Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Readiness

Readiness Quotes (9 quotes)

A physician ought to have his shop provided with plenty of all necessary things, as lint, rollers, splinters: let there be likewise in readiness at all times another small cabinet of such things as may serve for occasions of going far from home; let him have also all sorts of plasters, potions, and purging medicines, so contrived that they may keep some considerable time, and likewise such as may be had and used whilst they are fresh.
In Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay (1876), 536.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Home (170)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Physician (273)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Potion (2)  |  Purge (9)  |  Roller (3)  |  Shop (11)  |  Small (477)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)

As for your doctrines I am prepared to go to the Stake if requisite ... I trust you will not allow yourself to be in any way disgusted or annoyed by the considerable abuse & misrepresentation which unless I greatly mistake is in store for you... And as to the curs which will bark and yelp - you must recollect that some of your friends at any rate are endowed with an amount of combativeness which (though you have often & justly rebuked it) may stand you in good stead - I am sharpening up my claws and beak in readiness.
Letter (23 Nov 1859) to Charles Darwin a few days after the publication of Origin of Species. In Charles Darwin, Frederick Burkhardt, Sydney Smith, The Correspondence of Charles Darwin: 1858-1859 (1992), Vol. 19, 390-391.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (22)  |  Amount (151)  |  Bark (18)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Friend (168)  |  Good (889)  |  Misrepresentation (5)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Must (1526)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Publication (101)  |  Stand (274)  |  Store (48)  |  Trust (66)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

But at the same time, there must never be the least hesitation in giving up a position the moment it is shown to be untenable. It is not going too far to say that the greatness of a scientific investigator does not rest on the fact of his having never made a mistake, but rather on his readiness to admit that he has done so, whenever the contrary evidence is cogent enough.
Principles of General Physiology (1915), x.xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Cogent (6)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Time (1877)  |  Untenable (5)  |  Whenever (81)

For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things (which is the chief point) , and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to reconsider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. So I thought my nature had a kind of familiarity and relationship with Truth.
From 'Progress of philosophical speculations. Preface to intended treatise De Interpretatione Naturæ (1603), in Francis Bacon and James Spedding (ed.), Works of Francis Bacon (1868), Vol. 3, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Affectation (4)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Catch (31)  |  Chief (97)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enough (340)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fix (25)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Hate (64)  |  Imposture (6)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nimble (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Patience (56)  |  Point (580)  |  Reconsideration (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Slowness (5)  |  Steady (44)  |  Study (653)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Versatile (6)

Men become civilized, not in proportion to their willingness to believe, but in proportion to their readiness to doubt.
...
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Willingness (10)

Simplification of modes of proof is not merely an indication of advance in our knowledge of a subject, but is also the surest guarantee of readiness for farther progress.
In Lord Kelvin and Peter Guthrie Tait Elements of Natural Philosophy (1873), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Farther (51)  |  Father (110)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Indication (33)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mode (41)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proof (287)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surest (5)

The philosopher may very justly be delighted with the extent of his views, the artificer with the readiness of his hands, but let the one remember that without mechanical performance, refined speculation is an empty dream, and the other that without theoretical reasoning, dexterity is little more than brute instinct.
In 'The Rambler' (17 Apr 1750), No. 9. Collected in The Rambler (1763), Vol. 1, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificer (5)  |  Brute (28)  |  Delight (108)  |  Dexterity (7)  |  Dream (208)  |  Empty (80)  |  Extent (139)  |  Hand (143)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Justly (6)  |  Little (707)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Performance (48)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Refined (7)  |  Remember (179)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  View (488)

To regulate something always requires two opposing factors. You cannot regulate by a single factor. To give an example, the traffic in the streets could not be controlled by a green light or a red light alone. It needs a green light and a red light as well. The ratio between retine and promine determines whether there is any motion, any growth, or not. Two different inclinations have to be there in readiness to make the cells proliferate.
In Ralph W. Moss, Free Radical (1988), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Cell (138)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Green (63)  |  Growth (187)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Light (607)  |  Motion (310)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Red (35)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Require (219)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Street (23)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Two (937)

[D]iscovery should come as an adventure rather than as the result of a logical process of thought. Sharp, prolonged thinking is necessary that we may keep on the chosen road but it does not itself necessarily lead to discovery. The investigator must be ready and on the spot when the light comes from whatever direction.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Choice (110)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leading (17)  |  Light (607)  |  Logic (287)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Process (423)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prolonged (6)  |  Result (677)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whatever (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: Albert Einstein Isaac Newton Lord Kelvin Charles Darwin Srinivasa Ramanujan Carl Sagan Florence Nightingale Thomas Edison Aristotle Marie Curie Benjamin Franklin Winston Churchill Galileo Galilei Sigmund Freud Robert Bunsen Louis Pasteur Theodore Roosevelt Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan Leonardo DaVinci Michio Kaku Karl Popper Johann Goethe Robert Oppenheimer Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: Atomic  Bomb Biology Chemistry Deforestation Engineering Anatomy Astronomy Bacteria Biochemistry Botany Conservation Dinosaur Environment Fractal Genetics Geology History of Science Invention Jupiter Knowledge Love Mathematics Measurement Medicine Natural Resource Organic Chemistry Physics Physician Quantum Theory Research Science and Art Teacher Technology Universe Volcano Virus Wind Power Women Scientists X-Rays Youth Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.