Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Familiar

Familiar Quotes (43 quotes)

Active experimentation must force the apparent facts of nature into forms different to those in which they familiarly present themselves; and thus make them tell the truth about themselves, as torture may compel an unwilling witness to reveal what he has been concealing.
In Reconstruction in Philosophy (1920), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Compel (30)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Different (577)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Present (619)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Torture (29)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unwilling (9)  |  Witness (54)

Although with the majority of those who study and practice in these capacities [engineers, builders, surveyors, geographers, navigators, hydrographers, astronomers], secondhand acquirements, trite formulas, and appropriate tables are sufficient for ordinary purposes, yet these trite formulas and familiar rules were originally or gradually deduced from the profound investigations of the most gifted minds, from the dawn of science to the present day. … The further developments of the science, with its possible applications to larger purposes of human utility and grander theoretical generalizations, is an achievement reserved for a few of the choicest spirits, touched from time to time by Heaven to these highest issues. The intellectual world is filled with latent and undiscovered truth as the material world is filled with latent electricity.
In Orations and Speeches, Vol. 3 (1870), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Acquirement (3)  |  Application (242)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Builder (12)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Development (422)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Far (154)  |  Fill (61)  |  Formula (98)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geographer (6)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grand (27)  |  Heaven (258)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hydrographer (3)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Issue (42)  |  Large (394)  |  Latent (12)  |  Majority (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Material World (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Originally (6)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Present Day (5)  |  Profound (104)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Table (104)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Trite (4)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Utility (49)  |  World (1774)

At the sea shore you pick up a pebble, fashioned after a law of nature, in the exact form that best resists pressure, and worn as smooth as glass. It is so perfect that you take it as a keepsake. But could you know its history from the time when a rough fragment of rock fell from the overhanging cliff into the sea, to be taken possession of by the under currents, and dragged from one ocean to another, perhaps around the world, for a hundred years, until in reduced and perfect form it was cast upon the beach as you find it, you would have a fit illustration of what many principles, now in familiar use, have endured, thus tried, tortured and fashioned during the ages.
From Address (1 Aug 1875), 'The Growth of Principles' at Saratoga. Collected in William L. Snyder (ed.), Great Speeches by Great Lawyers: A Collection of Arguments and Speeches (1901), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Beach (21)  |  Best (459)  |  Cast (66)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Current (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Form (959)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Glass (92)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Possession (65)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reduced (3)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rough (6)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seashore (6)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Wear (18)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Being perpetually charmed by his familiar siren, that is, by his geometry, he [Archimedes] neglected to eat and drink and took no care of his person; that he was often carried by force to the baths, and when there he would trace geometrical figures in the ashes of the fire, and with his finger draws lines upon his body when it was anointed with oil, being in a state of great ecstasy and divinely possessed by his science.
Plutarch
As translated in George Finlay Simmons, Calculus Gems: Brief Lives and Memorable Mathematics, (1992), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ash (20)  |  Bath (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Care (186)  |  Carry (127)  |  Charm (51)  |  Divine (112)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Ecstasy (9)  |  Figure (160)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Force (487)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Line (91)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Often (106)  |  Oil (59)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Person (363)  |  Possess (156)  |  Science (3879)  |  Siren (4)  |  State (491)  |  Trace (103)

Common sense is not wrong in the view that is meaningful, appropriate and necessary to talk about the large objects of our daily experience …. Common sense is wrong only if it insists that what is familiar must reappear in what is unfamiliar.
In 'Uncommon Sense', collected in J. Robert Oppenheimer, Nicholas Metropolis (ed.) and ‎Gian-Carlo Rota (ed.), Uncommon Sense (1984), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Daily (87)  |  Experience (467)  |  Insist (20)  |  Large (394)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Reappear (4)  |  Sense (770)  |  Talk (100)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  View (488)  |  Wrong (234)

Fiction is, indeed, an indispensable supplement to logic, or even a part of it; whether we are working inductively or deductively, both ways hang closely together with fiction: and axioms, though they seek to be primary verities, are more akin to fiction. If we had realized the nature of axioms, the doctrine of Einstein, which sweeps away axioms so familiar to us that they seem obvious truths, and substitutes others which seem absurd because they are unfamiliar, might not have been so bewildering.
In The Dance of Life (1923), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Akin (5)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Bewildering (3)  |  Both (493)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Fiction (22)  |  Hang (45)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Logic (287)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Realize (147)  |  Seek (213)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Verity (5)  |  Way (1217)

For all these years you were merely
A smear of light through our telescopes
On the clearest, coldest night; a hint
Of a glint, just a few pixels wide
On even your most perfectly-framed portraits.
But now, now we see you!
Swimming out of the dark - a great
Stone shark, your star-tanned skin pitted
And pocked, scarred after eons of drifting
Silently through the endless ocean of space.
Here on Earth our faces lit up as we saw
You clearly for the first time; eyes wide
With wonder we traced the strangely familiar
Grooves raked across your sides,
Wondering if Rosetta had doubled back to Mars
And raced past Phobos by mistake –
Then you were gone, falling back into the black,
Not to be seen by human eyes again for a thousand
Blue Moons or more. But we know you now,
We know you; you’ll never be just a speck of light again.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Double (15)  |  Drift (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endless (56)  |  Eon (11)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  First Time (10)  |  Glint (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Groove (3)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Mars (44)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Past (337)  |  Pit (19)  |  Pixel (2)  |  Portrait (4)  |  Race (268)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scar (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Shark (10)  |  Side (233)  |  Silently (4)  |  Skin (47)  |  Smear (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Speck (23)  |  Star (427)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Year (933)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Build (204)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consist (223)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Dead (59)  |  Direct (225)  |  Elude (10)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extend (128)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ineffable (4)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Memory (134)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Moment (253)  |  Personality (62)  |  Physical (508)  |  Probability (130)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Soft (29)  |  Someday (14)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Will (2355)

I despair of persuading people to drop the familiar and comforting tactic of dichotomy. Perhaps, instead, we might expand the framework of debates by seeking other dichotomies more appropriate than, or simply different from, the conventional divisions. All dichotomies are simplifications, but the rendition of a conflict along differing axes of several orthogonal dichotomies might provide an amplitude of proper intellectual space without forcing us to forgo our most comforting tool of thought.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amplitude (4)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Axe (15)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Debate (38)  |  Despair (40)  |  Dichotomy (4)  |  Differ (85)  |  Different (577)  |  Division (65)  |  Drop (76)  |  Expand (53)  |  Force (487)  |  Forgo (4)  |  Framework (31)  |  Instead (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Proper (144)  |  Provide (69)  |  Seek (213)  |  Several (32)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Simply (53)  |  Space (500)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tool (117)

I have decided today that the United States should proceed at once with the development of an entirely new type of space transportation system designed to help transform the space frontier of the 1970s into familiar territory, easily accessible for human endeavor in the 1980s and ’90s. This system will center on a space vehicle that can shuttle repeatedly from Earth to orbit and back. It will revolutionize transportation into near space, by routinizing it. It will take the astronomical costs out of astronautics. In short, it will go a long way toward delivering the rich benefits of practical space utilization and the valuable spin-offs from space efforts into the daily lives of Americans and all people.
Statement by President Nixon (5 Jan 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Cost (86)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Decide (41)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Design (195)  |  Development (422)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easily (35)  |  Effort (227)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Orbit (81)  |  People (1005)  |  Practical (200)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Revolutionize (8)  |  Routine (25)  |  Short (197)  |  Shuttle (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Shuttle (12)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spin-Off (2)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Territory (24)  |  Today (314)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Type (167)  |  United States (23)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Utilize (9)  |  Value (365)  |  Vehicle (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

I recall my own emotions: I had just been initiated into the mysteries of the complex number. I remember my bewilderment: here were magnitudes patently impossible and yet susceptible of manipulations which lead to concrete results. It was a feeling of dissatisfaction, of restlessness, a desire to fill these illusory creatures, these empty symbols, with substance. Then I was taught to interpret these beings in a concrete geometrical way. There came then an immediate feeling of relief, as though I had solved an enigma, as though a ghost which had been causing me apprehension turned out to be no ghost at all, but a familiar part of my environment.
In Tobias Dantzig and Joseph Mazur (ed.), 'The Two Realities', Number: The Language of Science (1930, ed. by Joseph Mazur 2007), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complex Number (3)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Creature (233)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Environment (216)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Illusory (2)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Lead (384)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Number (699)  |  Patently (4)  |  Recall (10)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Restless (11)  |  Restlessness (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Solve (130)  |  Substance (248)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Teach (277)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Way (1217)

In gaining knowledge you must accustom yourself to the strictest sequence. You must be familiar with the very groundwork of science before you try to climb the heights. Never start on the “next” before you have mastered the “previous.”
Translation of a note, 'Bequest of Pavlov to the Academic Youth of his Country', written a few days before his death for a student magazine, The Generation of the Victors. As published in 'Pavlov and the Spirit of Science', Nature (4 Apr 1936), 137, 572.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Groundwork (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Start (221)  |  Try (283)

It is another property of the human mind that whenever men can form no idea of distant and unknown things, they judge them by what is familiar and at hand.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 122, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948, 1984), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Distant (33)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Judge (108)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Property (168)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Whenever (81)

No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Head (81)  |  Home (170)  |  Old (481)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rest (280)  |  Travel (114)

Of all the offspring of Time, Error is the most ancient, and is so old and familiar an acquaintance, that Truth, when discovered, comes upon most of us like an intruder, and meets the intruder’s welcome.
From Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions (1841), Vol. 1, 314.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Discover (553)  |  Error (321)  |  Intruder (4)  |  Meet (31)  |  Most (1731)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Old (481)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Welcome (16)

Over the years it has become clear that adjustments to the physical environment are behavioral as well as physiological and are inextricably intertwined with ecology and evolution. Consequently, a student of the physiology of adaptation should not only be a technically competent physiologist, but also be familiar with the evolutionary and ecological setting of the phenomenon that he or she is studying.
From 'Interspecific comparison as a tool for ecological physiologists', collected in M.E. Feder, A.F. Bennett, W.W. Burggren, and R.B. Huey, (eds.), New Directions in Ecological Physiology (1987), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  Become (815)  |  Behavioral (6)  |  Clear (100)  |  Competent (20)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Inextricably (2)  |  Intertwine (4)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Technically (5)  |  Year (933)

Recurrences of like cases in which A is always connected with B, that is, like results under like circumstances, that is again, the essence of the connection of cause and effect, exist but in the abstraction which we perform for the purpose of mentally reproducing the facts. Let a fact become familiar, and we no longer require this putting into relief of its connecting marks, our attention is no longer attracted to the new and surprising, and we cease to speak of cause and effect.
In The Science of Mechanics (1893), 483.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Cease (79)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Effect (393)  |  Essence (82)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Mental (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recurrence (5)  |  Relief (30)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Speak (232)  |  Surprising (4)

Thanks to the sharp eyes of a Minnesota man, it is possible that two identical snowflakes may finally have been observed. While out snowmobiling, Oley Skotchgaard noticed a snowflake that looked familiar to him. Searching his memory, he realized it was identical to a snowflake he had seen as a child in Vermont. Weather experts, while excited, caution that the match-up will be difficult to verify.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (24)  |  Child (307)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Excite (15)  |  Expert (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Identical (53)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Memory (134)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Possible (552)  |  Realize (147)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Two (937)  |  Verify (23)  |  Weather (44)  |  Will (2355)

The complexity of contemporary biology has led to an extreme specialization, which has inevitably been followed by a breakdown in communication between disciplines. Partly as a result of this, the members of each specialty tend to feel that their own work is fundamental and that the work of other groups, although sometimes technically ingenious, is trivial or at best only peripheral to an understanding of truly basic problems and issues. There is a familiar resolution to this problem but it is sometimes difficulty to accept emotionally. This is the idea that there are a number of levels of biological integration and that each level offers problems and insights that are unique to it; further, that each level finds its explanations of mechanism in the levels below, and its significances in the levels above it.
From 'Interaction of physiology and behavior under natural conditions', collected in R.I. Bowman (ed.), The Galapagos (1966), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Basic (138)  |  Below (24)  |  Best (459)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Breakdown (3)  |  Communication (94)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Emotionally (3)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Group (78)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Insight (102)  |  Integration (19)  |  Issue (42)  |  Lead (384)  |  Level (67)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Member (41)  |  Number (699)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Partly (5)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Result (677)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Technically (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Truly (116)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unique (67)  |  Work (1351)

The concepts most familiar to us are often the most mysterious.
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (221)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Often (106)

The difficulty really is psychological and exists in the perpetual torment that results from your saying to yourself, “But how can it be like that?” which is a reflection of uncontrolled but utterly vain desire to see it in terms of something familiar. … If you will simply admit that maybe [Nature] does behave like this, you will find her a delightful, entrancing thing. Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possible avoid it, "But how can it be like that?" because you will get 'down the drain', into a blind alley from which nobody has escaped. Nobody knows how it can be like that.
[About wave-particle duality.]
'Probability abd Uncertainty—the Quantum Mechanical View of Nature', the sixth of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Behave (17)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blind Alley (4)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Drain (11)  |  Entrancing (2)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Possible (552)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Torment (18)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Vain (83)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wave-Particle Duality (2)  |  Will (2355)

The discoverer and the poet are inventors; and they are so because their mental vision detects the unapparent, unsuspected facts, almost as vividly as ocular vision rests on the apparent and familiar.
From 'The Principles of Success in Literature', The Fortnightly (1865), 1, 574.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (84)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detection (16)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Mental (177)  |  Ocular (3)  |  Poet (83)  |  Rest (280)  |  Vision (123)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Vividly (11)

The employment of mathematical symbols is perfectly natural when the relations between magnitudes are under discussion; and even if they are not rigorously necessary, it would hardly be reasonable to reject them, because they are not equally familiar to all readers and because they have sometimes been wrongly used, if they are able to facilitate the exposition of problems, to render it more concise, to open the way to more extended developments, and to avoid the digressions of vague argumentation.
From Recherches sur les Principes Mathématiques de la Théorie des Richesses (1838), as translated by Nathaniel T. Bacon in 'Preface', Researches Into Mathematical Principles of the Theory of Wealth (1897), 3-4. From the original French, “L’emploi des signes mathématiques est chose naturelle toutes les fois qu'il s'agit de discuter des relations entre des grandeurs ; et lors même qu’ils ne seraient pas rigoureusement nécessaires, s’ils peuvent faciliter l’exposition, la rendre plus concise, mettre sur la voie de développements plus étendus, prévenir les écarts d’une vague argumentation, il serait peu philosophique de les rebuter, parce qu'ils ne sont pas également familiers à tous les lecteurs et qu'on s'en est quelquefois servi à faux.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Concise (8)  |  Development (422)  |  Digression (3)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Extend (128)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Open (274)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Reject (63)  |  Relation (157)  |  Render (93)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Vague (47)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wrong (234)

The general knowledge of our author [Leonhard Euler] was more extensive than could well be expected, in one who had pursued, with such unremitting ardor, mathematics and astronomy as his favorite studies. He had made a very considerable progress in medical, botanical, and chemical science. What was still more extraordinary, he was an excellent scholar, and possessed in a high degree what is generally called erudition. He had attentively read the most eminent writers of ancient Rome; the civil and literary history of all ages and all nations was familiar to him; and foreigners, who were only acquainted with his works, were astonished to find in the conversation of a man, whose long life seemed solely occupied in mathematical and physical researches and discoveries, such an extensive acquaintance with the most interesting branches of literature. In this respect, no doubt, he was much indebted to an uncommon memory, which seemed to retain every idea that was conveyed to it, either from reading or from meditation.
In Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary (1815), 493-494.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ardor (5)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Author (167)  |  Botany (57)  |  Branch (150)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Civil (26)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Convey (16)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Erudition (6)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreigner (3)  |  General (511)  |  Generally (15)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literary (13)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possess (156)  |  Progress (465)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Respect (207)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rome (19)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

The Greeks in the first vigour of their pursuit of mathematical truth, at the time of Plato and soon after, had by no means confined themselves to those propositions which had a visible bearing on the phenomena of nature; but had followed out many beautiful trains of research concerning various kinds of figures, for the sake of their beauty alone; as for instance in their doctrine of Conic Sections, of which curves they had discovered all the principal properties. But it is curious to remark, that these investigations, thus pursued at first as mere matters of curiosity and intellectual gratification, were destined, two thousand years later, to play a very important part in establishing that system of celestial motions which succeeded the Platonic scheme of cycles and epicycles. If the properties of conic sections had not been demonstrated by the Greeks and thus rendered familiar to the mathematicians of succeeding ages, Kepler would probably not have been able to discover those laws respecting the orbits and motions of planets which were the occasion of the greatest revolution that ever happened in the history of science.
In History of Scientific Ideas, Bk. 9, chap. 14, sect. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Concern (228)  |  Confine (26)  |  Conic Section (8)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Curve (49)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Destined (42)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Epicycle (4)  |  Establish (57)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Greek (107)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Important (209)  |  Instance (33)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Late (118)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mere (84)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Part (222)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Planet (356)  |  Plato (76)  |  Platonic (3)  |  Play (112)  |  Principal (63)  |  Probably (49)  |  Property (168)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Remark (28)  |  Render (93)  |  Research (664)  |  Respect (207)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sake (58)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Visible (84)  |  Year (933)

The origin of volcanic energy is one of the blankest mysteries of science, and it is strange indeed, that a class of phenomena so long familiar to the human race and so zealously studied through all the ages should be so utterly without explanation. (1880)
In Report on the Geology of the High Plateaus of Utah (1880), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Class (164)  |  Energy (344)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Long (790)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Origin (239)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strange (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Through (849)  |  Volcano (39)

The present state of electrical science seems peculiarly unfavorable to speculation … to appreciate the requirements of the science, the student must make himself familiar with a considerable body of most intricate mathematics, the mere retention of which in the memory materially interferes with further progress. The first process therefore in the effectual study of the science, must be one of simplification and reduction of the results of previous investigation to a form in which the mind can grasp them.
First sentence of Maxwell’s first paper (read 10 Dec 1855), 'On Faraday’s Lines of Force', Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society (1857), Vol. X, part I. Collected in William Davidson Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 1, 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Body (537)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Effective (59)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Himself (461)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Retention (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Unfavorable (3)

The problems of the infinite have challenged man’s mind and have fired his imagination as no other single problem in the history of thought. The infinite appears both strange and familiar, at times beyond our grasp, at times easy and natural to understand. In conquering it, man broke the fetters that bound him to earth. All his faculties were required for this conquest—his reasoning powers, his poetic fancy, his desire to know.
With co-author James R Newman, in 'Beyond the Google', Mathematics and the Imagination (1940), 35.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bind (25)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Break (99)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Desire (204)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Fire (189)  |  Grasp (61)  |  History (673)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poetic (7)  |  Power (746)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Single (353)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)

The process of self-estrangement and its removal underlies all education. The mind must fix its attention upon what is alien to it and penetrate its disguise, making it become familiar. … Wonder is only the first stage of this estrangement. It must be followed by recognition.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Education (378)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Making (300)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Removal (11)  |  Self (267)  |  Stage (143)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Wonder (236)

The professor may choose familiar topics as a starting point. The students collect material, work problems, observe regularities, frame hypotheses, discover and prove theorems for themselves. … the student knows what he is doing and where he is going; he is secure in his mastery of the subject, strengthened in confidence of himself. He has had the experience of discovering mathematics. He no longer thinks of mathematics as static dogma learned by rote. He sees mathematics as something growing and developing, mathematical concepts as something continually revised and enriched in the light of new knowledge. The course may have covered a very limited region, but it should leave the student ready to explore further on his own.
In A Concrete Approach to Abstract Algebra (1959), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (112)  |  Collect (16)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Experience (467)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Frame (26)  |  Growing (98)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Observe (168)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prove (250)  |  Ready (39)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rote (4)  |  Secure (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Static (8)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Think (1086)  |  Topic (21)  |  Work (1351)

The simplest schoolboy is now familiar with facts for which Archimedes would have sacrificed his life. What would we not give to make it possible for us to steal a look at a book that will serve primary schools in a hundred years?
In Souvenirs d’Enfance et de Jeunesse (1846), Preface, 13. From the original French, “Le simple écolier sait maintenant des vérités pour lesquelles Archimède eût sacrifié sa vie. Que ne donnerions-nous pas pour qu’il nous fût possible de jeter un coup d’œil furtif sur tel livre qui servira aux écoles primaires dans cent ans?”
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Book (392)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Give (202)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primary (80)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  School (219)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simple (406)  |  Steal (13)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

The symbol A is not the counterpart of anything in familiar life. To the child the letter A would seem horribly abstract; so we give him a familiar conception along with it. “A was an Archer who shot at a frog.” This tides over his immediate difficulty; but he cannot make serious progress with word-building so long as Archers, Butchers, Captains, dance round the letters. The letters are abstract, and sooner or later he has to realise it. In physics we have outgrown archer and apple-pie definitions of the fundamental symbols. To a request to explain what an electron really is supposed to be we can only answer, “It is part of the A B C of physics”.
In Introduction to The Nature of the Physical World (1928), xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apple (40)  |  Building (156)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Conception (154)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Dance (32)  |  Definition (221)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Electron (93)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Frog (38)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Progress (465)  |  Realize (147)  |  Serious (91)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tide (34)  |  Word (619)

The world is full of signals that we don’t perceive. Tiny creatures live in a different world of unfamiliar forces. Many animals of our scale greatly exceed our range of perception for sensations familiar to us ... What an imperceptive lot we are. Surrounded by so much, so fascinating and so real, that we do not see (hear, smell, touch, taste) in nature, yet so gullible and so seduced by claims for novel power that we mistake the tricks of mediocre magicians for glimpses of a psychic world beyond our ken. The paranormal may be a fantasy; it is certainly a haven for charlatans. But ‘parahuman’ powers of perception lie all about us in birds, bees, and bacteria.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacterium (5)  |  Bee (40)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bird (149)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Charlatan (8)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creature (233)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exceed (9)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Force (487)  |  Full (66)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hear (139)  |  Ken (2)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Lot (151)  |  Magician (14)  |  Mediocre (14)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Novel (32)  |  Paranormal (3)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (746)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Range (99)  |  Real (149)  |  Scale (121)  |  Seduce (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Signal (27)  |  Smell (27)  |  Surround (30)  |  Taste (90)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Touch (141)  |  Trick (35)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  World (1774)

There is no “pure” science itself divorced from human values. The importance of science to the humanities and the humanities to science in their complementary contribution to the variety of human life grows daily. The need for men familiar with both is imperative.
In 'Abstract' The Impurity of Science (19 Apr 1962), the printed version of the Robbins Lecture (27 Feb 1962) given at Pomona College, Claremont, California, as published by Ernest O. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Daily (87)  |  Grow (238)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Humanities (20)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Importance (286)  |  Life (1795)  |  Need (290)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Value (365)  |  Variety (132)

There is not so contemptible a Plant or Animal that does not confound the most enlarged Understanding. Though the familiar use of Things, take off our Wonder; yet it cures not our Ignorance.
In An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1690), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Confound (21)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Cure (122)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Plant (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Wonder (236)

Though much new light is shed by ... studies in radioactivity, the nucleus of the atom, with its hoard of energy, thus continues to present us with a fascinating mystery. ... Our assault on atoms has broken down the outer fortifications. We feel that we know the fundamental rules according to which the outer part of the atom is built. The appearance and properties of the electron atmosphere are rather familiar. Yet that inner citadel, the atomic nucleus, remains unconquered, and we have reason to believe that within this citadel is secreted a great treasure. Its capture may form the main objective of the physicists’ next great drive.
'Assault on Atoms' (Read 23 Apr 1931 at Symposium—The Changing World) Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1931), 70, No. 3, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assault (12)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Broken (56)  |  Built (7)  |  Capture (10)  |  Citadel (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Down (456)  |  Drive (55)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hoard (2)  |  Inner (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Main (28)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Objective (91)  |  Outer (13)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rule (294)  |  Secret (194)  |  Study (653)  |  Treasure (57)

Thought-economy is most highly developed in mathematics, that science which has reached the highest formal development, and on which natural science so frequently calls for assistance. Strange as it may seem, the strength of mathematics lies in the avoidance of all unnecessary thoughts, in the utmost economy of thought-operations. The symbols of order, which we call numbers, form already a system of wonderful simplicity and economy. When in the multiplication of a number with several digits we employ the multiplication table and thus make use of previously accomplished results rather than to repeat them each time, when by the use of tables of logarithms we avoid new numerical calculations by replacing them by others long since performed, when we employ determinants instead of carrying through from the beginning the solution of a system of equations, when we decompose new integral expressions into others that are familiar,—we see in all this but a faint reflection of the intellectual activity of a Lagrange or Cauchy, who with the keen discernment of a military commander marshalls a whole troop of completed operations in the execution of a new one.
In Populär-wissenschafliche Vorlesungen (1903), 224-225.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy (10)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completed (30)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Digit (4)  |  Discernment (4)  |  Economy (55)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equation (132)  |  Execution (25)  |  Expression (175)  |  Faint (9)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Frequently (21)  |  High (362)  |  Highly (16)  |  Instead (21)  |  Integral (26)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Keen (10)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Long (790)  |  Marshal (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Previously (11)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Replace (31)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution (267)  |  Strange (157)  |  Strength (126)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Troop (5)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Use (766)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)

Traveling is a brutality. It forces you to trust strangers and to lose sight of all that familiar comfort of home and friends. You are constantly off balance. Nothing is yours except the essential things - air, sleep, dreams, the sea, the sky - all things tending towards the eternal or what we imagine of it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Balance (77)  |  Brutality (4)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Dream (208)  |  Essential (199)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Force (487)  |  Friend (168)  |  Home (170)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Lose (159)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Travel (114)  |  Trust (66)

We are just beginning to understand how molecular reaction systems have found a way to “organize themselves”. We know that processes of this nature ultimately led to the life cycle, and that (for the time being?) Man with his central nervous system, i.e. his memory, his mind, and his soul, stands at the end of this development and feels compelled to understand this development. For this purpose he must penetrate into the smallest units of time and space, which also requires new ideas to make these familiar concepts from physics of service in understanding what has, right into our century, appeared to be beyond the confines of space and time.
Answering “Where Now?” as the conclusion of his Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1967) on 'Immeasurably Fast Reactions', published in Nobel Lectures, Chemistry 1963-1970 (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Central (80)  |  Century (310)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confine (26)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Development (422)  |  End (590)  |  Feel (367)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  New (1216)  |  Organize (29)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Process (423)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Require (219)  |  Right (452)  |  Service (110)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Stand (274)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unit (33)  |  Way (1217)

We only have to look around us to see how complexity ... and psychic “temperature” are still rising: and rising no longer on the scale of the individual but now on that of the planet. This indication is so familiar to us that we cannot but recognize the objective, experiential, reality of a directionally controlled transformation of the Noosphere “as a whole.”
In Teilhard de Chardin and René Hague (trans.), The Heart of Matter (1950, 1978), 38. His term Noosphere refers to the collective sphere of human consciousness.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (111)  |  Controlled (3)  |  Indication (33)  |  Individual (404)  |  Look (582)  |  Objective (91)  |  Planet (356)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scale (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Whole (738)

When living with the Indians in their homes and pursuing my ethnological studies: One day I suddenly realized with a rude shock that, unlike my Indian friends, I was an alien, a stranger in my native land; its fauna and flora had no fond, familiar place amid my mental imagery, nor did any thoughts of human aspiration or love give to its hills and valleys the charm of personal companionship. I was alone, even in my loneliness.
Opening of Preface, Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs (1915), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Charm (51)  |  Companionship (4)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Flora (9)  |  Fond (12)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hill (20)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagery (3)  |  Indian (27)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Loneliness (5)  |  Love (309)  |  Mental (177)  |  Native (38)  |  Native Land (3)  |  Personal (67)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Realize (147)  |  Shock (37)  |  Strange (157)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unlike (8)  |  Valley (32)

When we try to pick out anything by itself we find it hitched to everything else in the universe ... The whole wilderness is unity and interrelation, is alive and familiar, full of humanity. The very stones seem talkative, sympathetic, brotherly.
John Muir
In My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), 211 and 319. Based on Muir's original journals and sketches of his 1869 stay in the Sierra.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Brother (43)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Hitch (2)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Interrelation (8)  |  Pick (16)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Talk (100)  |  Try (283)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wilderness (45)

… just as the astronomer, the physicist, the geologist, or other student of objective science looks about in the world of sense, so, not metaphorically speaking but literally, the mind of the mathematician goes forth in the universe of logic in quest of the things that are there; exploring the heights and depths for facts—ideas, classes, relationships, implications, and the rest; observing the minute and elusive with the powerful microscope of his Infinitesimal Analysis; observing the elusive and vast with the limitless telescope of his Calculus of the Infinite; making guesses regarding the order and internal harmony of the data observed and collocated; testing the hypotheses, not merely by the complete induction peculiar to mathematics, but, like his colleagues of the outer world, resorting also to experimental tests and incomplete induction; frequently finding it necessary, in view of unforeseen disclosures, to abandon one hopeful hypothesis or to transform it by retrenchment or by enlargement:—thus, in his own domain, matching, point for point, the processes, methods and experience familiar to the devotee of natural science.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 26
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Class (164)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complete (204)  |  Data (156)  |  Depth (94)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Disclosure (6)  |  Domain (69)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Guess (61)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Height (32)  |  Hopeful (6)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Implication (23)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Internal (66)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Literally (30)  |  Located (2)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Process (423)  |  Quest (39)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Resort (8)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (300)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transform (73)  |  Unforeseen (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.