Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Disadvantage

Disadvantage Quotes (8 quotes)

For this we must make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague?
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Automatic (13)  |  Guard (12)  |  Habit (78)  |  Plague (34)  |  Useful (66)

Geologists have usually had recourse for the explanation of these changes to the supposition of sundry violent and extraordinary catastrophes, cataclysms, or general revolutions having occurred in the physical state of the earth's surface.
As the idea imparted by the term Cataclysm, Catastrophe, or Revolution, is extremely vague, and may comprehend any thing you choose to imagine, it answers for the time very well as an explanation; that is, it stops further inquiry. But it also has had the disadvantage of effectually stopping the advance of science, by involving it in obscurity and confusion.
Considerations on Volcanoes (1825), iv.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Answer (201)  |  Catastrophe (17)  |  Change (291)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Earth (487)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impart (2)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Obscurity (18)  |  Recourse (6)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Science (1699)  |  State (96)  |  Stop (56)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Surface (74)  |  Term (87)  |  Vagueness (8)  |  Violence (20)

If the resident zoologist of Galaxy X had visited the earth 5 million years ago while making his inventory of inhabited planets in the universe, he would surely have corrected his earlier report that apes showed more promise than Old World monkeys and noted that monkeys had overcome an original disadvantage to gain domination among primates. (He will confirm this statement after his visit next year–but also add a footnote that one species from the ape bush has enjoyed an unusual and unexpected flowering, thus demanding closer monitoring.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Ape (39)  |  Bush (8)  |  Close (40)  |  Confirm (12)  |  Correct (53)  |  Demand (52)  |  Domination (12)  |  Early (39)  |  Earth (487)  |  Enjoy (23)  |  Flower (65)  |  Footnote (4)  |  Gain (48)  |  Galaxy (38)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Inventory (6)  |  Million (89)  |  Monitor (5)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Next (23)  |  Note (22)  |  Old World (3)  |  Original (36)  |  Overcome (8)  |  Planet (199)  |  Primate (8)  |  Promise (27)  |  Report (31)  |  Show (55)  |  Species (181)  |  Statement (56)  |  Surely (13)  |  Unexpected (26)  |  Universe (563)  |  Unusual (13)  |  Visit (15)  |  X (2)  |  Year (214)  |  Zoologist (10)

It is not always the most brilliant speculations nor the choice of the most exotic materials that is most profitable. I prefer Monsieur de Reaumur busy exterminating moths by means of an oily fleece; or increasing fowl production by making them hatch without the help of their mothers, than Monsieur Bemouilli absorbed in algebra, or Monsieur Leibniz calculating the various advantages and disadvantages of the possible worlds.
Spectacle, 1, 475. Quoted in Camille Limoges, 'Noel-Antoine Pluche', in C. C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974 ), Vol. 11, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Algebra (36)  |  Brilliance (8)  |  Choice (64)  |  Exotic (4)  |  Extermination (10)  |  Fleece (2)  |  Fowl (3)  |  Hatch (2)  |  Help (68)  |  Increase (107)  |  Incubation (2)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (27)  |  Material (124)  |  Moth (3)  |  Mother (59)  |  Oil (37)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Production (105)  |  Profit (28)  |  Speculation (77)  |  World (667)

Science is neither a single tradition, nor the best tradition there is, except for people who have become accustomed to its presence, its benefits and its disadvantages. In a democracy it should be separated from the state just as churches are now separated from the state.
Against Method, p. 238 (1975).The author's warning against allowing scientists to become the new 'high priests' of society.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustomed (8)  |  Become (100)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Best (129)  |  Church (30)  |  Democracy (21)  |  People (269)  |  Presence (26)  |  Science (1699)  |  Separate (46)  |  Single (72)  |  State (96)  |  Tradition (43)

The story is told of Lord Kelvin, a famous Scotch physicist of the last century, that after he had given a lecture on atoms and molecules, one of his students came to him with the question, “Professor, what is your idea of the structure of the atom.”
“What,” said Kelvin, “The structure of the atom? Why, don’t you know, the very word ‘atom’ means the thing that can’t be cut. How then can it have a structure?”
“That,” remarked the facetious young man, “shows the disadvantage of knowing Greek.”
As described in 'Assault on Atoms' (Read 23 Apr 1931 at Symposium—The Changing World) Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1931), 70, No. 3, 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Century (94)  |  Cut (36)  |  Facetious (2)  |  Greek (46)  |  Idea (440)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (50)  |  Know (321)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Professor (39)  |  Question (315)  |  Scottish (2)  |  Story (58)  |  Structure (191)  |  Student (131)  |  Word (221)

There was yet another disadvantage attaching to the whole of Newton’s physical inquiries, ... the want of an appropriate notation for expressing the conditions of a dynamical problem, and the general principles by which its solution must be obtained. By the labours of LaGrange, the motions of a disturbed planet are reduced with all their complication and variety to a purely mathematical question. It then ceases to be a physical problem; the disturbed and disturbing planet are alike vanished: the ideas of time and force are at an end; the very elements of the orbit have disappeared, or only exist as arbitrary characters in a mathematical formula
Address to the Mechanics Institute, 'An Address on the Genius and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton' (1835), excerpted in paper by Luis M. Laita, Luis de Ledesma, Eugenio Roanes-Lozano and Alberto Brunori, 'George Boole, a Forerunner of Symbolic Computation', collected in John A. Campbell and Eugenio Roanes-Lozano (eds.), Artificial Intelligence and Symbolic Computation: International Conference AISC 2000 (2001), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Character (82)  |  Complication (20)  |  Condition (119)  |  Disappearance (21)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Dynamics (6)  |  Expression (82)  |  Force (194)  |  Formula (51)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (11)  |  Motion (127)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Notation (9)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Planet (199)  |  Problem (362)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Question (315)  |  Solution (168)  |  Time (439)  |  Vanishing (8)  |  Variety (53)

Why has elegance found so little following? Elegance has the disadvantage that hard work is needed to achieve it and a good education to appreciate it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Appreciate (17)  |  Education (280)  |  Elegance (20)  |  Find (248)  |  Follow (66)  |  Good (228)  |  Hard Work (3)  |  Little (126)  |  Need (211)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.