Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Conspicuous

Conspicuous Quotes (12 quotes)

But as my conclusions have lately been much misrepresented, and it has been stated that I attribute the modification of species exclusively to natural selection, I may be permitted to remark that in the first edition of this work, and subsequently, I placed in a most conspicuous position—namely, at the close of the Introduction—the following words: “I am convinced that natural selection has been the main but not the exclusive means of modification.” This has been of no avail. Great is the power of steady misrepresentation; but the history of science shows that fortunately this power does not long endure.
In The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection with additions and corrections from sixth and last English edition (1899), Vol. 2, 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (61)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Edition (5)  |  Endure (20)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misrepresentation (5)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Power (746)  |  Remark (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selection (128)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

How can he [Thomas Edison] call it a wonderful success when everyone acquainted with the subject will recognize it as a conspicuous failure?
In The New York Herald, (18 Dec 1879). As quoted and cited in Rob Kaplan (ed.), Science Says (2001), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Failure (161)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)

Injustice or oppression in the next street...or any spot inhabited by men was a personal affront to Thomas Addis and his name, from its early alphabetical place, was conspicuous on lists of sponsors of scores of organizations fighting for democracy and against fascism. He worked on more committees than could reasonably have been expected of so busy a man... Tom Addis was happy to have a hand in bringing to the organization of society some of the logic of science and to further that understanding and to promote that democracy which are the only enduring foundations of human dignity.
Kevin V. Lemley and Linus Pauling, 'Thomas Addis: 1881-1949', Biographical Memoirs, National Academy of Sciences, 63, 27-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Thomas Addis (3)  |  Against (332)  |  Biography (240)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Early (185)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fascism (4)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Happy (105)  |  Human (1468)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Next (236)  |  Organization (114)  |  Promote (29)  |  Science (3879)  |  Society (326)  |  Sponsor (5)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

It is when physicians are bogged down … when they lack a clear understanding of disease mechanisms, that the deficiencies of the health-care system are most conspicuous. If I were a policy-maker, interested in saving money for health care over the long haul, I would regard it as an act of high prudence to give high priority to a lot more basic research in biologic science.
In 'The Technology of Medicine', The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974), 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Care (186)  |  Clear (100)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Disease (328)  |  Down (456)  |  Health (193)  |  Health Care (9)  |  High (362)  |  Human Biology (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interested (5)  |  Lack (119)  |  Long (790)  |  Lot (151)  |  Maker (34)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physician (273)  |  Priority (10)  |  Prudent (5)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Saving (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Understanding (513)

One of the most conspicuous and distinctive features of mathematical thought in the nineteenth century is its critical spirit. Beginning with the calculus, it soon permeates all analysis, and toward the close of the century it overhauls and recasts the foundations of geometry and aspires to further conquests in mechanics and in the immense domains of mathematical physics. … A searching examination of the foundations of arithmetic and the calculus has brought to light the insufficiency of much of the reasoning formerly considered as conclusive.
In History of Mathematics in the Nineteenth Century', Congress of Arts and Sciences (1906), Vol. 1, 482. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 113-114.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Century (310)  |  Conclusive (11)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Consider (416)  |  Critical (66)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Domain (69)  |  Examination (98)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Immense (86)  |  Insufficiency (3)  |  Insufficient (9)  |  Light (607)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thought (953)

OSTRICH, n. A large bird to which (for its sins, doubtless) nature has denied that hinder toe in which so many pious naturalists have seen a conspicuous evidence of design. The absence of a good working pair of wings is no defect, for, as has been ingeniously pointed out, the ostrich does not fly.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  241.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Defect (31)  |  Design (195)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fly (146)  |  Good (889)  |  Hinder (12)  |  Humour (116)  |  Large (394)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Point (580)  |  Sin (42)  |  Toe (7)  |  Wing (75)

The most conspicuous scientific and technical achievements of our age—nuclear bombs, rockets, computers—are all direct products of war.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Computer (127)  |  Direct (225)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Bomb (6)  |  Product (160)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Technical (43)  |  War (225)

To emphasize this opinion that mathematicians would be unwise to accept practical issues as the sole guide or the chief guide in the current of their investigations, ... let me take one more instance, by choosing a subject in which the purely mathematical interest is deemed supreme, the theory of functions of a complex variable. That at least is a theory in pure mathematics, initiated in that region, and developed in that region; it is built up in scores of papers, and its plan certainly has not been, and is not now, dominated or guided by considerations of applicability to natural phenomena. Yet what has turned out to be its relation to practical issues? The investigations of Lagrange and others upon the construction of maps appear as a portion of the general property of conformal representation; which is merely the general geometrical method of regarding functional relations in that theory. Again, the interesting and important investigations upon discontinuous two-dimensional fluid motion in hydrodynamics, made in the last twenty years, can all be, and now are all, I believe, deduced from similar considerations by interpreting functional relations between complex variables. In the dynamics of a rotating heavy body, the only substantial extension of our knowledge since the time of Lagrange has accrued from associating the general properties of functions with the discussion of the equations of motion. Further, under the title of conjugate functions, the theory has been applied to various questions in electrostatics, particularly in connection with condensers and electrometers. And, lastly, in the domain of physical astronomy, some of the most conspicuous advances made in the last few years have been achieved by introducing into the discussion the ideas, the principles, the methods, and the results of the theory of functions. … the refined and extremely difficult work of Poincare and others in physical astronomy has been possible only by the use of the most elaborate developments of some purely mathematical subjects, developments which were made without a thought of such applications.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1897), Nature, 56, 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accrue (3)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applicability (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Associate (25)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Body (537)  |  Build (204)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chief (97)  |  Choose (112)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condenser (4)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Construction (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deem (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discontinuous (6)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Domain (69)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Far (154)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Fluid Motion (2)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  General (511)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Guide (97)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Interpreting (5)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Issue (42)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Last (426)  |  Least (75)  |  Let (61)  |  Map (44)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Plan (117)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Refine (8)  |  Regard (305)  |  Region (36)  |  Relation (157)  |  Representation (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Rotate (8)  |  Score (8)  |  Similar (36)  |  Sole (49)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Title (18)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turned Out (4)  |  Two (937)  |  Unwise (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Variable (34)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

We have also here an acting cause to account for that balance so often observed in nature,—a deficiency in one set of organs always being compensated by an increased development of some others—powerful wings accompanying weak feet, or great velocity making up for the absence of defensive weapons; for it has been shown that all varieties in which an unbalanced deficiency occurred could not long continue their existen The action of this principle is exactly like that of the centrifugal governor of the steam engine, which checks and corrects any irregularities almost before they become evident; and in like manner no unbalanced deficiency in the animal kingdom can ever reach any conspicuous magnitude, because it would make itself felt at the very first step, by rendering existence difficult and extinction almost sure soon to follow.
In 'On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type', Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society, Zoology (1858), 3, 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Balance (77)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Centrifugal (3)  |  Compensation (7)  |  Continue (165)  |  Correct (86)  |  Defense (23)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Engine (98)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinction (74)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foot (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Increased (3)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Making (300)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reach (281)  |  Set (394)  |  Soon (186)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Variety (132)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weak (71)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wing (75)

When I examine the conclusion [on experiments with the electric light bulb experiments published in the Herald] which everyone acquainted with the subject will recognize as a conspicuous failure, trumpeted as a wonderful success, I [conclude]... that the writer ... must either be very ignorant, and the victim of deceit, or a conscious accomplice in what is nothing less than a fraud upon the public.
Letter to the Sanitary Engineer (22 Dec 1880). Quoted in Charles Bazermanl, The Languages of Edison's Light (2002), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Bulb (10)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Deceit (7)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Electric (76)  |  Examine (78)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Light (607)  |  Light Bulb (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Sucess (2)  |  Victim (35)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Writer (86)

When the sun is covered by clouds, objects are less conspicuous, because there is little difference between the light and shade of the trees and the buildings being illuminated by the brightness of the atmosphere which surrounds the objects in such a way that the shadows are few, and these few fade away so that their outline is lost in haze.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brightness (12)  |  Building (156)  |  Buildings (4)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Cover (37)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fade (10)  |  Haze (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Lose (159)  |  Object (422)  |  Outline (11)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surround (30)  |  Tree (246)  |  Way (1217)

While electric railroading is perhaps the most important branch of electrical engineering, at least as regards commercial importance, considering the amount capital invested therein, nevertheless it is a remarkable fact that while most other branches of electrical engineering had been developed to a very high degree of perfection, even a few years ago theoretical investigation of electric railroading was still conspicuous by its almost entire absence.
All the work was done by some kind of empirical experimenting, that is, some kind of motor was fitted up with some gearing or some sort of railway car, and then run, and if the motor burned out frequently it was replaced with a larger motor, and if it did not burn out, a trailer was put on the car, and perhaps a second trailer, until the increase of the expense account in burn-outs of the motors balanced the increased carrying capacity of the train.
'The Electric Railway', Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (1902), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Branch (150)  |  Burn (87)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Car (71)  |  Carrying capacity (3)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electrical Engineering (11)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empirical Science (9)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Increase (210)  |  Invest (18)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kind (557)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motor (23)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Railway (18)  |  Regard (305)  |  Run (174)  |  Still (613)  |  Train (114)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.