Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index V > Category: Violence

Violence Quotes (34 quotes)

Nature and nurture are an inseparable blend of influences that work together to produce our behavior. A growing band of researchers are demonstrating that the bedrock of behaviors that make up the concerns of everyday life, such as sex, language, cooperation, and violence have been carved out by evolution over the eons, and this Stone Age legacy continues to influence modern life today.
In Stone Age Present: How Evolution Has Shaped Modern Life: From Sex, Violence and Language to Emotions, Morals and Communities, (1995), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Bedrock (2)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Blend (9)  |  Concern (228)  |  Continue (165)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Eon (11)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Growing (98)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Language (293)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Life (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Sex (69)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stone Age (12)  |  Today (314)  |  Together (387)  |  Work (1351)

CLAUDIO: Death is a fearful thing.
ISABELLA: And shamed life a hateful.
CLAUDIO: Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot;
This sensible warm motion to become
A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit
To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice;
To be imprisioned in the viewless winds,
And blown with restless violence round about
The pendant world; or to be worst than worst
Of those lawless and incertain thought
Imagine howling—'tis too horrible!
The weariest and most loathed worldly life
That age, ache, penury, and imprisionment
Can lay on nature is a paradise
To what we fear of death.
Measure for Measure (1604), III, i.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Become (815)  |  Cold (112)  |  Death (388)  |  Delight (108)  |  Fear (197)  |  Flood (50)  |  Ice (54)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Paradise (13)  |  Penury (3)  |  Reside (25)  |  Rot (9)  |  Rotting (2)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wind (128)  |  World (1774)  |  Worst (57)

Even bigger machines, entailing even bigger concentrations of economic power and exerting ever greater violence against the environment, do not represent progress: they are a denial of wisdom. Wisdom demands a new orientation of science and technology tow
Small is Beautiful (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Big (48)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Demand (123)  |  Denial (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Entail (4)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exert (39)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Machine (257)  |  New (1216)  |  Orientation (3)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Represent (155)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Technology (257)  |  Wisdom (221)

Geologists have usually had recourse for the explanation of these changes to the supposition of sundry violent and extraordinary catastrophes, cataclysms, or general revolutions having occurred in the physical state of the earth's surface.
As the idea imparted by the term Cataclysm, Catastrophe, or Revolution, is extremely vague, and may comprehend any thing you choose to imagine, it answers for the time very well as an explanation; that is, it stops further inquiry. But it also has had the disadvantage of effectually stopping the advance of science, by involving it in obscurity and confusion.
Considerations on Volcanoes (1825), iv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Answer (366)  |  Cataclysm (2)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Choose (112)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  General (511)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impart (23)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Physical (508)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Stop (80)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surface (209)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vagueness (15)

I am not ... asserting that humans are either genial or aggressive by inborn biological necessity. Obviously, both kindness and violence lie with in the bounds of our nature because we perpetrate both, in spades. I only advance a structural claim that social stability rules nearly all the time and must be based on an overwhelmingly predominant (but tragically ignored) frequency of genial acts, and that geniality is therefore our usual and preferred response nearly all the time ... The center of human nature is rooted in ten thousand ordinary acts of kindness that define our days.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Advance (280)  |  Aggressive (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Base (117)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Bound (119)  |  Bounds (7)  |  Center (33)  |  Claim (146)  |  Define (49)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Genial (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Inborn (4)  |  Kindness (14)  |  Lie (364)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Overwhelmingly (3)  |  Perpetrate (3)  |  Predominant (3)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Response (53)  |  Root (120)  |  Rule (294)  |  Social (252)  |  Spade (3)  |  Stability (25)  |  Structural (29)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)

If one of these elements, heat, becomes predominant in any body whatsoever, it destroys and dissolves all the others with its violence. …Again if too much moisture enters the channels of a body, and thus introduces disproportion, the other elements, adulterated by the liquid, are impaired, and the virtues of the mixture dissolved. This defect, in turn, may arise from the cooling properties of moist winds and breezes blowing upon the body. In the same way, increase or diminution of the proportion of air or of the earthy which is natural to the body may enfeeble the other elements.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 4, Sec. 6. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Body (537)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Defect (31)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Element (310)  |  Enter (141)  |  Heat (174)  |  Impair (3)  |  Increase (210)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Moist (12)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phlogiston Theory (2)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Turn (447)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Wind (128)

In attempting to explain geological phenomena, the bias has always been on the wrong side; there has always been a disposition to reason á priori on the extraordinary violence and suddenness of changes, both in the inorganic crust of the earth, and in organic types, instead of attempting strenuously to frame theories in accordance with the ordinary operations of nature.
Letter to Rev. W. Whewell (7 Mar 1837). Quoted in Mrs Lyell (ed.), Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart (1881), Vol. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Bias (20)  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Crust (38)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organic (158)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Reason (744)  |  Side (233)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Type (167)  |  Wrong (234)

Invention is an Heroic thing, and plac'd above the reach of a low, and vulgar Genius. It requires an active, a bold, a nimble, a restless mind: a thousand difficulties must be contemn'd with which a mean heart would be broken: many attempts must be made to no purpose: much Treasure must sometimes be scatter'd without any return: much violence, and vigour of thoughts must attend it: some irregularities, and excesses must be granted it, that would hardly be pardon'd by the severe Rules of Prudence.
The History of the Royal Society (1667), 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bold (22)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Broken (56)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Excess (22)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grant (73)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Invention (369)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Low (80)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pardon (7)  |  Prudence (4)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reach (281)  |  Require (219)  |  Restlessness (7)  |  Return (124)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vulgar (33)

It has the property of detonating very violently in certain circumstances. On one occasion a small amount of ether solution of pyroglycerin condensed in a glass bowl. ... When the bowl was heated over a spirit lamp, an extremely violent explosion occurred, which shattered it into small fragments. On another occasion a drop was heated in a test-tube, and exploded with such violence that the glass splinters cut deep into my face and hands, and hurt other people who were standing some distance off in the room.
[Describing early experiments on his discovery of nitroglycerin.]
From speech to the Royal Academy of Turin (1847). In Robert Shaplen, 'Annals of Science, Adventures of a Pacifist,' The New Yorker (15 Mar 1958), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Amount (151)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Cut (114)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detonation (2)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drop (76)  |  Early (185)  |  Ether (35)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exploded (11)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Face (212)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Glass (92)  |  Heat (174)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Property (168)  |  Shattered (8)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)

It is hard to tell what causes the pervasive timidity. One thinks of video-induced stupor, intake of tranquilizers, fear of not living to enjoy the many new possessions and toys, the example of our betters in cities and on campuses who high-mindedly surrender to threats of violence and make cowardice fashionable.
In 'Thoughts on the Present', First Things, Last Things (1971), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Cause (541)  |  City (78)  |  Cowardice (2)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Example (94)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hard (243)  |  High (362)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  New (1216)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Possession (65)  |  Stupor (2)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Threat (30)  |  Timidity (5)  |  Toy (19)  |  Tranquilizer (4)

Like the furtive collectors of stolen art, we [cell biologists] are forced to be lonely admirers of spectacular architecture, exquisite symmetry, dramas of violence and death, mobility, self-sacrifice and, yes, rococo sex.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirer (9)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Art (657)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cell (138)  |  Collector (9)  |  Death (388)  |  Drama (21)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Force (487)  |  Furtive (2)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Mobility (11)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Sacrifice (5)  |  Sex (69)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Steal (13)  |  Symmetry (43)

My passion for social justice has often brought me into conflict with people, as did my aversion to any obligation and dependence I do not regard as absolutely necessary. I always have a high regard for the individual and have an insuperable distaste for violence and clubmanship.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Bring (90)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Distaste (3)  |  Do (1908)  |  High (362)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insuperable (3)  |  Justice (39)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Often (106)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Regard (305)  |  Social (252)

Non-violence … is the only thing that the atom bomb cannot destroy.
In William Borman, Gandhi and Non-Violence (1986), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Thing (1915)

None but a naturalist can understand the intense excitement I experienced when I at length captured it [a hitherto unknown species of butterfly]. On taking it out of my net and opening the glorious wings, my heart began to beat, violently, the blood rushed to my head, and I felt much more like fainting than I have done when in apprehension of immediate death. I had a headache the rest of the day, so great was the excitement produced by what will appear to most people a very inadequate cause.
The Malay Archipelago (1890), 257-258.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Beat (41)  |  Blood (134)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Cause (541)  |  Death (388)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Great (1574)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  People (1005)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rest (280)  |  Species (401)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)

One [idea] was that the Universe started its life a finite time ago in a single huge explosion, and that the present expansion is a relic of the violence of this explosion. This big bang idea seemed to me to be unsatisfactory even before detailed examination showed that it leads to serious difficulties.
In radio talk on the BBC Third Programme, as subsequently printed in the BBC’s The Listener magazine (9 Mar 1950), Vol.43, 420. This was his further use of the term “big bang” that he first expressed in a radio talk on 28 Mar 1949.
Science quotes on:  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Creation (327)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Finite (59)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Present (619)  |  Relic (6)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Start (221)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unsatisfactory (3)

Peace cannot be achieved through violence, it can only be attained through understanding.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Attain (125)  |  Peace (108)  |  Through (849)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Reason is always a kind of brute force; those who appeal to the head rather than the heart, however pallid and polite, are necessarily men of violence. We speak of “touching” a man’s heart, but we can do nothing to his head but hit it.
From 'Charles II', Twelve Types (1906), 98.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Brute (28)  |  Brute Force (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Force (487)  |  Head (81)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hit (20)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Polite (9)  |  Reason (744)  |  Speak (232)  |  Touching (16)

Science would have us believe that such accuracy, leading to certainty, is the only criterion of knowledge, would make the trial of Galileo the paradigm of the two points of view which aspire to truth, would suggest, that is, that the cardinals represent only superstition and repression, while Galileo represents freedom. But there is another criterion which is systematically neglected in this elevation of science. Man does not now—and will not ever—live by the bread of scientific method alone. He must deal with life and death, with love and cruelty and despair, and so must make conjectures of great importance which may or may not be true and which do not lend themselves to experimentation: It is better to give than to receive; Love thy neighbor as thyself; Better to risk slavery through non-violence than to defend freedom with murder. We must deal with such propositions, must decide whether they are true, whether to believe them, whether to act on them—and scientific method is no help for by their nature these matters lie forever beyond the realm of science.
In The End of the Modern Age (1973), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bread (39)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Deal (188)  |  Death (388)  |  Decide (41)  |  Despair (40)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Experimentation (7)  |  Forever (103)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Paradigm (14)  |  Point (580)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Realm (85)  |  Receive (114)  |  Represent (155)  |  Repression (3)  |  Risk (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

Should the research worker of the future discover some means of releasing this [atomic] energy in a form which could be employed, the human race will have at its command powers beyond the dream of scientific fiction, but the remotest possibility must always be considered that the energy once liberated will be completely uncontrollable and by its intense violence detonate all neighbouring substances. In this event, the whole of the hydrogen on earth might be transformed at once and the success of the experiment published at large to the universe as a new star.
'Mass Spectra and Isotopes', Nobel Lecture, 12 December 1922. In Nobel Lectures, Chemistry, 1922-1941 (1966), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Command (58)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consider (416)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dream (208)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employ (113)  |  Energy (344)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Large (394)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Star (427)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Transform (73)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Sir how pitiable is it to reflect, that altho you were so fully convinced of the benevolence of the Father of mankind, and of his equal and impartial distribution of those rights and privileges which he had conferred upon them, that you should at the Same time counteract his mercies, in detaining by fraud and violence so numerous a part of my brethren under groaning captivity and cruel oppression, that you should at the Same time be found guilty of that most criminal act, which you professedly detested in others, with respect to yourselves.
In Letter to Thomas Jefferson (19 Aug 1791). In John Hazlehurst Boneval Latrobe, Memoir of Benjamin Banneker: Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, at the Monthly Meeting, May 1, 1845 (1845), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Captivity (2)  |  Conferred (2)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Counteract (4)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Detest (5)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Equal (83)  |  Father (110)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Groan (5)  |  Guilt (14)  |  Impartial (4)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Most (1731)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Oppression (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pity (14)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Profess (20)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Slave (37)  |  Time (1877)

Taken on the whole, I would believe that Gandhi’s views were the most enlightened of all the political men in our time. We should strive to do things in his spirit ... not to use violence in fighting for our cause, but by non-participation in what we believe is evil.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fight (44)  |  Most (1731)  |  Participation (15)  |  Political (121)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strive (46)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

The injurious agent in cigarettes comes principally from the burning paper wrapper. The substance thereby formed is called “acrolein.” It has a violent action on the nerve centers, producing degeneration of the cells of the brain, which is quite rapid among boys. Unlike most narcotics, this degeneration is permanent and uncontrollable. I employ no person who smokes cigarettes.
[From the Laboratory of Thomas A. Edison, Orange, N.J., April 26, 1914.]
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Agent (70)  |  April (9)  |  Boy (94)  |  Brain (270)  |  Burning (48)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Degeneration (10)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Injurious (14)  |  Injury (36)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Orange (14)  |  Paper (182)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Person (363)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoker (3)  |  Substance (248)  |  Uncontrollable (4)

The terror of the atom age is not the violence of the new power but the speed of man’s adjustment to it—the speed of his acceptance.
In 'The Age of Dust', collected in Second Tree From the Corner (1954), 115.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  Age (499)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  Power (746)  |  Speed (65)  |  Terror (30)

The unavoidable conclusion is that the unprecedented meekness of the majority is responsible for the increase in violence. Social stability is the product of an equilibrium between a vigorous majority and violent minorities. Disorder does not come from an increased inner pressure or from the interaction of explosive ingredients. There is no reason to believe that the nature of the violent minorities is now greatly different from what it was in the past. What has changed is the will and ability of the majority to react.
In 'Thoughts on the Present', First Things, Last Things (1971), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Belief (578)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Different (577)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Increase (210)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Majority (66)  |  Meekness (2)  |  Minority (21)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Past (337)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Product (160)  |  React (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Social (252)  |  Stability (25)  |  Unavoidable (3)  |  Unprecedented (11)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Violent (17)  |  Will (2355)

The violence in the world comes about because we human beings are forever creating barriers between men who are like us and men who are not like us.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrier (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Create (235)  |  Forever (103)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  World (1774)

The [mechanical] bird I have described ought to be able by the help of the wind to rise to a great height, and this will prove to be its safety; since even if… revolutions [of the winds] were to befall it, it would still have time to regain a condition of equilibrium; provided that its various parts have a great power of resistance, so that they can safely withstand the fury and violence of the descent, by the aid of the defenses which I have mentioned; and its joints should be made of strong tanned hide, and sewn with cords of strong raw silk. And let no one encumber himself with iron bands, for these are very soon broken at the joints or else they become worn out, and consequently it is well not to encumber oneself with them.
'Of the Bird’s Movement' from Sul Voio degli Uccelli, 8 [7] r. in Leonardo da Vinci's Notebooks, trans. E. MacCurdy (1906), 153-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Become (815)  |  Bird (149)  |  Broken (56)  |  Condition (356)  |  Defense (23)  |  Descent (27)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Flight (98)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hide (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Iron (96)  |  Joint (31)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Mention (82)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Power (746)  |  Prove (250)  |  Raw (28)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rise (166)  |  Safety (54)  |  Silk (13)  |  Soon (186)  |  Still (613)  |  Strong (174)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)

This topic brings me to that worst outcrop of the herd nature, the military system, which I abhor. That a man can take pleasure in marching in formation to the strains of a band is enough to make me despise him. He has only been given his big brain by mistake; a backbone was all he needed. This plague-spot of civilisation ought to be abolished with all possible speed. Heroism by order, senseless violence, and all the pestilent nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism–how I hate them! War seems to me a mean, contemptible thing: I would rather be hacked in pieces than take part in such an abominable business.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abhor (6)  |  Abolish (12)  |  Abominable (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Backbone (9)  |  Bad (180)  |  Band (9)  |  Big (48)  |  Brain (270)  |  Bring (90)  |  Business (149)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Despise (13)  |  Enough (340)  |  Formation (96)  |  Give (202)  |  Hack (3)  |  Hate (64)  |  Herd (15)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Man (2251)  |  March (46)  |  Mean (809)  |  Military (40)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Order (632)  |  Part (222)  |  Patriotism (7)  |  Pestilent (2)  |  Piece (38)  |  Plague (41)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Possible (552)  |  Seem (145)  |  Senseless (3)  |  Speed (65)  |  Strain (11)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Topic (21)  |  War (225)  |  Worst (57)

Those who suggest that the “dark ages” were a time of violence and superstition would do well to remember the appalling cruelties of our own time, truly without parallel in past ages, as well as the fact that the witch-hunts were not strictly speaking a medieval phenomenon but belong rather to the so-called Renaissance.
From Interview (2003) on the Exhibition, 'Il Medioevo Europeo di Jacques le Goff' (The European Middle Ages by Jacques Le Goff), at Parma, Italy (27 Sep 2003—11 Jan 2004). Published among web pages about the Exhibition, that were on the website of the Province of Parma.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Belong (162)  |  Call (769)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Medieval (10)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Past (337)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Remember (179)  |  Renaissance (14)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)

Typhoons are a sort of violent whirlwinds. Before these whirlwinds come on... there appears a heavy cloud to the northeast which is very black near the horizon, but toward the upper part is a dull reddish color. The tempest came with great violence, but after a while, the winds ceased all at once and a calm succeeded. This lasted... an hour, more or less, then the gales were turned around, blowing with great fury from the southwest.
from A New Voyage Round the World (1697)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Calm (31)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Dull (54)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hour (186)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Turn (447)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)

Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.
In Foundation: Foundation and Empire: Second Foundation (1951, 2010), 104
Science quotes on:  |  Incompetent (4)  |  Last (426)  |  Refuge (15)

We are many small puppets moved by fate and fortune through strings unseen by us; therefore, if it is so as I think, one has to prepare oneself with a good heart and indifference to accept things coming towards us, because they cannot be avoided, and to oppose them requires a violence that tears our souls too deeply, and it seems that both fortune and men are always busy in affairs for our dislike because the former is blind and the latter only think of their interest.
'Letter to Bellini' (17 Oct 1689), in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), The Correspondence of Marcello Malpighi (1975), Vol. 4, 1534.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Affair (29)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Both (493)  |  Coming (114)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Fate (72)  |  Former (137)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Heart (229)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Interest (386)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Puppet (3)  |  Require (219)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  String (21)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Unseen (22)

We have the opportunity of observing her [Nature] through these delicate and pellucid teguments of the bodies of Insects acting according to her usual course and way, undisturbed, whereas when we endeavour to pry into her secrets by breaking open the doors upon her, and dissecting and mangling creatures whil'st there is life yet within them, we find her indeed at work, but put into such disorder by the violence offer'd, as it may easily be imagin'd how differing a thing we should find, if we could, as we can with a Microscope, in these smaller creatures, quietly peep in at the windows, without frighting her out of her usual byas.
Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries thereupon (1665), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Door (93)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Find (998)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Secret (194)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)  |  Window (58)  |  Work (1351)

What if angry vectors veer
Round your sleeping head, and form.
There’s never need to fear
Violence of the poor world’s abstract storm.
Poem, 'Lullaby: Smile in Sleep' (1957). In John D. Burt (ed.), The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren (1998), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Angry (8)  |  Fear (197)  |  Form (959)  |  Head (81)  |  Need (290)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poor (136)  |  Round (26)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Storm (51)  |  Vector (6)  |  Veer (2)  |  World (1774)

…the Form or true definition of heat … is in few words as follows: Heat is a motion; expansive, restrained, and acting in its strife upon the smaller particles of bodies. But the expansion is thus modified; while it expands all ways, it has at the same time an inclination upward. And the struggle in the particles is modified also; it is not sluggish, but hurried and with violence.
Novum Organum (1620), Book 2, Aphorism 20. Translated as 'First Vintage Concerning the Form of Heat', The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 154-5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Definition (221)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Expansive (5)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Motion (310)  |  Particle (194)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Time (1877)  |  Upward (43)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.