Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Incidental

Incidental Quotes (15 quotes)

A superficial knowledge of mathematics may lead to the belief that this subject can be taught incidentally, and that exercises akin to counting the petals of flowers or the legs of a grasshopper are mathematical. Such work ignores the fundamental idea out of which quantitative reasoning grows—the equality of magnitudes. It leaves the pupil unaware of that relativity which is the essence of mathematical science. Numerical statements are frequently required in the study of natural history, but to repeat these as a drill upon numbers will scarcely lend charm to these studies, and certainly will not result in mathematical knowledge.
In Primary Arithmetic: First Year, for the Use of Teachers (1897), 26-27.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Charm (51)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Drill (11)  |  Equality (31)  |  Essence (82)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Flower (106)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Grasshopper (7)  |  Grow (238)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Leg (34)  |  Lend (4)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Petal (4)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Unaware (5)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

An incidental remark from a German colleague illustrates the difference between Prussian ways and our own. He had apparently been studying the progress of our various crews on the river, and had been struck with the fact that though the masters in charge of the boats seemed to say and do very little, yet the boats went continually faster and faster, and when I mentioned Dr. Young’s book to him, he made the unexpected but suggestive reply: “Mathematics in Prussia! Ah, sir, they teach mathematics in Prussia as you teach your boys rowing in England: they are trained by men who have been trained by men who have themselves been trained for generations back.”
In John Perry (ed.), Discussion on the Teaching of Mathematics (1901), 43. The discussion took place on 14 Sep 1901 at the British Association at Glasgow, during a joint meeting of the mathematics and physics sections with the education section. The proceedings began with an address by John Perry. Langley related this anecdote during the Discussion which followed.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Charge (59)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  England (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faster (50)  |  Generation (242)  |  German (36)  |  Little (707)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reply (56)  |  River (119)  |  Row (9)  |  Say (984)  |  Studying (70)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Train (114)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Young (227)

Before delivering your lectures, the manuscript should be in such a perfect form that, if need be, it could be set in type. Whether you follow the manuscript during the delivery of the lecture is purely incidental. The essential point is that you are thus master of the subject matter.
Advice to his son. As quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side Of Scientists (1975), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Delivery (6)  |  Essential (199)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Master (178)  |  Matter (798)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Purely (109)  |  Set (394)  |  Subject (521)  |  Type (167)

Before the promulgation of the periodic law the chemical elements were mere fragmentary incidental facts in nature; there was no special reason to expect the discovery of new elements, and the new ones which were discovered from time to time appeared to be possessed of quite novel properties. The law of periodicity first enabled us to perceive undiscovered elements at a distance which formerly were inaccessible to chemical vision, and long ere they were discovered new elements appeared before our eyes possessed of a number of well-defined properties.
In Faraday Lecture, delivered before the Fellows of the Chemical Society in the Theatre of the Royal Institution (4 Jun 1889), printed in Professor Mendeléeff, 'The Periodic Law of the Chemical Elements', Transactions of the Chemical Society (1889), 55, 648.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (292)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Element (310)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Fragmentary (8)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Novel (32)  |  Number (699)  |  Periodic Law (6)  |  Periodicity (6)  |  Possess (156)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Property (168)  |  Reason (744)  |  Special (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Vision (123)  |  Well-Defined (8)

It is not only a decided preference for synthesis and a complete denial of general methods which characterizes the ancient mathematics as against our newer Science [modern mathematics]: besides this extemal formal difference there is another real, more deeply seated, contrast, which arises from the different attitudes which the two assumed relative to the use of the concept of variability. For while the ancients, on account of considerations which had been transmitted to them from the Philosophie school of the Eleatics, never employed the concept of motion, the spatial expression for variability, in their rigorous system, and made incidental use of it only in the treatment of phonoromically generated curves, modern geometry dates from the instant that Descartes left the purely algebraic treatment of equations and proceeded to investigate the variations which an algebraic expression undergoes when one of its variables assumes a continuous succession of values.
In 'Untersuchungen über die unendlich oft oszillierenden und unstetigen Functionen', Ostwald’s Klassiker der exacten Wissenschaften (1905), No. 153, 44-45. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 115. From the original German, “Nicht allein entschiedene Vorliebe für die Synthese und gänzliche Verleugnung allgemeiner Methoden charakterisiert die antike Mathematik gegenüber unserer neueren Wissenschaft; es gibt neben diesem mehr äußeren, formalen, noch einen tiefliegenden realen Gegensatz, welcher aus der verschiedenen Stellung entspringt, in welche sich beide zu der wissenschaftlichen Verwendung des Begriffes der Veränderlichkeit gesetzt haben. Denn während die Alten den Begriff der Bewegung, des räumlichen Ausdruckes der Veränderlichkeit, aus Bedenken, die aus der philosophischen Schule der Eleaten auf sie übergegangen waren, in ihrem strengen Systeme niemals und auch in der Behandlung phoronomisch erzeugter Kurven nur vorübergehend verwenden, so datiert die neuere Mathematik von dem Augenblicke, als Descartes von der rein algebraischen Behandlung der Gleichungen dazu fortschritt, die Größenveränderungen zu untersuchen, welche ein algebraischer Ausdruck erleidet, indem eine in ihm allgemein bezeichnete Größe eine stetige Folge von Werten durchläuft.”
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Complete (204)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Curve (49)  |  Denial (17)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equation (132)  |  Expression (175)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Instant (45)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Never (1087)  |  Preference (28)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Succession (77)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  System (537)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Variable (34)  |  Variation (90)

Language is a guide to 'social reality.' Though language is not ordinarily thought of as essential interest to the students of social science, it powerfully conditions all our thinking about social problems and processes. Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. It is quite an illusion to imagine that one adjusts to reality essentially without the use of language and that language is merely an incidental means of solving specific problems of communication or reflection. The fact of the matter is that the 'real world' is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group. No two languages are ever sufficiently similar to be considered as representing the same social reality. The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached.
'The Status of Linguistics as a Science', Language (1929), 5, 207-14. In David Mandelbaum (ed.), Selected Writings of Edward Sapir in Language, Culture, and Personality (1949), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Guide (97)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Interest (386)  |  Label (11)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Live (628)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Objective (91)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Solution (267)  |  Specific (95)  |  Student (300)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  World (1774)

One feature which will probably most impress the mathematician accustomed to the rapidity and directness secured by the generality of modern methods is the deliberation with which Archimedes approaches the solution of any one of his main problems. Yet this very characteristic, with its incidental effects, is calculated to excite the more admiration because the method suggests the tactics of some great strategist who foresees everything, eliminates everything not immediately conducive to the execution of his plan, masters every position in its order, and then suddenly (when the very elaboration of the scheme has almost obscured, in the mind of the spectator, its ultimate object) strikes the final blow. Thus we read in Archimedes proposition after proposition the bearing of which is not immediately obvious but which we find infallibly used later on; and we are led by such easy stages that the difficulties of the original problem, as presented at the outset, are scarcely appreciated. As Plutarch says: “It is not possible to find in geometry more difficult and troublesome questions, or more simple and lucid explanations.” But it is decidedly a rhetorical exaggeration when Plutarch goes on to say that we are deceived by the easiness of the successive steps into the belief that anyone could have discovered them for himself. On the contrary, the studied simplicity and the perfect finish of the treatises involve at the same time an element of mystery. Though each step depends on the preceding ones, we are left in the dark as to how they were suggested to Archimedes. There is, in fact, much truth in a remark by Wallis to the effect that he seems “as it were of set purpose to have covered up the traces of his investigation as if he had grudged posterity the secret of his method of inquiry while he wished to extort from them assent to his results.” Wallis adds with equal reason that not only Archimedes but nearly all the ancients so hid away from posterity their method of Analysis (though it is certain that they had one) that more modern mathematicians found it easier to invent a new Analysis than to seek out the old.
In The Works of Archimedes (1897), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Add (40)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approach (108)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Assent (12)  |  Bear (159)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blow (44)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conducive (3)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cover (37)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Decidedly (2)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easiness (4)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Equal (83)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execution (25)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extort (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feature (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Generality (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grudge (2)  |  Hide (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impress (64)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involve (90)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Main (28)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Outset (7)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plutarch (15)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Precede (23)  |  Present (619)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remark (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Secret (194)  |  Secure (22)  |  Secured (18)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Strike (68)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  John Wallis (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Specialists never contribute anything to their specialty; Helmholtz wasn’t an eye-specialist, but a German army doctor who invented the ophthalmoscope one Saturday afternoon when there wasn’t anything else to do. Incidentally, he rewrote whole chapters of physics, so that the physicists only know him as one of their own. Robert Mayer wasn’t a physicist, but another country doctor; and Pasteur, who made bacteriology, was a tanner’s son or a chemist, as you will.
In Fischerisms (1930), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Army (33)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Country (251)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Eye (419)  |  German (36)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (28)  |  Invented (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Robert Mayer (9)  |  Never (1087)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Son (24)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Such men as Newton and Linnaeus are incidental, but august, teachers of religion.
In Essays: Education of the People.
Science quotes on:  |  August (2)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Religion (361)  |  Teacher (143)

The aid which we feel impelled to give to the helpless is mainly an incidental result of the instinct of sympathy, which was originally acquired as part of the social instincts, but subsequently rendered, in the manner previously indicated, more tender and more widely diffused. Nor could we check our sympathy, even at the urging of hard reason, without deterioration in the noblest part of our nature.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Aid (97)  |  Check (24)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Diffuse (4)  |  Feel (367)  |  Give (202)  |  Hard (243)  |  Helpless (11)  |  Impel (5)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Manner (58)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Originally (6)  |  Part (222)  |  Previously (11)  |  Reason (744)  |  Render (93)  |  Result (677)  |  Social (252)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tender (4)  |  Urge (17)  |  Widely (9)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Ash (20)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determined (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gland (14)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Major (84)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Master (178)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Proper (144)  |  Removal (11)  |  Remove (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  Survival (94)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Tract (5)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)

The science hangs like a gathering fog in a valley, a fog which begins nowhere and goes nowhere, an incidental, unmeaning inconvenience to passers-by.
repr. In The Works of H.G. Wells, vol. 9 (1925). A Modern Utopia, ch. 3, sect. 3 (1905)
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Fog (10)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Hang (45)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Valley (32)

To the pure geometer the radius of curvature is an incidental characteristic—like the grin of the Cheshire cat. To the physicist it is an indispensable characteristic. It would be going too far to say that to the physicist the cat is merely incidental to the grin. Physics is concerned with interrelatedness such as the interrelatedness of cats and grins. In this case the “cat without a grin” and the “grin without a cat” are equally set aside as purely mathematical phantasies.
In 'The Universe and the Atom' The Expanding Universe. (1933), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Cat (47)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Concern (228)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Equally (130)  |  Merely (316)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)

What was at first merely by-the-way may become the very heart of a matter. Flints were long flaked into knives, arrowheads, spears. Incidentally it was found that they struck fire; to-day that is their one use.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrowhead (4)  |  Become (815)  |  By The Way (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Flake (6)  |  Flint (6)  |  Heart (229)  |  Knife (23)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Spear (6)  |  Strike (68)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

Whatever may happen to the latest theory of Dr. Einstein, his treatise represents a mathematical effort of overwhelming proportions. It is the more remarkable since Einstein is primarily a physicist and only incidentally a mathematician. He came to mathematics rather of necessity than by predilection, and yet he has here developed mathematical formulae and calculations springing from a colossal knowledge.
In 'Marvels at Einstein For His Mathematics', New York Times (4 Feb 1929), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (127)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Develop (268)  |  Effort (227)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Formula (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Predilection (4)  |  Primary (80)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Represent (155)  |  Spring (133)  |  Theory (970)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Whatever (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.