Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Define

Define Quotes (29 quotes)

L’analyse mathématique est aussi étendue que la nature elle-même; elle définit tous les rapports sensibles, mesure les temps y les espaces, les forces, les températures; cette science difficile se forme avec lenteur, mais elle conserve tous les principes quelle a une fois acquis; elle s’accroît et s’affermit sans cesse au milieu de tant de variations et d’erreurs de l’esprit humain.
Mathematical analysis is as extensive as nature itself; it defines all perceptible relations, measures times, spaces, forces, temperatures; this difficult science is formed slowly, but it preserves every principle which it has once acquired; it grows and strengthens itself incessantly in the midst of the many variations and errors of the human mind.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), xiv, translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (4)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Error (230)  |  Extensive (10)  |  Formed (4)  |  Grow (66)  |  Human (445)  |  Incessantly (3)  |  Mathematical Analysis (5)  |  Measure (70)  |  Midst (3)  |  Mind (544)  |  Perceptible (4)  |  Principle (228)  |  Relation (96)  |  Slowly (10)  |  Space (154)  |  Strengthen (13)  |  Temperature (42)  |  Time (439)

[Defining Life] An internal principle of action.
Kritik der Urtheilskraft in Werke, IV, 260). In George Henry Lewes, Aristotle (1864), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Definition (152)  |  Internal (18)  |  Life (917)  |  Principle (228)

[Defining Organism] That in which every part is at once means and end.
Kritik der Urtheilskraft in Werke, IV, 260). In George Henry Lewes, Aristotle (1864), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (152)  |  End (141)  |  Means (109)  |  Organism (126)  |  Part (146)

A mathematician thinks that two points are enough to define a straight line, while a physicist wants more data.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Data (100)  |  Difference (208)  |  Line (44)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Point (72)  |  Quip (75)  |  Straight (15)

Although species may be discrete, they have no immutable essence. Variation is the raw material of evolutionary change. It represents the fundamental reality of nature, not an accident about a created norm. Variation is primary; essences are illusory. Species must be defined as ranges of irreducible variation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Change (291)  |  Create (98)  |  Discrete (6)  |  Essence (42)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Immutable (9)  |  Irreducible (5)  |  Material (124)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Norm (3)  |  Primary (29)  |  Range (38)  |  Raw (10)  |  Reality (140)  |  Represent (27)  |  Species (181)  |  Variation (50)

As for “Don’t be evil,” we have tried to define precisely what it means to be a force for good—always do the right, ethical thing. Ultimately, “Don’t be evil” seems the easiest way to summarize it.
From interview, 'Google Guys', Playboy (Sep 2004).
Science quotes on:  |  Easiest (2)  |  Ethical (10)  |  Evil (67)  |  Force (194)  |  Good (228)  |  Precise (17)  |  Right (144)  |  Seem (89)  |  Summarize (7)  |  Ultimate (61)

Common sense … may be thought of as a series of concepts and conceptual schemes which have proved highly satisfactory for the practical uses of mankind. Some of those concepts and conceptual schemes were carried over into science with only a little pruning and whittling and for a long time proved useful. As the recent revolutions in physics indicate, however, many errors can be made by failure to examine carefully just how common sense ideas should be defined in terms of what the experimenter plans to do.
In Science and Common Sense (1951), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (12)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Concept (102)  |  Error (230)  |  Examine (24)  |  Experimenter (18)  |  Failure (118)  |  Idea (440)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Physics (301)  |  Plan (69)  |  Practical (93)  |  Prune (5)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Satisfactory (9)  |  Science (1699)

Difficulties [in defining mathematics with full generality, yet simplicity] are but consequences of our refusal to see that mathematics cannot be defined without acknowledging its most obvious feature: namely, that it is interesting. Nowhere is intellectual beauty so deeply felt and fastidiously appreciated.
In Personal Knowledge (1958, 2012), 200,
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (13)  |  Appreciate (17)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Feature (34)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Refusal (20)

Each of the major sciences has contributed an essential ingredient in our long retreat from an initial belief in our own cosmic importance. Astronomy defined our home as a small planet tucked away in one corner of an average galaxy among millions; biology took away our status as paragons created in the image of God; geology gave us the immensity of time and taught us how little of it our own species has occupied.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Average (31)  |  Belief (400)  |  Biology (150)  |  Contribute (10)  |  Corner (24)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Create (98)  |  Essential (87)  |  Galaxy (38)  |  Geology (187)  |  Give (117)  |  God (454)  |  Home (58)  |  Image (38)  |  Immensity (17)  |  Importance (183)  |  Ingredient (10)  |  Initial (13)  |  Little (126)  |  Long (95)  |  Major (24)  |  Millions (13)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Planet (199)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Science (1699)  |  Small (97)  |  Species (181)  |  Status (18)  |  Teach (102)  |  Time (439)  |  Tuck (3)

Every definition implies an axiom, since it asserts the existence of the object defined. The definition then will not be justified, from the purely logical point of view, until we have ‘proved’ that it involves no contradiction either in its terms or with the truths previously admitted.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Assert (11)  |  Axiom (26)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Definition (152)  |  Existence (254)  |  Imply (12)  |  Involve (27)  |  Justify (19)  |  Logical (20)  |  Object (110)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Previously (7)  |  Prove (60)  |  Purely (15)  |  Term (87)  |  Truth (750)

Gates is the ultimate programming machine. He believes everything can be defined, examined, reduced to essentials, and rearranged into a logical sequence that will achieve a particular goal.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Belief (400)  |  Examine (24)  |  Bill Gates (6)  |  Goal (81)  |  Logic (187)  |  Machine (133)  |  Programming (2)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Ultimate (61)

I am not ... asserting that humans are either genial or aggressive by inborn biological necessity. Obviously, both kindness and violence lie with in the bounds of our nature because we perpetrate both, in spades. I only advance a structural claim that social stability rules nearly all the time and must be based on an overwhelmingly predominant (but tragically ignored) frequency of genial acts, and that geniality is therefore our usual and preferred response nearly all the time ... The center of human nature is rooted in ten thousand ordinary acts of kindness that define our days.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Advance (123)  |  Aggressive (3)  |  Assert (11)  |  Base (43)  |  Biological (21)  |  Both (52)  |  Bounds (5)  |  Center (30)  |  Claim (52)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Genial (3)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Nature (51)  |  Ignore (22)  |  Inborn (3)  |  Kindness (10)  |  Lie (80)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Overwhelmingly (2)  |  Predominant (2)  |  Prefer (18)  |  Response (24)  |  Root (48)  |  Rule (135)  |  Social (93)  |  Spade (2)  |  Stability (17)  |  Structural (8)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Time (439)  |  Violence (20)

I do not claim that intelligence, however defined, has no genetic basis–I regard it as trivially true, uninteresting, and unimportant that it does. The expression of any trait represents a complex interaction of heredity and environment ... a specific claim purporting to demonstrate a mean genetic deficiency in the intelligence of American blacks rests upon no new facts whatever and can cite no valid data in its support. It is just as likely that blacks have a genetic advantage over whites. And, either way, it doesn’t matter a damn. An individual can’t be judged by his group mean.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  American (34)  |  Basis (60)  |  Black (27)  |  Cite (5)  |  Claim (52)  |  Complex (78)  |  Damn (11)  |  Data (100)  |  Deficiency (8)  |  Demonstrate (25)  |  Environment (138)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fact (609)  |  Genetic (11)  |  Group (52)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Judge (43)  |  Likely (23)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mean (63)  |  New (340)  |  Purport (2)  |  Regard (58)  |  Represent (27)  |  Rest (64)  |  Specific (30)  |  Support (63)  |  Trait (19)  |  True (120)  |  Unimportant (4)  |  Uninteresting (3)  |  Valid (6)  |  White (38)

I do not define time, space, place, and motion, as being well known to all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Know (321)  |  Motion (127)  |  Place (111)  |  Space (154)  |  Space-Time (14)  |  Time (439)

If we are to define science, ... it does not consist so much in knowing, nor even in “organized knowledge,” as it does in diligent inquiry into truth for truth’s sake, without any sort of axe to grind, nor for the sake of the delight of contemplating it, but from an impulse to penetrate into the reason of things.
From 'Lessons from the History of Science: The Scientific Attitude' (c.1896), in Collected Papers (1931), Vol. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Axe (12)  |  Consist (22)  |  Contemplate (8)  |  Delight (51)  |  Diligent (4)  |  Grind (8)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Organized (9)  |  Penetrate (21)  |  Reason (330)  |  Sake (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Truth (750)

No one should feel at all offended or threatened by the obvious fact that we are not all born entirely blank, or entirely the same, in our mixture of the broad behavioral propensities defining what we call ‘temperament.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (28)  |  Blank (11)  |  Broad (18)  |  Call (68)  |  Entirely (23)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feel (93)  |  Mixture (22)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Offend (4)  |  Propensity (7)  |  Same (92)  |  Temperament (8)  |  Threaten (6)

Now, it may be stretching an analogy to compare epidemics of cholera—caused by a known agent—with that epidemic of violent crime which is destroying our cities. It is unlikely that our social problems can be traced to a single, clearly defined cause in the sense that a bacterial disease is ‘caused’ by a microbe. But, I daresay, social science is about as advanced in the late twentieth century as bacteriological science was in the mid nineteenth century. Our forerunners knew something about cholera; they sensed that its spread was associated with misdirected sewage, filth, and the influx of alien poor into crowded, urban tenements. And we know something about street crime; nowhere has it been reported that a member of the New York Stock Exchange has robbed ... at the point of a gun. Indeed, I am naively confident that an enlightened social scientist of the next century will be able to point out that we had available to us at least some of the clues to the cause of urban crime.
'Cholera at the Harvey,' Woods Hole Cantata: Essays on Science and Society (1985).
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (22)  |  20th Century (25)  |  Advance (123)  |  Agent (27)  |  Alien (25)  |  Analogy (46)  |  Associate (9)  |  Available (18)  |  Bacteria (32)  |  Cause (231)  |  Cholera (2)  |  City (37)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Clue (14)  |  Compare (15)  |  Crime (20)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Disease (257)  |  Enlightened (4)  |  Epidemic (6)  |  Filth (4)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Gun (7)  |  Know (321)  |  Late (28)  |  Member (27)  |  Microbe (17)  |  Misdirect (2)  |  New York (14)  |  Nowhere (19)  |  Point (72)  |  Point Out (2)  |  Problem (362)  |  Report (31)  |  Rob (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sewage (5)  |  Single (72)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Science (18)  |  Social Scientist (3)  |  Spread (19)  |  Stock Exchange (2)  |  Street (17)  |  Stretch (8)  |  Teenager (4)  |  Trace (39)  |  Unlikely (12)  |  Urban (7)  |  Violent (15)

On my tests I used to always give as my first question, define chemistry, because I thought every student should know what they were taking. I do this quite often.
In address, to the Economic Club of Detroit (14 Jan 1990), 'Where Do We Go From Here?' on the massiechairs.com website.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Question (315)  |  Student (131)  |  Test (96)

Paradox has been defined as “Truth standing on her head to get attention.”
In 'When Doctors Agree', The Paradoxes of Mr Pond (1937), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (76)  |  Head (52)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Stand (60)  |  Truth (750)

Rulers and generals muster their troops. Magnates muster the sums of money which give them power. The fascist dictators muster the irrational human reactions which make it possible for them to attain and maintain their power over the masses. The scientists muster knowledge and means of research. But, thus far, no organization fighting for freedom has ever mustered the biological arsenal where the weapons are to be found for the establishment and the maintenance of human freedom. All precision of our social existence notwithstanding, there is as yet no definition of the word freedom which would be in keeping with natural science. No word is more misused and misunderstood. To define freedom is the same as to define sexual health. But nobody will openly admit this. The advocacy of personal and social freedom is connected with anxiety and guilt feelings. As if to be free were a sin or at least not quite as it should be. Sex-economy makes this guilt feeling comprehensible: freedom without sexual self-determination is in itself a contradiction. But to be sexual means—according to the prevailing human structure—to be sinful or guilty. There are very few people who experience sexual love without guilt feeling. “Free love” has acquired a degrading meaning: it lost the meaning given it by the old fighters for freedom. In films and in books, to be genital and to be criminal are presented as the same thing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Acquire (19)  |  Admit (22)  |  Anxiety (15)  |  Arsenal (4)  |  Attain (21)  |  Biological (21)  |  Book (181)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Connect (15)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Criminal (14)  |  Definition (152)  |  Degrade (4)  |  Dictator (3)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Existence (254)  |  Experience (268)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascist (2)  |  Feel (93)  |  Feelings (11)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fighter (4)  |  Film (8)  |  Find (248)  |  Free (59)  |  Freedom (76)  |  General (92)  |  Give (117)  |  Guilt (8)  |  Guilty (4)  |  Health (136)  |  Human (445)  |  Irrational (7)  |  Keep (47)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Least (43)  |  Lose (53)  |  Love (164)  |  Maintain (22)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Mass (61)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Misunderstand (2)  |  Misuse (9)  |  Money (125)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Old (104)  |  Openly (2)  |  Organization (79)  |  People (269)  |  Personal (49)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Precision (38)  |  Present (103)  |  Prevail (13)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Research (517)  |  Ruler (12)  |  Same (92)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sexual (4)  |  Sin (27)  |  Social (93)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sum (30)  |  Troop (3)  |  Weapon (57)  |  Word (221)

The chemical differences among various species and genera of animals and plants are certainly as significant for the history of their origins as the differences in form. If we could define clearly the differences in molecular constitution and functions of different kinds of organisms, there would be possible a more illuminating and deeper understanding of question of the evolutionary reactions of organisms than could ever be expected from morphological considerations.
'Uber das Vorkommen von Haemoglobin in den Muskeln der Mollusken und die Verbreitung desselben in den lebenden Organismen', Pflügers Archiv für die gesamte Physiologie des Menschen und der Tiere, 1871, 4, 318-9. Trans. Joseph S. Fruton, Proteins, Enzymes, Genes: The Interplay of Chemistry and Biology (1999), 270.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Difference (208)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Form (210)  |  Function (90)  |  Genus (16)  |  History (302)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Organism (126)  |  Origin (77)  |  Plant (173)  |  Question (315)  |  Significance (60)  |  Species (181)  |  Understanding (317)

Very little comes easily to our poor, benighted species (the first creature, after all, to experiment with the novel evolutionary inventions of self-conscious philosophy and art). Even the most ‘obvious,’ ‘accurate,’ and ‘natural’ style of thinking or drawing must be regulated by history and won by struggle. Solutions must therefore arise within a social context and record the complex interactions of mind and environment that define the possibility of human improvement.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (21)  |  Arise (32)  |  Art (205)  |  Benighted (2)  |  Complex (78)  |  Context (17)  |  Creature (127)  |  Draw (25)  |  Easily (16)  |  Environment (138)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Experiment (543)  |  First (174)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Invention (283)  |  Little (126)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural (128)  |  Novel (16)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Poor (46)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Record (56)  |  Regulate (4)  |  Self-Conscious (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Solution (168)  |  Species (181)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Style (15)  |  Think (205)  |  Win (25)

We are more than just flesh and bones. There’s a certain spiritual nature and something of the mind that we can’t measure.… With all our sophisticated equipment, we cannot monitor or define it, and yet it’s there.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 44
Science quotes on:  |  Bone (57)  |  Certain (84)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Flesh (22)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mind (544)  |  Monitor (5)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sophisticated (11)  |  Spiritual (45)

We inhabit a complex world. Some boundaries are sharp and permit clean and definite distinctions. But nature also includes continua that cannot be neatly parceled into two piles of unambiguous yeses and noes. Biologists have rejected, as fatally flawed in principle, all attempts by antiabortionists to define an unambiguous ‘beginning of life,’ because we know so well that the sequence from ovulation or spermatogenesis to birth is an unbreakable continuum–and surely no one will define masturbation as murder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Begin (52)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Birth (81)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Clean (20)  |  Complex (78)  |  Continua (3)  |  Continuum (5)  |  Definite (27)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Flawed (2)  |  Include (27)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Know (321)  |  Life (917)  |  Masturbation (2)  |  Murder (11)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Neatly (2)  |  Permit (20)  |  Pile (8)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reject (21)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Sharp (12)  |  Surely (13)  |  Unambiguous (4)  |  Unbreakable (2)  |  World (667)

We think of something that has four legs and wags its tail as being alive. We look at a rock and say it’s not living. Yet when we get down to the no man’s land of virus particles and replicating molecules, we are hard put to define what is living and what is non-living.
From interview, 'The Seeds of Life', in The Omni Interviews (1984), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Leg (13)  |  Life (917)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Non-Living (3)  |  Rock (107)  |  Tail (13)  |  Virus (22)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Aim (58)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Analyze (3)  |  Answer (201)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arise (32)  |  Belief (400)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Break (33)  |  Briefly (3)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Conform (5)  |  Connect (15)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Construction (69)  |  Country (121)  |  Decision (58)  |  Definite (27)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demand (52)  |  Deny (29)  |  Describe (38)  |  Design (92)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dominate (13)  |  Easy (56)  |  Element (129)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exclusion (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Human (445)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instance (18)  |  Intention (25)  |  Learn (160)  |  Likely (23)  |  Merely (35)  |  Method (154)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Movement (65)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Observe (48)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Part (146)  |  Path (59)  |  Pattern (56)  |  People (269)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Problem (362)  |  Produce (63)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Raise (20)  |  Reckon (6)  |  Region (26)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Result (250)  |  Room (29)  |  Seek (57)  |  Seem (89)  |  Show (55)  |  Single (72)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Sciences (4)  |  Society (188)  |  Sort (32)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (12)  |  Technical (26)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Thought (374)  |  Totality (9)  |  Track (9)  |  Traverse (4)  |  Try (103)  |  Type (34)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wild (39)

[Defining Life] The definite combination of heterogeneous changes, both simultaneous and successive, in correspondence with external co-existences and sequences.
Herbert Spencer, "Principles of Psychology" 1835, p. 354. Compare "Physiology of Common Life" 1860, ii., 426. In The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine (1865), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (52)  |  Change (291)  |  Combination (69)  |  Correspondence (8)  |  Definite (27)  |  External (45)  |  Heterogeneous (3)  |  Life (917)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Simultaneous (12)  |  Successive (14)

[Defining Life] The special activity of organized beings.
Duges, "Physiologie Comparée." In The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine (1865), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Life (917)  |  Organize (14)  |  Special (51)

[Defining Life] the sum of the phenomena proper to organized beings. In consists essentially in this, that organized beings are all, during a certain time, the centres to which foreign substances penetrate and are appropriated, and from which others issue.
Béclard, "Anatomie Générale." In The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine (1865), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (18)  |  Centre (19)  |  Certain (84)  |  Consist (22)  |  Essentially (11)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Issue (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Organize (14)  |  Penetrate (21)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Proper (27)  |  Substance (73)  |  Sum (30)  |  Time (439)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.