Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Extremely

Extremely Quotes (15 quotes)

'Tis certain that our senses are extremely disproportioned for comprehending the whole compass and latitude of things.
In Mathematical Magic; or the Wonders That May Be Performed by Mechanical Geometry (1680), 116
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (131)  |  Compass (24)  |  Comprehension (57)  |  Latitude (4)  |  Nature Of Things (9)  |  Sense (321)  |  Thing (37)

An extremely healthy dose of skepticism about the reliability of science is an absolutely inevitable consequence of any scientific study of its track record.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Dose (13)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Inevitable (27)  |  Reliability (15)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific Study (2)  |  Skepticism (21)  |  Track Record (3)

As immoral and unethical as this may be [to clone a human], there is a real chance that could have had some success. This is a pure numbers game. If they have devoted enough resources and they had access to enough eggs, there is a distinct possibility. But, again, without any scientific data, one has to be extremely skeptical.
Commenting on the announcement of the purported birth of the first cloned human.
Transcript of TV interview by Sanjay Gupta aired on CNN (27 Dec 2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Access (16)  |  Announcement (10)  |  Birth (93)  |  Chance (160)  |  Clon (3)  |  Clone (7)  |  Comment (11)  |  Data (120)  |  Devote (35)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Egg (45)  |  First (314)  |  Game (61)  |  Human (550)  |  Immoral (4)  |  Number (282)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Pure (103)  |  Purport (3)  |  Real (149)  |  Resource (62)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Skeptical (11)  |  Skepticism (21)  |  Success (250)

Despite its importance to navigation, fishing, oil and gas development, and maritime safety, our understanding of how the Gulf system works remains extremely limited.
In 'Opinion: Why we can’t forget the Gulf', CNN (16 Apr 2015).
Science quotes on:  |  Despite (7)  |  Development (289)  |  Fishing (13)  |  Gas (50)  |  Gulf (11)  |  Importance (218)  |  Limited (18)  |  Navigation (16)  |  Oil (39)  |  Safety (43)  |  System (191)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Work (635)

I consider it extremely doubtful whether the happiness of the human race has been enhanced by the technical and industrial developments that followed in the wake of rapidly progressing natural science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (81)  |  Doubtful (9)  |  Enhance (9)  |  Follow (124)  |  Happiness (94)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Progress (368)  |  Rapidly (13)  |  Technical (42)  |  Wake (13)

I recognize that many physicists are smarter than I am—most of them theoretical physicists. A lot of smart people have gone into theoretical physics, therefore the field is extremely competitive. I console myself with the thought that although they may be smarter and may be deeper thinkers than I am, I have broader interests than they have.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Competitive (8)  |  Console (2)  |  Deep (124)  |  Field (171)  |  Interest (237)  |  Lot (29)  |  Myself (36)  |  People (390)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Smart (18)  |  Theoretical Physics (18)  |  Thinker (19)  |  Thought (546)

It is a good principle in science not to believe any “fact”—however well attested—until it fits into some accepted frame of reference. Occasionally, of course, an observation can shatter the frame and force the construction of a new one, but that is extremely rare. Galileos and Einsteins seldom appear more than once per century, which is just as well for the equanimity of mankind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Appear (118)  |  Attest (3)  |  Belief (504)  |  Century (131)  |  Construction (83)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Equanimity (4)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fit (48)  |  Force (249)  |  Frame (26)  |  Frame of Reference (4)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Good (345)  |  Mankind (241)  |  New (496)  |  Observation (450)  |  Occasionally (5)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Principle (292)  |  Rare (50)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Shatter (8)

Nevertheless, it is necessary to remember that a planned economy is not yet socialism. A planned economy as such may be accompanied by the complete enslavement of the individual. The achievement of socialism requires the solution of some extremely difficult socio-political problems: how is it possible, in view of the far-reaching centralisation of political and economic power, to prevent bureaucracy from becoming all-powerful and overweening? How can the rights of the individual be protected and therewith a democratic counterweight to the power of bureaucracy be assured?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Achievement (150)  |  All-Powerful (2)  |  Assure (15)  |  Become (172)  |  Bureaucracy (5)  |  Complete (87)  |  Democratic (7)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Economic (26)  |  Economy (54)  |  Enslavement (3)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Individual (221)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Plan (87)  |  Political (36)  |  Possible (158)  |  Power (366)  |  Prevent (40)  |  Problem (497)  |  Protect (33)  |  Remember (82)  |  Require (85)  |  Right (197)  |  Socialism (4)  |  Solution (216)  |  View (171)

Some mathematics problems look simple, and you try them for a year or so, and then you try them for a hundred years, and it turns out that they're extremely hard to solve. There's no reason why these problems shouldn't be easy, and yet they turn out to be extremely intricate. [Fermat's] Last Theorem is the most beautiful example of this.
From interview for PBS website on the NOVA program, 'The Proof'.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Easy (102)  |  Example (94)  |  Fermat’s Last Theorem (3)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Hard (99)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Intricate (21)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Problem (497)  |  Reason (471)  |  Simple (178)  |  Solve (78)  |  Try (141)  |  Turns Out (4)  |  Year (299)

To ask what qualities distinguish good from routine scientific research is to address a question that should be of central concern to every scientist. We can make the question more tractable by rephrasing it, “What attributes are shared by the scientific works which have contributed importantly to our understanding of the physical world—in this case the world of living things?” Two of the most widely accepted characteristics of good scientific work are generality of application and originality of conception. . These qualities are easy to point out in the works of others and, of course extremely difficult to achieve in one’s own research. At first hearing novelty and generality appear to be mutually exclusive, but they really are not. They just have different frames of reference. Novelty has a human frame of reference; generality has a biological frame of reference. Consider, for example, Darwinian Natural Selection. It offers a mechanism so widely applicable as to be almost coexistent with reproduction, so universal as to be almost axiomatic, and so innovative that it shook, and continues to shake, man’s perception of causality.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Achieve (64)  |  Address (12)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applicable (11)  |  Application (170)  |  Ask (160)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Biological (35)  |  Case (99)  |  Causality (10)  |  Central (34)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Conception (92)  |  Concern (110)  |  Consider (81)  |  Continue (65)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Different (186)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Easy (102)  |  Example (94)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  First (314)  |  Frame (26)  |  Frame of Reference (4)  |  Generality (34)  |  Good (345)  |  Hear (63)  |  Human (550)  |  Importantly (3)  |  Innovative (2)  |  Living Things (5)  |  Mechanism (52)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Novelty (23)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Offer (43)  |  Originality (18)  |  Perception (64)  |  Physical World (12)  |  Point Out (8)  |  Quality (95)  |  Question (404)  |  Really (78)  |  Reference (33)  |  Rephrase (2)  |  Reproduction (61)  |  Research (590)  |  Routine (19)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Shake (29)  |  Share (49)  |  Understand (340)  |  Universal (105)  |  Widely (8)  |  Work (635)  |  World (898)

To emphasize this opinion that mathematicians would be unwise to accept practical issues as the sole guide or the chief guide in the current of their investigations, ... let me take one more instance, by choosing a subject in which the purely mathematical interest is deemed supreme, the theory of functions of a complex variable. That at least is a theory in pure mathematics, initiated in that region, and developed in that region; it is built up in scores of papers, and its plan certainly has not been, and is not now, dominated or guided by considerations of applicability to natural phenomena. Yet what has turned out to be its relation to practical issues? The investigations of Lagrange and others upon the construction of maps appear as a portion of the general property of conformal representation; which is merely the general geometrical method of regarding functional relations in that theory. Again, the interesting and important investigations upon discontinuous two-dimensional fluid motion in hydrodynamics, made in the last twenty years, can all be, and now are all, I believe, deduced from similar considerations by interpreting functional relations between complex variables. In the dynamics of a rotating heavy body, the only substantial extension of our knowledge since the time of Lagrange has accrued from associating the general properties of functions with the discussion of the equations of motion. Further, under the title of conjugate functions, the theory has been applied to various questions in electrostatics, particularly in connection with condensers and electrometers. And, lastly, in the domain of physical astronomy, some of the most conspicuous advances made in the last few years have been achieved by introducing into the discussion the ideas, the principles, the methods, and the results of the theory of functions. … the refined and extremely difficult work of Poincare and others in physical astronomy has been possible only by the use of the most elaborate developments of some purely mathematical subjects, developments which were made without a thought of such applications.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1897), Nature, 56, 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Accrue (3)  |  Achieve (64)  |  Advance (165)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applicability (6)  |  Application (170)  |  Apply (77)  |  Associate (16)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Belief (504)  |  Body (247)  |  Build (117)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Chief (38)  |  Choose (60)  |  Complex (95)  |  Condenser (4)  |  Connection (111)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Conspicuous (7)  |  Construction (83)  |  Current (54)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deem (6)  |  Develop (107)  |  Development (289)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Discontinuous (5)  |  Discussion (48)  |  Domain (42)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Elaborate (21)  |  Electrostatic (5)  |  Emphasize (12)  |  Equation (96)  |  Extension (31)  |  Far (154)  |  Fluid Motion (2)  |  Function (131)  |  Functional (10)  |  General (160)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Guide (65)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Idea (580)  |  Important (205)  |  Initiate (6)  |  Instance (32)  |  Interest (237)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Issue (42)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Least (74)  |  Let (61)  |  Map (30)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (239)  |  Motion (160)  |  Natural (173)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Paper (83)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Physical (134)  |  Plan (87)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Portion (24)  |  Possible (158)  |  Practical (133)  |  Principle (292)  |  Property (126)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Purely (28)  |  Question (404)  |  Refine (5)  |  Regard (95)  |  Region (36)  |  Relation (154)  |  Representation (36)  |  Result (389)  |  Rotate (6)  |  Score (8)  |  Similar (35)  |  Sole (21)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (240)  |  Substantial (14)  |  Supreme (37)  |  Theory (696)  |  Thought (546)  |  Time (595)  |  Title (18)  |  Turned Out (4)  |  Unwise (4)  |  Variable (16)  |  Various (47)  |  Work (635)  |  Year (299)

We are like the inhabitants of an isolated valley in New Guinea who communicate with societies in neighboring valleys (quite different societies, I might add) by runner and by drum. When asked how a very advanced society will communicate, they might guess by an extremely rapid runner or by an improbably large drum. They might not guess a technology beyond their ken. And yet, all the while, a vast international cable and radio traffic passes over them, around them, and through them... We will listen for the interstellar drums, but we will miss the interstellar cables. We are likely to receive our first messages from the drummers of the neighboring galactic valleys - from civilizations only somewhat in our future. The civilizations vastly more advanced than we, will be, for a long time, remote both in distance and in accessibility. At a future time of vigorous interstellar radio traffic, the very advanced civilizations may be, for us, still insubstantial legends.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accessibility (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (165)  |  Ask (160)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Both (81)  |  Cable (7)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Communicate (17)  |  Different (186)  |  Distance (77)  |  Drum (2)  |  Drummer (3)  |  First (314)  |  Future (287)  |  Galactic (2)  |  Guess (48)  |  Improbable (12)  |  Inhabitant (28)  |  International (23)  |  Interstellar (6)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Ken (2)  |  Large (130)  |  Legend (10)  |  Likely (33)  |  Listen (41)  |  Long (174)  |  Message (35)  |  Miss (27)  |  Neighboring (5)  |  New Guinea (3)  |  Pass (93)  |  Radio (30)  |  Rapid (32)  |  Receive (60)  |  Remote (42)  |  Runner (2)  |  Society (228)  |  Technology (222)  |  Time (595)  |  Traffic (6)  |  Valley (22)  |  Vast (89)  |  Vastly (8)  |  Vigorous (20)

We are, of course, extremely concerned that if this did, in fact, happen, that there is going to be a tremendous public outcry, and we will be concerned with what the Congress does, … Obviously, we are concerned about there being a backlash against the medical applications of this technology, which have, of course, the potential to cure millions of patients.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Concern (110)  |  Congress (12)  |  Cure (96)  |  Fact (733)  |  Happen (82)  |  Medical (24)  |  Millions (17)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Outcry (3)  |  Patient (125)  |  Potential (39)  |  Public (94)  |  Technology (222)  |  Tremendous (17)

We have not done the things that are necessary to lower emissions because these things fundamentally conflict with deregulated capitalism… We are stuck because the actions that would give us the best chance of averting catastrophe–and would benefit the vast majority–are extremely threatening to an elite minority that has a stranglehold over our economy, our political process, and most of our major media outlets.
From This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate (2014), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Benefit (73)  |  Best (173)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Catastrophe (21)  |  Chance (160)  |  Climate Change (60)  |  Conflict (55)  |  Deregulation (2)  |  Economy (54)  |  Elite (5)  |  Emission (17)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Lower (11)  |  Major (32)  |  Majority (42)  |  Medium (12)  |  Minority (16)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Outlet (3)  |  Political (36)  |  Process (267)  |  Stranglehold (2)  |  Stuck (5)  |  Vast (89)

[Wolfgang Bolyai] was extremely modest. No monument, said he, should stand over his grave, only an apple-tree, in memory of the three apples: the two of Eve and Paris, which made hell out of earth, and that of Newton, which elevated the earth again into the circle of the heavenly bodies.
In History of Elementary Mathematics (1910), 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (35)  |  Body (247)  |  Circle (56)  |  Earth (638)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Eve (4)  |  Grave (26)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  Hell (32)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Memory (106)  |  Modest (8)  |  Monument (26)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Paris (11)  |  Say (228)  |  Stand (108)  |  Tree (171)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.