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Who said: “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”
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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Butcher

Butcher Quotes (6 quotes)

A dead cow or sheep lying in a pasture is recognized as carrion. The same sort of a carcass dressed and hung up in a butcher's stall passes as food.
This quote is consistent in sentiment with others documented as by Kellogg, but Webmaster has so far not found the original source for this one. If you know the primary source of this quote, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Carcass (2)  |  Carrion (4)  |  Cow (27)  |  Dead (45)  |  Dressed (2)  |  Food (139)  |  Pasture (11)  |  Recognized (3)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Stall (3)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1987), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Act (80)  |  Alone (61)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Balance (43)  |  Bone (57)  |  Building (51)  |  Change (291)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Computer (84)  |  Cooking (7)  |  Cooperation (27)  |  Death (270)  |  Design (92)  |  Efficiency (25)  |  Equation (69)  |  Fight (37)  |  Hog (4)  |  Human (445)  |  Insect (57)  |  Invasion (7)  |  Manure (6)  |  Meal (14)  |  New (340)  |  Order (167)  |  Pitch (7)  |  Plan (69)  |  Problem (362)  |  Program (32)  |  Set (56)  |  Ship (33)  |  Solution (168)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Specialization (12)  |  Wall (20)  |  Writing (72)

A scientist without imagination is a butcher with dull knives and out-worn scales.
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 204.
Science quotes on:  |  Dull (26)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Knife (10)  |  Scale (49)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Worn (4)

Just as Americans have discovered the hidden energy costs in a multitude of products—in refrigerating a steak, for example, on its way to the butcher—they are about to discover the hidden water costs. Beginning with the water that irrigated the corn that was fed to the steer, the steak may have accounted for 3,500 gallons. The water that goes into a 1,000-pound steer would float a destroyer. It takes 14,935 gallons of water to grow a bushel of wheat, 60,000 gallons to produce a ton of steel, 120 gallons to put a single egg on the breakfast table.
From 'The Browning of America: Drought, Waste and Pollution Threaten a Water Shortage', Newsweek (23 Feb 1981), 26-30. In long excerpt in William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi, History of Soymilk and Other Non-Dairy Milks (1226-2013) (2013), 1126-1127.
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Breakfast (7)  |  Bushel (3)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Corn (10)  |  Cost (31)  |  Destroyer (2)  |  Egg (41)  |  Energy (185)  |  Feed (22)  |  Floating (3)  |  Growing (15)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Irrigation (6)  |  Production (105)  |  Refrigeration (3)  |  Single (72)  |  Steak (3)  |  Steel (14)  |  Steer (2)  |  Table (25)  |  Ton (7)  |  Water (244)  |  Wheat (8)

The first drizzling shower is born...
[Then] the flood comes down,
Threatening with deluge this devoted town. ...
Now from all parts the swelling kennels flow,
And bear their trophies with them as they go:
Filth of all hues and odors seem to tell
What street they sailed from, by their sight and smell.
They, as each torrent drives with rapid force,
From Smithfield or St. Pulchre’s shape their course,
And in huge confluence joined at Snow Hill ridge,
Fall from the conduit prone to Holborn Bridge.
Sweepings from butchers’ stalls, dung, guts, and blood.
Drowned puppies, stinking sprats, all drenched in mud,
Dead cats, and turnip tops, come tumbling down the flood.
Poem, 'A Description of a City Shower', first published in the Tatler, No. 238 (17 Oct 1710). Reprinted in Pope and Swift's Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711, 1721), 225-227. Swift wrote at the time in London that the street surface open gutters (kennels) were the primary means for handling stormwater flows and disposing of every kind of human and animal waste. “Devoted” means overwhelmed. Smithfield was a market with butchers' shops and cattle and sheep pens. St. Sepulchre refers to a church in Holborn. The Holborn Conduit was taken down in 1746. Below Holborn Bridge ran the Fleet Ditch (a stagnant remnant of the former Fleet River after its water supply had been diverted). It was joined by a stream called Snow Hill. Notes printed with the poem collected in Jay Parini, The Wadsworth Anthology Of Poetry (2005), 723-724.
Science quotes on:  |  Blood (95)  |  Cat (31)  |  Conduit (2)  |  Deluge (7)  |  Dung (4)  |  Filth (4)  |  Flood (26)  |  Guts (2)  |  Mud (14)  |  Puppy (2)  |  Sewer (4)  |  Shower (4)  |  Smell (16)  |  Stall (3)  |  Sweeping (2)  |  Torrent (3)  |  Turnip (3)  |  Water (244)

This is all very fine, but it won't do—Anatomy—botany—Nonsense! Sir, I know an old woman in Covent Garden, who understands botany better, and as for anatomy, my butcher can dissect a joint full as well; no, young man, all that is stuff; you must go to the bedside, it is there alone you can learn disease!
Comment to Hans Sloane on Robert Boyle's letter of introduction describing Sloane as a 'ripe scholar, a good botanist, a skilful anatomist'.
Quoted in John D. Comrie, 'Life of Thomas Sydenham, M. D.', in Comrie (ed.), Selected Works of Thomas Sydenham (1922), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Bedside (2)  |  Botany (47)  |  Disease (257)  |  Dissection (26)  |  Introduction (31)  |  Joint (11)  |  Learning (174)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Woman (94)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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