Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Synthetic

Synthetic Quotes (12 quotes)

A principle of induction would be a statement with the help of which we could put inductive inferences into a logically acceptable form. In the eyes of the upholders of inductive logic, a principle of induction is of supreme importance for scientific method: “... this principle”, says Reichenbach, “determines the truth of scientific theories. To eliminate it from science would mean nothing less than to deprive science of the power to decide the truth or falsity of its theories. Without it, clearly, science would no longer have the right to distinguish its theories from the fanciful and arbitrary creations of the poet’s mind.” Now this principle of induction cannot be a purely logical truth like a tautology or an analytic statement. Indeed, if there were such a thing as a purely logical principle of induction, there would be no problem of induction; for in this case, all inductive inferences would have to be regarded as purely logical or tautological transformations, just like inferences in inductive logic. Thus the principle of induction must be a synthetic statement; that is, a statement whose negation is not self-contradictory but logically possible. So the question arises why such a principle should be accepted at all, and how we can justify its acceptance on rational grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Acceptable (5)  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Arise (32)  |  Case (64)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Creation (211)  |  Decide (25)  |  Deprive (9)  |  Determine (45)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Eye (159)  |  Falsity (12)  |  Fanciful (4)  |  Form (210)  |  Ground (63)  |  Help (68)  |  Importance (183)  |  Induction (45)  |  Inference (26)  |  Justify (19)  |  Less (54)  |  Logic (187)  |  Logical (20)  |  Long (95)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mind (544)  |  Negation (2)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Poet (59)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Purely (15)  |  Question (315)  |  Rational (42)  |  Regard (58)  |  Right (144)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Statement (56)  |  Supreme (24)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Theory (582)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Truth (750)

An evolution is a series of events that in itself as series is purely physical, — a set of necessary occurrences in the world of space and time. An egg develops into a chick; … a planet condenses from the fluid state, and develops the life that for millions of years makes it so wondrous a place. Look upon all these things descriptively, and you shall see nothing but matter moving instant after instant, each instant containing in its full description the necessity of passing over into the next. … But look at the whole appreciatively, historically, synthetically, as a musician listens to a symphony, as a spectator watches a drama. Now you shall seem to have seen, in phenomenal form, a story.
In The Spirit of Modern Philosophy: An Essay in the Form of Lectures (1892), 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Chick (3)  |  Condense (6)  |  Contain (37)  |  Description (72)  |  Develop (55)  |  Drama (10)  |  Egg (41)  |  Event (97)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fluid (18)  |  Form (210)  |  History (302)  |  Instant (10)  |  Life (917)  |  Listen (26)  |  Make (23)  |  Matter (270)  |  Million (89)  |  Move (58)  |  Musician (11)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Pass (60)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physical (94)  |  Planet (199)  |  Pure (62)  |  Series (38)  |  Set (56)  |  Space (154)  |  Spectator (6)  |  State (96)  |  Story (58)  |  Symphony (4)  |  Time (439)  |  Watch (39)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

Geometrical axioms are neither synthetic a priori conclusions nor experimental facts. They are conventions: our choice, amongst all possible conventions, is guided by experimental facts; but it remains free, and is only limited by the necessity of avoiding all contradiction. ... In other words, axioms of geometry are only definitions in disguise.
That being so what ought one to think of this question: Is the Euclidean Geometry true?
The question is nonsense. One might as well ask whether the metric system is true and the old measures false; whether Cartesian co-ordinates are true and polar co-ordinates false.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Amongst (2)  |  Ask (99)  |  Avoid (34)  |  Axiom (26)  |  Cartesian (2)  |  Choice (64)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Convention (13)  |  Definition (152)  |  Disguise (8)  |  Euclidean (2)  |  Experimental (12)  |  Fact (609)  |  False (79)  |  Free (59)  |  Geometrical (3)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Guide (46)  |  In Other Words (4)  |  Limit (86)  |  Measure (70)  |  Metric System (6)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Old (104)  |  Polar (2)  |  Possible (100)  |  Question (315)  |  Remain (77)  |  Think (205)  |  True (120)

Having discovered … by observation and comparison that certain objects agree in certain respects, we generalise the qualities in which they coincide,—that is, from a certain number of individual instances we infer a general law; we perform an act of Induction. This induction is erroneously viewed as analytic; it is purely a synthetic process.
In Lecture VI of his Biennial Course, by William Hamilton and Henry L. Mansel (ed.) and John Veitch (ed.), Metaphysics (1860), Vol. 1, 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (19)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Coincide (4)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Discover (115)  |  Erroneous (3)  |  General (92)  |  Generalize (9)  |  Individual (177)  |  Induction (45)  |  Infer (10)  |  Instance (18)  |  Law (418)  |  Object (110)  |  Observation (418)  |  Process (201)  |  Pure (62)  |  Quality (65)  |  View (115)

Melvin Calvin was a fearless scientist, totally unafraid to venture into new fields such as hot atom chemistry, carcinogenesis, chemical evolution and the origin of life, organic geochemistry, immunochemistry, petroleum production from plants, farming, Moon rock analysis, and development of novel synthetic biomembrane models for plant photosystems.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Atom (251)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Carcinogenesis (2)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Development (228)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Farm (17)  |  Fearless (5)  |  Field (119)  |  Hot (17)  |  Immunochemistry (2)  |  Model (64)  |  Moon (132)  |  New (340)  |  Novel (16)  |  Organic (48)  |  Origin Of Life (32)  |  Petroleum (7)  |  Plant (173)  |  Production (105)  |  Rock (107)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Venture (12)

The effort to eliminate synthetic pesticides because of unsubstantiated fears about residues in food will make fruits and vegetables more expensive, decrease consumption, and thus increase cancer rates. The levels of synthetic pesticide residues are trivial in comparison to natural chemicals, and thus their potential for cancer causation is extremely low. [Ames believes that “to eat your veggies” is the best way to prevent cancer.]
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has written a similar sentiment in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (44)  |  Causation (6)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Consumption (11)  |  Decrease (11)  |  Effort (94)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Expense (10)  |  Fear (113)  |  Food (139)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Increase (107)  |  Level (51)  |  Natural (128)  |  Pesticide (4)  |  Potential (34)  |  Rate (22)  |  Residue (6)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Vegetable (19)

The glimpses of chemical industry's services to man afforded by this book could be presented only by utilizing innumerable chemical products. The first outline of its plan began to take shape on chemically produced notepaper with the aid of a chemically-treated graphite held in a synthetic resin pencil. Early corrections were made with erasers of chemically compounded rubber. In its ultimate haven on the shelves of your bookcase, it will rest on a coating of chemical varnish behind a pane of chemically produced glass. Nowhere has it been separated from that industry's products.
Man in a Chemical World (1937), L'Envoi, 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Correction (28)  |  Eraser (2)  |  Glass (35)  |  Graphite (2)  |  Industry (91)  |  Paper (52)  |  Pencil (7)  |  Product (72)  |  Resin (2)  |  Rubber (3)  |  Shelf (5)

The great masters of modern analysis are Lagrange, Laplace, and Gauss, who were contemporaries. It is interesting to note the marked contrast in their styles. Lagrange is perfect both in form and matter, he is careful to explain his procedure, and though his arguments are general they are easy to follow. Laplace on the other hand explains nothing, is indifferent to style, and, if satisfied that his results are correct, is content to leave them either with no proof or with a faulty one. Gauss is as exact and elegant as Lagrange, but even more difficult to follow than Laplace, for he removes every trace of the analysis by which he reached his results, and studies to give a proof which while rigorous shall be as concise and synthetical as possible.
History of Mathematics (3rd Ed., 1901), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Anecdote (17)  |  Concise (4)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Content (39)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Correct (53)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Easy (56)  |  Elegant (8)  |  Exact (38)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Faulty (2)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (55)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (11)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (50)  |  Leave (63)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Proof (192)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Remove (18)  |  Result (250)  |  Rigor (12)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Style (15)

This whole period was a golden age of immunology, an age abounding in important synthetic discoveries all over the world, a time we all thought it was good to be alive. We, who were working on these problems, all knew each other and met as often as we could to exchange ideas and hot news from the laboratory.
In Memoir of a Thinking Radish: An Autobiography (1986), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (591)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Golden Age (5)  |  Idea (440)  |  Immunology (13)  |  Important (124)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  News (12)  |  Problem (362)  |  World (667)

We speak erroneously of “artificial” materials, “synthetics”, and so forth. The basis for this erroneous terminology is the notion that Nature has made certain things which we call natural, and everything else is “man-made”, ergo artificial. But what one learns in chemistry is that Nature wrote all the rules of structuring; man does not invent chemical structuring rules; he only discovers the rules. All the chemist can do is find out what Nature permits, and any substances that are thus developed or discovered are inherently natural. It is very important to remember that.
From 'The Comprehensive Man', Ideas and Integrities: A Spontaneous Autobiographical Disclosure (1963), 75-76.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (26)  |  Basis (60)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Development (228)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Find (248)  |  Importance (183)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Invention (283)  |  Learning (174)  |  Man-Made (4)  |  Material (124)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Notion (32)  |  Permit (20)  |  Remember (53)  |  Rule (135)  |  Structure (191)  |  Substance (73)  |  Terminology (7)  |  Writing (72)

When we understand how animals are resistant to chemicals, the mechanisms are all independent of whether its natural or synthetic. And in fact, when you look at natural chemicals, half of those tested come out positive.
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has written a similar sentiment in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Independent (41)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Natural (128)  |  Positive (28)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Test (96)  |  Understanding (317)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Aim (58)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Analyze (3)  |  Answer (201)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arise (32)  |  Belief (400)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Break (33)  |  Briefly (3)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Conform (5)  |  Connect (15)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Construction (69)  |  Country (121)  |  Decision (58)  |  Define (29)  |  Definite (27)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demand (52)  |  Deny (29)  |  Describe (38)  |  Design (92)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dominate (13)  |  Easy (56)  |  Element (129)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exclusion (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Human (445)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instance (18)  |  Intention (25)  |  Learn (160)  |  Likely (23)  |  Merely (35)  |  Method (154)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Movement (65)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Observe (48)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Part (146)  |  Path (59)  |  Pattern (56)  |  People (269)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Problem (362)  |  Produce (63)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Raise (20)  |  Reckon (6)  |  Region (26)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Result (250)  |  Room (29)  |  Seek (57)  |  Seem (89)  |  Show (55)  |  Single (72)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Sciences (4)  |  Society (188)  |  Sort (32)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Technical (26)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Thought (374)  |  Totality (9)  |  Track (9)  |  Traverse (4)  |  Try (103)  |  Type (34)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wild (39)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.