Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Old

Old Quotes (481 quotes)

Πάντα ῥεῖ : all things are in flux. It is inevitable that you are indebted to the past. You are fed and formed by it. The old forest is decomposed for the composition of the new forest. The old animals have given their bodies to the earth to furnish through chemistry the forming race, and every individual is only a momentary fixation of what was yesterday another’s, is today his and will belong to a third to-morrow. So it is in thought.
In Lecture, second in a series given at Freeman Place Chapel, Boston (Mar 1859), 'Quotation and Originality', collected in Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 200. The Greek expression, “panta rei” is a quote from Heraclitus.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Belong (162)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Composition (84)  |  Debt (13)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Earth (996)  |  Feed (27)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Flux (21)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Forming (42)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Momentary (4)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Race (268)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yesterday (36)

...while science gives us implements to use, science alone does not determine for what ends they will be employed. Radio is an amazing invention. Yet now that it is here, one suspects that Hitler never could have consolidated his totalitarian control over Germany without its use. One never can tell what hands will reach out to lay hold on scientific gifts, or to what employment they will be put. Ever the old barbarian emerges, destructively using the new civilization.
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Barbarian (2)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Control (167)  |  Determine (144)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Germany (13)  |  Gift (104)  |  Hand (143)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implement (13)  |  Invention (369)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Radio (50)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Suspect (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Totalitarian (6)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

Lyveris to-forn us
Useden to marke
For selkouthes that thei seighen,
Hir sones for to teche;
And helden it an heigh science
Hir wittes to knowe.
Ac thorugh hir science soothly
Was nevere no soule y-saved,
Ne broght by hir bokes
To blisse ne to joye;
For alle hir kynde knowynges
Come but of diverse sightes.
Patriarkes and prophetes
Repreveden hir science,
And seiden hir wordes and hir wisdomes
Nas but a folye
And to the clergie of Crist
Counted it but a trufle.

Our ancestors in olden days used to record
The strange things they saw, and teach them to their sons;
And they held it a high science, to have knowledge of such things.
But no soul was ever saved by all that science,
Nor brought by books into eternal bliss;
Their science was only a series of sundry observations.
So patriarchs and prophets disapproved of their science,
And said their so-called words of wisdom were but folly—
And compared with Christian philosophy, a contemptible thing.
In William Langland and B. Thomas Wright (ed.) The Vision and Creed of Piers Ploughman (1842), 235-236. Modern translation by Terrence Tiller in Piers Plowman (1981, 1999), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Bliss (3)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Christian (43)  |  Compared (8)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Count (105)  |  Disapproval (2)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Folly (43)  |  High (362)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Observation (555)  |  Patriarch (4)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Record (154)  |  Saw (160)  |  Science (3879)  |  Series (149)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Son (24)  |  Soul (226)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Word (619)

On the future of Chemistry:
Chemistry is not the preservation hall of old jazz that it sometimes looks like. We cannot know what may happen tomorrow. Someone may oxidize mercury (II), francium (I), or radium (II). A mineral in Nova Scotia may contain an unsaturated quark per 1020 nucleons. (This is still 6000 per gram.) We may pick up an extraterrestrial edition of Chemical Abstracts. The universe may be a 4-dimensional soap bubble in an 11-dimensional space as some supersymmetry theorists argued in May of 1983. Who knows?
George B. Kaufmann, 'Interview with Jannik Bjerrum and Christian Klixbull Jørgensen', Journal of Chemical Education (1985), 62, 1005.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Francium (2)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Nova (6)  |  Nucleon (5)  |  Quark (7)  |  Radium (25)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Universe (857)

The Water-baby story character, Tom, asks: 'I heard, ma'am, that you were always making new beasts out of old.'
Mother Carey [Mother Nature] replies: 'So people fancy. But I am not going to trouble myself to make things, my little dear. I sit here and make them make themselves.'
[The author's indirect reference to evolution.]
The Water-babies (1886), 307.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Author (167)  |  Baby (28)  |  Beast (55)  |  Character (243)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Nature (4)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Story (118)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Water (481)

[In refutation of evolution] They use carbon dating ... to prove that something was millions of years old. Well, we have the eruption of Mt. Saint Helens and the carbon dating test that they used then would have to then prove that these were hundreds of millions of years younger, when what happened was they had the exact same results on the fossils and canyons that they did the tests on that were supposedly 100 millions of years old. And it’s the kind of inconsistent tests like this that they’re basing their “facts” on.
[Citing results from a solitary young-Earth creationist, questioning whether the lava dome at Mount St. Helens is really a million years old.]
From interview by Miles O''Brien on CNN (30 Mar 1996). Reported from transcript, via Nexis, in New York Magazine (15 Sep 2010).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Canyon (9)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Dome (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lava (9)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount St. Helens (2)  |  Prove (250)  |  Result (677)  |  Saint (17)  |  Something (719)  |  Test (211)  |  Use (766)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

A closer look at the course followed by developing theory reveals for a start that it is by no means as continuous as one might expect, but full of breaks and at least apparently not along the shortest logical path. Certain methods often afforded the most handsome results only the other day, and many might well have thought that the development of science to infinity would consist in no more than their constant application. Instead, on the contrary, they suddenly reveal themselves as exhausted and the attempt is made to find other quite disparate methods. In that event there may develop a struggle between the followers of the old methods and those of the newer ones. The former's point of view will be termed by their opponents as out-dated and outworn, while its holders in turn belittle the innovators as corrupters of true classical science.
In 'On the Development of the Methods of Theoretical Physics in Recent Times', Populäre Schriften, Essay 14. Address (22 Sep 1899) to the Meeting of Natural Scientists at Munich. Collected in Brian McGuinness (ed.), Ludwig Boltzmann: Theoretical Physics and Philosophical Problems, Selected Writings (1974), 79.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Application (242)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Break (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Classical (45)  |  Closer (43)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Handsome (4)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Look (582)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Start (221)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

A complete theory of evolution must acknowledge a balance between ‘external’ forces of environment imposing selection for local adaptation and ‘internal’ forces representing constraints of inheritance and development. Vavilov placed too much emphasis on internal constraints and downgraded the power of selection. But Western Darwinians have erred equally in practically ignoring (while acknowledging in theory) the limits placed on selection by structure and development–what Vavilov and the older biologists would have called ‘laws of form.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Balance (77)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Development (422)  |  Downgrade (2)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Err (4)  |  Evolution (590)  |  External (57)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Ignoring (11)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Internal (66)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Local (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Place (177)  |  Power (746)  |  Practically (10)  |  Represent (155)  |  Selection (128)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Western (45)

A drop of old tuberculin, which is an extract of tubercle bacilli, is put on the skin and then a small superficial scarification is made by turning, with some pressure, a vaccination lancet on the surface of the skin. The next day only those individuals show an inflammatory reaction at the point of vaccination who have already been infected with tuberculosis, whereas the healthy individuals show no reaction at all. Every time we find a positive reaction, we can say with certainty that the child is tuberculous.
'The Relation of Tuberculosis to Infant Mortality', read at the third mid-year meeting of the American Academy of Medicine, New Haven, Conn, (4 Nov 1909). In Bulletin of the American Academy of Medicine (1910), 11, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Child (307)  |  Drop (76)  |  Extract (40)  |  Find (998)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infection (27)  |  Inflammation (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Point (580)  |  Positive (94)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Skin (47)  |  Small (477)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Surface (209)  |  Test (211)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tuberculosis (8)  |  Vaccination (6)

A formative influence on my undergraduate self was the response of a respected elder statesmen of the Oxford Zoology Department when an American visitor had just publicly disproved his favourite theory. The old man strode to the front of the lecture hall, shook the American warmly by the hand and declared in ringing, emotional tones: ‘My dear fellow, I wish to thank you. I have been wrong these fifteen years.’ And we clapped our hands red. Can you imagine a Government Minister being cheered in the House of Commons for a similar admission? “Resign, Resign” is a much more likely response!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (17)  |  American (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Clap (3)  |  Common (436)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Department (92)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Elder (8)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Formative (2)  |  Front (16)  |  Government (110)  |  Hand (143)  |  House (140)  |  House Of Commons (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Influence (222)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Likely (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minister (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Oxford (16)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Red (35)  |  Resign (4)  |  Respect (207)  |  Response (53)  |  Ring (16)  |  Self (267)  |  Shake (41)  |  Similar (36)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Stride (15)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tone (22)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)  |  Zoology (36)

A good method of discovery is to imagine certain members of a system removed and then see how what is left would behave: for example, where would we be if iron were absent from the world: this is an old example.
Aphorism 258 in Notebook J (1789-1793), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Example (94)  |  Good (889)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Iron (96)  |  Member (41)  |  Method (505)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Removal (11)  |  See (1081)  |  System (537)  |  World (1774)

A grove of giant redwoods or sequoias should be kept just as we keep a great or beautiful cathedral. The extermination of the passenger pigeon meant that mankind was just so much poorer; exactly as in the case of the destruction of the cathedral at Rheims. And to lose the chance to see frigate-birds soaring in circles above the storm, or a file of pelicans winging their way homeward across the crimson afterglow of the sunset, or a myriad terns flashing in the bright light of midday as they hover in a shifting maze above the beach—why, the loss is like the loss of a gallery of the masterpieces of the artists of old time.
In A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open (1916), 316-317.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Beach (21)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bird (149)  |  Bright (79)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circle (110)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Flash (49)  |  Gallery (7)  |  Giant (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grove (5)  |  Hover (8)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Light (607)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Masterpiece (9)  |  Maze (10)  |  Midday (4)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Pigeon (8)  |  Poor (136)  |  Redwood (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Sequoia (4)  |  Shift (44)  |  Soaring (9)  |  Storm (51)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Tern (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

A magician of old waved a wand that he might banish disease, a physician to-day peers through a microscope to detect the bacillus of that disease and plan its defeat. The belief in miracles was premature, that is all; it was based on dreams now coming true.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Banish (11)  |  Based (10)  |  Belief (578)  |  Come (4)  |  Coming (114)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Detect (44)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dream (208)  |  Magician (14)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Peer (12)  |  Physician (273)  |  Plan (117)  |  Premature (20)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  True (212)  |  Wand (3)  |  Wave (107)

A man is as old as his arteries.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Artery (10)  |  Man (2251)

A man that is young in years may be old in hours, if he has lost no time.
‘Of Youth and Age’, Essays.
Science quotes on:  |  Hour (186)  |  Man (2251)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

A man who has once looked with the archaeological eye will never see quite normally. He will be wounded by what other men call trifles. It is possible to refine the sense of time until an old shoe in the bunch grass or a pile of nineteenth century beer bottles in an abandoned mining town tolls in one’s head like a hall clock.
The Night Country (1971), 81.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  19th Century (33)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Beer (10)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Call (769)  |  Century (310)  |  Clock (47)  |  Eye (419)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hall (5)  |  Head (81)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mining (18)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pile (12)  |  Possible (552)  |  Refine (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toll (3)  |  Town (27)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wound (26)

A new truth is a truth, an old error is an error.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1734).
Science quotes on:  |  Error (321)  |  New (1216)  |  Truth (1057)

A parable: A man was examining the construction of a cathedral. He asked a stone mason what he was doing chipping the stones, and the mason replied, “I am making stones.” He asked a stone carver what he was doing. “I am carving a gargoyle.” And so it went, each person said in detail what they were doing. Finally he came to an old woman who was sweeping the ground. She said. “I am helping build a cathedral.”
...Most of the time each person is immersed in the details of one special part of the whole and does not think of how what they are doing relates to the larger picture.
[For example, in education, a teacher might say in the next class he was going to “explain Young's modulus and how to measure it,” rather than, “I am going to educate the students and prepare them for their future careers.”]
In The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn (1975, 2005), 195.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Career (75)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Class (164)  |  Construction (112)  |  Detail (146)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Future (429)  |  Gargoyle (3)  |  Ground (217)  |  Immersion (4)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mason (2)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Parable (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (363)  |  Picture (143)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Relation (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Special (184)  |  Stone (162)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whole (738)  |  Woman (151)  |  Young (227)

A persistent and age-old instinct makes us want to wander
Into regions yet untrod
And read what is still unread
In the manuscripts of God.
Address upon receiving the Perkin Medal Award, 'The Big Things in Chemistry', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Feb 1921), 13, No. 2, 163. These lines concluded his remarks, without citation, and since Webmaster has found no other source has assumed the words are his own. Contact Webmaster if you know a different primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  God (757)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Make (25)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Read (287)  |  Region (36)  |  Research (664)  |  Still (613)  |  Wander (35)  |  Want (497)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Buddha (5)  |  Capable (168)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cling (6)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Content (69)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Count (105)  |  Definition (221)  |  Depth (94)  |  Desire (204)  |  Devout (5)  |  Divine (112)  |  Domain (69)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Force (487)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  Himself (461)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Object (422)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Outside (141)  |  Person (363)  |  Personality (62)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rational (90)  |  Regardless (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Seem (145)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Superpersonal (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unite (42)  |  Value (365)

A plain, reasonable working man supposes, in the old way which is also the common-sense way, that if there are people who spend their lives in study, whom he feeds and keeps while they think for him—then no doubt these men are engaged in studying things men need to know; and he expects of science that it will solve for him the questions on which his welfare, and that of all men, depends. He expects science to tell him how he ought to live: how to treat his family, his neighbours and the men of other tribes, how to restrain his passions, what to believe in and what not to believe in, and much else. And what does our science say to him on these matters?
It triumphantly tells him: how many million miles it is from the earth to the sun; at what rate light travels through space; how many million vibrations of ether per second are caused by light, and how many vibrations of air by sound; it tells of the chemical components of the Milky Way, of a new element—helium—of micro-organisms and their excrements, of the points on the hand at which electricity collects, of X rays, and similar things.
“But I don't want any of those things,” says a plain and reasonable man—“I want to know how to live.”
In 'Modern Science', Essays and Letters (1903), 221-222.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Component (48)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  Ether (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Family (94)  |  Helium (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solve (130)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Travel (114)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  X-ray (37)

A propos of Distempers, I am going to tell you a thing that I am sure will make you wish your selfe here. The Small Pox so fatal and so general amongst us is here entirely harmless by the invention of engrafting (which is the term they give it). There is a set of old Women who make it their business to perform the Operation.
Letter to Sarah Chiswell (1 Apr 1717). In Robert Halsband (ed.), The Complete Letters of the Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1965), Vol. 1, 338.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (149)  |  Distemper (5)  |  General (511)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Invention (369)  |  Operation (213)  |  Perform (121)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Tell (340)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

A religion old or new, that stressed the magnificence of the universe as revealed by modern science, might be able to draw forth reserves of reverence and awe hardly tapped by the conventional faiths. Sooner or later such a religion will emerge.
Pale Blue Dot: a Vision of the Human Future in Space (1994), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Convention (14)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Draw (137)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Faith (203)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  New (1216)  |  Religion (361)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Stress (22)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

A road across the United States; Let’s build it before we’re too old to enjoy it. [About the Lincoln Highway]
As quoted in the Lincoln Highway Association, The Lincoln Highway: the Story of a Crusade That Made Transportation History (1935), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Build (204)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Lincoln Highway (4)  |  Road (64)  |  State (491)  |  U.S.A. (6)

A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.
In recent years, this has been widely quoted and cited as an (ancient?) Greek proverb. Seen, for example in, Violence on Television: Hearings Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance (1994), 340. Webmaster however has so far found no example of this wording in, say, 19th century quotation collections. Which leaves the authenticity of the citation in question. Variations exist (for example “The beginning of wisdom comes when a person plants trees, the shade under which they know they will never sit.” (1993) or “Thoughtless men might ask why an old man plants a tree when he may never hope to sit in its shade” (1954).) However, the general sentiment has indeed existed for a long time. For example, “He that plants Trees, loves others besides himself,” collected in Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs (1731), 91, No. 2248.
Science quotes on:  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Grow (238)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Plant (294)  |  Shade (31)  |  Sit (48)  |  Society (326)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wisdom (221)

A specter is haunting Europe—the specter of Communism. All the Powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this specter: Pope and Czar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.
Karl Marx
Introductory sentence, The Communist Manifesto (1848). Collected in The Library of Original Sources (1907), Vol. 10, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alliance (5)  |  Communism (11)  |  Enter (141)  |  Europe (43)  |  France (27)  |  French (20)  |  German (36)  |  Germany (13)  |  Haunt (5)  |  Holy (34)  |  Police (5)  |  Pope (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Radical (25)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Spy (8)

A story about the Jack Spratts of medicine [was] told recently by Dr. Charles H. Best, co-discoverer of insulin. He had been invited to a conference of heart specialists in North America. On the eve of the meeting, out of respect for the fat-clogs-the-arteries theory, the delegates sat down to a special banquet served without fats. It was unpalatable but they all ate it as a duty. Next morning Best looked round the breakfast room and saw these same specialists—all in the 40-60 year old, coronary age group—happily tucking into eggs, bacon, buttered toast and coffee with cream.
'Objections To High-Fat Diets', Eat Fat And Grow Slim (1958), Ch. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Artery (10)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Banquet (2)  |  Best (459)  |  Charles Best (3)  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Butter (8)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Conference (17)  |  Cream (6)  |  Delegate (3)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Down (456)  |  Duty (68)  |  Eat (104)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fat (11)  |  Heart (229)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Look (582)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Morning (94)  |  Next (236)  |  Respect (207)  |  Saw (160)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Story (118)  |  Theory (970)  |  Toast (8)  |  Year (933)

Alike fantastic, if too new, or old;
Be not the first by whom the new are try'd,
Not yet the last to lay the old aside.
In An Essay on Criticism. With notes by Mr. Warburton (1749), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  First (1283)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Last (426)  |  New (1216)  |  Try (283)

All frescoes are as high finished as miniatures or enamels, and they are known to be unchangeable; but oil, being a body itself, will drink or absorb very little colour, and changing yellow, and at length brown, destroys every colour it is mixed with, especially every delicate colour. It turns every permanent white to a yellow and brown putty, and has compelled the use of that destroyer of colour, white lead, which, when its protecting oil is evaporated, will become lead again. This is an awful thing to say to oil painters ; they may call it madness, but it is true. All the genuine old little pictures, called cabinet pictures, are in fresco and not in oil. Oil was not used except by blundering ignorance till after Vandyke’s time ; but the art of fresco painting being lost, oil became a fetter to genius and a dungeon to art.
In 'Opinions', The Poems: With Specimens of the Prose Writings of William Blake (1885), 276-277.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Body (537)  |  Brown (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Compel (30)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drink (53)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  Finish (59)  |  Genius (284)  |  Genuine (52)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Madness (33)  |  Miniature (7)  |  Oil (59)  |  Painter (29)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Picture (143)  |  Putty (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Use (766)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yellow (30)

All minds quote. Old and new make the warp and woof of every moment. There is no thread that is not a twist of these two strands.
In Lecture, second in a series given at Freeman Place Chapel, Boston (Mar 1859), 'Quotation and Originality', Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Quote (42)  |  Strand (9)  |  Thread (32)  |  Twist (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Warp (5)  |  Woof (2)

All of us are interested in our roots. Generally this interest is latent in youth, and grows with age. Until I reached fifty I thought that history of science was a refuge for old scientists whose creative juices had dried up. Now of course I know that I was wrong! As we grow older, we become more interested in the past, in family history, local history, etc. Astronomy is, or was when I started in it, almost a family.
In Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (2002), Vol. 3, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Become (815)  |  Course (409)  |  Creative (137)  |  Dried (2)  |  Family (94)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Grow (238)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Interest (386)  |  Juice (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Latent (12)  |  Local (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Older (7)  |  Past (337)  |  Reach (281)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Start (221)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Youth (101)

All the old constellations had gone from the sky, however: that slow movement which is imperceptible in a hundred human lifetimes, had long since rearranged them in unfamiliar groupings. But the Milky Way, it seemed to me, was still the same tattered streamer of star-dust as of yore.
In The Time Machine (1898), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Dust (64)  |  Grouping (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Long (790)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Movement (155)  |  Rearrange (5)  |  Same (157)  |  Seemed (2)  |  Sky (161)  |  Slow (101)  |  Star (427)  |  Still (613)  |  Tattered (2)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Way (1217)

Alphonse of Castile is reported to have said that if he had had the making of the universe he would have done it much better. And I think so too. Instead of making a man go through the degradation of faculties and death, he should continually improve with age, and then be translated from this world to a superior planet, where he should begin life with the knowledge gained here, and so on. That would be to my mind, as an old man, a more satisfactory way of conducting affairs
Address, in 'Report to the Chemical Society's Jubilee', Nature (26 Mar 1891), 43, 493.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Continual (43)  |  Death (388)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Gain (145)  |  Improve (58)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Planet (356)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Superior (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Translate (19)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Among the older records, we find chapter after chapter of which we can read the characters, and make out their meaning: and as we approach the period of man’s creation, our book becomes more clear, and nature seems to speak to us in language so like our own, that we easily comprehend it. But just as we begin to enter on the history of physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us—a leaf has been torn out from nature's record, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Language (293)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Succession (77)  |  Tear (42)  |  Torn (17)

An idea must not be condemned for being a little shy and incoherent; all new ideas are shy when introduced first among our old ones. We should have patience and see whether the incoherency is likely to wear off or to wear on, in which latter case the sooner we get rid of them the better.
In Samuel Butler and Henry Festing Jones (ed.), 'Higgledy-Piggledy', The Note-books of Samuel Butler (1912, 1917), 216-217.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Get Rid (4)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incoherency (2)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Introduced (3)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Patience (56)  |  Rid (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Shy (3)  |  Wear (18)

An idea must not be condemned for being a little shy and incoherent; all new ideas are shy when introduced first among our old ones. We should have patience and see whether the incoherency is likely to wear off or to wear on, in which latter case the sooner we get rid of them the better.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 216-217.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Condemn (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Patience (56)  |  See (1081)

An Individual, whatever species it might be, is nothing in the Universe. A hundred, a thousand individuals are still nothing. The species are the only creatures of Nature, perpetual creatures, as old and as permanent as it. In order to judge it better, we no longer consider the species as a collection or as a series of similar individuals, but as a whole independent of number, independent of time, a whole always living, always the same, a whole which has been counted as one in the works of creation, and which, as a consequence, makes only a unity in Nature.
'De la Nature: Seconde Vue', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1765), Vol. 13, i. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Collection (64)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Count (105)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Individual (404)  |  Judge (108)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Species (401)  |  Still (613)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

An inventor is simply a fellow who doesn’t take his education too seriously. You see, from the time a person is six years old until he graduates form college he has to take three or four examinations a year. If he flunks once, he is out. But an inventor is almost always failing. He tries and fails maybe a thousand times. It he succeeds once then he’s in. These two things are diametrically opposite. We often say that the biggest job we have is to teach a newly hired employee how to fail intelligently. We have to train him to experiment over and over and to keep on trying and failing until he learns what will work.
In 'How Can We Develop Inventors?' presented to the Annual meeting of the American Society of Society Engineers. Reprinted in Mechanical Engineering (Apr 1944). Collected in Prophet of Progress: Selections from the Speeches of Charles F. Kettering (1961), 108.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  College (66)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Form (959)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Learn (629)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Person (363)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

An old foundation is worthy of all respect, but it must not take from us the right to build afresh wherever we will.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 188.
Science quotes on:  |  Afresh (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Build (204)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Must (1526)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)

An old French geometer used to say that a mathematical theory was never to be considered complete till you had made it so clear that you could explain it to the first man you met in the street.
In Nature (1873), 8, 458.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  French (20)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meet (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Say (984)  |  Street (23)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theory (970)

An old medical friend gave me some excellent practical advice. He said: “You will have for some time to go much oftener down steps than up steps. Never mind! win the good opinions of washerwomen and such like, and in time you will hear of their recommendations of you to the wealthier families by whom they are employed.” I did so, and found it succeed as predicted.
[On beginning a medical practice.]
From Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 94. Going “down steps” refers to the homes of lower-class workers of the era that were often in basements and entered by exterior steps down from street level.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Down (456)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  Family (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Medical (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Practical (200)  |  Practice (204)  |  Predict (79)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Step (231)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)  |  Up (5)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)

An old paleontological in joke proclaims that mammalian evolution is a tale told by teeth mating to produce slightly altered descendant teeth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Joke (83)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  Mate (6)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Produce (104)  |  Slightly (3)  |  Tale (16)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tooth (29)

An old saying is “A penny for your thoughts.” The offer is not high enough: some thoughts would not be confessed for a million dollars.
In Sinner Sermons: A Selection of the Best Paragraphs of E. W. Howe (1926), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Confess (42)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Enough (340)  |  High (362)  |  Million (114)  |  Offer (141)  |  Penny (5)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Thought (953)

An old Scotch physician, for whom I had a great respect, and whom I frequently met professionally in the city, used to say, as we were entering the patient's room together, 'Weel, Mister Cooper, we ha' only twa things to keep in meend, and they'll searve us for here and herea'ter; one is always to have the fear of the Laird before our ees; that 'ill do for herea'ter; and t'other is to keep your booels open, and that will do for here.'
'Lecture 3, Treatment of Inflammation', The Lectures of Sir Astley Cooper (1825), Vol. 1, 58.Lectures on surgery, Lect. 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  City (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fear (197)  |  Great (1574)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Respect (207)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Will (2355)

An old writer says that there are four sorts of readers: “Sponges which attract all without distinguishing; Howre-glasses which receive and powre out as fast; Bagges which only retain the dregges of the spices and let the wine escape, and Sives which retaine the best onely.” A man wastes a great many years before he reaches the ‘sive’ stage.
Address for the Dedication of the New Building of the Boston Medical Library (12 Jan 1901). Printed as 'Books and Men', The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal (17 Jan 1901), 144, No. 3, 60. [Presumably “Howre-glasses” refers to Hour-glasses. -Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bag (3)  |  Best (459)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Dregs (2)  |  Escape (80)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hourglass (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Pouring (3)  |  Reader (40)  |  Receive (114)  |  Retain (56)  |  Say (984)  |  Sieve (3)  |  Spice (2)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Stage (143)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wine (38)  |  Writer (86)  |  Year (933)

Anaximander son of Praxiades, of Miletus: he said that the principle and element is the Indefinite, not distinguishing air or water or anything else. … he was the first to discover a gnomon, and he set one up on the Sundials (?) in Sparta, according to Favorinus in his Universal History, to mark solstices and equinoxes; and he also constructed hour indicators. He was the first to draw an outline of earth and sea, but also constructed a [celestial] globe. Of his opinions he made a summary exposition, which I suppose Apollodorus the Athenian also encountered. Apollodorus says in his Chronicles that Anaximander was sixty-four years old in the year of the fifty-eighth Olympiad [547/6 B.C.], and that he died shortly afterwards (having been near his prime approximately during the time of Polycrates, tyrant of Samos).
Diogenes Laërtius II, 1-2. In G.S. Kirk, J.E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1957), 99. The editors of this translation note that Anaximander may have introduced the gnomon into Greece, but he did not discover it—the Babylonians used it earlier, and the celestial sphere, and the twelve parts of the day.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Air (347)  |  Anaximander (5)  |  Cartography (3)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Construct (124)  |  Discover (553)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  First (1283)  |  History (673)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Principle (507)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Set (394)  |  Summary (11)  |  Sundial (6)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universal (189)  |  Water (481)  |  Year (933)

Ancient stars in their death throes spat out atoms like iron which this universe had never known. ... Now the iron of old nova coughings vivifies the redness of our blood.
Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st century (2003), 223. Quoted in Rob Brezsny, Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia (2005), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atom (355)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cough (8)  |  Death (388)  |  Iron (96)  |  Known (454)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nova (6)  |  Redness (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Universe (857)

Another argument of hope may be drawn from this–that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels.
Translation of Novum Organum, XCII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Channel (21)  |  Color (137)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Forming (42)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Set (394)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)

Antiqua consuetudo difficulter relinquitur: & ultra proprium videre nemo libenter ducitur.
Old habits are hard to break: and no one is easily led beyond his own point of view.
In De Imitatione Christi (1709), Book 1, Chap. 14, 23. As translated by William C. Creasy in The Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis: A New Reading of the 1441 Latin Autograph Manuscript (2007), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Break (99)  |  Easily (35)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lead (384)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  View (488)

Any fool can destroy trees. They cannot run away; and if they could, they would still be destroyed,—chased and hunted down as long as fun or a dollar could be got out of their bark hides, branching horns, or magnificent bole backbones. Few that fell trees plant them; nor would planting avail much towards getting back anything like the noble primeval forests. During a man’s life only saplings can be grown, in the place of the old trees—tens of centuries old—that have been destroyed.
John Muir
In 'The American Forests', Atlantic Monthly (Aug 1897), Vol. 80, 157.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Backbone (9)  |  Bark (18)  |  Branch (150)  |  Branching (10)  |  Chase (14)  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Down (456)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fool (116)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fun (38)  |  Hide (69)  |  Horn (18)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Man (2251)  |  Noble (90)  |  Plant (294)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Run (174)  |  Still (613)  |  Tree (246)

As long as museums and universities send out expeditions to bring to light new forms of living and extinct animals and new data illustrating the interrelations of organisms and their environments, as long as anatomists desire a broad comparative basis human for anatomy, as long as even a few students feel a strong curiosity to learn about the course of evolution and relationships of animals, the old problems of taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution will gradually reassert themselves even in competition with brilliant and highly fruitful laboratory studies in cytology, genetics and physiological chemistry.
'Genetics Versus Paleontology', The American Naturalist, 1917, 51, 623.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Animal (617)  |  Basis (173)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Competition (39)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Cytology (7)  |  Data (156)  |  Desire (204)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expedition (8)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Museum (31)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Phylogeny (10)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Problem (676)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Taxonomy (18)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2355)

As Love is too young to know what conscience is, so Truth and Genius are too old to know what definition is.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Conscience (50)  |  Definition (221)  |  Genius (284)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Love (309)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Young (227)

As regards the co-ordination of all ordinary properties of matter, Rutherford’s model of the atom puts before us a task reminiscent of the old dream of philosophers: to reduce the interpretation of the laws of nature to the consideration of pure numbers.
In Faraday Lecture (1930), Journal of the Chemical Society (Feb 1932), 349. As quoted and cited in Chen Ning Yang, Elementary Particles (1961), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Dream (208)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Matter (798)  |  Model (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Properties Of Matter (7)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Task (147)

As the component parts of all new machines may be said to be old[,] it is a nice discriminating judgment, which discovers that a particular arrangement will produce a new and desired effect. ... Therefore, the mechanic should sit down among levers, screws, wedges, wheels, etc. like a poet among the letters of the alphabet, considering them as the exhibition of his thoughts; in which a new arrangement transmits a new idea to the world.
A Treatise on the Improvement of Canal Navigation (1796), preface, x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Component (48)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Discrimination (9)  |  Down (456)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Exhibition (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Letter (109)  |  Lever (13)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  New (1216)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Poet (83)  |  Production (183)  |  Screw (17)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Wedge (3)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

At the Egyptian city of Naucratis there was a famous old god whose name was Theuth; the bird which is called the Ibis was sacred to him, and he was the inventor of many arts, such as arithmetic and calculation and geometry and astronomy and draughts and dice, but his great discovery was the use of letters.
Plato
In the Phaedrus. Collected in Plato the Teacher (1897), 171. A footnote gives that Naucratis was a city in the Delta of Egypt, on a branch of the Nile.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Art (657)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Bird (149)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  City (78)  |  Dice (21)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Geometry (255)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Letter (109)  |  Name (333)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Use (766)

At the entrance to the observatory Stjerneborg located underground, Tycho Brahe built a Ionic portal. On top of this were three sculptured lions. On both sides were inscriptions and on the backside was a longer inscription in gold letters on a porfyr stone: Consecrated to the all-good, great God and Posterity. Tycho Brahe, Son of Otto, who realized that Astronomy, the oldest and most distinguished of all sciences, had indeed been studied for a long time and to a great extent, but still had not obtained sufficient firmness or had been purified of errors, in order to reform it and raise it to perfection, invented and with incredible labour, industry, and expenditure constructed various exact instruments suitable for all kinds of observations of the celestial bodies, and placed them partly in the neighbouring castle of Uraniborg, which was built for the same purpose, partly in these subterranean rooms for a more constant and useful application, and recommending, hallowing, and consecrating this very rare and costly treasure to you, you glorious Posterity, who will live for ever and ever, he, who has both begun and finished everything on this island, after erecting this monument, beseeches and adjures you that in honour of the eternal God, creator of the wonderful clockwork of the heavens, and for the propagation of the divine science and for the celebrity of the fatherland, you will constantly preserve it and not let it decay with old age or any other injury or be removed to any other place or in any way be molested, if for no other reason, at any rate out of reverence to the creator’s eye, which watches over the universe. Greetings to you who read this and act accordingly. Farewell!
(Translated from the original in Latin)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Both (493)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Constant (144)  |  Construct (124)  |  Creator (91)  |  Decay (53)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Divine (112)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Error (321)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Finish (59)  |  Glorious (48)  |  God (757)  |  Gold (97)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greeting (9)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Honour (56)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Industry (137)  |  Injury (36)  |  Inscription (11)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Island (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Labour (98)  |  Letter (109)  |  Lion (22)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Monument (45)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Portal (7)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rare (89)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reform (22)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Side (233)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Underground (11)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useful (250)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)

At the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes—an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counterintuitive they may be, and the most ruthless skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new. This is how deep truths are winnowed from deep nonsense.
The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (1997), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Balance (77)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Counterintuitive (4)  |  Deep (233)  |  Essential (199)  |  Heart (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Openness (7)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Winnow (4)

At times the mathematician has the passion of a poet or a conqueror, the rigor of his arguments is that of a responsible statesman or, more simply, of a concerned father, and his tolerance and resignation are those of an old sage; he is revolutionary and conservative, skeptical and yet faithfully optimistic.
Max Dehn
Address (18 Jan 1928) at the University of Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Trans. by Abe Schenitzer, and published in 'The Mentality of the Mathematician: A Characterization', The Mathematical Intelligencer (1983), 5, No. 2. As quoted in Michael Fitzgerald and Ioan James, The Mind of the Mathematician (2007), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conqueror (8)  |  Conservative (15)  |  Faithfully (3)  |  Father (110)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  More (2559)  |  Passion (114)  |  Poet (83)  |  Resignation (3)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Sage (23)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tolerance (10)

Beta decay was … like a dear old friend. There would always be a special place in my heart reserved especially for it.
In paper presented to the International Conference on the History of Original Ideas and Basic Discoveries, Erice, Sicily (27 Jul-4 Aug 1994), 'Parity Violation' collected in Harvey B. Newman, Thomas Ypsilantis History of Original Ideas and Basic Discoveries in Particle Physics (1996), 390-391.
Science quotes on:  |  Decay (53)  |  Friend (168)  |  Heart (229)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Special (184)

Beware of old Linnaeus,
The Man of the Linden-tree,
So beautiful, bright and early
He brushed away the dews
He found the wicked wild-flowers
All courting there in twos.
In 'Tycho Brahe', The Torch-Bearers: The Book of Earth (1925), Vol. 2, 174.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beware (16)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brush (5)  |  Court (33)  |  Dew (9)  |  Early (185)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Man (2251)  |  Tree (246)  |  Two (937)  |  Wicked (4)  |  Wild (87)

Beware of the young Doctor, & the old Barber.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1733).
Science quotes on:  |  Barber (5)  |  Beware (16)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Physician (273)  |  Young (227)

Blessings on Science! When the earth seem’d old,
When Faith grew doting, and the Reason cold,
Twas she discover’d that the world was young,
And taught a language to its lisping tongue:
’Twas she disclosed a future to its view,
And made old knowledge pale before the new.
From poem, 'Railways' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Cold (112)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Faith (203)  |  Future (429)  |  Grow (238)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  New (1216)  |  Pale (9)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teach (277)  |  Tongue (43)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Blood mixture and the result drop in the racial level is the sole cause of the dying out of old cultures; for men do not perish as a result of lost wars, but by the loss of that force of resistance which is continued only in pure blood. All who are not of good race in this world are chaff.
Mein Kampf (1925-26), American Edition (1943), 296. In William Lawrence Shirer, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich (1990), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cause (541)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Force (487)  |  Good (889)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Perish (50)  |  Pure (291)  |  Race (268)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Sole (49)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)

BODY-SNATCHER, n. A robber of grave-worms. One who supplies the young physicians with that with which the old physicians have supplied the undertaker. 
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  38-39.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Grave (52)  |  Humour (116)  |  Physician (273)  |  Worm (42)  |  Young (227)

Broadly speaking, the short words are the best, and the old words are the best of all.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Good (889)  |  Language (293)  |  Short (197)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Word (619)

But among all these many departments of research, these many branches of industry, new and old, which are being rapidly expanded, there is one dominating all others in importance—one which is of the greatest significance for the comfort and welfare, not t
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Department (92)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Expand (53)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Importance (286)  |  Industry (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Research (664)  |  Significance (113)  |  Welfare (25)

But beyond the bright searchlights of science,
Out of sight of the windows of sense,
Old riddles still bid us defiance,
Old questions of Why and of Whence.
from Recent Development of Physical Science (p. 10)
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bright (79)  |  Poem (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Searchlight (5)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Still (613)  |  Why (491)  |  Window (58)

But does Man have any “right” to spread through the universe? Man is what he is, a wild animal with the will to survive, and (so far) the ability, against all competition. Unless one accepts that, anything one says about morals, war, politics, you name it, is nonsense. Correct morals arise from knowing what man is, not what do-gooders and well-meaning old Aunt Nellies would like him to be. The Universe will let us know—later—whether or not Man has any “right” to expand through it.
In Starship Troopers (1959), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Accept (191)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Aunt (2)  |  Competition (39)  |  Correct (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expand (53)  |  Far (154)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Late (118)  |  Let (61)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Moral (195)  |  Name (333)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Politics (112)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Spread (83)  |  Survive (79)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  War (225)  |  Well-Meaning (3)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)

But if anyone, well seen in the knowledge, not onely of Sacred and exotick History, but of Astronomical Calculation, and the old Hebrew Kalendar, shall apply himself to these studies, I judge it indeed difficult, but not impossible for such a one to attain, not onely the number of years, but even, of dayes from the Creation of the World.
In 'Epistle to the Reader', The Annals of the World (1658). As excerpted in Wallen Yep, Man Before Adam: A Correction to Doctrinal Theology, "The Missing Link Found" (2002), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attain (125)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Creation (327)  |  Day (42)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Judge (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Number (699)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Study (653)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

But no pursuit at Cambridge was followed with nearly so much eagerness or gave me so much pleasure as collecting beetles. It was the mere passion for collecting, for I did not dissect them, and rarely compared their external characters with published descriptions, but got them named anyhow. I will give a proof of my zeal: one day, on tearing off some old bark, I saw two rare beetles, and seized one in each hand; then I saw a third and new kind, which I could not bear to lose, so that I popped the one which I held in my right hand into my mouth. Alas! it ejected some intensely acrid fluid, which burnt my tongue so that I was forced to spit the beetle out, which was lost, as was the third one.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Bark (18)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Burn (87)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Classification (97)  |  Collection (64)  |  Compare (69)  |  Description (84)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Eager (15)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Follow (378)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lose (159)  |  Lost (34)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Name (333)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rare (89)  |  Right (452)  |  Saw (160)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zeal (11)

But of all environments, that produced by man’s complex technology is perhaps the most unstable and rickety. In its present form, our society is not two centuries old, and a few nuclear bombs will do it in.
To be sure, evolution works over long periods of time and two centuries is far from sufficient to breed Homo technikos… .
The destruction of our technological society in a fit of nuclear peevishness would become disastrous even if there were many millions of immediate survivors.
The environment toward which they were fitted would be gone, and Darwin’s demon would wipe them out remorselessly and without a backward glance.
Asimov on Physics (1976), 151. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 181.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Backward (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Breed (24)  |  Century (310)  |  Complex (188)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Demon (8)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fit (134)  |  Form (959)  |  Glance (34)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Produced (187)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Rickety (2)  |  Society (326)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Survivor (2)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unstable (8)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

By considering the embryological structure of man - the homologies which he presents with the lower animals - the rudiments which he retains - and the reversions to which he is liable, we can partly recall in imagination the former condition of our early progenitors; and we can approximately place them in their proper position in the zoological series. We thus learnt that man is descended from a hairy quadruped, furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in its habit, and an inhabitant of the Old World. This creature, if its whole structure had been examined by a naturalist, would have been classed among the Quadrumana, as surely as would be the common and still more ancient progenitor of the Old and New World monkeys.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 389.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Ear (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Former (137)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Habit (168)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  New (1216)  |  Old World (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Proper (144)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Series (149)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surely (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

By the worldly standards of public life, all scholars in their work are of course oddly virtuous. They do not make wild claims, they do not cheat, they do not try to persuade at any cost, they appeal neither to prejudice nor to authority, they are often frank about their ignorance, their disputes are fairly decorous, they do not confuse what is being argued with race, politics, sex or age, they listen patiently to the young and to the old who both know everything. These are the general virtues of scholarship, and they are peculiarly the virtues of science.
In Science and Human Values (1956).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Authority (95)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cost (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  General (511)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Politics (112)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Race (268)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sex (69)  |  Try (283)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Virtuous (9)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

By the year 2070 we cannot say, or it would be imbecile to do so, that any man alive could understand Shakespearean experience better than Shakespeare, whereas any decent eighteen-year-old student of physics will know more physics than Newton.
'The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case’, Times Literary Supplement (9 Jul 1970), 737-740. Collected in Public Affairs (1971), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Better (486)  |  Decent (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experience (467)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Newton (10)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Student (300)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Chaos theory is a new theory invented by scientists panicked by the thought that the public were beginning to understand the old ones.
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chaos Theory (4)  |  Invent (51)  |  New (1216)  |  Panic (2)  |  Public (96)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)

Chemistry has the same quickening and suggestive influence upon the algebraist as a visit to the Royal Academy, or the old masters may be supposed to have on a Browning or a Tennyson. Indeed it seems to me that an exact homology exists between painting and poetry on the one hand and modern chemistry and modern algebra on the other. In poetry and algebra we have the pure idea elaborated and expressed through the vehicle of language, in painting and chemistry the idea enveloped in matter, depending in part on manual processes and the resources of art for its due manifestation.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Art (657)  |  Robert Browning (7)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Due (141)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Envelope (6)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Influence (222)  |  Language (293)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Manual (7)  |  Master (178)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painting (44)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Process (423)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Academy (3)  |  Suggestive (4)  |  Lord Alfred Tennyson (24)  |  Through (849)  |  Vehicle (11)  |  Visit (26)

Consider the plight of a scientist of my age. I graduated from the University of California at Berkeley in 1940. In the 41 years since then the amount of biological information has increased 16 fold; during these 4 decades my capacity to absorb new information has declined at an accelerating rate and now is at least 50% less than when I was a graduate student. If one defines ignorance as the ratio of what is available to be known to what is known, there seems no alternative to the conclusion that my ignorance is at least 25 times as extensive as it was when I got my bachelor’s degree. Although I am sure that my unfortunate condition comes as no surprise to my students and younger colleagues, I personally find it somewhat depressing. My depression is tempered, however, by the fact that all biologists, young or old, developing or senescing, face the same melancholy situation because of an interlocking set of circumstances.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 228.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Accelerate (11)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Amount (151)  |  Available (78)  |  Bachelor (3)  |  Berkeley (3)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Decade (59)  |  Decline (26)  |  Define (49)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depressing (3)  |  Depression (24)  |  Develop (268)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Fold (8)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Increase (210)  |  Information (166)  |  Interlocking (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Least (75)  |  Less (103)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Personally (7)  |  Plight (4)  |  Rate (29)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Same (157)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seem (145)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Student (300)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Temper (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  University (121)  |  University Of California (2)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

Creating a new theory is not like destroying an old barn and erecting a skyscraper in its place. It is rather like climbing a mountain, gaining new and wider views, discovering unexpected connections between our starting point and its rich environment. But the point from which we started out still exists and can be seen, although it appears smaller and forms a tiny part of our broad view gained by the mastery of the obstacles on our adventurous way up.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Barn (5)  |  Climb (35)  |  Connection (162)  |  Create (235)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Environment (216)  |  Erect (6)  |  Exist (443)  |  Form (959)  |  Gain (145)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mountain (185)  |  New (1216)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Start (221)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wide (96)

Darwin's theory was received in Russia with profound sympathy. While in Western Europe it met firmly established old traditions which it had first to overcome, in Russia its appearance coincided with the awakening of our society after the Crimean War and here it immediately received the status of full citizenship and ever since has enjoyed widespread popularity.
Quoted in Thomas F. Glick (ed.), The Comparative Reception of Darwinism (1988), 229-30.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Crimean War (2)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  First (1283)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Profound (104)  |  Russia (13)  |  Society (326)  |  Status (35)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tradition (69)  |  War (225)  |  Western (45)  |  Widespread (22)

Darwin's Origin of Species had come into the theological world like a plough into an ant-hill. Everywhere those thus rudely awakened from their old comfort and repose had swarmed forth angry and confused. Reviews, sermons, books light and heavy, came flying at the new thinker from all sides.
From The Warfare of Science and Theology in Christendom (1898), 70.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anger (20)  |  Ant (28)  |  Anthill (3)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Book (392)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Flying (72)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Light (607)  |  New (1216)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Plough (13)  |  Repose (6)  |  Review (26)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Side (233)  |  Species (401)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thinker (39)  |  World (1774)

Disease is largely a removable evil. It continues to afflict humanity, not only because of incomplete knowledge of its causes and lack of individual and public hygiene, but also because it is extensively fostered by harsh economic and industrial conditions and by wretched housing in congested communities. ... The reduction of the death rate is the principal statistical expression and index of human social progress. It means the saving and lengthening of lives of thousands of citizens, the extension of the vigorous working period well into old age, and the prevention of inefficiency, misery, and suffering. These advances can be made by organized social effort. Public health is purchasable. (1911)
Quoted in Evelynn Maxine Hammonds, Childhood's Deadly Scourge: The Campaign to Control Diphtheria in New York City, 1880-1930(1999), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Affliction (6)  |  Age (499)  |  Cause (541)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Community (104)  |  Condition (356)  |  Congestion (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evil (116)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extension (59)  |  Foster (12)  |  Health (193)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Hygiene (12)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Incompleteness (2)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misery (30)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Period (198)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Principal (63)  |  Progress (465)  |  Public Health (10)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Progress (3)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Wretched (8)

Drunkenness, the ruin of reason, the destruction of strength, premature old age, momentary death.
Homilies, No. XIV, Ch. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Death (388)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Reason (744)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Strength (126)

During the school period the student has been mentally bending over his desk; at the University he should stand up and look around. For this reason it is fatal if the first year at the University be frittered away in going over the old work in the old spirit. At school the boy painfully rises from the particular towards glimpses at general ideas; at the University he should start from general ideas and study their applications to concrete cases.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Boy (94)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Education (378)  |  First (1283)  |  Frittering (2)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Look (582)  |  Particular (76)  |  Period (198)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rise (166)  |  School (219)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Each new scientific development is due to the pressure of some social need. Of course … insatiable curiosity … is still nothing but a response either to an old problem of nature, or to one arising from new social circumstances.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Arising (22)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Development (422)  |  Due (141)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Response (53)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Social (252)  |  Still (613)

Einstein, twenty-six years old, only three years away from crude privation, still a patent examiner, published in the Annalen der Physik in 1905 five papers on entirely different subjects. Three of them were among the greatest in the history of physics. One, very simple, gave the quantum explanation of the photoelectric effect—it was this work for which, sixteen years later, he was awarded the Nobel prize. Another dealt with the phenomenon of Brownian motion, the apparently erratic movement of tiny particles suspended in a liquid: Einstein showed that these movements satisfied a clear statistical law. This was like a conjuring trick, easy when explained: before it, decent scientists could still doubt the concrete existence of atoms and molecules: this paper was as near to a direct proof of their concreteness as a theoretician could give. The third paper was the special eory of relativity, which quietly amalgamated space, time, and matter into one fundamental unity. This last paper contains no references and quotes no authority. All of them are written in a style unlike any other theoretical physicist's. They contain very little mathematics. There is a good deal of verbal commentary. The conclusions, the bizarre conclusions, emerge as though with the greatest of ease: the reasoning is unbreakable. It looks as though he had reached the conclusions by pure thought, unaided, without listening to the opinions of others. To a surprisingly large extent, that is precisely what he had done.
Variety of Men (1966), 100-1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Authority (95)  |  Award (13)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Brownian Motion (2)  |  Commentary (3)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Crude (31)  |  Deal (188)  |  Decent (10)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Ease (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Erratic (4)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatest (328)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Physics (3)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Listening (25)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Particle (194)  |  Patent (33)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Photoelectric Effect (2)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Privation (5)  |  Proof (287)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suspension (7)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Trick (35)  |  Unbreakable (3)  |  Unity (78)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

EXPERIENCE, n. The wisdom that enables us to recognize as an undesirable old acquaintance the folly that we have already embraced.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  93.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Already (222)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experience (467)  |  Folly (43)  |  Humour (116)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Wisdom (221)

Faraday thinks from day to day, against a background of older thinking, and anticipating new facts of tomorrow. In other words, he thinks in three dimensions of time; past, present, and future.
In 'The Scientific Grammar of Michael Faraday’s Diaries', Part I, 'The Classic of Science', A Classic and a Founder (1937), collected in Rosenstock-Huessy Papers (1981), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Background (43)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Future (429)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Past Present and Future (2)  |  Present (619)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Word (619)

Fires from beneath, and meteors from above,
Portentous, unexampled, unexplain'd,
Have kindled beacons in the skies; and th' old
And crazy earth has had her shaking fits
More frequent, and foregone her usual rest.
Is it a time to wrangle, when the props
And pillars of our planet seem to fail,
And nature, with a dim and sickly eye,
To wait the close of all?
Alluding the meteors of 17 Aug 1883.
'The Time-Piece,' Task, Book ii, lines 58-66. In William Cowper, Henry Francis Cary, The Poetical Works of William Cowper (1863), 52-53.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beacon (8)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fit (134)  |  Meteor (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rest (280)  |  Time (1877)

Following the light of the sun, we left the Old World.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Follow (378)  |  Leave (130)  |  Light (607)  |  Old World (8)  |  Sun (385)  |  World (1774)

For my own part I would as soon be descended from that heroic little monkey, who braved his dreaded enemy in order to save the life of his keeper; or from that old baboon, who, descending from the mountains, carried away in triumph his young comrade from a crowd of astonished dogs—as from a savage who delights to torture his enemies, offers up bloody sacrifices, practices infanticide without remorse, treats his wives like slaves, knows no decency, and is haunted by the grossest superstitions.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 404-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Decency (4)  |  Delight (108)  |  Descend (47)  |  Dog (70)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Offer (141)  |  Order (632)  |  Practice (204)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Savage (29)  |  Save (118)  |  Slave (37)  |  Soon (186)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Torture (29)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Young (227)

For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things (which is the chief point) , and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to reconsider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. So I thought my nature had a kind of familiarity and relationship with Truth.
From 'Progress of philosophical speculations. Preface to intended treatise De Interpretatione Naturæ (1603), in Francis Bacon and James Spedding (ed.), Works of Francis Bacon (1868), Vol. 3, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Affectation (4)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Catch (31)  |  Chief (97)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enough (340)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fix (25)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Hate (64)  |  Imposture (6)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nimble (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Patience (56)  |  Point (580)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Reconsideration (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Slowness (5)  |  Steady (44)  |  Study (653)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Versatile (6)

For out of old feldes, as men seith,
Cometh al this newe corn fro yere to yere;
And out of olde bokes, in good feith,
Cometh al this newe science that men lere.
Science quotes on:  |  Corn (19)  |  Field (364)  |  Good (889)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)

FORTRAN —’the infantile disorder’—, by now nearly 20 years old, is hopelessly inadequate for whatever computer application you have in mind today: it is now too clumsy, too risky, and too expensive to use. PL/I —’the fatal disease’— belongs more to the problem set than to the solution set. It is practically impossible to teach good programming to students that have had a prior exposure to BASIC: as potential programmers they are mentally mutilated beyond hope of regeneration. The use of COBOL cripples the mind; its teaching should, therefore, be regarded as a criminal offence. APL is a mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new generation of coding bums.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Basic (138)  |  Belong (162)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bum (3)  |  Carry (127)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Code (31)  |  Computer (127)  |  Create (235)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Cripple (3)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Exposure (7)  |  Fatal (12)  |  Fortran (3)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hopelessly (3)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Infantile (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Mentally (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutilated (2)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Offence (4)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Potential (69)  |  Practically (10)  |  Prior (5)  |  Problem (676)  |  Program (52)  |  Programmer (4)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regeneration (5)  |  Risky (4)  |  Set (394)  |  Solution (267)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Technique (80)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Year (933)

FORTRAN, ‘the infantile disorder’, by now nearly 20 years old, is hopelessly inadequate for whatever computer application you have in mind today: it is now too clumsy, too risky, and too expensive to use.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Computer (127)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Fortran (3)  |  Hopelessly (3)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Infantile (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Risky (4)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Year (933)

From our home on the Earth, we look out into the distances and strive to imagine the sort of world into which we were born. Today, we have reached far into space. Our immediate neighborhood we know rather intimately. But with increasing distance our knowledge fades … The search will continue. The urge is older than history. It is not satisfied and will not be suppressed.
In 'From Our Home On The Earth', The Land (1946), 5, 145. As cited on the webpage of the Edwin Powell Hubble Papers.
Science quotes on:  |  Continue (165)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fade (10)  |  History (673)  |  Home (170)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Increase (210)  |  Intimately (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Reach (281)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Search (162)  |  Space (500)  |  Today (314)  |  Urge (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Gentlemen, there is such a chaos in our therapeutics that we ought to be thankful for any good advice, whether it comes from an old woman, a shepherd, a blacksmith, or even a Homeopath.
As quoted in George E. Shipman, 'Allopathic Science', American Homœpathist (Jan 1878), 2, No.1, 39
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Good (889)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Thankful (4)  |  Therapeutics (3)  |  Woman (151)

Geometrical axioms are neither synthetic a priori conclusions nor experimental facts. They are conventions: our choice, amongst all possible conventions, is guided by experimental facts; but it remains free, and is only limited by the necessity of avoiding all contradiction. ... In other words, axioms of geometry are only definitions in disguise.
That being so what ought one to think of this question: Is the Euclidean Geometry true?
The question is nonsense. One might as well ask whether the metric system is true and the old measures false; whether Cartesian co-ordinates are true and polar co-ordinates false.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Among (3)  |  Ask (411)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Choice (110)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Convention (14)  |  Definition (221)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Euclidean (3)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  False (100)  |  Free (232)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Guide (97)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Measure (232)  |  Metric System (6)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Polar (12)  |  Possible (552)  |  Question (621)  |  Remain (349)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)  |  True (212)  |  Word (619)

Given one has before oneself a strong, healthy, youth rich in spirited blood and a powerless, weak, cachectic old man scarcely capable of breathing. If now the physician wishes to practise the rejuvenating art on the latter, he should make silver tubes which fit into each other: open then the artery of the healthy person and introduce one of the tubes into it and fasten it into the artery; thereupon he opens also the artery of the ill person...
[First detailed description of blood transfusion (1615)]
In N.S.R. Maluf, 'History of Blood Transfusion', Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences (1954), 9, No. 1, 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Artery (10)  |  Blood (134)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Capable (168)  |  Detail (146)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Man (2251)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Physician (273)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Silver (46)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strong (174)  |  Transfusion (2)  |  Weak (71)  |  Youth (101)

Go, wondrous creature! mount where Science guides,
Go, measure earth, weigh air, and state the tides;
Instruct the planets in what orbs to run,
Correct old Time, and regulate the Sun.
In An Essay on Man (1736), Epistle II, lines 19-22, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Correct (86)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Guide (97)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mount (42)  |  Orb (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Regulate (8)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tide (34)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wondrous (21)

Go, wondrous creature, mount where science guides.
Go, measure earth, weigh air, and state the tides;
Instruct the planets in what orbs to run,
Correct old Time, and regulate the sun;
Go, teach Eternal Wisdom how to rule,
Then drop into thyself and be a fool.
Quoted in James Wood Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Creature (233)  |  Drop (76)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Fool (116)  |  Guide (97)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mount (42)  |  Orb (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rule (294)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Sun (385)  |  Teach (277)  |  Tide (34)  |  Time (1877)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wondrous (21)

Gold and iron at the present day, as in ancient times, are the rulers of the world; and the great events in the world of mineral art are not the discovery of new substances, but of new and rich localities of old ones.
Lecture (26 Npv 1851), to the London Society of Arts, 'The General Bearing of the Great Exhibition on the Progress of Art and Science', collected in Lectures on the Results of the Great Exhibition of 1851' (1852), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Art (657)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Event (216)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Iron (96)  |  Mineral (59)  |  New (1216)  |  Present (619)  |  Rich (62)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Substance (248)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

Good, old-fashioned common sense iz one ov the hardest things in the world to out-wit, out-argy, or beat in enny way, it iz az honest az a loaf ov good domestik bread, alwus in tune, either hot from the oven or 8 days old.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (23)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bread (39)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Good (889)  |  Honest (50)  |  Hot (60)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Outwit (6)  |  Oven (5)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wit (59)  |  World (1774)

Great thinkers build their edifices with subtle consistency. We do our intellectual forebears an enormous disservice when we dismember their visions and scan their systems in order to extract a few disembodied ‘gems’–thoughts or claims still accepted as true. These disarticulated pieces then become the entire legacy of our ancestors, and we lose the beauty and coherence of older systems that might enlighten us by their unfamiliarity–and their consequent challenge in our fallible (and complacent) modern world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Build (204)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Claim (146)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Consequent (19)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Disembodied (6)  |  Dismember (2)  |  Disservice (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Entire (47)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fallible (6)  |  Gem (16)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Lose (159)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern World (4)  |  Order (632)  |  Piece (38)  |  Scan (3)  |  Still (613)  |  Subtle (35)  |  System (537)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

Having someone wonder where you are when you don’t come home at night is a very old human need.
As quoted, without citation, in New Woman (1983), 13, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Need (290)  |  Night (120)  |  Wonder (236)

He (Anaxagoras) is said to have been twenty years old at the time of Xerxes' crossing, and to have lived to seventy-two. Apollodorus says in his Chronicles that he was born in the seventieth Olympiad (500-497 B.C.) and died in the first year of the eighty-eighth (428/7). He began to be a philosopher at Athens in the archonship of Callias (456/5), at the age of twenty, as Demetrius Phalereus tells us in his Register of Archons, and they say he spent thirty years there. … There are different accounts given of his trial. Sotion, in his Succession of Philosophers, says that he was prosecuted by Cleon for impiety, because he maintained that the sun was a red hot mass of metal, and after that Pericles, his pupil, had made a speech in his defence, he was fined five talents and exiled. Satyrus in his Uves, on the other hand, says that the charge was brought by Thucydides in his political campaign against Pericles; and he adds that the charge was not only for the impiety but for Medism as well; and he was condemned to death in his absence. ... Finally he withdrew to Lampsacus, and there died. It is said that when the rulers of the city asked him what privilege he wished to be granted, he replied that the children should be given a holiday every year in the month in which he died. The custom is preserved to the present day. When he died the Lampsacenes buried him with full honours.
Diogenes Laërtius 2.7. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 353.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Anaxagoras (10)  |  Ask (411)  |  Charge (59)  |  Children (200)  |  City (78)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Custom (42)  |  Death (388)  |  Defence (14)  |  Different (577)  |  First (1283)  |  Grant (73)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hot (60)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mass (157)  |  Metal (84)  |  Month (88)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Political (121)  |  Present (619)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Register (21)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Say (984)  |  Speech (61)  |  Spent (85)  |  Succession (77)  |  Sun (385)  |  Talent (94)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trial (57)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)  |  Year (933)

He was 40 yeares old before he looked on Geometry; which happened accidentally. Being in a Gentleman's Library, Euclid's Elements lay open, and 'twas the 47 El. Libri 1 [Pythagoras' Theorem]. He read the proposition. By G-, sayd he (he would now and then sweare an emphaticall Oath by way of emphasis) this is impossible! So he reads the Demonstration of it, which referred him back to such a Proposition; which proposition he read. That referred him back to another, which he also read. Et sic deinceps [and so on] that at last he was demonstratively convinced of that trueth. This made him in love with Geometry .
Of Thomas Hobbes, in 1629.
Brief Lives (1680), edited by Oliver Lawson Dick (1949), 150.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Element (310)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Last (426)  |  Library (48)  |  Look (582)  |  Love (309)  |  Oath (10)  |  Open (274)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Read (287)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Way (1217)

He who would know what geometry is, must venture boldly into its depths and learn to think and feel as a geometer. I believe that it is impossible to do this, and to study geometry as it admits of being studied and am conscious it can be taught, without finding the reason invigorated, the invention quickened, the sentiment of the orderly and beautiful awakened and enhanced, and reverence for truth, the foundation of all integrity of character, converted into a fixed principle of the mental and moral constitution, according to the old and expressive adage “abeunt studia in mores”.
In 'A probationary Lecture on Geometry, in Collected Mathematical Papers (1908), Vol. 2, 9. [The Latin phrase, “abeunt studia in mores” translates as “studies pass on into character”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Adage (4)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Convert (22)  |  Depth (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fix (25)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invigorate (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Venture (18)

His work was so great that it cannot be compassed in a few words. His death is one of the greatest losses ever to occur to British science.
Describing Ernest Rutherford upon his death at age 66. Thomson, then 80 years old, was once his teacher.
Quoted in Time Magazine (1 Nov 1937).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  British (41)  |  Compass (34)  |  Death (388)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Occur (150)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

History is primarily a socio-psychological science. In the conflict between the old and the new tendencies in historical investigation... we are at the turn of the stream, the parting of the ways in historical science.
Historical Development and Present Character of the Science of History (1906), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Investigation (230)  |  New (1216)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stream (81)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)

Hot things, sharp things, sweet things, cold things
All rot the teeth, and make them look like old things.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1734).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dentistry (3)  |  Health (193)  |  Hot (60)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Rot (9)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thing (1915)

How many famous men be there in this our age, which make scruple to condemne these old witches, thinking it to bee nothing but a melancholike humour which corrupteth thei imagination, and filleth them with all these vaines toyes. I will not cast my selfe any further into the depth of this question, the matter craveth a man of more leisure.
Describing melancholy as the innocent affliction of those regarded as witches instead of Satanic influence, while distancing himself from the controversy.
Discours de la conservation de la veue; des maladies mélancholiques, des catarrhes, et de la vieillese (1594). In Richard Surphlet (trans.) A Discourse of the Preservation of the Sight: of Melancholike Diseases; of Rheumes, and of Old Age (1599), 98-9. Quoted in Michael Heyd, Be sober and Reasonable (), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Bee (40)  |  Cast (66)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Depth (94)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humour (116)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Influence (222)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Question (621)  |  Regard (305)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Will (2355)  |  Witch (4)

However, the small probability of a similar encounter [of the earth with a comet], can become very great in adding up over a huge sequence of centuries. It is easy to picture to oneself the effects of this impact upon the Earth. The axis and the motion of rotation changed; the seas abandoning their old position to throw themselves toward the new equator; a large part of men and animals drowned in this universal deluge, or destroyed by the violent tremor imparted to the terrestrial globe.
Exposition du Système du Monde, 2nd edition (1799), 208, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Axis (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Comet (54)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drown (12)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Equator (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impact (42)  |  Impart (23)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Picture (143)  |  Probability (130)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Small (477)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tremor (2)  |  Universal (189)

HURRICANE, n. An atmospheric demonstration once very common but now generally abandoned for the tornado and cyclone. The hurricane is still in popular use in the West Indies and is preferred by certain old- fashioned sea-captains.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Captain (14)  |  Certain (550)  |  Common (436)  |  Cyclone (2)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Humour (116)  |  Hurricane (4)  |  Sea (308)  |  Still (613)  |  Tornado (3)  |  Use (766)

I always rejoice to hear of your being still employed in experimental researches into nature, and of the success you meet with. The rapid progress true science now makes, occasions my regretting sometimes that I was born so soon: it is impossible to imagine the height to which may be carried, in a thousand years, the power of man over matter; we may perhaps learn to deprive large masses of their gravity, and give them absolute levity for the sake of easy transport. Agriculture may diminish its labour and double its produce; all diseases may by sure means be prevented or cured (not excepting even that of old age), and our lives lengthened at pleasure even beyond the antediluvian standard. Oh! that moral science were in as fair a way of improvement; that men would cease to be wolves to one another; and that human beings would at length learn what they now improperly call humanity!
Letter to Dr Priestley, 8 Feb 1780. In Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin (1845), Vol. 2, 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Age (499)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Antediluvian (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Disease (328)  |  Easy (204)  |  Employ (113)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Progress (465)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transport (30)  |  True Science (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

I am an old man now, and when I die and go to heaven, there are two matters on which I hope for enlightenment. One is quantum electrodynamics and the other is the turbulent motion of fluids. About the former, I am really rather optimistic.
In Address to the British Society for the Advancement of Science (1932). As cited by Tom Mullin in 'Turbulent Times For FLuids', New Science (11 Nov 1989), 52. Werner Heisenberg is also reported, sometimes called apocryphal, to have expressed a similar sentiment, but Webmaster has found no specific citation.
Science quotes on:  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Former (137)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Turbulent (4)  |  Two (937)

I am not pleading with you to make changes, I am telling you you have got to make them—not because I say so, but because old Father Time will take care of you if you don’t change. Consequently, you need a procurement department for new ideas.
As quoted in book review, T.A. Boyd, 'Charles F. Kettering: Prophet of Progress', Science (30 Jan 1959), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Change (593)  |  Department (92)  |  Father (110)  |  Idea (843)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Plead (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

I am very fond of the oyster shell. It is humble and awkward and ugly. It is slate-colored and unsymmetrical. Its form is not primarily beautiful but functional. I make fun of its knobbiness. Sometimes I resent its burdens and excrescences. But its tireless adaptability and tenacity draw my astonished admiration and sometimes even my tears. And it is comfortable in its familiarity, its homeliness, like old garden gloves when have molded themselves perfectly to the shape of the hand.
In 'Oyster Bed', Gift From the Sea (1955), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptability (7)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Color (137)  |  Draw (137)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fond (12)  |  Form (959)  |  Functional (10)  |  Garden (60)  |  Humble (50)  |  Mold (33)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Shell (63)  |  Slate (6)  |  Tear (42)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tireless (5)  |  Ugly (14)

I came into the room, which was half dark, and presently spotted Lord Kelvin in the audience and realised that I was in for trouble at the last part of my speech dealing with the age of the earth, where my views conflicted with his. To my relief, Kelvin fell fast asleep, but as I came to the important point, I saw the old bird sit up, open an eye and cock a baleful glance at me! Then a sudden inspiration came, and I said Lord Kelvin had limited the age of the earth, provided no new source (of energy) was discovered. That prophetic utterance refers to what we are now considering tonight, radium! Behold! the old boy beamed upon me.
Speech at the Royal Institution (1904). Quoted in Arthur S. Eve, Rutherford (1939), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of The Earth (12)  |  Audience (26)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bird (149)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cock (6)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Dark (140)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eye (419)  |  Glance (34)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Last (426)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Lord (93)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Point (580)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Radium (25)  |  Relief (30)  |  Saw (160)  |  Speech (61)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Utterance (10)  |  View (488)

I can conceive few human states more enviable than that of the man to whom, panting in the foul laboratory, or watching for his life under the tropic forest, Isis shall for a moment lift her sacred veil, and show him, once and for ever, the thing he dreamed not of; some law, or even mere hint of a law, explaining one fact; but explaining with it a thousand more, connecting them all with each other and with the mighty whole, till order and meaning shoots through some old Chaos of scattered observations.
Health and Education (1874), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Deer (9)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forest (150)  |  Foul (15)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1468)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paramecium (2)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Show (346)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Veil (26)  |  Whole (738)

I can remember … starting to gather all sorts of things like rocks and beetles when I was about nine years old. There was no parental encouragement—nor discouragement either—nor any outside influence that I can remember in these early stages. By about the age of twelve, I had settled pretty definitely on butterflies, largely I think because the rocks around my home were limited to limestone, while the butterflies were varied, exciting, and fairly easy to preserve with household moth-balls. … I was fourteen, I remember, when … I decided to be scientific, caught in some net of emulation, and resolutely threw away all of my “childish” specimens, mounted haphazard on “common pins” and without “proper labels.” The purge cost me a great inward struggle, still one of my most vivid memories, and must have been forced by a conflict between a love of my specimens and a love for orderliness, for having everything just exactly right according to what happened to be my current standards.
In The Nature of Natural History (1950, 1990), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Cost (86)  |  Current (118)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easy (204)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fourteen (2)  |  Gather (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Haphazard (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Home (170)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inward (6)  |  Label (11)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Love (309)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Outside (141)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pin (18)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purge (9)  |  Remember (179)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Settled (34)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standard (57)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Year (933)

I confess that Fermat’s Theorem as an isolated proposition has very little interest for me, for a multitude of such theorems can easily be set up, which one could neither prove nor disprove. But I have been stimulated by it to bring our again several old ideas for a great extension of the theory of numbers. Of course, this theory belongs to the things where one cannot predict to what extent one will succeed in reaching obscurely hovering distant goals. A happy star must also rule, and my situation and so manifold distracting affairs of course do not permit me to pursue such meditations as in the happy years 1796-1798 when I created the principal topics of my Disquisitiones arithmeticae. But I am convinced that if good fortune should do more than I expect, and make me successful in some advances in that theory, even the Fermat theorem will appear in it only as one of the least interesting corollaries.
In reply to Olbers' attempt in 1816 to entice him to work on Fermat's Theorem. The hope Gauss expressed for his success was never realised.
Letter to Heinrich Olbers (21 Mar 1816). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 413.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Belong (162)  |  Confess (42)  |  Course (409)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Express (186)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extent (139)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Little (707)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Meditation (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Permit (58)  |  Predict (79)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rule (294)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Star (427)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Topic (21)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I devoted myself to studying the texts—the original and commentaries—in the natural sciences and metaphysics, and the gates of knowledge began opening for me. Next I sought to know medicine, and so read the books written on it. Medicine is not one of the difficult sciences, and therefore, I excelled in it in a very short time, to the point that distinguished physicians began to read the science of medicine under me. I cared for the sick and there opened to me some of the doors of medical treatment that are indescribable and can be learned only from practice. In addition I devoted myself to jurisprudence and used to engage in legal disputations, at that time being sixteen years old.
Avicenna
W. E. Gohhnan, The Life of Ibn Sina: A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation (1974), 25-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Car (71)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Door (93)  |  Engage (39)  |  Gate (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Next (236)  |  Open (274)  |  Physician (273)  |  Point (580)  |  Practice (204)  |  Read (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Sick (81)  |  Studying (70)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Year (933)

I don't know what your Company is feeling as of today about the work of Dr. Alice Hamilton on benzol [benzene] poisoning. I know that back in the old days some of your boys used to think that she was a plain nuisance and just picking on you for luck. But I have a hunch that as you have learned more about the subject, men like your good self have grown to realize the debt that society owes her for her crusade. I am pretty sure that she has saved the lives of a great many girls in can-making plants and I would hate to think that you didn't agree with me.
Letter to S. P. Miller, technical director of a company that sold solvents, 9 Feb 1933. Alice Hamilton papers, no. 40, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College. Quoted in Barbara Sicherman, Alice Hamilton: A Life in Letters (1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Boy (94)  |  Company (59)  |  Debt (13)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hate (64)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Live (628)  |  Luck (42)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  Owe (71)  |  Plant (294)  |  Realize (147)  |  Self (267)  |  Society (326)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Work (1351)

I had gone on a walk on a fine Sabbath afternoon. I had entered the Green [of Glasgow] by the gate at the foot of Charlotte Street—had passed the old washing-house. I was thinking upon the engine at the time, and had gone as far as the herd's house, when the idea came into my mind that as steam was an elastic body it would rush into a vacuum, and if a communication were made between the cylinder and an exhausted vessel it would rush into it, and might be there condensed without cooling the cylinder. I then saw that I must get rid of the condensed steam and injection water if I used a jet, as in Newcomen's engine. Two ways of doing this occurred to me. First, the water might be run off by a descending pipe, if an outlet could be got at the depth of 35 or 36 feet, and any air might be extracted by a small pump. The second was to make the pump large enough to extract both water and air. ... I had not walked further than the Golf-house when the whole thing was arranged in my mind.
[In Robert Hart's words, a recollection of the description of Watt's moment of inspiration, in May 1765, for improving Thomas Newcomen's steam engine.]
In Robert Hart, 'Reminiscences of James Watt' (read 2 Nov 1857), Transactions of the Glasgow Archaeological Society (1859), Vol. 1, 1. Note that these are not the verbatim words of James Watt, but are only a recollection of them by Robert Hart, who is quoting as best he can from memory of a conversation he and his brother had with James Watt that took place over 43 years previously. In his Reminiscences, Hart explains, “I have accordingly thrown together the following brief narrative:— As these meetings took place forty-three years since, many observations that were made at the time may have escaped me at present; yet, when the same subjects are touched on, I have as distinct recollection of his treatment of them as if it were yesterday.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Depth (94)  |  Doing (280)  |  Elastic (2)  |  Engine (98)  |  Enough (340)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Extract (40)  |  First (1283)  |  Gate (32)  |  Green (63)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Injection (9)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Invention (369)  |  Large (394)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Thomas Newcomen (2)  |  Pass (238)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Small (477)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

I have always had the feeling that organic chemistry is a very peculiar science, that organic chemists are unlike other men, and there are few occupations that give more satisfactions [sic] than masterly experimentation along the old lines of this highly specialised science.
Henderson’s memories, unpublished typescript, 85-6, Harvard University Archives 4450.7.2. Quoted in J. S. Fruton, Contrasts in Scientific Style (1990), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Feeling (250)  |  More (2559)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)

I have an old belief that a good observer really means a good theorist.
Letter to Henry Walter Bates (22 Nov 1860). In F. Darwin and A.C. Seward (eds.), More Letters of Charles Darwin (1903), 176. Contrast with what he wrote to J.D. Hooker (11 Jan 1844): “Do not indulge in the loose speculations so easily started by every smatterer and wandering collector.” Ibid. 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Good (889)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Observer (43)  |  Theorist (44)

I have had a fairly long life, above all a very happy one, and I think that I shall be remembered with some regrets and perhaps leave some reputation behind me. What more could I ask? The events in which I am involved will probably save me from the troubles of old age. I shall die in full possession of my faculties, and that is another advantage that I should count among those that I have enjoyed. If I have any distressing thoughts, it is of not having done more for my family; to be unable to give either to them or to you any token of my affection and my gratitude is to be poor indeed.
Letter to Augez de Villiers, undated. Quoted in D. McKie, Antoine Lavoisier: Scientist, Economist, Social Reformer (1952), 303.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Affection (43)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Behind (137)  |  Count (105)  |  Death (388)  |  Event (216)  |  Family (94)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Happy (105)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Involved (90)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Poor (136)  |  Possession (65)  |  Regret (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Save (118)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Token (9)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Will (2355)

I have just received copies of “To-day” containing criticisms of my letter. I am in no way surprised to find that these criticisms are not only unfair and misleading in the extreme. They are misleading in so far that anyone reading them would be led to believe the exact opposite of the truth. It is quite possible that I, an old and trained engineer and chronic experimenter, should put an undue value upon truth; but it is common to all scientific men. As nothing but the truth is of any value to them, they naturally dislike things that are not true. ... While my training has, perhaps, warped my mind so that I put an undue value upon truth, their training has been such as to cause them to abhor exact truth and logic.
[Replying to criticism by Colonel Acklom and other religious parties attacking Maxim's earlier contribution to the controversy about the modern position of Christianity.]
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 86.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Common (436)  |  Content (69)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Copy (33)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Find (998)  |  Leading (17)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Modern (385)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reading (133)  |  Receive (114)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undue (4)  |  Unfair (8)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

I have known silence: the cold earthy silence at the bottom of a newly dug well; the implacable stony silence of a deep cave; the hot, drugged midday silence when everything is hypnotised and stilled into silence by the eye of the sun;… I have heard summer cicadas cry so that the sound seems stitched into your bones. I have heard tree frogs in an orchestration as complicated as Bach singing in a forest lit by a million emerald fireflies. I have heard the Keas calling over grey glaciers that groaned to themselves like old people as they inched their way to the sea. I have heard the hoarse street vendor cries of the mating Fur seals as they sang to their sleek golden wives, the crisp staccato admonishment of the Rattlesnake, the cobweb squeak of the Bat and the belling roar of the Red deer knee-deep in purple heather.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (7)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cave (15)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Cobweb (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Cry (29)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deer (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Forest (150)  |  Frog (38)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Golden (45)  |  Groan (5)  |  Hot (60)  |  Implacable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Midday (4)  |  Orchestration (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seal (18)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sing (26)  |  Singing (19)  |  Sound (183)  |  Squeak (2)  |  Staccato (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  Way (1217)

I have never had reason, up to now, to give up the concept which I have always stressed, that nerve cells, instead of working individually, act together, so that we must think that several groups of elements exercise a cumulative effect on the peripheral organs through whole bundles of fibres. It is understood that this concept implies another regarding the opposite action of sensory functions. However opposed it may seem to the popular tendency to individualize the elements, I cannot abandon the idea of a unitary action of the nervous system, without bothering if, by that, I approach old conceptions.
'The Neuron Doctrine-Theory and Facts', Nobel Lecture 11 Dec 1906. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Approach (108)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conception (154)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Effect (393)  |  Element (310)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Function (228)  |  Idea (843)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Organ (115)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Stress (22)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Understood (156)  |  Whole (738)

I know of nothing more laughable than a doctor who does not die of old age.
Letter to Charles Augustin Ferriol, comte d'Argental (1767). In Raymond C. Rowe, Joseph Chamberlain, A Spoonful of Sugar (2007), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Die (86)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Laughable (4)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old Age (33)

I love to read the dedications of old books written in monarchies–for they invariably honor some (usually insignificant) knight or duke with fulsome words of sycophantic insincerity, praising him as the light of the universe (in hopes, no doubt, for a few ducats to support future work); this old practice makes me feel like such an honest and upright man, by comparison, when I put a positive spin, perhaps ever so slightly exaggerated, on a grant proposal.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Dedication (11)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Duke (2)  |  Exaggerate (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Future (429)  |  Grant (73)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honor (54)  |  Hope (299)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Knight (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Positive (94)  |  Practice (204)  |  Praise (26)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Read (287)  |  Slightly (3)  |  Spin (26)  |  Support (147)  |  Universe (857)  |  Upright (2)  |  Usually (176)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

I often get letters … from people who say … I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature. … I reply … “Well, it’s funny that the people, when they say that this is evidence of the Almighty, always quote beautiful things … orchids and hummingbirds and butterflies and roses.” But I always have to think too of a little boy sitting on the banks of a river in west Africa who has a worm boring through his eyeball, turning him blind before he’s five years old. And I … say, “Well, presumably the God you speak about created the worm as well,” and now, I find that baffling to credit a merciful God with that action. And therefore it seems to me safer to show things that I know to be truth, truthful and factual, and allow people to make up their own minds about the moralities of this thing, or indeed the theology of this thing.
From BBC TV, Life on Air (2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Africa (35)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Bank (31)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boring (7)  |  Boy (94)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Orchid (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reply (56)  |  River (119)  |  Rose (34)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Show (346)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Worm (42)  |  Year (933)

I remember my father had a sermon he used to preach when we were in Florida, in which he gave a reference to the Southern Cross—about the stars, the colors, in the Southern Cross, which thrilled me very much. I must have been around 5 years old. ... Now, it turns out that the Southern Cross itself does have one red star, together with three blue ones.
'Oral History Transcript: Dr. William Wilson Morgan' (8 Aug 1978) in the Niels Bohr Library & Archives.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Color (137)  |  Father (110)  |  Must (1526)  |  Remember (179)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thrill (22)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Year (933)

I remember working out a blueprint for my future when I was twelve years old I resolved first to make enough money so I'd never be stopped from finishing anything; second, that to accumulate money in a hurry—and I was in a hurry—I'd have to invent something that people wanted. And third, that if I ever was going to stand on my own feet, I'd have to leave home.
In Sidney Shalett, 'Aviation’s Stormy Genius', Saturday Evening Post (13 Oct 1956), 229, No. 15, 26 & 155
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Blueprint (7)  |  Enough (340)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Home (170)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Invention (369)  |  Money (170)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Remember (179)  |  Something (719)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stop (80)  |  Want (497)  |  Year (933)

I said to myself, if there's a group of these people that are so courageous and so selfless, somebody ought to carry their damn banner and do something about. That's 1965. I was 20 years old. I said I was going to commit my career to curing paralysis.
Referring to the paralyzed veteran volunteers in the spinal cord injury laboratory with whom Green worked while attending medical school.
Quoted in Jennifer Kay 'Neurosurgeon Barth Green: Football player's treatment available to all', Associated Press news report, USA Today website (posted 27 Sep 2007).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Banner (7)  |  Biography (240)  |  Career (75)  |  Carry (127)  |  Commit (41)  |  Do (1908)  |  Green (63)  |  Injury (36)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Myself (212)  |  Neurosurgery (3)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  People (1005)  |  School (219)  |  Something (719)  |  Spinal Cord (5)  |  Volunteer (7)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I suspect that the most important effect of World War II on physical science lay in the change in the attitude of people to science. The politicians and the public were convinced that science was useful and were in no position to argue about the details. A professor of physics might be more sinister than he was in the 1930s, but he was no longer an old fool with a beard in a comic-strip. The scientists or at any rate the physicists, had changed their attitude. They not only believed in the interest of science for themselves, they had acquired also a belief that the tax-payer should and would pay for it and would, in some unspecified length of run, benefit by it.
'The Effect of World War II on the Development of Knowledge in the Physical Sciences', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1975, Series A, 342, 532.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Change (593)  |  Detail (146)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fool (116)  |  Interest (386)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Politician (38)  |  Politics (112)  |  Professor (128)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Tax (26)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Useful (250)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)

I think all museums should be directed toward 12-year-old boys. They’re the brightest group you can find and this is the age when you can arouse their curiosity and interest.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Boy (94)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Direct (225)  |  Find (998)  |  Group (78)  |  Interest (386)  |  Museum (31)  |  Think (1086)  |  Year (933)

I think if a physician wrote on a death certificate that old age was the cause of death, he’d be thrown out of the union. There is always some final event, some failure of an organ, some last attack of pneumonia, that finishes off a life. No one dies of old age.
In talk, 'Origin of Death' (1970). Evolution began with one-celled organisms reproducing indefinitely by cell division.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Attack (84)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certificate (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Event (216)  |  Failure (161)  |  Final (118)  |  Finish (59)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Organ (115)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pneumonia (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Union (51)

I venture to maintain, that, if the general culture obtained in the Faculty of Arts were what it ought to be, the student would have quite as much knowledge of the fundamental principles of Physics, of Chemistry, and of Biology, as he needs, before he commenced his special medical studies. Moreover, I would urge, that a thorough study of Human Physiology is, in itself, an education broader and more comprehensive than much that passes under that name. There is no side of the intellect which it does not call into play, no region of human knowledge into which either its roots, or its branches, do not extend; like the Atlantic between the Old and the New Worlds, its waves wash the shores of the two worlds of matter and of mind; its tributary streams flow from both; through its waters, as yet unfurrowed by the keel of any Columbus, lies the road, if such there be, from the one to the other; far away from that Northwest Passage of mere speculation, in which so many brave souls have been hopelessly frozen up.
'Universities: Actual and Ideal' (1874). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 3, 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Biology (216)  |  Both (493)  |  Brave (12)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Extend (128)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Northwest Passage (2)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Principle (507)  |  Root (120)  |  Side (233)  |  Soul (226)  |  Special (184)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Through (849)  |  Tributary (3)  |  Two (937)  |  Wash (21)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  World (1774)

I was x years old in the year x2.
When asked about his age (43).
Quoted in H. Eves, In Mathematical Circles (1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ask (411)  |  Biography (240)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Year (933)

I went to the trash pile at Tuskegee Institute and started my laboratory with bottles, old fruit jars and any other thing I found I could use. ... [The early efforts were] worked out almost wholly on top of my flat topped writing desk and with teacups, glasses, bottles and reagents I made myself.
Manuscript fragment, no date, Box 1, George Washington Carver Papers. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottle (15)  |  Desk (13)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Flat (33)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Jar (9)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Made (14)  |  Myself (212)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Start (221)  |  Teacup (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Top (96)  |  Trash (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

I've known rivers:
I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.
My soul has grown deep like the rivers.
The Negro Speaks of Rivers (1926).
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Blood (134)  |  Deep (233)  |  Depth (94)  |  Flow (83)  |  Human (1468)  |  Known (454)  |  River (119)  |  Soul (226)  |  Vein (25)  |  World (1774)

If any human being earnestly desire to push on to new discoveries instead of just retaining and using the old; to win victories over Nature as a worker rather than over hostile critics as a disputant; to attain, in fact, clear and demonstrative knowlegde instead of attractive and probable theory; we invite him as a true son of Science to join our ranks.
Novum Organum (1620), 34, Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Being (1278)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Push (62)  |  Rank (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)  |  Win (52)

If finally, the science should prove that society at a certain time revert to the church and recover its old foundation of absolute faith in a personal providence and a revealed religion, it commits suicide.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Certain (550)  |  Church (56)  |  Commit (41)  |  Faith (203)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Personal (67)  |  Prove (250)  |  Providence (18)  |  Recover (11)  |  Religion (361)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Revert (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Society (326)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Time (1877)

If in some madhouse there is a lunatic who still believes the old churchly tenet that heaven is up above, even this [the first manned landing on the moon] probably will not disabuse him. Surely those of us still sane enough to be at large realize that this event will have no more to so with theology, God, or self-knowledge than any flower we pluck or any hand we press—in fact, much less.
(13 Jul 1969). As given in Alan F. and Jason R. Pater (eds.), What They Said in 1969: The Yearbook of Spoken Opinion (1970), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Enough (340)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  God (757)  |  Hand (143)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Lunatic (9)  |  Madhouse (3)  |  Moon (237)  |  Moon Landing (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Realize (147)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Self (267)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Still (613)  |  Surely (101)  |  Theology (52)  |  Will (2355)

If it were true what in the end would be gained? Nothing but another truth. Is this such a mighty advantage? We have enough old truths still to digest, and even these we would be quite unable to endure if we did not sometimes flavor them with lies.
Aphorism 10 in Notebook E (1775-1776), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  End (590)  |  Enough (340)  |  Flavor (7)  |  Gain (145)  |  Lie (364)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Still (613)  |  Truth (1057)

If Mozart, instead of playing the pianoforte at three years old with wonderfully little practice, had played a tune with no practice at all, he might truly have been said to have done so instinctively.
Origin of Species
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Little (707)  |  Playing (42)  |  Practice (204)  |  Truly (116)  |  Tune (19)  |  Year (933)

If on occasion Mr. Casson exhibits an insularity of judgment when it comes to the evaluation of the contribution made by various men to the development of modern anthropology, he may be forgiven upon the ground that, where anthropology is concerned, he is only following an old English custom!
In 'Review: The Discovery of Man by Stanley Casson', Isis (Jun 1941), 33, No. 2, 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Stanley Casson (2)  |  Concern (228)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Custom (42)  |  Development (422)  |  English (35)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forgive (12)  |  Ground (217)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Modern (385)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Various (200)

If the average man in the street were asked to name the benefits derived from sunshine, he would probably say “light and warmth” and there he would stop. But, if we analyse the matter a little more deeply, we will soon realize that sunshine is the one great source of all forms of life and activity on this old planet of ours. … [M]athematics underlies present-day civilization in much the same far-reaching manner as sunshine underlies all forms of life, and that we unconsciously share the benefits conferred by the mathematical achievements of the race just as we unconsciously enjoy the blessings of the sunshine.
From Address (25 Feb 1928) to National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Boston. Abstract published in 'Mathematics and Sunshine', The Mathematics Teacher (May 1928), 21, No. 5, 245.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Average (82)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Confer (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man In The Street (2)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Planet (356)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Realize (147)  |  Say (984)  |  Share (75)  |  Soon (186)  |  Source (93)  |  Stop (80)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunshine (10)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Will (2355)

If the Humours of the Eye by old Age decay, so as by shrinking to make the Cornea and Coat of the Crystalline Humour grow flatter than before, the Light will not be refracted enough, and for want of a sufficient Refraction will not converge to the bottom of the Eye but to some place beyond it, and by consequence paint in the bottom of the Eye a confused Picture, and according to the Indistinctuess of this Picture the Object will appear confused. This is the reason of the decay of sight in old Men, and shews why their Sight is mended by Spectacles. For those Convex glasses supply the defect of plumpness in the Eye, and by increasing the Refraction make the rays converge sooner, so as to convene distinctly at the bottom of the Eye if the Glass have a due degree of convexity. And the contrary happens in short-sighted Men whose Eyes are too plump. For the Refraction being now too great, the Rays converge and convene in the Eyes before they come at the bottom; and therefore the Picture made in the bottom and the Vision caused thereby will not be distinct, unless the Object be brought so near the Eye as that the place where the converging Rays convene may be removed to the bottom, or that the plumpness of the Eye be taken off and the Refractions diminished by a Concave-glass of a due degree of Concavity, or lastly that by Age the Eye grow flatter till it come to a due Figure: For short-sighted Men see remote Objects best in Old Age, and therefore they are accounted to have the most lasting Eyes.
Opticks (1704), Book 1, Part 1, Axiom VII, 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Account (192)  |  Age (499)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Concave (6)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Converge (8)  |  Convergence (4)  |  Convex (6)  |  Decay (53)  |  Defect (31)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Due (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Eye (419)  |  Figure (160)  |  Glass (92)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happen (274)  |  Humour (116)  |  Lens (14)  |  Light (607)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Picture (143)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reason (744)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Remote (83)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Short-Sighted (4)  |  Sight (132)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supply (93)  |  Vision (123)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

If the resident zoologist of Galaxy X had visited the earth 5 million years ago while making his inventory of inhabited planets in the universe, he would surely have corrected his earlier report that apes showed more promise than Old World monkeys and noted that monkeys had overcome an original disadvantage to gain domination among primates. (He will confirm this statement after his visit next year–but also add a footnote that one species from the ape bush has enjoyed an unusual and unexpected flowering, thus demanding closer monitoring.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Ape (53)  |  Bush (9)  |  Close (69)  |  Closer (43)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Correct (86)  |  Demand (123)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Domination (12)  |  Early (185)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Flower (106)  |  Footnote (5)  |  Gain (145)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Inventory (7)  |  Making (300)  |  Million (114)  |  Monitor (7)  |  Monkey (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Note (34)  |  Old World (8)  |  Original (58)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Planet (356)  |  Primate (11)  |  Promise (67)  |  Report (38)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  Statement (142)  |  Surely (101)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Visit (26)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  X (2)  |  Year (933)  |  Zoologist (12)

If there’s one thing in physics I feel more responsible for than any other, it’s this perception of how everything fits together. I like to think of myself as having a sense of judgment. I’m willing to go anywhere, talk to anybody, ask any question that will make headway. I confess to being an optimist about things, especially about someday being able to understand how things are put together. So many young people are forced to specialize in one line or another that a young person can’t afford to try and cover this waterfront — only an old fogy who can afford to make a fool of himself. If I don't, who will?
Stated during a 1983 interview. Quoted in Dennis Overbye, 'John A. Wheeler, Physicist Who Coined the Term Black Hole, Is Dead at 96', New York Times (14 Apr 2008).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Ask (411)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Being (1278)  |  Confess (42)  |  Everything (476)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fool (116)  |  Himself (461)  |  Judgment (132)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Optimist (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Perception (97)  |  Person (363)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Sense (770)  |  Someday (14)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Young (227)

If we can abstract pathogenicity and hygiene from our notion of dirt, we are left with the old definition of dirt as matter out of place. This is a very suggestive approach. It implies two conditions: a set of ordered relations and a contravention of that order. Dirt then, is never a unique, isolated event.
In Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo (1966), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Approach (108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Definition (221)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Event (216)  |  Hygiene (12)  |  Matter (798)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Pathogen (5)  |  Set (394)  |  Two (937)  |  Unique (67)

If we take science as our sole guide, if we accept and hold fast that alone which is verifiable, the old theology must go.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Alone (311)  |  Fast (45)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hold (95)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sole (49)  |  Theology (52)  |  Verifiable (6)

If you walked into Netscape headquarters with a plain old modem from CompUSA they’d think it was a garage-door opener.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Door (93)  |  Modem (3)  |  Plain (33)  |  Think (1086)  |  Walk (124)

If you want to grow old as a pilot, you’ve got to know when to push it, and when to back off.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Grow (238)  |  Know (1518)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Push (62)  |  Want (497)

In 1900 however, he [Planck] worked out the revolutionary quantum theory, a towering achievement which extended and improved the basic concepts of physics. It was so revolutionary, in fact, that almost no physicist, including Planck himself could bring himself to accept it. (Planck later said that the only way a revolutionary theory could be accepted was to wait until all the old scientists had died.)
(1976). In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Concept (221)  |  Die (86)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Himself (461)  |  Improve (58)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Theory (970)  |  Towering (11)  |  Wait (58)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

In a manner which matches the fortuity, if not the consequence, of Archimedes’ bath and Newton’s apple, the [3.6 million year old] fossil footprints were eventually noticed one evening in September 1976 by the paleontologist Andrew Hill, who fell while avoiding a ball of elephant dung hurled at him by the ecologist David Western.
Missing Links: The Hunt for Earliest Man
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apple (40)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Ball (62)  |  Bath (10)  |  Consequence (203)  |  David (6)  |  Dung (7)  |  Ecologist (9)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Fall (230)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Hill (20)  |  Hurl (2)  |  Manner (58)  |  Match (29)  |  Million (114)  |  Newton (10)  |  Notice (77)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  September (2)  |  Western (45)  |  Year (933)

In a way, cancer is so simple and so natural. The older you get, this is just one of the things that happens as the clock ticks.
As quoted in Eric Berger, Houston Chronicle (28 Oct 2005)
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Clock (47)  |  Happen (274)  |  Natural (796)  |  Simple (406)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tick (9)  |  Way (1217)

In Cairo, I secured a few grains of wheat that had slumbered for more than thirty centuries in an Egyptian tomb. As I looked at them this thought came into my mind: If one of those grains had been planted on the banks of the Nile the year after it grew, and all its lineal descendants had been planted and replanted from that time until now, its progeny would to-day be sufficiently numerous to feed the teeming millions of the world. An unbroken chain of life connects the earliest grains of wheat with the grains that we sow and reap. There is in the grain of wheat an invisible something which has power to discard the body that we see, and from earth and air fashion a new body so much like the old one that we cannot tell the one from the other.…This invisible germ of life can thus pass through three thousand resurrections.
In In His Image (1922), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Bank (31)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Chain (50)  |  Connect (125)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Discard (29)  |  DNA (77)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Germ (53)  |  Grain (50)  |  Growth (187)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Nile (4)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (294)  |  Planting (4)  |  Power (746)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Reap (17)  |  Resurrection (4)  |  Secured (18)  |  See (1081)  |  Slumber (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Sow (11)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Wheat (10)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

In diagnosis, the young are positive and the middle-aged tentative; only the old have flair.
Anonymous
Lancet (1951), 1, 795.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Physician (273)  |  Positive (94)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Young (227)

IN MEMORIAM: FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
She whom we love, our Lady of Compassion,
Can never die, for Love forbids her death.
Love has bent down in his old kindly fashion,
And breathed upon her his immortal breath.
On wounded soldiers, in their anguish lying,
Her gentle spirit shall descend like rain.
Where the white flag with the red cross is flying,
There shall she dwell, the vanquisher of pain.
[In remembrance of 'The Lady of the Lamp' who died 13 Aug 1910.]
In New York Times (29 Aug 1910), 6. Collected in Summer of Love (1911), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (59)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Descend (47)  |  Down (456)  |  Flag (11)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Immortal (35)  |  In Memoriam (2)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Love (309)  |  Lying (55)  |  Never (1087)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Rain (62)  |  Remembrance (5)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Spirit (265)  |  White (127)  |  Wound (26)

In most sciences one generation tears down what another has built, and what one has established, another undoes. In mathematics alone each generation adds a new storey to the old structure.
In Die Entwickelung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1869), 34. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 14. From the original German, “In den meisten Wissenschaften pflegt eine Generation das niederzureissen, was die andere gebaut, und was jene gesetzt, hebt diese auf. In der Mathematik allein setzt jede Generation ein neues Stockwerk auf den alten Unterbau.”
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Build (204)  |  Down (456)  |  Establish (57)  |  Generation (242)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Mathematics (10)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tear (42)  |  Undo (3)

In old age, you realise that while you're divided from your youth by decades, you can close your eyes and summon it at will. As a writer it puts one at a distinct advantage.
Interview with Sarah Crown, in The Guardian (25 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Age (499)  |  Close (69)  |  Decade (59)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Divided (50)  |  Eye (419)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Summon (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writer (86)  |  Youth (101)

In science it is no crime to be wrong, unless you are (inappropriately) laying claim to truth. What matters is that science as a whole is a self-correcting mechanism in which both new and old notions are constantly under scrutiny. In other words, the edifice of scientific knowledge consists simply of a body of observations and ideas that have (so far) proven resistant to attack, and that are thus accepted as working hypotheses about nature.
In The Monkey in the Mirror: Essays on the Science of What Makes Us Human (2003), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Attack (84)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Claim (146)  |  Consist (223)  |  Crime (38)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Resistant (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Correcting (5)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)  |  Wrong (234)

In science it often happens that scientists say, “You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,” and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. It’s very rare that a senator, say, replies, “That’s a good argument. I will now change my political affiliation.”
From keynote address at CSICOP conference, Pasadena, California (3 Apr 1987). Printed in 'The Burden of Skepticism', Skeptical Inquirer (1987), 12, No. 1. Collected in Kendrick Frazier (ed.), The Hundredth Monkey: And Other Paradigms of the Paranormal (1991), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Argument (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Rare (89)  |  Religion (361)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

In the animal world we have seen that the vast majority of species live in societies, and that they find in association the best arms for the struggle for life: understood, of course, in its wide Darwinian sense—not as a struggle for the sheer means of existence, but as a struggle against all natural conditions unfavourable to the species. The animal species, in which individual struggle has been reduced to its narrowest limits, and the practice of mutual aid has attained the greatest development, are invariably the most numerous, the most prosperous, and the most open to further progress. The mutual protection which is obtained in this case, the possibility of attaining old age and of accumulating experience, the higher intellectual development, and the further growth of sociable habits, secure the maintenance of the species, its extension, and its further progressive evolution. The unsociable species, on the contrary, are doomed to decay.
Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution (1902), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Association (46)  |  Attain (125)  |  Best (459)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Decay (53)  |  Development (422)  |  Doom (32)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extension (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Growth (187)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Open (274)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Practice (204)  |  Progress (465)  |  Protection (36)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)

In the context of biological research one can reasonably identify creativity with the capacity 1 to ask new and incisive questions, 2 to form new hypotheses, 3 to examine old questions in new ways or with new techniques, and 4 to perceive previously unnoticed relationships.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Biological (137)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Context (29)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Examine (78)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Identify (13)  |  Incisive (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Previously (11)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonably (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Research (664)  |  Technique (80)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Way (1217)

In the early seventies my mother [Mary Leakey] returned to Laetoli, a site in Tanzania that my parents had discovered in the thirties. In 1976, she discovered footprints of ancient hominids. These three-and-a-half-million- year-old footprints provide evidence of bipedality.
In Pamela Weintraub, The Omni Interviews (1984), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Bipedal (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Early (185)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Mary Douglas Leakey (2)  |  Mother (114)  |  Parent (76)  |  Return (124)  |  Year (933)

In the first papers concerning the aetiology of tuberculosis I have already indicated the dangers arising from the spread of the bacilli-containing excretions of consumptives, and have urged moreover that prophylactic measures should be taken against the contagious disease. But my words have been unheeded. It was still too early, and because of this they still could not meet with full understanding. It shared the fate of so many similar cases in medicine, where a long time has also been necessary before old prejudices were overcome and the new facts were acknowledged to be correct by the physicians.
'The current state of the struggle against tuberculosis', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1905). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Already (222)  |  Arising (22)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Contagious (4)  |  Danger (115)  |  Disease (328)  |  Early (185)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fate (72)  |  First (1283)  |  Long (790)  |  Measure (232)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Paper (182)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Spread (83)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tuberculosis (8)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Word (619)

In the good old days physicists repeated each other’s experiments, just to be sure. Today they stick to FORTRAN, so that they can share each other’s programs, bugs included.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bug (10)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fortran (3)  |  Good (889)  |  Include (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Program (52)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Share (75)  |  Stick (24)  |  Today (314)

In the main, Bacon prophesied the direction of subsequent progress. But he “anticipated” the advance. He did not see that the new science was for a long time to be worked in the interest of old ends of human exploitation. He thought that it would rapidly give man new ends. Instead, it put at the disposal of a class the means to secure their old ends of aggrandizement at the expense of another class. The industrial revolution followed, as he foresaw, upon a revolution in scientific method. But it is taking the revolution many centuries to produce a new mind.
In Democracy and Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 330-331.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Aggrandizement (2)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Century (310)  |  Class (164)  |  Direction (175)  |  End (590)  |  Expense (16)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Human (1468)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Interest (386)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Produce (104)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Secure (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

In the old days, they killed the messenger who brought the bad news... a Cassandra is never popular in her time.
Quoted in Gayle Jacoba Greene The Woman Who Knew Too Much (1999).
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Biography (240)  |  Kill (100)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Time (1877)

In the school of political projectors, I was but ill entertained, the professors appearing, in my judgment, wholly out of their senses; which is a scene that never fails to make me melancholy. These unhappy people were proposing schemes for persuading monarchs to choose favourites upon the score of their wisdom, capacity, and virtue; of teaching ministers to consult the public good; of rewarding merit, great abilities, and eminent services; of instructing princes to know their true interest, by placing it on the same foundation with that of their people; of choosing for employment persons qualified to exercise them; with many other wild impossible chimeras, that never entered before into the heart of man to conceive, and confirmed in me the old observation, that there is nothing so extravagant and irrational which some philosophers have not maintained for truth.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 6, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chimera (9)  |  Choose (112)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Employment (32)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extravagance (3)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fail (185)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interest (386)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Merit (50)  |  Minister (9)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Political (121)  |  Prince (13)  |  Professor (128)  |  Projector (3)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Scene (36)  |  Scheme (57)  |  School (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Service (110)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wisdom (221)

In the space of one hundred and seventy-six years the Lower Mississippi has shortened itself two hundred and forty-two miles. That is an average of a trifle over one mile and a third per year. Therefore, any calm person, who is not blind or idiotic, can see that in the old Oolitic Silurian Period, must a million years ago next November, the Lower Mississippi River was upward of one million three hundred thousand miles long, and stuck out over the Gulf of Mexico like a fishing-rod. And by the same token any person can see that seven hundred and forty-two years from now the Lower Mississippi will be only a mile and three-quarters long, and Cairo and New Orleans will have their streets joined together, and be plodding comfortably along under a single mayor and a mutual board of aldermen. There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
Life on the Mississippi (1883, 2000), 173.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Blind (95)  |  Calm (31)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Investment (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Period (198)  |  Person (363)  |  Return (124)  |  River (119)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Silurian (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Together (387)  |  Token (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Upward (43)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

In this age of specialization men who thoroughly know one field are often incompetent to discuss another. … The old problems, such as the relation of science and religion, are still with us, and I believe present as difficult dilemmas as ever, but they are not often publicly discussed because of the limitations of specialization.
Opening statement, in transcript of talk to the Caltech Lunch Forum (2 May 1956), 'The Relation of Science and Religion', collected in Richard Phillips Feynman and Jeffrey Robbins (ed.), The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (1999, 2005), 245-246.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Belief (578)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Field (364)  |  Incompetent (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public (96)  |  Relation (157)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Still (613)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)

Indeed, while Nature is wonderfully inventive of new structures, her conservatism in holding on to old ones is still more remarkable. In the ascending line of development she tries an experiment once exceedingly thorough, and then the question is solved for all time. For she always takes time enough to try the experiment exhaustively. It took ages to find how to build a spinal column or brain, but when the experiment was finished she had reason to be, and was, satisfied.
In The Whence and Whither of Man; a Brief History of his Origin and Development through Conformity to Environment; being the Morse Lectures of 1895. (1896), 173. The Morse lectureship was founded by Prof. Samuel F.B. Morse in 1865 at Union Theological Seminary, the lectures to deal with “the relation of the Bible to any of the sciences.”
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Brain (270)  |  Build (204)  |  Conservatism (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Exhaustive (2)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Hold (95)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inventive (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spinal Column (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Wonder (236)

Inventions that are not made, like babies that are not born, are rarely missed. In the absence of new developments, old ones may seem very impressive for quite a long while.
The Affluent Society (1958), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Development (422)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Invention (369)  |  Long (790)  |  Miss (51)  |  New (1216)

It had the old double keyboard, an entirely different set of keys for capitals and figures, so that the paper seemed a long way off, and the machine was as big and solid as a battle cruiser. Typing was then a muscular activity. You could ache after it. If you were not familiar with those vast keyboards, your hand wandered over them like a child lost in a wood. The noise might have been that of a shipyard on the Clyde. You would no more have thought of carrying one of those grim structures as you would have thought of travelling with a piano.
[About his first typewriter.]
English Journey (1934), 122-123.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Child (307)  |  Different (577)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Keyboard (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  More (2559)  |  Noise (37)  |  Paper (182)  |  Piano (12)  |  Set (394)  |  Solid (116)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thought (953)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wander (35)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wood (92)

It hath been an old remark, that Geometry is an excellent Logic. And it must be owned that when the definitions are clear; when the postulata cannot be refused, nor the axioms denied; when from the distinct contemplation and comparison of figures, their properties are derived, by a perpetual well-connected chain of consequences, the objects being still kept in view, and the attention ever fixed upon them; there is acquired a habit of reasoning, close and exact and methodical; which habit strengthens and sharpens the mind, and being transferred to other subjects is of general use in the inquiry after truth.
In 'The Analyst', in The Works of George Berkeley (1898), Vol. 3, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Attention (190)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Definition (221)  |  Deny (66)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Exact (68)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Figure (160)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Habit (168)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Logic (287)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Still (613)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)

It is always the case with the best work, that it is misrepresented, and disparaged at first, for it takes a curiously long time for new ideas to become current, and the older men who ought to be capable of taking them in freely, will not do so through prejudice.
From letter reprinted in Journal of Political Economy (Feb 1977), 85, No. 1, back cover, as cited in Stephen M. Stigler, The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty Before 1900 (1986), 307. Stigler notes the letter is held by David E. Butler of Nuffield College, Oxford.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Current (118)  |  Disparage (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Long (790)  |  Misrepresentation (5)  |  New (1216)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

It is an old dream: To travel on the back of a benevolent sea beast down to some secret underwater garden.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Beast (55)  |  Benevolent (9)  |  Down (456)  |  Dream (208)  |  Garden (60)  |  Sea (308)  |  Secret (194)  |  Travel (114)  |  Underwater (5)

It is an old saying, abundantly justified, that where sciences meet there growth occurs. It is true moreover to say that in scientific borderlands not only are facts gathered that [are] often new in kind, but it is in these regions that wholly new concepts arise. It is my own faith that just as the older biology from its faithful studies of external forms provided a new concept in the doctrine of evolution, so the new biology is yet fated to furnish entirely new fundamental concepts of science, at which physics and chemistry when concerned with the non-living alone could never arrive.
'Biological Thought and Chemical Thought: A Plea for Unification', Linacre Lecture, Cambridge (6 May 1938), published in Lancet (1938),2, 1204.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Arise (158)  |  Biology (216)  |  Borderland (6)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Gather (72)  |  Growth (187)  |  Kind (557)  |  Living (491)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wholly (88)

It is characteristic of the unlearned that they are forever proposing something which is old, and because it has recently come to their own attention, supposing it to be new.
Address at Holy Cross College (25 Jun 1919), collected in Have Faith In Massachusetts: A Collection of Speeches and Messages (1919, 2nd Ed.), 231. (This speech was not included in the period covered by the first edition.)
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Forever (103)  |  New (1216)  |  Recent (77)  |  Something (719)  |  Supposing (3)  |  Unlearn (11)  |  Unlearned (2)

It is curious to reflect on how history repeats itself the world over. Why, I remember the same thing was done when I was a boy on the Mississippi River. There was a proposition in a township there to discontinue public schools because they were too expensive. An old farmer spoke up and said if they stopped the schools they would not save anything, because every time a school was closed a jail had to be built.
It's like feeding a dog on his own tail. He'll never get fat. I believe it is better to support schools than jails.
Address at a meeting of the Berkeley Lyceum, New York (23 Nov 1900). Mark Twain's Speeches (2006), 69-70.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Better (486)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Close (69)  |  Closed (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discontinue (3)  |  Dog (70)  |  Education (378)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Farmer (32)  |  Fat (11)  |  Feed (27)  |  History (673)  |  Jail (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Public (96)  |  Remember (179)  |  River (119)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Support (147)  |  Tail (18)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

It is disconcerting that present-day young who did not know Stalin and Hitler are displaying the old naïveté. After all that has happened they still do not know that you cannot build utopia without terror, and that before long terror is all that’s left.
In Before the Sabbath (1979), 120.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Build (204)  |  Disconcerting (3)  |  Display (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eacute (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Iuml (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leave (130)  |  Long (790)  |  Na (3)  |  Present (619)  |  Present-Day (2)  |  Stalin_Joseph (5)  |  Still (613)  |  Terror (30)  |  Utopia (5)  |  Young (227)

It is idle to dispute with old men. Their opinions, like their cranial sutures, are ossified.
In Charlas de Café as cited in Peter McDonald (ed.) Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Cranial (2)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Idle (33)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ossified (2)

It is idle to expect any great advancement in science from the superinducing and engrafting of new things upon old. We must begin anew from the very foundations, unless we would revolve for ever in a circle with mean and contemptible progress.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 31. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Anew (18)  |  Begin (260)  |  Circle (110)  |  Expect (200)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idle (33)  |  Mean (809)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)

It is in the name of Moses that Bellarmin thunderstrikes Galileo; and this great vulgarizer of the great seeker Copernicus, Galileo, the old man of truth, the magian of the heavens, was reduced to repeating on his knees word for word after the inquisitor this formula of shame: “Corde sincera et fide non ficta abjuro maledico et detestor supradictos errores et hereses.” Falsehood put an ass's hood on science.
[With a sincere heart, and of faith unfeigned, I deny by oath, condemn and detest the aforesaid errors and heresies.]
In Victor Hugo and Lorenzo O'Rourke (trans.) Victor Hugo's Intellectual Autobiography: (Postscriptum de ma vie) (1907), 313.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Deny (66)  |  Error (321)  |  Faith (203)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Formula (98)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Heresy (9)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Knee (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moses (6)  |  Name (333)  |  Oath (10)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeker (8)  |  Shame (14)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)

It is natural selection that gives direction to changes, orients chance, and slowly, progressively produces more complex structures, new organs, and new species. Novelties come from previously unseen association of old material. To create is to recombine.
In 'Evolution and Tinkering', Science (10 Jun 1977), 196, 1163.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Chance (239)  |  Change (593)  |  Complex (188)  |  Create (235)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  New (1216)  |  Organ (115)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Unseen (22)

It is not so difficult a task as to plant new truths, as to root out old errors
Lacon: Many Things in Few Words (1820-22, 1866), 276.
Science quotes on:  |  Difficult (246)  |  Error (321)  |  New (1216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Root (120)  |  Root Out (4)  |  Task (147)  |  Truth (1057)

It is now necessary to indicate more definitely the reason why mathematics not only carries conviction in itself, but also transmits conviction to the objects to which it is applied. The reason is found, first of all, in the perfect precision with which the elementary mathematical concepts are determined; in this respect each science must look to its own salvation .... But this is not all. As soon as human thought attempts long chains of conclusions, or difficult matters generally, there arises not only the danger of error but also the suspicion of error, because since all details cannot be surveyed with clearness at the same instant one must in the end be satisfied with a belief that nothing has been overlooked from the beginning. Every one knows how much this is the case even in arithmetic, the most elementary use of mathematics. No one would imagine that the higher parts of mathematics fare better in this respect; on the contrary, in more complicated conclusions the uncertainty and suspicion of hidden errors increases in rapid progression. How does mathematics manage to rid itself of this inconvenience which attaches to it in the highest degree? By making proofs more rigorous? By giving new rules according to which the old rules shall be applied? Not in the least. A very great uncertainty continues to attach to the result of each single computation. But there are checks. In the realm of mathematics each point may be reached by a hundred different ways; and if each of a hundred ways leads to the same point, one may be sure that the right point has been reached. A calculation without a check is as good as none. Just so it is with every isolated proof in any speculative science whatever; the proof may be ever so ingenious, and ever so perfectly true and correct, it will still fail to convince permanently. He will therefore be much deceived, who, in metaphysics, or in psychology which depends on metaphysics, hopes to see his greatest care in the precise determination of the concepts and in the logical conclusions rewarded by conviction, much less by success in transmitting conviction to others. Not only must the conclusions support each other, without coercion or suspicion of subreption, but in all matters originating in experience, or judging concerning experience, the results of speculation must be verified by experience, not only superficially, but in countless special cases.
In Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 105. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Care (186)  |  Carry (127)  |  Case (99)  |  Chain (50)  |  Check (24)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Coercion (3)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Computation (24)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continue (165)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Convince (41)  |  Correct (86)  |  Countless (36)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fare (5)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (202)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Thought (7)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Least (75)  |  Less (103)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metaphysic (6)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Originate (36)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Part (222)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Reach (281)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Reward (68)  |  Rid (13)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Rule (294)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Single (353)  |  Soon (186)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Support (147)  |  Survey (33)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmit (11)  |  True (212)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Use (766)  |  Verify (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

It is one of the little ironies of our times that while the layman was being indoctrinated with the stereotype image of black holes as the ultimate cookie monsters, the professionals have been swinging round to the almost directly opposing view that black holes, like growing old, are really not so bad when you consider the alternative.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Black Holes (4)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cookie (2)  |  Directly (22)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Image (96)  |  Irony (8)  |  Layman (21)  |  Little (707)  |  Monster (31)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Professional (70)  |  Really (78)  |  Round (26)  |  Stereotype (4)  |  Swing (11)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  View (488)

It is safe to say that the little pamphlet which was left to find its way through the slow mails to the English scientist outweighed in importance and interest for the human race all the press dispatches which have been flashed under the channel since the delivery of the address—March 24. The rapid growth of the Continental capitals, the movements of princely noodles and fat, vulgar Duchesses, the debates in the Servian Skupschina, and the progress or receding of sundry royal gouts are given to the wings of lightning; a lumbering mail-coach is swift enough for the news of one of the great scientific discoveries of the age. Similarly, the gifted gentlemen who daily sift out for the American public the pith and kernel of the Old World's news; leave Dr. KOCH and his bacilli to chance it in the ocean mails, while they challenge the admiration of every gambler and jockey in this Republic by the fullness and accuracy of their cable reports of horse-races.
New York Times (3 May 1882). Quoted in Thomas D. Brock, Robert Koch (1988), 131.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Cable (11)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  Daily (87)  |  Debate (38)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Flash (49)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Gout (5)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Horse (74)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Little (707)  |  Mail (2)  |  March (46)  |  Movement (155)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Old World (8)  |  Progress (465)  |  Race (268)  |  Republic (15)  |  Royal (57)  |  Safe (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Slow (101)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Through (849)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)

It is the old experience that a rude instrument in the hand of a master craftsman will achieve more than the finest tool wielded by the uninspired journeyman.
Quoted in The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton (1930), Vol. 3A, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Craftsman (5)  |  Experience (467)  |  Hand (143)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Journeyman (3)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Rude (6)  |  Tool (117)  |  Uninspired (2)  |  Wield (10)  |  Will (2355)

It is told of Faraday that he refused to be called a physicist; he very much disliked the new name as being too special and particular and insisted on the old one, philosopher, in all its spacious generality: we may suppose that this was his way of saying that he had not over-ridden the limiting conditions of class only to submit to the limitation of a profession.
Commentary (Jun 1962), 33, 461-77. Cited by Sydney Ross in Nineteenth-Century Attitudes: Men of Science (1991), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Call (769)  |  Called (9)  |  Class (164)  |  Condition (356)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Generality (45)  |  Insist (20)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Over-Ride (2)  |  Particular (76)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Preference (28)  |  Profession (99)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Special (184)  |  Submit (18)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Way (1217)

It is utterly false and cruelly arbitrary to put all the play and learning into childhood, all the work into middle age, and all the regrets into old age.
Quoted, without citation, as a column filler, in New York State Department of Mental Hygiene, Mental Hygiene News (1949), Volumes 20-26, 20. Webmaster has so far been unable to find a primary source, so please contact if you know the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Cruel (25)  |  False (100)  |  Learning (274)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Play (112)  |  Regret (30)  |  Utterly (15)  |  Work (1351)

It is very much in the order of nature that toothless animals should have horns: is it any wonder that old men and women should often have them?
Aphorism 6 in Notebook E (1775-1776), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Horn (18)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Wonder (236)

It may be said of some very old places, as of some very old books, that they are destined to be forever new. The nearer we approach them, the more remote they seem: the more we study them, the more we have yet to learn. Time augments rather than diminishes their everlasting novelty; and to our descendants of a thousand years hence it may safely be predicted that they will be even more fascinating than to ourselves. This is true of many ancient lands, but of no place is it so true as of Egypt.
Opening remark in Pharaohs, Fellahs and Explorers (1891), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Approach (108)  |  Augment (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Destined (42)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Everlasting (8)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Forever (103)  |  Land (115)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearer (45)  |  New (1216)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Place (177)  |  Predict (79)  |  Remote (83)  |  Seem (145)  |  Study (653)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

It may be that the old astrologers had the truth exactly reversed, when they believed that the stars controlled the destinies of men. The time may come when men control the destinies of stars.
The View from Serendip (1977), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Control (167)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)

It seems as though no laws, not even fairly old ones, can safely be regarded as unassailable. The force of gravity, which we have always ascribed to the “pull of the earth,” was reinterpreted the other day by a scientist who says that when we fall it is not earth pulling us, it is heaven pushing us. This blasts the rock on which we sit. If science can do a rightabout-face on a thing as fundamental as gravity, maybe Newton was a sucker not to have just eaten the apple.
In 'Talk of the Town,', The New Yorker (3 Apr 1937). As cited in Martha White (ed.), In the Words of E.B. White (2011), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (40)  |  Blast (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eat (104)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pull (43)  |  Push (62)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rock (161)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sucker (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unassailable (3)

It seems to me that the older subjects, classics and mathematics, are strongly to be recommended on the ground of the accuracy with which we can compare the relative performance of the students. In fact the definiteness of these subjects is obvious, and is commonly admitted. There is however another advantage, which I think belongs in general to these subjects, that the examinations can be brought to bear on what is really most valuable in these subjects.
In Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Bear (159)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bring (90)  |  Classic (11)  |  Commonly (9)  |  Compare (69)  |  Definiteness (3)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Performance (48)  |  Really (78)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Relative (39)  |  Seem (145)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

It was a reaction from the old idea of protoplasm, a name which was a mere repository of ignorance.
In 'The Biochemistry of the Individual' (1937), collected in Neurath Hans (ed.), Perspectives in Biochemistry (1989), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Mere (84)  |  Name (333)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Repository (5)

It was a reaction from the old idea of “protoplasm”, a name which was a mere repository of ignorance.
Perspectives in Biochemistry (1938). As cited in Max Perutz, I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier: Essays on Science, Scientists, and Humanity (1998).
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Repository (5)

It was a standing joke of [Dr. Chapman] to quote old Leuwenhoeck as having discovered 'twenty thousand devils playing upon the point of a needle' thus foreshadowing some of the most remarkable discoveries of the present day, especially disease germs.
Opening address to American Medical Association, Cleveland, Ohio, 5 Jun 1883. In The Chicago Medical Journal and Examiner (1883), 47 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Nathaniel Chapman (3)  |  Devil (31)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Germ (53)  |  Joke (83)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Most (1731)  |  Playing (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Quote (42)  |  Thousand (331)

It was above all in the period after the devastating incursions of the Goths that all branches of knowledge which previously had flourished gloriously and been practiced in the proper manner, began to deteriorate. This happened first of all in Italy where the most fashionable physicians, spurning surgery as did the Romans of old, assigned to their servants such surgical work as their patients seemed to require and merely exercised a supervision over them in the manner of architects.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, i, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), Preface, xlviii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Devastating (5)  |  Devastation (6)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Incursion (2)  |  Italy (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Patient (199)  |  Period (198)  |  Physician (273)  |  Proper (144)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Roman (36)  |  Servant (39)  |  Supervision (4)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Work (1351)

It was long before I got at the maxim, that in reading an old mathematician you will not read his riddle unless you plough with his heifer; you must see with his light, if you want to know how much he saw.
Letter to W. R. Hamilton, 27 January 1853. In R. P. Graves (ed.), A Life of Sir W. R. Hamilton (1889), Vol. 3, 438.
Science quotes on:  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Must (1526)  |  Plough (13)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

It would not be difficult to come to an agreement as to what we understand by science. Science is the century-old endeavor to bring together by means of systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as thoroughgoing an association as possible. To put it boldly, it is the attempt at the posterior reconstruction of existence by the process of conceptualization. But when asking myself what religion is I cannot think of the answer so easily. And even after finding an answer which may satisfy me at this particular moment, I still remain convinced that I can never under any circumstances bring together, even to a slight extent, the thoughts of all those who have given this question serious consideration.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Association (46)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Bring (90)  |  Century (310)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easily (35)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extent (139)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moment (253)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceptible (6)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remain (349)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serious (91)  |  Slight (31)  |  Still (613)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Understand (606)  |  World (1774)

I’m convinced that the best solutions are often the ones that are counterintuitive—that challenge conventional thinking—and end in breakthroughs. It is always easier to do things the same old way … why change? To fight this, keep your dissatisfaction index high and break with tradition. Don’t be too quick to accept the way things are being done. Question whether there’s a better way. Very often you will find that once you make this break from the usual way - and incidentally, this is probably the hardest thing to do—and start on a new track your horizon of new thoughts immediately broadens. New ideas flow in like water. Always keep your interests broad - don’t let your mind be stunted by a limited view.
1988
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Counterintuitive (4)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easier (53)  |  End (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Flow (83)  |  High (362)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Interest (386)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Start (221)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Tradition (69)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Jealousy was plainly exhibited when I fondled a large doll, and when I weighed his infant sister, he being then 15? months old. Seeing how strong a feeling of jealousy is in dogs, it would probably be exhibited by infants at any earlier age than just specified if they were tried in a fitting manner
Mind
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Being (1278)  |  Dog (70)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Infant (26)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Large (394)  |  Month (88)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Strong (174)  |  Weigh (49)

Just now nuclear physicists are writing a great deal about hypothetical particles called neutrinos supposed to account for certain peculiar facts observed in β-ray disintegration. We can perhaps best describe the neutrinos as little bits of spin-energy that have got detached. I am not much impressed by the neutrino theory. In an ordinary way I might say that I do not believe in neutrinos… But I have to reflect that a physicist may be an artist, and you never know where you are with artists. My old-fashioned kind of disbelief in neutrinos is scarcely enough. Dare I say that experimental physicists will not have sufficient ingenuity to make neutrinos? Whatever I may think, I am not going to be lured into a wager against the skill of experimenters under the impression that it is a wager against the truth of a theory. If they succeed in making neutrinos, perhaps even in developing industrial applications of them, I suppose I shall have to believe—though I may feel that they have not been playing quite fair.
From Tarner Lecture, 'Discovery or Manufacture?' (1938), in The Philosophy of Physical Science (1939, 2012), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Application (242)  |  Artist (90)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Dare (50)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Disbelief (4)  |  Disintegration (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Impression (114)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Neutrino (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physicist (5)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Playing (42)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Skill (109)  |  Spin (26)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writing (189)

Just think of the differences today. A young person gets interested in chemistry and is given a chemical set. But it doesn't contain potassium cyanide. It doesn't even contain copper sulfate or anything else interesting because all the interesting chemicals are considered dangerous substances. Therefore, these budding young chemists don't get a chance to do anything engrossing with their chemistry sets. As I look back, I think it is pretty remarkable that Mr. Ziegler, this friend of the family, would have so easily turned over one-third of an ounce of potassium cyanide to me, an eleven-year-old boy.
In Barbara Marinacci, Linus Pauling In His Own Words (1995), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Boy (94)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Chemistry Set (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Copper (25)  |  Danger (115)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Family (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gift (104)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Look (582)  |  Person (363)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Set (394)  |  Substance (248)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Turn (447)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

Knowledge does not keep any better than fish. You may be dealing with knowledge of the old species, with some old truth; but somehow or other it must come to the students, as it were, just drawn out of the sea and with the freshness of its immediate importance.
In 'Universities and Their Function', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Education (378)  |  Fish (120)  |  Freshness (8)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Importance (286)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sea (308)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Species (401)  |  Student (300)  |  Truth (1057)

Learning acquired in youth arrests the evil of old age; and if you understand that old age has wisdom for its food, you will so conduct yourself in youth that your old age will not lack for nourishment.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Age (499)  |  Arrest (8)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Evil (116)  |  Food (199)  |  Lack (119)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Youth (101)

Learning is ever in the freshness of its youth, even for the old.
Aeschylus
Agamemnon, 584. In John Bartlett, Familar Quotations: A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs (1891), 695.
Science quotes on:  |  Freshness (8)  |  Learning (274)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Youth (101)

Let us suppose, that the Old and New worlds were formerly but one continent, and that, by a violent earthquake, the ancient Atalantis [sic] of Plato was sunk ... The sea would necessarily rush in from all quarters, and form what is now called the Atlantic ocean.
'Second Discours: Histoire et Théorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. I, 96; Natural History, General and Particular (1785), Vol. I, trans. W. Smellie, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atlantic Ocean (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Continent (76)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Form (959)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Sea (308)  |  Suppose (156)  |  World (1774)

Life is girt all round with a zodiac of sciences, the contributions of men who have perished to add their point of light to our sky. ... These road-makers on every hand enrich us. We must extend the area of life and multiply our relations. We are as much gainers by finding a property in the old earth as by acquiring a new planet.
In James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 247:34.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Extend (128)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Maker (34)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Perish (50)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Property (168)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sky (161)

Linnaeus and Cuvier have been my two gods, though in very different ways, but they were mere schoolboys to old Aristotle.
Letter to W. Ogle (22 Feb 1882). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1896), 427.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Different (577)  |  God (757)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)

Listen now for the sound that forevermore separates the old from the new.
[Introducing the beep-beep chirp transmitted by the Sputnik satellite.]
NBC Radio
NBC radio announcer on the night of 4 Oct 1957. In 'The Nation: Red Moon Over the U.S.', Time (14 Oct 1957), 70, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Listen (73)  |  New (1216)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Sound (183)  |  Sputnik (4)

Magnetism, galvanism, electricity, are “one form of many names.” Without magnetism we should never have discovered America; to which we are indebted for nothing but evil; diseases in the worst forms that can afflict humanity, and slavery in the worst form in which slavery can exist. The Old World had the sugar-cane and the cotton-plant, though it did not so misuse them.
Written for fictional character, the Rev. Dr. Opimian, in Gryll Grange (1861), collected in Sir Henry Cole (ed.) The Works of Thomas Love Peacock(1875), Vol. 2, 382. [Hans Øersted discovered electromagnetism in 1820. Presumably the next reference to magnetism refers to a compass needle for navigation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  America (127)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exist (443)  |  Form (959)  |  Galvanism (8)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Misuse (13)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old World (8)  |  Plant (294)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Sugar (23)  |  World (1774)  |  Worst (57)

Man … begins life as an ambiguous speck of matter which can in no way be distinguished from the original form of the lowest animal or plant. He next becomes a cell; his life is precisely that of the animalcule. Cells cluster round this primordial cell, and the man is so far advanced that he might be mistaken for an undeveloped oyster; he grows still more, and it is clear that he might even be a fish; he then passes into a stage which is common to all quadrupeds, and next assumes a form which can only belong to quadrupeds of the higher type. At last the hour of birth approaches; coiled within the dark womb he sits, the image of an ape; a caricature of the man that is to be. He is born, and for some time he walks only on all fours; he utters only inarticulate sounds; and even in his boyhood his fondness for climbing trees would seem to be a relic of the old arboreal life.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belong (162)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Cell (138)  |  Climbing (4)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Dark (140)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hour (186)  |  Image (96)  |  Inarticulate (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Plant (294)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Relic (6)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speck (23)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Type (167)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Womb (24)

Many will, no doubt, prefer to retain old unsystematic names as far as possible, but it is easy to see that the desire to avoid change may carry us too far in this direction; it will undoubtedly be very inconvenient to the present generation of chemists to abandon familiar and cherished names, but nevertheless it may be a wise course to boldly face the difficulty, rather than inflict on coming generations a partially illogical and unsystematic nomenclature.
'International Conference on Chemical Nomenclature', Nature (19 May 1892), 46, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Carry (127)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Coming (114)  |  Course (409)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Face (212)  |  Generation (242)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Name (333)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Partially (8)  |  Possible (552)  |  Preference (28)  |  Present (619)  |  Retain (56)  |  See (1081)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)

Mathematical economics is old enough to be respectable, but not all economists respect it. It has powerful supporters and impressive testimonials, yet many capable economists deny that mathematics, except as a shorthand or expository device, can be applied to economic reasoning. There have even been rumors that mathematics is used in economics (and in other social sciences) either for the deliberate purpose of mystification or to confer dignity upon commonplaces as French was once used in diplomatic communications. …. To be sure, mathematics can be extended to any branch of knowledge, including economics, provided the concepts are so clearly defined as to permit accurate symbolic representation. That is only another way of saying that in some branches of discourse it is desirable to know what you are talking about.
In J.R. Newman (ed.), Commentary on Cournot, Jevons and the Mathematics of Money', The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 2, 1200.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Branch (150)  |  Capable (168)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Communication (94)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confer (11)  |  Defined (4)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Deny (66)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Device (70)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Economist (17)  |  Enough (340)  |  Expository (2)  |  Extend (128)  |  French (20)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permit (58)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Representation (53)  |  Respect (207)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Rumor (2)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shorthand (5)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Supporter (4)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Talking (76)  |  Testimonial (3)  |  Way (1217)

Mathematicians seem to have no difficulty in creating new concepts faster than the old ones become well understood.
Acceptance Speech for the Kyoto Prize (1991), 'A scientist by choice'. On kyotoprize.org website.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Concept (221)  |  Create (235)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Faster (50)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  New (1216)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

Mathematics has often been characterized as the most conservative of all sciences. This is true in the sense of the immediate dependence of new upon old results. All the marvellous new advancements presuppose the old as indispensable steps in the ladder. … Inaccessibility of special fields of mathematics, except by the regular way of logically antecedent acquirements, renders the study discouraging or hateful to weak or indolent minds.
In Number and its Algebra (1896), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  All (4108)  |  Antecedent (4)  |  Conservative (15)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Field (364)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Logic (287)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Regular (46)  |  Render (93)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weak (71)

Mathematics is one of the oldest of the sciences; it is also one of the most active, for its strength is the vigour of perpetual youth.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1897), Nature, 66, 378.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strength (126)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Youth (101)

Medals are great encouragement to young men and lead them to feel their work is of value, I remember how keenly I felt this when in the 1890s. I received the Darwin Medal and the Huxley Medal. When one is old, one wants no encouragement and one goes on with one's work to the extent of one's power, because it has become habitual.
Letter to Major Greenwood (8 Dec 1933). Quoted in M. E. Magnello, 'Karl Pearson', in P. Armitage and T. Colton (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (1998), Vol. 4, 3314.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Extent (139)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habit (168)  |  Lead (384)  |  Medal (4)  |  Power (746)  |  Receive (114)  |  Remember (179)  |  Value (365)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

Men have been talking now for a week at the post office about the age of the great elm, as a matter interesting but impossible to be determined. The very choppers and travelers have stood upon its prostrate trunk and speculated upon its age, as if it were a profound mystery. I stooped and read its years to them (127 at nine and a half feet), but they heard me as the wind that once sighed through its branches. They still surmised that it might be two hundred years old, but they never stooped to read the inscription. Truly they love darkness rather than light. One said it was probably one hundred and fifty, for he had heard somebody say that for fifty years the elm grew, for fifty it stood still, and for fifty it was dying. (Wonder what portion of his career he stood still!) Truly all men are not men of science. They dwell within an integument of prejudice thicker than the bark of the cork-tree, but it is valuable chiefly to stop bottles with. Tied to their buoyant prejudices, they keep themselves afloat when honest swimmers sink.
(26 Jan 1856). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: VIII: November 1, 1855-August 15, 1856 (1906), 145-146.
Science quotes on:  |  Afloat (4)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Bark (18)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Buoyant (5)  |  Career (75)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Cork (2)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Elm (4)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Great (1574)  |  Honest (50)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inscription (11)  |  Integument (3)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Never (1087)  |  Office (71)  |  Portion (84)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Profound (104)  |  Read (287)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sink (37)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Still (613)  |  Swimmer (3)  |  Talking (76)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Tree (246)  |  Truly (116)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Two (937)  |  Week (70)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Year (933)

Men in most cases continue to be sexually competent until they are sixty years old, and if that limit be overpassed then until seventy years; and men have been actually known to procreate children at seventy years of age.
Aristotle
In The Works of Aristotle: Historia Animalium (350 BC), (The History of Animals), Book VII, Part 6, 585b5 translated in William David Ross and John Alexander Smith (eds.), D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (trans.), (1910), Vol. 4, 4
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Competent (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Limit (280)  |  Most (1731)  |  Procreate (4)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Seventy (2)  |  Sexuality (11)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Year (933)

Modern Physics impresses us particularly with the truth of the old doctrine which teaches that there are realities existing apart from our sense-perceptions, and that there are problems and conflicts where these realities are of greater value for us than the richest treasures of the world of experience.
In The Universe in the Light of Modern Physics (1931), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impress (64)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Perception (97)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rich (62)  |  Sense (770)  |  Teach (277)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)  |  World (1774)

Mr Justus Liebig is no doubt a very clever gentleman and a most profound chemist, but in our opinion he knows as much of agriculture as the horse that ploughs the ground, and there is not an old man that stands between the stilts of a plough in Virginia, that cannot tell him of facts totally at variance with his finest spun theories.
Magazine
The Southern Planter (1845), 3, 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Clever (38)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Ground (217)  |  Horse (74)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Justus von Liebig (38)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Plough (13)  |  Profound (104)  |  Stand (274)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Variance (12)  |  Virginia (2)

My grandfather opened the first chapter of his story, A Smile of the Walrus, with an old nursery rhyme, “Did you ever see a walrus smile all these many years? Why yes I’ve seen a walrus smile, but it was hidden by his tears.” As we open this new chapter in the battle against climate change, I fear that if we do not take action, then the smiles of our children, like the walrus, will be hidden by the tears they shed as they pay the consequences of our inaction, our apathy and our greed.
In 'What do the Arctic, a Thermostat and COP15 Have in Common?', Huffington Post (18 Mar 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Apathy (3)  |  Battle (34)  |  Change (593)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fear (197)  |  First (1283)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Greed (14)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Inaction (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Pay (43)  |  Rhyme (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Shed (5)  |  Smile (31)  |  Story (118)  |  Tear (42)  |  Walrus (4)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

My heart rate wasn’t as high as his [Robert Crippen], because I’m so dang old and it just wouldn’t go any faster.
As quoted on the nmspacemuseum.org website of the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Science quotes on:  |  Robert Laurel Crippen (2)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  Rate (29)

Nature is an endless combination and repetition of very few laws. She hums the old well-known air through innumerable variations.
Essays, Lectures and Orations (1851), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Combination (144)  |  Endless (56)  |  Hum (4)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Through (849)  |  Variation (90)  |  Well-Known (4)

Nature! … She is ever shaping new forms: what is, has never yet been; what has been, comes not again. Everything is new, and yet nought but the old.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (476)  |  Form (959)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Shape (72)

No collateral science had profited so much by palæontology as that which teaches the structure and mode of formation of the earth’s crust, with the relative position, time, and order of formation of its constituent stratified and unstratified parts. Geology has left her old hand-maiden mineralogy to rest almost wholly on the broad shoulders of her young and vigorous offspring, the science of organic remains.
In article 'Palæontology' contributed to Encyclopædia Britannica (8th ed., 1859), Vol. 17, 91.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Broad (27)  |  Collateral (4)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Crust (38)  |  Earth (996)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geology (220)  |  Handmaiden (2)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Mode (41)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Position (77)  |  Profit (52)  |  Relative (39)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Structure (344)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Young (227)

No history of civilization can be tolerably complete which does not give considerable space to the explanation of scientific progress. If we had any doubts about this, it would suffice to ask ourselves what constitutes the essential difference between our and earlier civilizations. Throughout the course of history, in every period, and in almost every country, we find a small number of saints, of great artists, of men of science. The saints of to-day are not necessarily more saintly than those of a thousand years ago; our artists are not necessarily greater than those of early Greece; they are more likely to be inferior; and of course, our men of science are not necessarily more intelligent than those of old; yet one thing is certain, their knowledge is at once more extensive and more accurate. The acquisition and systematization of positive knowledge is the only human activity which is truly cumulative and progressive. Our civilization is essentially different from earlier ones, because our knowledge of the world and of ourselves is deeper, more precise, and more certain, because we have gradually learned to disentangle the forces of nature, and because we have contrived, by strict obedience to their laws, to capture them and to divert them to the gratification of our own needs.
Introduction to the History of Science (1927), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Activity (210)  |  Artist (90)  |  Ask (411)  |  Capture (10)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completion (22)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Country (251)  |  Course (409)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Early (185)  |  Essential (199)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greece (8)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Positive (94)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Progress (465)  |  Saint (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Truly (116)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

No old Men (excepting Dr. Wallis) love Mathematicks.
Comment made by Newton to William Whiston. Quoted in Richard Westfall, Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton (1980), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Old Age (33)  |  John Wallis (3)  |  William Whiston (2)

No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Head (81)  |  Home (170)  |  Pillow (4)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rest (280)  |  Travel (114)

Nobody grows old merely by living a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals. Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Desert (56)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Give Up (7)  |  Grow (238)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Merely (316)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Number (699)  |  Skin (47)  |  Soul (226)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Year (933)

Nothing could have been worse for the development of my mind than Dr. Butler's school, as it was strictly classical, nothing else being taught, except a little ancient geography and history. The school as a means of education to me was simply a blank. During my whole life I have been singularly incapable of mastering any language. Especial attention was paid to versemaking, and this I could never do well. I had many friends, and got together a good collection of old verses, which by patching together, sometimes aided by other boys, I could work into any subject.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blank (11)  |  Boy (94)  |  Classical (45)  |  Collection (64)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Friend (168)  |  Geography (36)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Mastering (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poetry (143)  |  School (219)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Together (387)  |  Verse (11)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Nothing inspires more reverence and awe in me than an old man who knows how to change his mind.
In Pensamientos Escogidos (1924), 58. Translated from the original Spanish, “Nada me inspira más veneración y asombro que un anciano que sabe cambiar de opinión.”
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Change (593)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Reverence (28)

Of all the offspring of Time, Error is the most ancient, and is so old and familiar an acquaintance, that Truth, when discovered, comes upon most of us like an intruder, and meets the intruder’s welcome.
From Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions (1841), Vol. 1, 314.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Discover (553)  |  Error (321)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Intruder (4)  |  Meet (31)  |  Most (1731)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Welcome (16)

Of my own age I may say … I was x years old in the year x × x. … I dare say Professor De Morgan, or some of your mathematical correspondents, will be able to find my age.
In Notes and Queries: Volume Twelve: July—December 1855 (4 Aug 1855), Vol. 12 No. 301, 94. The reply is signed as by M. However De Morgan is identified as author in C.O. Tuckey, 'Noughts and Crosses', The Mathematical Gazette (Dec 1929), 14, No. 204, 577, which points out: M “contributed other replies that were certainly from the pen of De Morgan.” Furthermore, De Morgan, mathematician, born in 1806, was 43 in the year 1849 (43 × 43, which is the only reasonable solution for an adult writing in 1855 since 42² = 1764).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Dare (50)  |  Find (998)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Professor (128)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Square (70)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Old age is but a second childhood.
In Aristophanes and Thomas Mitchell (trans.), 'The Clouds', The Comedies of Aristophanes (1822), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Child (307)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Old Age (33)

Old age is the most unexpected of all things that happen to a man.
Diary entry (8 May 1936), collected in Diary in Exile (1959).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Happen (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unexpected (52)

Old and new put their stamp to everything in Nature. The snowflake that is now falling is marked by both. The present moment gives the motion and the color of the flake, Antiquity its form and properties. All things wear a lustre which is the gift of the present, and a tarnish of time.
Epigraph for chapter 'Quotation and Originality', in Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Both (493)  |  Color (137)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flake (6)  |  Form (959)  |  Gift (104)  |  Give (202)  |  Lustre (3)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Moment (253)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Tarnish (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wear (18)

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“I’ll move the world,” quoth he;
“My England’s high, and rich, and great,
But greater she shall be !”
And he call’d for the pick, and he call’d for the spade,
And he call’d for his miners bold;
“ And it’s dig,” he said, “in the deep, deep earth;
You’ll find my treasures better worth
Than mines of Indian gold!”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul,
Yet not content was he;
And he said, “I’ve found what I’ve desired,
Though ’tis but one of three.”
And he call’d for water, he call’d for fire,
For smiths and workmen true:
“Come, build me engines great and strong ;
We’ll have,” quoth he, “a change ere long;
We’ll try what Steam can do.”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“’Tis fairly done,” quoth he,
When he saw the myriad wheels at work
O’er all the land and sea.
They spared the bones and strength of men,
They hammer’d, wove, and spun;
There was nought too great, too mean, or small,
The giant Steam had power for all;—
His task was never done.
From song, 'Old King Coal' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 565. To the melody of 'Old King Cole'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Bold (22)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Coal (57)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engine (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hammer (25)  |  High (362)  |  Indian (27)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Long (790)  |  Loom (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mine (76)  |  Miner (9)  |  Move (216)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pick (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spade (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Task (147)  |  Transport (30)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)  |  Water (481)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

Old mathematicians never die; they just lose some of their functions.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Die (86)  |  Function (228)  |  Joke (83)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Never (1087)

Old Men and Comets have been reverenced for the same Reason: their Long Beards, and Pretences to foretel Events.
Thoughts on Various Subjects (1727), collected in The Works of Jonathan Swift (1746), Vol. 1, 317.
Science quotes on:  |  Comet (54)  |  Event (216)  |  Long (790)  |  Reason (744)

On May 7, a few weeks after the accident at Three-Mile Island, I was in Washington. I was there to refute some of that propaganda that Ralph Nader, Jane Fonda and their kind are spewing to the news media in their attempt to frighten people away from nuclear power. I am 71 years old, and I was working 20 hours a day. The strain was too much. The next day, I suffered a heart attack. You might say that I was the only one whose health was affected by that reactor near Harrisburg. No, that would be wrong. It was not the reactor. It was Jane Fonda. Reactors are not dangerous.
From statement, published as a two-page advertisement, 'I Was the Only Victim of Three-Mile Island', placed by Dresser Industries in The Wall Street Journal (31 Jul 1979), U.S. Representative Larry McDonald entered the entire content of the ad, as Extensions of Remarks, into the Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of the Congress (18 Dec 1979), 36876. [Note: The Three Mile Island accident happened on 28 Mar 1979. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Age (499)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Fright (10)  |  Health (193)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hour (186)  |  Island (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Media (13)  |  Ralph Nader (3)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Next (236)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Power (12)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Reactor (3)  |  Refute (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Week (70)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

On one occasion, when he was giving a dinner to some friends at the university, he left the table to get them a bottle of wine; but, on his way to the cellar, he fell into reflection, forgot his errand and his company, went to his chamber, put on his surplice, and proceeded to the chapel. Sometimes he would go into the street half dressed, and on discovering his condition, run back in great haste, much abashed. Often, while strolling in his garden, he would suddenly stop, and then run rapidly to his room, and begin to write, standing, on the first piece of paper that presented itself. Intending to dine in the public hall, he would go out in a brown study, take the wrong turn, walk a while, and then return to his room, having totally forgotten the dinner. Once having dismounted from his horse to lead him up a hill, the horse slipped his head out of the bridle; but Newton, oblivious, never discovered it till, on reaching a tollgate at the top of the hill, he turned to remount and perceived that the bridle which he held in his hand had no horse attached to it. His secretary records that his forgetfulness of his dinner was an excellent thing for his old housekeeper, who “sometimes found both dinner and supper scarcely tasted of, which the old woman has very pleasantly and mumpingly gone away with”. On getting out of bed in the morning, he has been discovered to sit on his bedside for hours without dressing himself, utterly absorbed in thought.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Back (390)  |  Bedside (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Both (493)  |  Brown (23)  |  Cellar (4)  |  Chapel (3)  |  Company (59)  |  Condition (356)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Discover (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Friend (168)  |  Garden (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Paper (182)  |  Present (619)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Record (154)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Secretary (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Street (23)  |  Stroll (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supper (10)  |  Table (104)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Top (96)  |  Turn (447)  |  University (121)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wine (38)  |  Woman (151)  |  Write (230)  |  Wrong (234)

On the day of Cromwell’s death, when Newton was sixteen, a great storm raged all over England. He used to say, in his old age, that on that day he made his first purely scientific experiment. To ascertain the force of the wind, he first jumped with the wind and then against it; and, by comparing these distances with the extent of his own jump on a calm day, he was enabled to compute the force of the storm. When the wind blew thereafter, he used to say it was so many feet strong.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 248.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Blow (44)  |  Calm (31)  |  Compare (69)  |  Compute (18)  |  Oliver Cromwell (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Distance (161)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Jump (29)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Purely (109)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strong (174)  |  Wind (128)

On the theory of natural selection we can clearly understand the full meaning of that old canon in natural history, “Natura non facit saltum.” This canon, if we look only to the present inhabitants of the world, is not strictly correct, but if we include all those of past times, it must by my theory be strictly true.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  History (673)  |  Include (90)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Look (582)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natura Non Facit Saltum (3)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Selection (128)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  World (1774)

Once early in the morning, at two or three in the morning, when the master was asleep, the books in the library began to quarrel with each other as to which was the king of the library. The dictionary contended quite angrily that he was the master of the library because without words there would be no communication at all. The book of science argued stridently that he was the master of the library for without science there would have been no printing press or any of the other wonders of the world. The book of poetry claimed that he was the king, the master of the library, because he gave surcease and calm to his master when he was troubled. The books of philosophy, the economic books, all put in their claims, and the clamor was great and the noise at its height when a small low voice was heard from an old brown book lying in the center of the table and the voice said, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.” And all of the noise and the clamor in the library ceased, and there was a hush in the library, for all of the books knew who the real master of the library was.
'Ministers of Justice', address delivered to the Eighty-Second Annual Convention of the Tennessee Bar Association at Gatlinburg (5 Jun 1963). In Tennessee Law Review (Fall 1963), 31, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anger (20)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Brown (23)  |  Calm (31)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Communication (94)  |  Dictionary (15)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  King (35)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Library (48)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Master (178)  |  Morning (94)  |  Noise (37)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Printing (22)  |  Printing Press (3)  |  Quarrel (10)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Small (477)  |  Table (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Voice (52)  |  Want (497)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Once established, an original river advances through its long life, manifesting certain peculiarities of youth, maturity and old age, by which its successive stages of growth may be recognized without much difficulty.
'The Rivers and Valleys of Pennsylvania', The National Geographic Magazine, 1889, 1, 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Certain (550)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Growth (187)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Maturity (14)  |  Old Age (33)  |  River (119)  |  Stage (143)  |  Successive (73)  |  Through (849)  |  Youth (101)

One feature which will probably most impress the mathematician accustomed to the rapidity and directness secured by the generality of modern methods is the deliberation with which Archimedes approaches the solution of any one of his main problems. Yet this very characteristic, with its incidental effects, is calculated to excite the more admiration because the method suggests the tactics of some great strategist who foresees everything, eliminates everything not immediately conducive to the execution of his plan, masters every position in its order, and then suddenly (when the very elaboration of the scheme has almost obscured, in the mind of the spectator, its ultimate object) strikes the final blow. Thus we read in Archimedes proposition after proposition the bearing of which is not immediately obvious but which we find infallibly used later on; and we are led by such easy stages that the difficulties of the original problem, as presented at the outset, are scarcely appreciated. As Plutarch says: “It is not possible to find in geometry more difficult and troublesome questions, or more simple and lucid explanations.” But it is decidedly a rhetorical exaggeration when Plutarch goes on to say that we are deceived by the easiness of the successive steps into the belief that anyone could have discovered them for himself. On the contrary, the studied simplicity and the perfect finish of the treatises involve at the same time an element of mystery. Though each step depends on the preceding ones, we are left in the dark as to how they were suggested to Archimedes. There is, in fact, much truth in a remark by Wallis to the effect that he seems “as it were of set purpose to have covered up the traces of his investigation as if he had grudged posterity the secret of his method of inquiry while he wished to extort from them assent to his results.” Wallis adds with equal reason that not only Archimedes but nearly all the ancients so hid away from posterity their method of Analysis (though it is certain that they had one) that more modern mathematicians found it easier to invent a new Analysis than to seek out the old.
In The Works of Archimedes (1897), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Add (40)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approach (108)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Assent (12)  |