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Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Depression

Depression Quotes (15 quotes)

Concern should drive us into action, not into a depression.
The Collected Works of Karen Horney (1957), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Concern (76)

Depression is rage spread thin.
In Ashton Applewhite, William R. Evans and Andrew Frothingham, And I Quote (2003)

Hormones, vitamines, stimulants and depressives are oils upon the creaky machinery of life. Principal item, however, is the machinery.
Science quotes on:  |  Hormone (7)  |  Life (917)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Stimulant (3)  |  Vitamin (11)

I was depressed at that time. I was in analysis. I was suicidal as a matter of fact and would have killed myself, but I was in analysis with a strict Freudian, and, if you kill yourself, they make you pay for the sessions you miss.
As character Alvy Singer doing a stand-up comedy act to a college audience, in movie Annie Hall (1977). Screenplay by Woody Allen with Marshall Brickman, transcript printed in Four films of Woody Allen (1982), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Freudian (4)  |  Killed (2)  |  Missing (7)  |  Pay (30)  |  Session (2)  |  Strict (7)  |  Suicide (16)

If Melancholy increases so far, that from the great motion of the Liquid of the Brain the Patient be thrown into a wild Fury, it is call’d Madness.… The greatest Remedy for it is to throw the Patient unwarily into the Sea, and to keep him under Water as long as he can possibly bear without being quite stifled.
Aphorism No. 1118 and 1123 in Boerhaave’s Aphorisms: Concerning The Knowledge and Cure of Diseases (1715), 302-303.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Fury (5)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Madness (26)  |  Melancholy (8)  |  Motion (127)  |  Patient (116)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Sea (143)  |  Stifled (2)  |  Throw (31)  |  Water (244)  |  Wild (39)

If we admit our depression openly and freely, those around us get from it an experience of freedom rather than the depression itself.
Paulus Harper & Row 73
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Experience (268)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Freely (7)  |  Openly (2)

Iron and coal dominated everywhere, from grey to black: the black boots, the black stove-pipe hat, the black coach or carriage, the black iron frame of the hearth, the black cooking pots and pans and stoves. Was it a mourning? Was it protective coloration? Was it mere depression of the senses? No matter what the original color of the paleotechnic milieu might be it was soon reduced by reason of the soot and cinders that accompanied its activities, to its characteristic tones, grey, dirty-brown, black.
Technics and Civilisation (1934), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Black (27)  |  Brown (4)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Cinder (5)  |  Coal (41)  |  Color (78)  |  Dirty (7)  |  Domination (12)  |  Grey (6)  |  Hat (8)  |  Iron (53)  |  Milieu (2)  |  Paleotechnic (2)  |  Protection (23)  |  Reason (330)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Sense (240)  |  Soot (7)  |  Tone (7)

Our Generation has had no Great war, no Great Depression. Our war is spiritual. Our depression is our lives.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 30
Science quotes on:  |  Generation (111)  |  Great (300)  |  Live (186)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  War (144)

Suppose a number of equal waves of water to move upon the surface of a stagnant lake, with a certain constant velocity, and to enter a narrow channel leading out of the lake. Suppose then another similar cause to have excited another equal series of waves, which arrive at the same time, with the first. Neither series of waves will destroy the other, but their effects will be combined: if they enter the channel in such a manner that the elevations of one series coincide with those of the other, they must together produce a series of greater joint elevations; but if the elevations of one series are so situated as to correspond to the depressions of the other, they must exactly fill up those depressions. And the surface of the water must remain smooth; at least I can discover no alternative, either from theory or from experiment.
A Reply to the Animadversions of the Edinburgh Reviewers on Some Papers Published in the Philosophical Transactions (1804), 17-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (22)  |  Channel (17)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Combination (69)  |  Constant (40)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Elevation (4)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Greater (36)  |  Interference (12)  |  Lake (12)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Smooth (13)  |  Stagnant (3)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Surface (74)  |  Theory (582)  |  Velocity (14)  |  Water (244)  |  Wave (55)

The achievements of the Beagle did not just depend on FitzRoy’s skill as a hydrographer, nor on Darwin’s skill as a natural scientist, but on the thoroughly effective fashion in which everyone on board pulled together. Of course Darwin and FitzRoy had their quarrels, but all things considered, they were remarkably infrequent. To have shared such cramped quarters for nearly five years with a man often suffering from serious depression, prostrate part of the time with sea sickness, with so little friction, Darwin must have been one of the best-natured people ever! This is, indeed, apparent in his letters. And anyone who has participated in a scientific expedition will agree that when he wrote from Valparaiso in July 1834 that ‘The Captain keeps all smooth by rowing everyone in turn, which of course he has as much right to do as a gamekeeper to shoot partridges on the first of September’, he was putting a finger on an important ingredient in the Beagle’s success.
From Introduction to The Beagle Record (1979, 2012), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Beagle (11)  |  Biography (227)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Robert Fitzroy (3)  |  Importance (183)  |  Ingredient (10)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Partridge (2)  |  Quarrel (9)  |  Skill (50)  |  Success (202)

The idea that the bumps or depressions on a man's head indicate the presence or absence of certain moral characteristics in his mental equipment is one of the absurdities developed from studies in this field that has long since been discarded by science. The ideas of the phrenologist Gall, however ridiculous they may now seem in the light of a century's progress, were nevertheless destined to become metamorphosed into the modern principles of cerebral localization.
From 'Looking for "The Face Within the Face" in Man', in the New York Times, 4 Mar 1906, SM page 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (16)  |  Bump (2)  |  Cerebrum (6)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Development (228)  |  Discard (14)  |  Franz Joseph Gall (3)  |  Head (52)  |  Localization (2)  |  Metamorphosis (4)  |  Moral (100)  |  Phrenology (4)  |  Progress (317)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Study (331)

The land! That is where our roots are. There is the basis of our physical life. The farther we get away from the land, the greater our insecurity. From the land comes everything that supports life, everything we use for the service of physical life. The land has not collapsed or shrunk in either extent or productivity. It is there waiting to honor all the labor we are willing to invest in it, and able to tide us across any dislocation of economic conditions.
Advice during the Great Depression, placed in an advertisement, 'Henry Ford on Self-Help', Literary Digest (29 Jun 1932), 113, No. 12, 29, and various other magazines.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Basis (60)  |  Collapse (16)  |  Dislocation (2)  |  Distance (54)  |  Economy (46)  |  Extent (30)  |  Food Security (5)  |  Honor (21)  |  Insecurity (3)  |  Invest (9)  |  Labor (53)  |  Land (83)  |  Life (917)  |  Physical (94)  |  Productivity (13)  |  Root (48)  |  Service (54)  |  Shrink (10)  |  Support (63)

The sooner patients can be removed from the depressing influence of general hospital life the more rapid their convalescence.
Lancet (1916).
Science quotes on:  |  Hospital (33)  |  Influence (110)  |  Patient (116)  |  Rapidity (14)

The vacuum-apparatus requires that its manipulators constantly handle considerable amounts of mercury. Mercury is a strong poison, particularly dangerous because of its liquid form and noticeable volatility even at room temperature. Its poisonous character has been rather lost sight of during the present generation. My co-workers and myself found from personal experience-confirmed on many sides when published—that protracted stay in an atmosphere charged with only 1/100 of the amount of mercury required for its saturation, sufficed to induce chronic mercury poisoning. This first reveals itself as an affection of the nerves, causing headaches, numbness, mental lassitude, depression, and loss of memory; such are very disturbing to one engaged in intellectual occupations.
Hydrides of Boron and Silicon (1933), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Character (82)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Engagement (4)  |  Experience (268)  |  Generation (111)  |  Handling (7)  |  Headache (5)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Loss (62)  |  Manipulator (3)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mercury (39)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Occupation (37)  |  Poison (32)  |  Vacuum (29)  |  Volatility (3)  |  Worker (23)

[On mediocrity] What we have today is a retreat into low-level goodness. Men are all working hard building barbecues, being devoted to their wives and spending time with their children. Many of us feel, “We never had it so good!” After three wars and a depression, we’re impressed by the rising curve. All we want is it not to blow up.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Blow Up (4)  |  Child (189)  |  Curve (16)  |  Devote (23)  |  Good (228)  |  Goodness (9)  |  Impressed (10)  |  Low (16)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Retreat (9)  |  Rising (9)  |  Spend (24)  |  Time (439)  |  Want (120)  |  War (144)  |  Wife (18)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

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- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
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Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
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Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
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JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
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- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
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Richard Feynman
James Hutton
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Emile Durkheim
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Robert Oppenheimer
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Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
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Francis Bacon
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- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
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Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
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