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Home > Dictionary of Science Quotations > Scientist Names Index W > Wiliam F. White Quotes

Wiliam F. White
( - 29 Nov 1908)

mathematician who was the head of the department of mathematics in the State Normal School at New Paltz, New York. He wrote A Scrap Book of Elementary Mathematics (1908), a collection of essays, recreations and notes on mathematical topics, presented in a somewhat humorous style.

Science Quotes by Wiliam F. White (7 quotes)

If the Indians hadn’t spent the $24. In 1626 Peter Minuit, first governor of New Netherland, purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for about $24. … Assume for simplicity a uniform rate of 7% from 1626 to the present, and suppose that the Indians had put their $24 at [compound] interest at that rate …. What would be the amount now, after 280 years? 24 x (1.07)280 = more than 4,042,000,000.
The latest tax assessment available at the time of writing gives the realty for the borough of Manhattan as $3,820,754,181. This is estimated to be 78% of the actual value, making the actual value a little more than $4,898,400,000.
The amount of the Indians’ money would therefore be more than the present assessed valuation but less than the actual valuation.
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 47-48.
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Behind the artisan is the chemist, behind the chemist a physicist, behind the physicist a mathematician.
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Artisan (9)  |  Behind (137)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Physicist (260)

Mathematics is the science of definiteness, the necessary vocabulary of those who know.
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Definite (110)  |  Know (1519)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Science (3880)  |  Vocabulary (8)

Mathematics, the science of the ideal, becomes the means of investigating, understanding and making known the world of the real. The complex is expressed in terms of the simple. From one point of view mathematics may be defined as the science of successive substitutions of simpler concepts for more complex.
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics (1908), 215.
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One rarely hears of the mathematical recitation as a preparation for public speaking. Yet mathematics shares with these studies [foreign languages, drawing and natural science] their advantages, and has another in a higher degree than either of them.
Most readers will agree that a prime requisite for healthful experience in public speaking is that the attention of the speaker and hearers alike be drawn wholly away from the speaker and concentrated upon the thought. In perhaps no other classroom is this so easy as in the mathematical, where the close reasoning, the rigorous demonstration, the tracing of necessary conclusions from given hypotheses, commands and secures the entire mental power of the student who is explaining, and of his classmates. In what other circumstances do students feel so instinctively that manner counts for so little and mind for so much? In what other circumstances, therefore, is a simple, unaffected, easy, graceful manner so naturally and so healthfully cultivated? Mannerisms that are mere affectation or the result of bad literary habit recede to the background and finally disappear, while those peculiarities that are the expression of personality and are inseparable from its activity continually develop, where the student frequently presents, to an audience of his intellectual peers, a connected train of reasoning. …
One would almost wish that our institutions of the science and art of public speaking would put over their doors the motto that Plato had over the entrance to his school of philosophy: “Let no one who is unacquainted with geometry enter here.”
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (135)  |  Alike (60)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (191)  |  Audience (26)  |  Background (43)  |  Bad (180)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Command (58)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Conclusion (255)  |  Connect (125)  |  Count (105)  |  Degree (275)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enter (142)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Experience (470)  |  Expression (176)  |  Feel (366)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hear (139)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Institution (68)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (708)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Most (1729)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peer (12)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosophy (382)  |  Plato (76)  |  Power (747)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Present (620)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recede (11)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Result (678)  |  Rigorous (49)  |  School (220)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Art (186)  |  Share (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (301)  |  Thought (954)  |  Train (114)  |  Unaffected (6)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2354)  |  Wish (212)

The beautiful has its place in mathematics as elsewhere. The prose of ordinary intercourse and of business correspondence might be held to be the most practical use to which language is put, but we should be poor indeed without the literature of imagination. Mathematics too has its triumphs of the Creative imagination, its beautiful theorems, its proofs and processes whose perfection of form has made them classic. He must be a “practical” man who can see no poetry in mathematics.
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (259)  |  Business (149)  |  Classic (11)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Creative (138)  |  Form (960)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Language (293)  |  Literature (105)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Most (1729)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Perfection (130)  |  Place (177)  |  Poetry (144)  |  Poor (136)  |  Practical (200)  |  Process (423)  |  Proof (289)  |  Prose (11)  |  See (1082)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Use (766)

The social sciences mathematically developed are to be the controlling factors in civilization.
— Wiliam F. White
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (206)  |  Control (167)  |  Develop (268)  |  Factor (46)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Science (3880)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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- 90 -
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- 80 -
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- 70 -
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- 60 -
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- 50 -
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- 40 -
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- 30 -
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- 20 -
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- 10 -
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