Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Cover

Cover Quotes (23 quotes)

Changements arrivées dans le globe: Quand on a vu de ses yeux une montagne s’avancer dans une plaine, c’est-à-dire un immense rocher de cette montagne se détacher et couvrir des champs, un château tout entier enfoncé dans la terre, un fleuve englouti qui sort ensuite de son abîme, des marques indubitables qu’un vaste amas d’eau inondait autrefois un pays habité aujourd’hui, et cent vestiges d’autres révolutions, on est alors plus disposé à croire les grands changements qui ont altéré la face du monde, que ne l’est une dame de Paris qui sait seulement que la place où est bâtie sa maison était autrefois un champ labourable. Mais une dame de Naples, qui a vu sous terre les ruines d’Herculanum, est encore moins asservie au préjugé qui nous fait croire que tout a toujours été comme il est aujourd’hui.
Changes That Have Occurred in the Globe: When we have seen with our own eyes a mountain progressing into a plain; that is to say, an immense boulder separating from this mountain and covering the fields; an entire castle broken into pieces over the ground; a river swallowed up which then bursts out from its abyss; clear marks of a vast amount of water having once flooded regions now inhabited, and a hundred vestiges of other transformations, then we are much more willing to believe that great changes altered the face of the earth, than a Parisian lady who knows only that the place where her house was built was once a cultivated field. However, a lady from Naples who has seen the buried ruins of Herculaneum, is much less subject to the bias which leads us to believe that everything has always been as it is today.
From article 'Changements arrivées dans le globe', in Dictionnaire philosophique (1764), collected in Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire (1878), Vol. 2, 427-428. Translated by Ian Ellis.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (20)  |  Alteration (22)  |  Belief (400)  |  Bias (15)  |  Boulder (5)  |  Breaking (3)  |  Built (7)  |  Buried (2)  |  Castle (4)  |  Change (291)  |  Country (121)  |  Disappearance (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Entire (29)  |  Erosion (18)  |  Eye (159)  |  Face (69)  |  Field (119)  |  Flood (26)  |  Geologic History (2)  |  Herculaneum (2)  |  House (36)  |  Inhabitation (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lady (6)  |  Land (83)  |  Mark (28)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Paris (9)  |  Place (111)  |  Plain (24)  |  River (68)  |  Rock (107)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Today (86)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Vast (56)  |  Vestige (4)  |  Water (244)

Question: A hollow indiarubber ball full of air is suspended on one arm of a balance and weighed in air. The whole is then covered by the receiver of an air pump. Explain what will happen as the air in the receiver is exhausted.
Answer: The ball would expand and entirely fill the vessell, driving out all before it. The balance being of greater density than the rest would be the last to go, but in the end its inertia would be overcome and all would be expelled, and there would be a perfect vacuum. The ball would then burst, but you would not be aware of the fact on account of the loudness of a sound varying with the density of the place in which it is generated, and not on that in which it is heard.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 181, Question 21. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Air (151)  |  Answer (201)  |  Awareness (23)  |  Balance (43)  |  Ball (20)  |  Burst (17)  |  Density (11)  |  Drive (38)  |  Entirely (23)  |  Examination (60)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Expulsion (2)  |  Fact (609)  |  Generation (111)  |  Happening (32)  |  Hearing (27)  |  Hollow (3)  |  Howler (15)  |  Inertia (10)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Place (111)  |  Question (315)  |  Receiver (5)  |  Sound (59)  |  Suspend (7)  |  Vacuum (29)  |  Varying (2)  |  Vessel (21)  |  Weighing (2)

A theory is scientific only if it can be disproved. But the moment you try to cover absolutely everything the chances are that you cover nothing.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Chance (122)  |  Disprove (15)  |  Everything (120)  |  Moment (61)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Theory (582)  |  Try (103)

Before the seas and lands had been created, before the sky that covers everything, Nature displayed a single aspect only throughout the cosmos; Chaos was its name, a shapeless, unwrought mass of inert bulk and nothing more, with the discordant seeds of disconnected elements all heaped together in anarchic disarray.
Describing the creation of the universe from chaos, at the beginning of Book I of Metamorphoses, lines 5-9. As translated in Charles Martin (trans.), Metamorphoses (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (37)  |  Bulk (5)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Cosmos (39)  |  Creation (211)  |  Disconnected (2)  |  Discord (9)  |  Display (22)  |  Element (129)  |  Everything (120)  |  Heap (12)  |  Inert (9)  |  Land (83)  |  Mass (61)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Sea (143)  |  Seed (52)  |  Single (72)  |  Sky (68)  |  Throughout (2)  |  Together (48)  |  Wrought (2)

Before the seas, and this terrestrial ball,
And Heav’n’s high canopy, that covers all,
One was the face of Nature; if a face:
Rather a rude and indigested mass:
A lifeless lump, unfashion’d, and unfram’d,
Of jarring seeds; and justly Chaos nam’d.
As translated by John Dryden, et al. and Sir Samuel Garth (ed.), Metamorphoses (1998), 3. Ovid started writing the 14 books of Metamorphoses in about 1 a.d.. Dryden died in 1700. He had translated about one-third of the full Metamorphoses. His work was finished by others, and the translation was published in 1717.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (20)  |  Canopy (3)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Digested (2)  |  Face (69)  |  Frame (17)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Jar (9)  |  Justly (3)  |  Lifeless (10)  |  Lump (2)  |  Mass (61)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Rude (5)  |  Sea (143)  |  Seed (52)  |  Terrestrial (14)

Believing, as I do, in the continuity of nature, I cannot stop abruptly where our microscopes cease to be of use. Here the vision of the mind authoritatively supplements the vision of the eye. By a necessity engendered and justified by science I cross the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern in that Matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial Life.
'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast', (19 Aug 1874). Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abruptness (2)  |  Belief (400)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Cessation (10)  |  Continuity (23)  |  Creator (40)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Engendering (3)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Eye (159)  |  Hitherto (3)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Justification (33)  |  Life (917)  |  Matter (270)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Notwithstanding (2)  |  Potency (5)  |  Power (273)  |  Professing (2)  |  Promise (27)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Stop (56)  |  Supplement (2)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Vision (55)

By felling the trees which cover the tops and sides of mountains, men in all climates seem to bring upon future generations two calamities at once; want of fuel and a scarcity of water.
In Alexander von Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland and Thomasina Ross (trans. and ed.) Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America: During the Years 1799-1804 (1852), Vol. 2, 9. (Translated from the original in French.)
Science quotes on:  |  Calamity (8)  |  Climate (38)  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Felling (2)  |  Fuel (27)  |  Future (229)  |  Generation (111)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Scarcity (2)  |  Side (36)  |  Top (20)  |  Tree (143)  |  Want (120)  |  Water (244)

Every leaf and twig was this morning covered with a sparkling ice armor; even the grasses in exposed fields were hung with innumerable diamond pendants, which jingled merrily when brushed by the foot of the traveler. It was literally the wreck of jewels and the crash of gems.
(21 Jan 1838). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Armor (3)  |  Crash (8)  |  Diamond (15)  |  Field (119)  |  Foot (39)  |  Gem (9)  |  Grass (30)  |  Ice (29)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Jewel (6)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Morning (31)  |  Pendant (2)  |  Sparkle (2)  |  Traveler (18)  |  Twig (7)  |  Wreck (7)

Evolution is the conviction that organisms developed their current forms by an extended history of continual transformation, and that ties of genealogy bind all living things into one nexus. Panselectionism is a denial of history, for perfection covers the tracks of time. A perfect wing may have evolved to its current state, but it may have been created just as we find it. We simply cannot tell if perfection be our only evidence. As Darwin himself understood so well, the primary proofs of evolution are oddities and imperfections that must record pathways of historical descent–the panda’s thumb and the flamingo’s smile of my book titles (chosen to illustrate this paramount principle of history).
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (18)  |  Book (181)  |  Choose (35)  |  Continual (13)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Create (98)  |  Current (43)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Denial (13)  |  Descent (14)  |  Develop (55)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Extend (20)  |  Find (248)  |  Flamingo (2)  |  Form (210)  |  Genealogy (4)  |  Historical (10)  |  History (302)  |  Illustrate (5)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Living Things (3)  |  Nexus (3)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Organism (126)  |  Panda (2)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Primary (29)  |  Principle (228)  |  Proof (192)  |  Record (56)  |  Simply (34)  |  Smile (13)  |  State (96)  |  Tell (67)  |  Thumb (8)  |  Tie (21)  |  Time (439)  |  Title (10)  |  Track (9)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Understand (189)  |  Wing (36)

Life through many long periods has been manifested in a countless host of varying structures, all circumscribed by one general plan, each appointed to a definite place, and limited to an appointed duration. On the whole the earth has been thus more and more covered by the associated life of plants and animals, filling all habitable space with beings capable of enjoying their own existence or ministering to the enjoyment of others; till finally, after long preparation, a being was created capable of the wonderful power of measuring and weighing all the world of matter and space which surrounds him, of treasuring up the past history of all the forms of life, and considering his own relation to the whole. When he surveys this vast and co-ordinated system, and inquires into its history and origin, can he be at a loss to decide whether it be a work of Divine thought and wisdom, or the fortunate offspring of a few atoms of matter, warmed by the anima mundi, a spark of electricity, or an accidental ray of sunshine?
Life on the Earth: Its Origin and Succession (1860), 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Animal (309)  |  Appointment (5)  |  Association (15)  |  Atom (251)  |  Capability (35)  |  Coordination (4)  |  Countless (13)  |  Decision (58)  |  Definite (27)  |  Divine (42)  |  Duration (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Fill (35)  |  Fortune (23)  |  General (92)  |  Habitat (10)  |  History (302)  |  Host (9)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Life (917)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Loss (62)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Matter (270)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Origin (77)  |  Period (49)  |  Place (111)  |  Plan (69)  |  Plant (173)  |  Ray (32)  |  Space (154)  |  Spark (18)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sunshine (2)  |  Survey (14)  |  System (141)  |  Thought (374)  |  Variation (50)  |  Vast (56)  |  Weight (61)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)

Once life evolves, it tends to cover its tracks.
Quoted in Peter Douglas Ward and Donald Brownlee, Rare Earth (2000), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (482)  |  Life (917)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Track (9)

Philosophers no longer write for the intelligent, only for their fellow professionals. The few thousand academic philosophers in the world do not stint themselves: they maintain more than seventy learned journals. But in the handful that cover more than one subdivision of philosophy, any given philosopher can hardly follow more than one or two articles in each issue. This hermetic condition is attributed to “technical problems” in the subject. Since William James, Russell, and Whitehead, philosophy, like history, has been confiscated by scholarship and locked away from the contamination of general use.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (12)  |  Article (15)  |  Attribute (22)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contamination (4)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Follow (66)  |  General (92)  |  Give (117)  |  Handful (6)  |  Hardly (12)  |  Hermetic (2)  |  History (302)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Issue (37)  |  William James (42)  |  Journal (13)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lock (9)  |  Long (95)  |  Maintain (22)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Problem (362)  |  Professional (27)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  Seventy (2)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Subject (129)  |  Technical (26)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Whitehead (2)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)

Physician's faults are covered with earth, and rich men's with money.
In Adam Wooléver (ed.), Treasury of Wisdom, Wit and Humor, Odd Comparisons and Proverbs (1878), 507.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (487)  |  Fault (27)  |  Money (125)  |  Physician (232)  |  Rich (48)

Physicians, of all men, are most happy; whatever good success soever they have, the world proclaimeth; and what faults they commit, the earth covereth.
Emblems, Divine and Moral; The School of the Heart; and Hieroglyphics of the Life of Man (1866), 404.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (487)  |  Fault (27)  |  Happy (22)  |  Physician (232)  |  Proclaim (12)  |  Success (202)

Science in the modern world has many uses, its chief use, however, is to provide long words to cover the errors of the rich. The word “kleptomania” is a vulgar example of what I mean.
From 'Celts and Celtophiles', in Heretics (1905, 1909), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Chief (25)  |  Error (230)  |  Long (95)  |  Modern (104)  |  Provision (15)  |  Rich (48)  |  Use (70)  |  Word (221)  |  World (667)

Scientists [still] refuse to consider man as an object of scientific scrutiny except through his body. The time has come to realise that an interpretation of the universe—even a positivist one—remains unsatisfying unless it covers the interior as well as the exterior of things; mind as well as matter. The true physics is that which will, one day, achieve the inclusion of man in his wholeness in a coherent picture of the world.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 36. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Body (193)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Consider (45)  |  Exterior (3)  |  Inclusion (5)  |  Interior (13)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Object (110)  |  Physics (301)  |  Picture (55)  |  Positivist (2)  |  Realise (12)  |  Refuse (14)  |  Remain (77)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Scrutiny (13)  |  Time (439)  |  True (120)  |  Universe (563)  |  Unsatisfying (3)  |  Wholeness (7)  |  World (667)

Success covers a multitude of blunders.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Blunder (13)  |  Multitude (14)  |  Success (202)

The following story is true. There was a little boy, and his father said, “Do try to be like other people. Don’t frown.” And he tried and tried, but could not. So his father beat him with a strap; and then he was eaten up by lions. Reader, if young, take warning by his sad life and death. For though it may be an honour to be different from other people, if Carlyle’s dictum about the 30 million be still true, yet other people do not like it. So, if you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do. In particular, if you are going to write a book, remember the wooden-headed. So be rigorous; that will cover a multitude of sins. And do not frown.
From 'Electromagnetic Theory, CXII', The Electrician (23 Feb 1900), Vol. 44, 615.
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (15)  |  Better (131)  |  Book (181)  |  Boy (33)  |  Thomas Carlyle (36)  |  Death (270)  |  Dictum (5)  |  Different (110)  |  Father (44)  |  Fortune (23)  |  Frown (3)  |  Hiding (6)  |  Honour (23)  |  Life (917)  |  Lion (15)  |  Money (125)  |  Multitude (14)  |  Person (114)  |  Reader (22)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Rigorous (10)  |  Sadness (26)  |  Sin (27)  |  Solemn (6)  |  Story (58)  |  Strap (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  Try (103)  |  Warning (10)  |  Worship (22)  |  Writing (72)  |  Young (72)

The surface of Animals is also covered with other Animals, which are in the same manner the Basis of other Animals that live upon it.
In The Spectator (25 Oct 1712), No. 519, as collected in Vol. 7 (1729, 10th ed.), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Basis (60)  |  Live (186)  |  Surface (74)  |  Zoology (28)

The wintry clouds drop spangles on the mountains. If the thing occurred once in a century historians would chronicle and poets would sing of the event; but Nature, prodigal of beauty, rains down her hexagonal ice-stars year by year, forming layers yards in thickness. The summer sun thaws and partially consolidates the mass. Each winter's fall is covered by that of the ensuing one, and thus the snow layer of each year has to sustain an annually augmented weight. It is more and more compacted by the pressure, and ends by being converted into the ice of a true glacier, which stretches its frozen tongue far down beyond the limits of perpetual snow. The glaciers move, and through valleys they move like rivers.
The Glaciers of the Alps & Mountaineering in 1861 (1911), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Annual (5)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Century (94)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Cloud (44)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conversion (14)  |  Drop (27)  |  Event (97)  |  Fall (89)  |  Freezing (11)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Hexagon (4)  |  Historian (30)  |  Ice (29)  |  Layer (14)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Perpetuity (7)  |  Poet (59)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (28)  |  Snow (15)  |  Song (18)  |  Spangle (2)  |  Star (251)  |  Stretch (8)  |  Summer (26)  |  Sun (211)  |  Sustain (13)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Tongue (16)  |  Truth (750)  |  Weight (61)  |  Winter (22)  |  Yard (4)  |  Year (214)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that... or: There is capitalism in so far as... The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills. [p.222]
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Abstract (43)  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Accord (21)  |  Act (80)  |  Action (151)  |  Actual (34)  |  Age (137)  |  Apply (38)  |  Area (18)  |  Authority (50)  |  Battle (30)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Casual (6)  |  Change (291)  |  Communism (8)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Complex (78)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contain (37)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Degree (48)  |  Democracy (21)  |  Device (24)  |  Element (129)  |  Elementary (30)  |  End (141)  |  Entire (29)  |  Entity (23)  |  Evil (67)  |  Exclusively (8)  |  Expression (82)  |  Extent (30)  |  External (45)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascism (3)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fill (35)  |  Fix (10)  |  Greek (46)  |  Idea (440)  |  Illustrate (5)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Independent (41)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interrelation (6)  |  Invade (4)  |  Isolate (10)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Level (51)  |  Limit (86)  |  Live (186)  |  Lose (53)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Measure (70)  |  Method (154)  |  Mind (544)  |  Modify (11)  |  Monster (21)  |  Myth (43)  |  Mythology (11)  |  Nation (111)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Objective (49)  |  Order (167)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  P (2)  |  People (269)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Play (60)  |  Political (31)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Property (96)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Rational (42)  |  Reality (140)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reference (17)  |  Relate (5)  |  Relation (96)  |  Represent (27)  |  Reserve (7)  |  Revenge (6)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Security (27)  |  Seem (89)  |  Simultaneous (12)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  Solve (41)  |  Specific (30)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Store (17)  |  Strive (35)  |  Subject (129)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Technician (5)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Unaffected (4)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vary (14)  |  Vocabulary (3)  |  Whatsoever (6)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (221)

There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame as to be found false and perfidious.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  False (79)  |  Find (248)  |  Shame (12)  |  Vice (15)

There's probably 5000 times more solar energy than the humans will ever need. We could cover our highways with solar collectors to make ribbons of energy, and I think that it's really the largest job creation program in the history of the planet that's in front of us. It's a celebration of the abundance of human creativity combined with the abundance of the natural world.
In audio segment, 'William McDonough: Godfather of Green', WNYC, Studio 360 broadcast on NPR radio (18 Mar 2008) and archived on the station website.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (15)  |  Collector (9)  |  Creativity (66)  |  Highway (10)  |  Human (445)  |  Job (33)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Need (211)  |  Solar Energy (17)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.