth in that manner watch over all that are created, that an entire Species shall not be lost or destroyed by any Accident. Now, I say, if these Bodies were sometimes the Shells and Bones of Fish, it will thence follow, that many Species have been lost out of the World... To which I have nothing to reply, but that there may be some of them remaining some where or other in the Seas, though as yet they have not come to my Knowledge. Far though they may have perished, or by some Accident been destroyed out of our Seas, yet the Race of them may be preserved and continued still in others.
John Ray
Three Physico-Theological Discourses (1713), Discourse II, 'Of the General Deluge, in the Days of Noah; its Causes and Effects', 172-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (39)  |  Admission (7)  |  Animal (199)  |  Continuation (15)  |  Creation (171)  |  Deluge (7)  |  Destruction (64)  |  Dismemberment (2)  |  Divine (23)  |  Esteem (3)  |  Fall (46)  |  Fish (43)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Ground (34)  |  Imperfection (12)  |  Infirmity (2)  |  Injury (13)  |  Knowledge (879)  |  Loss (55)  |  Natural History (31)  |  New (178)  |  Philosopher (92)  |  Preservation (19)  |  Production (81)  |  Providence (2)  |  Race (50)  |  Ravine (3)  |  Remains (8)  |  Rendering (6)  |  Reply (11)  |  Sea (83)  |  Shell (26)  |  Sparrow (3)  |  Species (119)  |  Unwillingness (3)  |  World (365)

Nature, the parent of all things, designed the human backbone to be like a keel or foundation. It is because we have a backbone that we can walk upright and stand erect. But this was not the only purpose for which Nature provided it; here, as elsewhere, she displayed great skill in turning the construction of a single member to a variety of different uses.
It Provides a Path for the Spinal Marrow, Yet is Flexible.
Firstly, she bored a hole through the posterior region of the bodies of all the vertebrae, thus fashioning a suitable pathway for the spinal marrow which would descend through them.
Secondly, she did not make the backbone out of one single bone with no joints. Such a unified construction would have afforded greater stability and a safer seat for the spinal marrow since, not having joints, the column could not have suffered dislocations, displacements, or distortions. If the Creator of the world had paid such attention to resistance to injury and had subordinated the value and importance of all other aims in the fabric of parts of the body to this one, he would certainly have made a single backbone with no joints, as when someone constructing an animal of wood or stone forms the backbone of one single and continuous component. Even if man were destined only to bend and straighten his back, it would not have been appropriate to construct the whole from one single bone. And in fact, since it was necessary that man, by virtue of his backbone, be able to perform a great variety of movements, it was better that it be constructed from many bones, even though as a result of this it was rendered more liable to injury.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 57-58, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature’s Skill in Creating a Backbone to Hold Us Erect', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (199)  |  Back (25)  |  Backbone (5)  |  Bend (5)  |  Column (8)  |  Distortion (9)  |  Flexible (3)  |  Form (112)  |  Foundation (49)  |  Human Body (22)  |  Importance (155)  |  Injury (13)  |  Joint (8)  |  Keel (3)  |  Marrow (3)  |  Member (14)  |  Movement (40)  |  Nature (688)  |  Necessity (104)  |  Path (35)  |  Posterior (2)  |  Skill (39)  |  Someone (5)  |  Stability (9)  |  Stand (32)  |  Stone (38)  |  Straight (4)  |  Unified (3)  |  Vertebra (3)  |  Virtue (33)  |  Walk (31)  |  Wood (22)

Not since the Lord himself showed his stuff to Ezekiel in the valley of dry bones had anyone shown such grace and skill in the reconstruction of animals from disarticulated skeletons. Charles R. Knight, the most celebrated of artists in the reanimation of fossils, painted all the canonical figures of dinosaurs that fire our fear and imagination to this day.
In Wonderful Life: the Burgess Shale and the Nature of History (1990), 23. First sentence of chapter one.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (30)  |  Celebration (4)  |  Dinosaur (16)  |  Fear (64)  |  Fire (79)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Grace (8)  |  Imagination (175)  |  Charles R. Knight (2)  |  Painting (19)  |  Reconstruction (10)  |  Skeleton (10)  |  Skill (39)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (6)  |  Anatomy (40)  |  Angle (12)  |  Attached (2)  |  Beam (7)  |  Bend (5)  |  Boat (8)  |  Body (133)  |  Breast (4)  |  Constituent (12)  |  Creator (22)  |  Crush (3)  |  Cut (25)  |  Defense (10)  |  Devoid (4)  |  Differentiation (15)  |  Driest (2)  |  Exception (23)  |  Fabric (9)  |  Finger (20)  |  Food (100)  |  Form (112)  |  Foundation (49)  |  Framework (12)  |  Function (63)  |  God (271)  |  Grind (7)  |  Hand (59)  |  Hearing (26)  |  House (27)  |  Human (225)  |  Joint (8)  |  Keel (3)  |  Move (16)  |  Natural (74)  |  Organ (49)  |  Pole (10)  |  Pound (4)  |  Process (144)  |  Professor (33)  |  Prop (5)  |  Protection (17)  |  Reason (211)  |  Rib (3)  |  Seed (30)  |  Sensation (13)  |  Serve (19)  |  Size (27)  |  Skull (3)  |  Specification (5)  |  Spine (5)  |  Strength (34)  |  Substance (57)  |  Teeth (11)  |  Tent (4)  |  Thumb (5)  |  Toe (4)  |  Vertebra (3)  |  Wall (16)

One never finds fossil bones bearing no resemblance to human bones. Egyptian mummies, which are at least three thousand years old, show that men were the same then. The same applies to other mummified animals such as cats, dogs, crocodiles, falcons, vultures, oxen, ibises, etc. Species, therefore, do not change by degrees, but emerged after the new world was formed. Nor do we find intermediate species between those of the earlier world and those of today's. For example, there is no intermediate bear between our bear and the very different cave bear. To our knowledge, no spontaneous generation occurs in the present-day world. All organized beings owe their life to their fathers. Thus all records corroborate the globe's modernity. Negative proof: the barbaritY of the human species four thousand years ago. Positive proof: the great revolutions and the floods preserved in the traditions of all peoples.
'Note prese al Corso di Cuvier. Corso di Geologia all'Ateneo nel 1805', quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck, trans. J. Mandelbaum (1988), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (199)  |  Bear (7)  |  Cat (20)  |  Change (186)  |  Crocodile (3)  |  Degree (22)  |  Dog (31)  |  Egypt (14)  |  Emergence (19)  |  Falcon (2)  |  Find (100)  |  Flood (22)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Generation (76)  |  Human (225)  |  Human Species (2)  |  Intermediate (12)  |  Knowledge (879)  |  Men (16)  |  Mummy (2)  |  Never (22)  |  New (178)  |  Ox (2)  |  People (77)  |  Positive (16)  |  Present Day (2)  |  Preservation (19)  |  Proof (162)  |  Resemblance (17)  |  Revolution (45)  |  Same (28)  |  Species (119)  |  Spontaneity (4)  |  Thousand (58)  |  Tradition (22)  |  Vulture (3)  |  World (365)  |  Year (110)

Quiet this metal!
Let the manes put off their terror, let
them put off their aqueous bodies with fire.
Let them assume the milk-white bodies of agate.
Let them draw together the bones of the metal.
'The Alchemist: Chant for the Transmutation of Metal'. In T. S. Eliot (ed.), Ezra Pound: Selected Poems (1928), 61-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (19)  |  Fire (79)  |  Metal (26)  |  Poem (79)  |  Terror (5)  |  White (18)

Science has blown to atoms, as she can rend and rive in the rocks themselves; but in those rocks she has found, and read aloud, the great stone book which is the history of the earth, even when darkness sat upon the face of the deep. Along their craggy sides she has traced the footprints of birds and beasts, whose shapes were never seen by man. From within them she has brought the bones, and pieced together the skeletons, of monsters that would have crushed the noted dragons of the fables at a blow.
Book review of Robert Hunt, Poetry of Science (1848), in the London Examiner (1848). Although uncredited in print, biographers identified his authorship from his original handwritten work. Collected in Charles Dickens and ‎Frederic George Kitton (ed.) Old Lamps for New Ones: And Other Sketches and Essays (1897), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (190)  |  Beast (18)  |  Bird (69)  |  Blow (6)  |  Book (129)  |  Crag (4)  |  Darkness (16)  |  Deep (29)  |  Dragon (3)  |  Earth (313)  |  Fable (5)  |  Face (37)  |  Footprint (6)  |  Great (110)  |  History (206)  |  Monster (10)  |  Piece (20)  |  Reading (46)  |  Rock (68)  |  Science (1133)  |  Shape (28)  |  Skeleton (10)  |  Stone (38)  |  Tracing (3)

That special substance according to whose mass and degree of development all the creatures of this world take rank in the scale of creation, is not bone, but brain.
The Foot-prints of the Creator: Or, The Asterolepis of Stromness (1850, 1859), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (133)  |  Creation (171)  |  Creature (67)  |  Development (172)  |  Mass (38)  |  Special (35)  |  Substance (57)

The first acquaintance which most people have with mathematics is through arithmetic. That two and two make four is usually taken as the type of a simple mathematical proposition which everyone will have heard of. … The first noticeable fact about arithmetic is that it applies to everything, to tastes and to sounds, to apples and to angels, to the ideas of the mind and to the bones of the body.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (8)  |  Angel (14)  |  Apple (25)  |  Application (92)  |  Arithmetic (50)  |  Body (133)  |  Idea (313)  |  Mathematics (471)  |  Mind (346)  |  Sound (34)  |  Taste (23)

The frequency of disastrous consequences in compound fracture, contrasted with the complete immunity from danger to life or limb in simple fracture, is one of the most striking as well as melancholy facts in surgical practice.
'On a New Method of Treating Compound Fracture, Abscesses, etc: With Observations on the Conditions of Supperation', Part I, The Lancet (1867), 326.
Science quotes on:  |  Fracture (2)  |  Infection (17)  |  Treatment (68)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorption (5)  |  Ash (7)  |  Atrophy (2)  |  Balance (29)  |  Blood (71)  |  Body (133)  |  Brain (133)  |  Break (23)  |  Chemist (69)  |  Composition (38)  |  Condition (93)  |  Constant (24)  |  Constituent (12)  |  Determined (4)  |  Environment (98)  |  Exaggeration (6)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Failure (82)  |  Fire (79)  |  Foreign (9)  |  Gland (7)  |  Ideal (34)  |  Immediate (12)  |  Incidental (6)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (60)  |  Innumerable (12)  |  Internal (8)  |  Keep (13)  |  Kidney (9)  |  Loaf (2)  |  Major (13)  |  Manufacturing (20)  |  Master (30)  |  Mouth (13)  |  Muscle (28)  |  Operation (72)  |  Performance (21)  |  Proper (19)  |  Removal (10)  |  Responsibility (29)  |  Reverse (9)  |  Sleep (27)  |  State (50)  |  Substance (57)  |  Survival (37)  |  Synthesis (33)  |  Task (44)  |  Variety (37)

The spine is a series of bones running down your back. You sit on one end of it and your head sits on the other.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Quip (71)  |  Spine (5)

There were details like clothing, hair styles and the fragile objects that hardly ever survive for the archaeologist—musical instruments, bows and arrows, and body ornaments depicted as they were worn. … No amounts of stone and bone could yield the kinds of information that the paintings gave so freely
As quoted in Current Biography Yearbook (1985), 259.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (14)  |  Archaeologist (10)  |  Arrow (9)  |  Bow (5)  |  Clothing (6)  |  Detail (48)  |  Fragile (3)  |  Freely (4)  |  Giving (11)  |  Hair (13)  |  Information (69)  |  Instrument (53)  |  Kind (41)  |  Music (39)  |  Ornament (10)  |  Painting (19)  |  Stone (38)  |  Survival (37)  |  Yield (11)

These rocks, these bones, these fossil forms and shells
Shall yet be touched with beauty and reveal
The secrets if the book of earth to man.
In The Book of Earth (1925), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (125)  |  Book (129)  |  Earth (313)  |  Form (112)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Man (288)  |  Revealing (3)  |  Rock (68)  |  Secret (61)  |  Shell (26)  |  Touch (27)

To the engineer falls the job of clothing the bare bones of science with life, comfort, and hope.
Reprint of his 1916 statement in 'Engineering as a Profession', Engineer’s Week (1954).
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (5)  |  Clothing (6)  |  Comfort (29)  |  Engineer (55)  |  Hope (65)  |  Life (606)  |  Science (1133)

To wage war with Marchand or anyone else again will benefit nobody and bring little profit to science. You consume yourself in this way, you ruin your liver and eventually your nerves with Morrison pills. Imagine the year 1900 when we have disintegrated into carbonic acid, ammonia and water and our bone substance is perhaps once more a constituent of the bones of the dog who defiles our graves. Who will then worry his head as to whether we have lived in peace or anger, who then will know about your scientific disputes and of your sacrifice of health and peace of mind for science? Nobody. But your good ideas and the discoveries you have made, cleansed of all that is extraneous to the subject, will still be known and appreciated for many years to come. But why am I trying to advise the lion to eat sugar.
Letter from Wohler to Liebig (9 Mar 1843). In A. W. Hofmann (ed.), Aus Justus Liebigs und Friedrich Wohlers Briefwechsel (1888), Vol. 1, 224. Trans. Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Ammonia (9)  |  Carbon Dioxide (15)  |  Discovery (480)  |  Dispute (7)  |  Grave (9)  |  Health (112)  |  Idea (313)  |  Lion (10)  |  Peace (38)  |  Sugar (11)  |  War (99)

To write the true natural history of the world, we should need to be able to follow it from within. It would thus appear no longer as an interlocking succession of structural types replacing one another, but as an ascension of inner sap spreading out in a forest of consolidated instincts. Right at its base, the living world is constituted by conscious clothes in flesh and bone.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 151. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (15)  |  Ascension (2)  |  Base (16)  |  Clothes (5)  |  Conscious (6)  |  Constituted (3)  |  Flesh (14)  |  Follow (30)  |  Forest (68)  |  Inner (11)  |  Instinct (38)  |  Living (35)  |  Natural History (31)  |  Need (86)  |  Sap (2)  |  Spreading (5)  |  Structural (5)  |  Succession (35)  |  True (49)  |  Type (21)  |  World (365)  |  Write (26)

Twitching occurs in all parts that can stretch, but never occurs in bones and cartilages, because bones and cartilages do not stretch in any way.
As quoted in Robert Taylor, White Coat Tales: Medicine's Heroes, Heritage, and Misadventures (2010), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Stretch (4)

We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh-and-bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun,—a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal.‎
John Muir
In My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), 20. Based on Muir's original journals and sketches of his 1869 stay in the Sierra.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (108)  |  Beauty (125)  |  Cell (104)  |  Enthusiasm (24)  |  Fill (16)  |  Flesh (14)  |  Glass (27)  |  Immortality (2)  |  Inseparable (4)  |  Kindling (2)  |  Mountain (85)  |  Nature (688)  |  Nerve (59)  |  Pore (5)  |  Quiver (2)  |  Rock (68)  |  Sickness (16)  |  Stream (16)  |  Sun (132)  |  Tabernacle (2)  |  Thrill (10)  |  Transparent (3)  |  Tree (106)  |  Wave (39)  |  Wellness (2)

We must in imagination sweep off the drifted matter that clogs the surface of the ground; we must suppose all the covering of moss and heath and wood to be torn away from the sides of the mountains, and the green mantle that lies near their feet to be lifted up; we may then see the muscular integuments, and sinews, and bones of our mother Earth, and so judge of the part played by each of them during those old convulsive movements whereby her limbs were contorted and drawn up into their present posture.
Letter 2 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Convulsion (3)  |  Covering (3)  |  Drift (4)  |  Earth (313)  |  Feet (5)  |  Green (14)  |  Ground (34)  |  Heath (4)  |  Imagination (175)  |  Integument (2)  |  Judge (23)  |  Lift (7)  |  Limb (4)  |  Matter (176)  |  Moss (7)  |  Mother (35)  |  Mountain (85)  |  Movement (40)  |  Muscle (28)  |  Part (74)  |  Play (25)  |  Posture (3)  |  Present (62)  |  Side (18)  |  Supposition (31)  |  Surface (47)  |  Sweep (4)  |  Torn (4)  |  Wood (22)

What opposite discoveries we have seen!
(Signs of true genius, and of empty pockets.)
One makes new noses, one a guillotine,
One breaks your bones, one sets them in their sockets;
But vaccination certainly has been
A kind antithesis to Congreve's rockets, ...
Don Juan (1819, 1858), Canto I, CCXXIX, 35. Referring to Edward Jenner's work on vaccination (started 14 May 1796), later applied by Napoleon who caused his soldiers to be vaccinated. Sir William Congreve's shells, invented in 1804, proved very effective at the battle of Leipzig (1813).
Science quotes on:  |  Antithesis (3)  |  Break (23)  |  Sir William Congreve (2)  |  Discovery (480)  |  Emptiness (2)  |  Genius (137)  |  New (178)  |  Nose (8)  |  Opposite (25)  |  Pocket (4)  |  Rocket (20)  |  Setting (5)  |  Socket (2)  |  Vaccination (5)

Why are the bones of great fishes, and oysters and corals and various other shells and sea-snails, found on the high tops of mountains that border the sea, in the same way in which they are found in the depths of the sea?
'Physical Geography', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Coral (6)  |  Fish (43)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Mountain (85)  |  Oyster (5)  |  Sea (83)  |  Shell (26)

Why, these men would destroy the Bible on evidence that would not convict a habitual criminal of a misdemeanor. They found a tooth in a sand pit in Nebraska with no other bones about it, and from that one tooth decided that it was the remains of the missing link. They have queer ideas about age too. They find a fossil and when they are asked how old it is they say they can't tell without knowing what rock it was in, and when they are asked how old the rock is they say they can't tell unless they know how old the fossil is.
In Henry Fairfield Osborn, 'Osborn States the Case For Evolution', New York Times (12 Jul 1925), XX1. In fact, the tooth was misidentified as anthropoid by Osborn, who over-zealously proposed Nebraska Man in 1922. This tooth was shortly thereafter found to be that of a peccary (a Pliocene pig) when further bones were found. A retraction was made in 1927, correcting the scientific blunder.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (90)  |  Bible (49)  |  Conviction (33)  |  Criminal (8)  |  Evidence (107)  |  Fossil (81)  |  Idea (313)  |  Missing Link (4)  |  Queer (3)  |  Rock (68)  |  Tooth (13)

[Concerning the Piltdown hoax,] that jaw has been literally a bone of contention for a long time.
In 'Quotation Marks', New York Times (29 Nov 1953), SM71.
Science quotes on:  |  Contention (7)  |  Hoax (2)  |  Jaw (2)  |  Long (29)  |  Time (252)

[On common water.] Its substance reaches everywhere; it touches the past and prepares the future; it moves under the poles and wanders thinly in the heights of air. It can assume forms of exquisite perfection in a snowflake, or strip the living to a single shining bone cast up by the sea.
From essay 'The Flow of the River', collected in The Immense Journey: An Imaginative Naturalist Explores the Mysteries of Man and Nature (1957, 1959), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (108)  |  Assume (8)  |  Cast (10)  |  Common (57)  |  Everywhere (6)  |  Exquisite (4)  |  Form (112)  |  Future (145)  |  Height (15)  |  Living (35)  |  Move (16)  |  Past (64)  |  Perfection (49)  |  Prepare (4)  |  Reach (34)  |  Sea (83)  |  Shining (7)  |  Single (36)  |  Snowflake (7)  |  Strip (3)  |  Substance (57)  |  Touch (27)  |  Under (5)  |  Wander (10)  |  Water (171)

“Try another Subtraction sum. Take a bone from a dog: what remains?” [asked the Red Queen]
Alice considered. “The bone wouldn't remain, of course, if I took it—and the dog wouldn’t remain; it would come to bite me—and I’m sure I shouldn’t remain!”
“Then you think nothing would remain?” said the Red Queen.
“I think that’s the answer.”
“Wrong, as usual,” said the Red Queen, “the dog's temper would remain.”
Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 190-191.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice (4)  |  Answer (119)  |  Asked (2)  |  Bite (5)  |  Considered (8)  |  Dog (31)  |  Nothing (136)  |  Red Queen (2)  |  Remain (22)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  Sum (22)  |  Temper (3)  |  Think (31)  |  Try (45)  |  Wrong (67)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.