Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Boundary

Boundary Quotes (27 quotes)

Believing, as I do, in the continuity of nature, I cannot stop abruptly where our microscopes cease to be of use. Here the vision of the mind authoritatively supplements the vision of the eye. By a necessity engendered and justified by science I cross the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern in that Matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial Life.
'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast', (19 Aug 1874). Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abruptness (2)  |  Belief (400)  |  Cessation (10)  |  Continuity (23)  |  Cover (23)  |  Creator (40)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Engendering (3)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Eye (159)  |  Hitherto (3)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Justification (33)  |  Life (917)  |  Matter (270)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Notwithstanding (2)  |  Potency (5)  |  Power (273)  |  Professing (2)  |  Promise (27)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Stop (56)  |  Supplement (2)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Vision (55)

Boundaries which mark off one field of science from another are purely artificial, are set up only for temporary convenience. Let chemists and physicists dig deep enough, and they reach common ground.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (26)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Common Ground (3)  |  Convenience (25)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dig (9)  |  Field (119)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Purely (15)  |  Reach (68)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Temporary (13)

Chemistry and physics are experimental sciences; and those who are engaged in attempting to enlarge the boundaries of science by experiment are generally unwilling to publish speculations; for they have learned, by long experience, that it is unsafe to anticipate events. It is true, they must make certain theories and hypotheses. They must form some kind of mental picture of the relations between the phenomena which they are trying to investigate, else their experiments would be made at random, and without connection.
From 'Radium and Its Products', Harper’s Magazine (Dec 1904), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (8)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Connection (86)  |  Enlarge (15)  |  Event (97)  |  Experience (268)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mental (57)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physics (301)  |  Picture (55)  |  Publish (18)  |  Random (21)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unsafe (5)  |  Unwilling (4)

Groves hated the weather, and the weathermen; they represented chaos and the messengers of chaos. Weather violated boundaries, ignored walls and gates, failed to adhere to deadlines, disobeyed orders. Weather caused delays. The weather forecasters had opposed the [atomic bomb] test date for months—it was set within a window of unfavorable conditions: thunderstorms, rain, high winds, inversion layers. Groves had overridden them. … Groves saw it as a matter of insubordination when the weather forecasters refused to forecast good weather for the test.
In Atomic Spaces: Living on the Manhattan Project (1999), 312. For the attitude of Groves toward the weather see his, 'Some Recollections of July 16, 1945', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Jun 1970), 26, No. 6, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (101)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Forecast (8)  |  Gate (8)  |  Leslie Richard Groves (13)  |  Rain (28)  |  Schedule (2)  |  Test (96)  |  Thunderstorm (3)  |  Trinity (7)  |  Wall (20)  |  Weather (27)  |  Wind (52)

I imagine that when we reach the boundaries of things set for us, or even before we reach them, we can see into the infinite, just as on the surface of the earth we gaze out into immeasurable space.
Aphorism 52 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (487)  |  Gaze (12)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Immeasurable (4)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Space (154)  |  Surface (74)

If you free yourself from the conventional reaction to a quantity like a million years, you free yourself a bit from the boundaries of human time. And then in a way you do not live at all, but in another way you live forever.
Basin and Range
Science quotes on:  |  Bit (13)  |  Conventional (16)  |  Forever (42)  |  Free (59)  |  Human (445)  |  Live (186)  |  Million (89)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Time (439)  |  Year (214)

In defining an element let us not take an external boundary, Let us say, e.g., the smallest ponderable quantity of yttrium is an assemblage of ultimate atoms almost infinitely more like each other than they are to the atoms of any other approximating element. It does not necessarily follow that the atoms shall all be absolutely alike among themselves. The atomic weight which we ascribe to yttrium, therefore, merely represents a mean value around which the actual weights of the individual atoms of the “element” range within certain limits. But if my conjecture is tenable, could we separate atom from atom, we should find them varying within narrow limits on each side of the mean.
Address to Annual General Meeting of the Chemical Society (28 Mar 1888), printed in Journal of the Chemical Society (1888), 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Actual (34)  |  Alike (10)  |  Approximation (16)  |  Ascribe (11)  |  Assemblage (6)  |  Atom (251)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Definition (152)  |  Element (129)  |  External (45)  |  Find (248)  |  Individual (177)  |  Infinitely (8)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mean (63)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Ponderable (3)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Range (38)  |  Separate (46)  |  Smallest (6)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Value (180)  |  Variation (50)  |  Yttrium (3)

In India we have clear evidence that administrative statistics had reached a high state of organization before 300 B.C. In the Arthasastra of Kautilya … the duties of the Gopa, the village accountant, [include] “by setting up boundaries to villages, by numbering plots of grounds as cultivated, uncultivated, plains, wet lands, gardens, vegetable gardens, fences (váta), forests altars, temples of gods, irrigation works, cremation grounds, feeding houses (sattra), places where water is freely supplied to travellers (prapá), places of pilgrimage, pasture grounds and roads, and thereby fixing the boundaries of various villages, of fields, of forests, and of roads, he shall register gifts, sales, charities, and remission of taxes regarding fields.”
Editorial, introducing the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933), 1, No. 1. Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accountant (2)  |  Administration (8)  |  Altar (6)  |  Charity (8)  |  Clear (52)  |  Cremation (2)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Duty (51)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Fence (7)  |  Field (119)  |  Fix (10)  |  Forest (88)  |  Garden (23)  |  Gift (47)  |  God (454)  |  Ground (63)  |  India (15)  |  Irrigation (6)  |  Land (83)  |  Number (179)  |  Organization (79)  |  Pasture (11)  |  Pilgrimage (2)  |  Place (111)  |  Plain (24)  |  Plot (9)  |  Register (9)  |  Remission (2)  |  Road (47)  |  Sale (3)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Tax (19)  |  Temple (22)  |  Traveler (18)  |  Uncultivated (2)  |  Various (25)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Village (6)  |  Water (244)  |  Wet (5)

In scientific matters ... the greatest discoverer differs from the most arduous imitator and apprentice only in degree, whereas he differs in kind from someone whom nature has endowed for fine art. But saying this does not disparage those great men to whom the human race owes so much in contrast to those whom nature has endowed for fine art. For the scientists' talent lies in continuing to increase the perfection of our cognitions and on all the dependent benefits, as well as in imparting that same knowledge to others; and in these respects they are far superior to those who merit the honour of being called geniuses. For the latter's art stops at some point, because a boundary is set for it beyond which it cannot go and which has probably long since been reached and cannot be extended further.
The Critique of Judgement (1790), trans. J. C. Meredith (1991), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprentice (4)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Cognition (3)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Genius (186)  |  Honour (23)  |  Imitator (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Science And Art (157)

Knowledge once gained casts a faint light beyond its own immediate boundaries. There is no discovery so limited as not to illuminate something beyond itself.
In 'On the Methods and Tendencies of Physical Investigation', Scientific Addresses (1870), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (65)  |  Cast (15)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Faint (5)  |  Gain (48)  |  Illumination (12)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Itself (7)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Light (246)  |  Limited (13)

Man is perhaps half spirit and half matter, as the polyp is half plant and half animal. The strangest of creatures lie always at the boundary.
Aphorism 30 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Creature (127)  |  Man (345)  |  Matter (270)  |  Plant (173)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Strange (61)

Mathematics knows no races or geographic boundaries; for mathematics, the cultural world is one country.
In H. Eves, Mathematical Circles Squared (1972). As cited in Anton Zettl, Sturm-Liouville Theory (2005), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Country (121)  |  Cultural (16)  |  Geographic (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Race (76)  |  World (667)

No despot ever flung forth his legions to die in foreign conquest, no privilege-ruled nation ever erupted across its borders, to lock in death embrace with another, but behind them loomed the driving power of a population too large for its boundaries and its natural resources.
In 'Woman's Error and Her Debt', The Birth Control Review (Aug 1921), 5, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Conquest (13)  |  Death (270)  |  Despot (2)  |  Embrace (22)  |  Eruption (5)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Large (82)  |  Legion (3)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Population (71)  |  Power (273)  |  Privilege (16)

Science has a simple faith, which transcends utility. Nearly all men of science, all men of learning for that matter, and men of simple ways too, have it in some form and in some degree. It is the faith that it is the privilege of man to learn to understand, and that this is his mission. If we abandon that mission under stress we shall abandon it forever, for stress will not cease. Knowledge for the sake of understanding, not merely to prevail, that is the essence of our being. None can define its limits, or set its ultimate boundaries.
Science is Not Enough (1967), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Being (39)  |  Cease (23)  |  Definition (152)  |  Essence (42)  |  Faith (131)  |  Forever (42)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Limit (86)  |  Men Of Science (97)  |  Mission (7)  |  Prevail (13)  |  Privilege (16)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simple (111)  |  Stress (8)  |  Transcendence (2)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Utility (23)

Science is a Differential Equation. Religion is a Boundary Condition.
Comment made on a postcard sent to Robin O. Gandy. Reproduced in Andrew Hodges, Alan Turing: The Enigma (1983), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (119)  |  Differential Equation (9)  |  Science And Religion (267)

Simply pushing harder within the old boundaries will not do.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Hard (70)  |  Old (104)  |  Push (22)  |  Simply (34)

Siphonophores do not convey the message–a favorite theme of unthinking romanticism–that nature is but one gigantic whole, all its parts intimately connected and interacting in some higher, ineffable harmony. Nature revels in boundaries and distinctions; we inhabit a universe of structure. But since our universe of structure has evolved historically, it must present us with fuzzy boundaries, where one kind of thing grades into another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Connect (15)  |  Convey (10)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Favorite (18)  |  Fuzzy (3)  |  Gigantic (16)  |  Grade (10)  |  Harmony (55)  |  High (78)  |  Historically (2)  |  Ineffable (2)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Interact (5)  |  Intimately (4)  |  Kind (99)  |  Message (30)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Part (146)  |  Present (103)  |  Revel (4)  |  Romanticism (5)  |  Structure (191)  |  Theme (8)  |  Universe (563)  |  Unthinking (3)  |  Whole (122)

The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. All through the long history of Earth it has been an area of unrest where waves have broken heavily against the land, where the tides have pressed forward over the continents, receded, and then returned. For no two suc-cessive days is the shore line precisely the same. Not only do the tides advance and retreat in their eternal rhythms, but the level of the sea itself is never at rest. It rises or falls as the glaciers melt or grow, as the floor of the deep ocean basins shifts under its increasing load of sediments, or as the Earth’s crust along the continental margins warps up or down in adjustment to strain and tension. Today a little more land may belong to the sea, tomorrow a little less. Always the edge of the sea remains an elusive and indefinable boundary.
The Edge of the Sea
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (12)  |  Advance (123)  |  Area (18)  |  Basin (2)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Belong (33)  |  Break (33)  |  Continent (39)  |  Crust (17)  |  Deep (81)  |  Down (44)  |  Earth (487)  |  Edge (16)  |  Elusive (6)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Fall (89)  |  Floor (16)  |  Forward (21)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Grow (66)  |  Heavily (3)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Increase (107)  |  Indefinable (2)  |  Land (83)  |  Less (54)  |  Level (51)  |  Line (44)  |  Little (126)  |  Load (8)  |  Long (95)  |  Margin (5)  |  Melt (15)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Place (111)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Press (16)  |  Recede (2)  |  Remain (77)  |  Rest (64)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Return (35)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Rise (51)  |  Same (92)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sediment (7)  |  Shift (21)  |  Shore (11)  |  Strain (8)  |  Strange (61)  |  Tension (7)  |  Tide (18)  |  Today (86)  |  Tomorrow (29)  |  Unrest (2)  |  Warp (5)  |  Wave (55)

The explorations of space end on a note of uncertainty. And necessarily so. … We know our immediate neighborhood rather intimately. With increasing distance our knowledge fades, and fades rapidly. Eventually, we reach the dim boundary—the utmost limits of our telescopes. There, we measure shadows, and we search among ghostly errors of measurement for landmarks that are scarcely more substantial.
In Realm of the Nebulae: The Silliman Memorial Lectures Series (1936), 201-202. The lecture series was delivered at Yale University in Fall 1935.
Science quotes on:  |  Dim (4)  |  Distance (54)  |  End (141)  |  Error (230)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Fade (5)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Increase (107)  |  Intimately (4)  |  Know (321)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Landmark (6)  |  Limit (86)  |  Measure (70)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Neighborhood (7)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Space (154)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Uncertainty (37)  |  Utmost (8)

The greater is the circle of light, the greater is the boundary of the darkness by which it is confined. But, notwithstanding this, the more light get, the more thankful we ought to be, for by this means we have the greater range for satisfactory contemplation. time the bounds of light will be still farther extended; and from the infinity of the divine nature, and the divine works, we may promise ourselves an endless progress in our investigation them: a prospect truly sublime and glorious.
Experiments and Observations with a Continuation of the Observations on Air (1781), Vol. 2, ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Bounds (5)  |  Circle (28)  |  Confinement (3)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Divinity (11)  |  Extension (20)  |  Glorious (17)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Light (246)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Progress (317)  |  Promise (27)  |  Prospect (19)  |  Sublime (18)

The Himalayas are the crowning achievement of the Indo-Australian plate. India in the Oligocene crashed head on into Tibet, hit so hard that it not only folded and buckled the plate boundaries but also plowed into the newly created Tibetan plateau and drove the Himalayas five and a half miles into the sky. The mountains are in some trouble. India has not stopped pushing them, and they are still going up. Their height and volume are already so great they are beginning to melt in their own self-generated radioactive heat. When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in a warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as 20,000 feet below the sea floor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth.
If by some fiat, I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence; this is the one I would choose: the summit of Mount Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Already (16)  |  Begin (52)  |  Below (11)  |  Blank (11)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Choose (35)  |  Clear (52)  |  Climber (3)  |  Crash (8)  |  Create (98)  |  Creature (127)  |  Crown (19)  |  Drive (38)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fiat (5)  |  Five (14)  |  Flag (10)  |  Floor (16)  |  Fold (4)  |  Foot (39)  |  Great (300)  |  Half (35)  |  Hard (70)  |  Head (52)  |  Heat (90)  |  Height (24)  |  High (78)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Hit (14)  |  India (15)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (186)  |  Marine (7)  |  Melt (15)  |  Mile (24)  |  Mount Everest (2)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Movement (65)  |  Newly (3)  |  North (7)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Plant (173)  |  Plate (5)  |  Plateau (4)  |  Plow (6)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Push (22)  |  Radioactive (7)  |  Remain (77)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Rock (107)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Set (56)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (15)  |  Sky (68)  |  Snow (15)  |  Stop (56)  |  Summit (7)  |  Surface Of The Earth (2)  |  Tibet (2)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Turn (72)  |  Volume (13)  |  Warm (20)  |  Write (87)

The totality of our so-called knowledge or beliefs, from the most casual matters of geography and history to the profoundest laws of atomic physics or even of pure mathematics and logic, is a man-made fabric which impinges on experience only along the edges. Or, to change the figure, total science is like a field of force whose boundary conditions are experience. A conflict with experience at the periphery occasions readjustments in the interior of the field. Truth values have to be redistributed over some of our statements. Reevaluation of some statements entails reevaluation of others, because of their logical interconnections—the logical laws being in turn simply certain further statements of the system, certain further elements of the field.
'Two Dogmas of Experience,' in Philosophical Review (1951). Reprinted in From a Logical Point of View (1953), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Physics (6)  |  Belief (400)  |  Casual (6)  |  Condition (119)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Edge (16)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fabric (13)  |  Field (119)  |  Geography (25)  |  History (302)  |  Impinge (3)  |  Interconnection (7)  |  Interior (13)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law (418)  |  Logic (187)  |  Man-Made (4)  |  Periphery (2)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Reevaluation (2)  |  Statement (56)  |  Totality (9)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value (180)

The traditional boundaries between various fields of science are rapidly disappearing and what is more important science does not know any national borders. The scientists of the world are forming an invisible network with a very free flow of scientific information - a freedom accepted by the countries of the world irrespective of political systems or religions. ... Great care must be taken that the scientific network is utilized only for scientific purposes - if it gets involved in political questions it loses its special status and utility as a nonpolitical force for development.
Banquet speech accepting Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (editor) Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Border (5)  |  Care (73)  |  Country (121)  |  Development (228)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Field (119)  |  Flow (31)  |  Information (102)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Nation (111)  |  Network (10)  |  Politics (77)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Status (18)  |  World (667)

Think of the image of the world in a convex mirror. ... A well-made convex mirror of moderate aperture represents the objects in front of it as apparently solid and in fixed positions behind its surface. But the images of the distant horizon and of the sun in the sky lie behind the mirror at a limited distance, equal to its focal length. Between these and the surface of the mirror are found the images of all the other objects before it, but the images are diminished and flattened in proportion to the distance of their objects from the mirror. ... Yet every straight line or plane in the outer world is represented by a straight line or plane in the image. The image of a man measuring with a rule a straight line from the mirror, would contract more and more the farther he went, but with his shrunken rule the man in the image would count out exactly the same results as in the outer world, all lines of sight in the mirror would be represented by straight lines of sight in the mirror. In short, I do not see how men in the mirror are to discover that their bodies are not rigid solids and their experiences good examples of the correctness of Euclidean axioms. But if they could look out upon our world as we look into theirs without overstepping the boundary, they must declare it to be a picture in a spherical mirror, and would speak of us just as we speak of them; and if two inhabitants of the different worlds could communicate with one another, neither, as far as I can see, would be able to convince the other that he had the true, the other the distorted, relation. Indeed I cannot see that such a question would have any meaning at all, so long as mechanical considerations are not mixed up with it.
In 'On the Origin and Significance of Geometrical Axioms,' Popular Scientific Lectures< Second Series (1881), 57-59. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 357-358.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (26)  |  Behind (25)  |  Convex (2)  |  Distortion (10)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Experience (268)  |  Horizon (13)  |  Image (38)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Line (44)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Solid (34)  |  Surface (74)  |  World (667)

We do not inhabit a perfected world where natural selection ruthlessly scrutinizes all organic structures and then molds them for optimal utility. Organisms inherit a body form and a style of embryonic development; these impose constraint s upon future change and adaptation. In many cases, evolutionary pathways reflect inherited patterns more than current environmental demands. These inheritances constrain, but they also provide opportunity. A potentially minor genetic change ... entails a host of complex, nonadaptive consequences ... What ‘play’ would evolution have if each structure were built for a restricted purpose and could be used for nothing else? How could humans learn to write if our brain had not evolved for hunting, social cohesion, or whatever, and could not transcend the adaptive boundaries of its original purpose?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Adaptive (2)  |  Body (193)  |  Brain (181)  |  Build (80)  |  Case (64)  |  Change (291)  |  Cohesion (5)  |  Complex (78)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Constrain (6)  |  Constraint (8)  |  Current (43)  |  Demand (52)  |  Development (228)  |  Embryonic (6)  |  Entail (4)  |  Environmental (8)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Genetic (11)  |  Host (9)  |  Human (445)  |  Hunt (12)  |  Impose (17)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Inherit (13)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Learn (160)  |  Minor (7)  |  Mold (26)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Optimal (4)  |  Organic (48)  |  Organism (126)  |  Original (36)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Play (60)  |  Provide (48)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reflect (17)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Scrutinize (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Structure (191)  |  Style (15)  |  Transcend (9)  |  Utility (23)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)

We inhabit a complex world. Some boundaries are sharp and permit clean and definite distinctions. But nature also includes continua that cannot be neatly parceled into two piles of unambiguous yeses and noes. Biologists have rejected, as fatally flawed in principle, all attempts by antiabortionists to define an unambiguous ‘beginning of life,’ because we know so well that the sequence from ovulation or spermatogenesis to birth is an unbreakable continuum–and surely no one will define masturbation as murder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Begin (52)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Birth (81)  |  Clean (20)  |  Complex (78)  |  Continua (3)  |  Continuum (5)  |  Define (29)  |  Definite (27)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Flawed (2)  |  Include (27)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Know (321)  |  Life (917)  |  Masturbation (2)  |  Murder (11)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Neatly (2)  |  Permit (20)  |  Pile (8)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reject (21)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Sharp (12)  |  Surely (13)  |  Unambiguous (4)  |  Unbreakable (2)  |  World (667)

[O]ur long-term security is threatened by a problem at least as dangerous as chemical, nuclear or biological weapons, or indeed international terrorism: human-induced climate change. … The impacts of global warming are such that I have no hesitation in describing it as a “weapon of mass destruction.” Like terrorism, this weapon knows no boundaries. It can strike anywhere, in any form…
London Guardian (28 Jul 2003)
Science quotes on:  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Nuclear Weapon (5)  |  Security (27)  |  Strike (21)  |  Terrorism (3)  |  Threat (24)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.