Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Roll

Roll Quotes (40 quotes)

Copernicus, who rightly did condemn
This eldest systeme, form’d a wiser scheme;
In which he leaves the Sun at Rest, and rolls
The Orb Terrestial on its proper Poles;
Which makes the Night and Day by this Career,
And by its slow and crooked Course the Year.
The famous Dane, who oft the Modern guides,
To Earth and Sun their Provinces divides:
The Earth's Rotation makes the Night and Day,
The Sun revolving through th'Eccliptic Way
Effects the various seasons of the Year,
Which in their Turn for happy Ends appear.
This Scheme or that, which pleases best, embrace,
Still we the Fountain of their Motion trace.
Kepler asserts these Wonders may be done
By the Magnetic Vertue of the Sun,
Which he, to gain his End, thinks fit to place
Full in the Center of that mighty Space,
Which does the Spheres, where Planets roll, include,
And leaves him with Attractive Force endu'd.
The Sun, thus seated, by Mechanic Laws,
The Earth, and every distant Planet draws;
By which Attraction all the Planets found
Within his reach, are turn'd in Ether round.
In Creation: A Philosophical Poem in Seven Books (1712), book 2, l. 430-53, p.78-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Best (459)  |  Career (75)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Course (409)  |  Divide (75)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Embrace (46)  |  End (590)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fit (134)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gain (145)  |  Guide (97)  |  Happy (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Modern (385)  |  Motion (310)  |  Orb (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Please (65)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pole (46)  |  Proper (144)  |  Province (35)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Season (47)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Year (933)

A Canadian newspaperman said yesterday that this is the President's “Easter egghead roll on the White House lawn.” I want to deny that!
[Welcoming Nobel Prize winners as his guests at a White House dinner.]
Remarks at a dinner honoring Nobel Prize Winners of the Western Hemisphere (29 Apr 1962). From John T. Woolley and Gerhard Peters, The American Presidency Project [online].
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Deny (66)  |  Easter (4)  |  House (140)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  President (31)  |  Want (497)  |  White (127)  |  White House (4)  |  Yesterday (36)

A noteworthy and often-remarked similarity exists between the facts and methods of geology and those of linguistic study. The science of language is, as it were, the geology of the most modern period, the Age of the Man, having for its task to construct the history of development of the earth and its inhabitants from the time when the proper geological record remains silent … The remains of ancient speech are like strata deposited in bygone ages, telling of the forms of life then existing, and of the circumstances which determined or affected them; while words are as rolled pebbles, relics of yet more ancient formations, or as fossils, whose grade indicates the progress of organic life, and whose resemblances and relations show the correspondence or sequence of the different strata; while, everywhere, extensive denudation has marred the completeness of the record, and rendered impossible a detailed exhibition of the whole course of development.
In Language and the Study of Language (1867), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Course (409)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exhibition (7)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marred (3)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organic (158)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Period (198)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proper (144)  |  Record (154)  |  Remain (349)  |  Render (93)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Show (346)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Speech (61)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Study (653)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

A possible explanation for the observed excess noise is the one given by Dicke, Peebles, Roll, and Wilkinson (1965) in a companion letter in this issue.
[The low-key announcement of the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation which is the afterglow of the Big Bang. Co-author with Robert Wilson. They received the 1978 Nobel Prize for their discovery.]
'A measurement of excess antenna temperature at 4080 Mc/s'. In Astrophysical Journal (1965). Reprinted in R. B. Partridge, 3 K the cosmic microwave background radiation? (1995), Appendix A, 355.
Science quotes on:  |  Announcement (15)  |  Author (167)  |  Background (43)  |  Background Radiation (3)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Co-Author (2)  |  Companion (19)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Detection (16)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Excess (22)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Give (202)  |  Issue (42)  |  Letter (109)  |  Low (80)  |  Microwave (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Noise (37)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Possible (552)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Receive (114)

An antiquated Rolls-Royce—but still a Rolls-Royce.[Describing his elderly body after his lifetime interest in physical fitness.]
As quoted in the obituary, 'Sir Aldophe Abrahams, O.B.E. M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P.', The British Medical Journal (23 Dec 1967), 4, No. 5581, 748.
Science quotes on:  |  Antique (3)  |  Body (537)  |  Interest (386)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Fitness (2)  |  Still (613)

Are God and Nature then at strife,
That Nature lends such evil dreams?
So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life; ...
'So careful of the type', but no.
From scarped cliff and quarried stone
She cries, 'A thousand types are gone:
I care for nothing, all shall go' ...
Man, her last work, who seemed so fair,
Such splendid purpose in his eyes,
Who rolled the psalm to wintry skies,
Who built him fanes of fruitless prayer,
Who trusted God was love indeed
And love Creation's final law—
Tho’ Nature red in tooth and claw
With ravine, shrieked against his creed...
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), Cantos 56-57. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 176.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Claw (8)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creed (27)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dream (208)  |  Evil (116)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fairness (2)  |  Final (118)  |  Fruitless (8)  |  God (757)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Red (35)  |  Rolling (3)  |  Scarp (2)  |  Shriek (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Sky (161)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strife (9)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Trust (66)  |  Type (167)  |  Winter (44)  |  Work (1351)

Beyond lonely Pluto, dark and shadowless, lies the glittering realm of interstellar space, the silent ocean that rolls on and on, past stars and galaxies alike, to the ends of the Universe. What do men know of this vast infinity, this shoreless ocean? Is it hostile or friendly–or merely indifferent?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Dark (140)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Friendly (4)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Glitter (8)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Merely (316)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Past (337)  |  Pluto (6)  |  Realm (85)  |  Silent (29)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)

Each pregnant Oak ten thousand acorns forms
Profusely scatter’d by autumnal storms;
Ten thousand seeds each pregnant poppy sheds
Profusely scatter’d from its waving heads;
The countless Aphides, prolific tribe,
With greedy trunks the honey’d sap imbibe;
Swarm on each leaf with eggs or embryons big,
And pendent nations tenant every twig ...
—All these, increasing by successive birth,
Would each o’erpeople ocean, air, and earth.
So human progenies, if unrestrain’d,
By climate friended, and by food sustain’d,
O’er seas and soils, prolific hordes! would spread
Erelong, and deluge their terraqueous bed;
But war, and pestilence, disease, and dearth,
Sweep the superfluous myriads from the earth...
The births and deaths contend with equal strife,
And every pore of Nature teems with Life;
Which buds or breathes from Indus to the Poles,
And Earth’s vast surface kindles, as it rolls!
The Temple of Nature (1803), canto 4, lines 347-54, 367-74, 379-82, pages 156-60.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Climate (97)  |  Countless (36)  |  Death (388)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Disease (328)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egg (69)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honey (15)  |  Human (1468)  |  Kindle (6)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oak (14)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pole (46)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seed (93)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spread (83)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Successive (73)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Surface (209)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Twig (14)  |  Vast (177)  |  War (225)

Evolution is a blind giant who rolls a snowball down a hill. The ball is made of flakes—circumstances. They contribute to the mass without knowing it. They adhere without intention, and without foreseeing what is to result. When they see the result they marvel at the monster ball and wonder how the contriving of it came to be originally thought out and planned. Whereas there was no such planning, there was only a law: the ball once started, all the circumstances that happened to lie in its path would help to build it, in spite of themselves.
'The Secret History of Eddypus', in Mark Twain and David Ketterer (ed.), Tales of Wonder (2003), 222-23.
Science quotes on:  |  Adhesion (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Down (456)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flake (6)  |  Giant (67)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hill (20)  |  Intention (46)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mass (157)  |  Monster (31)  |  Path (144)  |  Plan (117)  |  Planning (20)  |  Result (677)  |  Rolling (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Snowball (4)  |  Spite (55)  |  Start (221)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wonder (236)

Fundamentally, as is readily seen, there exists neither force nor matter. Both are abstractions of things, such as they are, looked at from different standpoints. They complete and presuppose each other. Isolated they are meaningless. … Matter is not a go-cart, to and from which force, like a horse, can be now harnessed, now loosed. A particle of iron is and remains exactly the same thing, whether it shoot through space as a meteoric stone, dash along on the tire of an engine-wheel, or roll in a blood-corpuscle through the veins of a poet. … Its properties are eternal, unchangeable, untransferable.
From the original German text in 'Über die Lebenskraft', Preface to Untersuchungen über tierische Elektrizität (1848), xliii. As translated in Ludwig Büchner, Force and Matter: Or, Principles of the Natural Order of the Universe (1891), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Complete (204)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Different (577)  |  Engine (98)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Force (487)  |  Force And Matter (3)  |  Harness (23)  |  Horse (74)  |  Iron (96)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meaningless (17)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Poet (83)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Property (168)  |  Remain (349)  |  Space (500)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stone (162)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Vein (25)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Wheel (50)

I experimented with all possible maneuvers—loops, somersaults and barrel rolls. I stood upside down on one finger and burst out laughing, a shrill, distorted laugh. Nothing I did altered the automatic rhythm of the air. Delivered from gravity and buoyancy, I flew around in space.
Describing his early test (1943) in the Mediterranean Sea of the Aqua-Lung he co-invented.
Quoted in 'Sport: Poet of the Depths', Time (28 Mar 1960)
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Burst (39)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Distort (22)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Finger (44)  |  Flying (72)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Loop (6)  |  Lung (34)  |  Maneuver (2)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Mediterranean Sea (6)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shrill (2)  |  Somersault (2)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Test (211)  |  Upside Down (8)

I was interested in flying beginning at age 7, when a close family friend took me in his little airplane. And I remember looking at the wheel of the airplane as we rolled down the runway, because I wanted to remember the exact moment that I first went flying... the other thing growing up is that I was always interested in science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Close (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Exact (68)  |  Family (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Friend (168)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growing Up (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Moment (253)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remember (179)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)  |  Wheel (50)

If thou examinest a man having a break in the column of his nose, his nose being disfigured, and a [depression] being in it, while the swelling that is on it protrudes, [and] he had discharged blood from both his nostrils, thou shouldst say concerning him: “One having a break in the column of his nose. An ailment which I will treat. “Thou shouldst cleanse [it] for him [with] two plugs of linen. Thou shouldst place two [other] plugs of linen saturated with grease in the inside of his two nostrils. Thou shouldst put [him] at his mooring stakes until the swelling is drawn out. Thou shouldst apply for him stiff rolls of linen by which his nose is held fast. Thou shouldst treat him afterward [with] lint, every day until he recovers.
Anonymous
(circa 1700 B.C.) From “The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus”, an ancient Egyptian document regarded as the earliest known historical record of scientific thought. As translated in James Henry Breasted, The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus: Published in Facsimile and Hieroglyphic Transliteration with Translation and Commentary (1930), 440.
Science quotes on:  |  Ailment (6)  |  Apply (160)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Break (99)  |  Cleanse (5)  |  Depression (24)  |  Examine (78)  |  Linen (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nostril (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Recover (11)  |  Say (984)  |  Swelling (5)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

It is said that the composing of the Lilavati was occasioned by the following circumstance. Lilavati was the name of the author’s daughter, concerning whom it appeared, from the qualities of the ascendant at her birth, that she was destined to pass her life unmarried, and to remain without children. The father ascertained a lucky hour for contracting her in marriage, that she might be firmly connected and have children. It is said that when that hour approached, he brought his daughter and his intended son near him. He left the hour cup on the vessel of water and kept in attendance a time-knowing astrologer, in order that when the cup should subside in the water, those two precious jewels should be united. But, as the intended arrangement was not according to destiny, it happened that the girl, from a curiosity natural to children, looked into the cup, to observe the water coming in at the hole, when by chance a pearl separated from her bridal dress, fell into the cup, and, rolling down to the hole, stopped the influx of water. So the astrologer waited in expectation of the promised hour. When the operation of the cup had thus been delayed beyond all moderate time, the father was in consternation, and examining, he found that a small pearl had stopped the course of the water, and that the long-expected hour was passed. In short, the father, thus disappointed, said to his unfortunate daughter, I will write a book of your name, which shall remain to the latest times—for a good name is a second life, and the ground-work of eternal existence.
In Preface to the Persian translation of the Lilavati by Faizi (1587), itself translated into English by Strachey and quoted in John Taylor (trans.) Lilawati, or, A Treatise on Arithmetic and Geometry by Bhascara Acharya (1816), Introduction, 3. [The Lilavati is the 12th century treatise on mathematics by Indian mathematician, Bhaskara Acharya, born 1114.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approach (108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Author (167)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chance (239)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Coming (114)  |  Compose (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contract (11)  |  Course (409)  |  Cup (7)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Delay (20)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Dress (9)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Examine (78)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fall (230)  |  Father (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hole (16)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indian (27)  |  Influx (2)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Late (118)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Precious (41)  |  Promise (67)  |  Quality (135)  |  Remain (349)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  Son (24)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subside (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  United (14)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wait (58)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

Learn to reverence night and to put away the vulgar fear of it, for, with the banishment of night from the experience of man, there vanishes as well a religious emotion, a poetic mood, which gives depth to the adventure of humanity. By day, space is one with the earth and with man - it is his sun that is shining, his clouds that are floating past; at night, space is his no more. When the great earth, abandoning day, rolls up the deeps of the heavens and the universe, a new door opens for the human spirit, and there are few so clownish that some awareness of the mystery of being does not touch them as they gaze. For a moment of night we have a glimpse of ourselves and of our world islanded in its stream of stars - pilgrims of mortality, voyaging between horizons across eternal seas of space and time. Fugitive though the instant be, the spirit of man is, during it, ennobled by a genuine moment of emotional dignity, and poetry makes its own both the human spirit and experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Across (32)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Banishment (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clown (2)  |  Deep (233)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Door (93)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Ennoble (8)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fear (197)  |  Float (30)  |  Fugitive (3)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Give (202)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Instant (45)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mood (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Pilgrim (4)  |  Poetic (7)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  World (1774)

Let him look at that dazzling light hung aloft as an eternal lamp to lighten the universe; let him behold the earth, a mere dot compared with the vast circuit which that orb describes, and stand amazed to find that the vast circuit itself is but a very fine point compared with the orbit traced by the stars as they roll their course on high. But if our vision halts there, let imagination pass beyond; it will fail to form a conception long before Nature fails to supply material. The whole visible world is but an imperceptible speck in the ample bosom of Nature. No notion comes near it. Though we may extend our thought beyond imaginable space, yet compared with reality we bring to birth mere atoms. Nature is an infinite sphere whereof the centre is everywhere, the circumference nowhere. In short, imagination is brought to silence at the thought, and that is the most perceptible sign of the all-power of God.
Let man reawake and consider what he is compared with the reality of things; regard himself lost in this remote corner of Nature; and from the tiny cell where he lodges, to wit the Universe, weigh at their true worth earth, kingdoms, towns, himself. What is a man face to face with infinity?
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 43. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal’s Pensées (1950), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aloft (5)  |  Amazement (15)  |  Ample (4)  |  Atom (355)  |  Behold (18)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cell (138)  |  Centre (28)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Circumference (23)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Corner (57)  |  Course (409)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Describe (128)  |  Dot (16)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extend (128)  |  Face (212)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Halt (9)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperceptibility (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Light (607)  |  Lodge (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Orb (20)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perception (97)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remote (83)  |  Short (197)  |  Sign (58)  |  Silence (56)  |  Space (500)  |  Speck (23)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Town (27)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (69)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Door (93)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (47)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Help (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Involve (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Listen (73)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (125)  |  Muse (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (15)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rich (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strand (9)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (300)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

On the basis of the results recorded in this review, it can be claimed that the average sand grain has taken many hundreds of millions of years to lose 10 per cent. of its weight by abrasion and become subangular. It is a platitude to point to the slowness of geological processes. But much depends on the way things are put. For it can also be said that a sand grain travelling on the bottom of a river loses 10 million molecules each time it rolls over on its side and that representation impresses us with the high rate of this loss. The properties of quartz have led to the concentration of its grains on the continents, where they could now form a layer averaging several hundred metres thick. But to my mind the most astounding numerical estimate that follows from the present evaluations, is that during each and every second of the incredibly long geological past the number of quartz grains on earth has increased by 1,000 million.
'Sand-its Origin, Transportation, Abrasion and Accumulation', The Geological Society of South Africa (1959), Annexure to Volume 62, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Astounding (9)  |  Average (82)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Claim (146)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Continent (76)  |  Depend (228)  |  Earth (996)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grain (50)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Layer (40)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Past (337)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Quartz (2)  |  Record (154)  |  Representation (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Review (26)  |  River (119)  |  Sand (62)  |  Side (233)  |  Slowness (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Year (933)

Our plenteous streams a various race supply,
The bright-eye Perch with fins of Tyrian dye,
The silver Eel, in shining volumes roll’d,
The yellow Carp, in scales bedropp’d with gold,
Swift Trouts, diversified with crimson stains,
And Pykes, the Tyrants of the wat’ry plains.
In poem, 'Windsor Forest', collected in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope (1718), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (79)  |  Crimson (4)  |  Dye (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fin (3)  |  Gold (97)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Perch (7)  |  Race (268)  |  Scale (121)  |  Shining (35)  |  Silver (46)  |  Stain (9)  |  Stream (81)  |  Supply (93)  |  Swift (12)  |  Trout (4)  |  Tyrant (9)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Yellow (30)

Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean—roll!
In 'Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage', The Complete Works of Lord Byron: Reprinted from the Last London Edition (1841), CLXXIX, 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Blue (56)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deep (233)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Wave (107)

Science is a capital or fund perpetually reinvested; it accumulates, rolls up, is carried forward by every new man. Every man of science has all the science before him to go upon, to set himself up in business with. What an enormous sum Darwin availed himself of and reinvested! Not so in literature; to every poet, to every artist, it is still the first day of creation, so far as the essentials of his task are concerned. Literature is not so much a fund to be reinvested as it is a crop to be ever new-grown.
Indoor Studies, vol. 12, Collected Works, Houghton (1913).
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Avail (4)  |  Business (149)  |  Capital (15)  |  Carry (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crop (25)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Essential (199)  |  Far (154)  |  First (1283)  |  Forward (102)  |  Fund (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Literature (103)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  New (1216)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Poet (83)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Still (613)  |  Sum (102)  |  Task (147)

So use all that is called Fortune. Most men gamble with her, and gain all, and lose all, as her wheel rolls. But do thou leave as unlawful these winnings, and deal with Cause and Effect, the Chancellors of God.
From 'Self-Reliance', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Chancellor (8)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Gain (145)  |  God (757)  |  Lose (159)  |  Most (1731)  |  Use (766)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Winning (19)

The ball of rumor and criticism, once it starts rolling, is difficult to stop.
In letter to mother, as quoted in Beverly Gherman, Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Between the Sea and the Stars (2007), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Rumor (2)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The blood, the fountain whence the spirits flow,
The generous stream that waters every part,
And motion, vigour, and warm life conveys
To every Particle that moves or lives;
This vital fluid, thro' unnumber'd tubes
Pour'd by the heart, and to the heart again
Refunded; scourg'd forever round and round;
Enrag'd with heat and toil, at last forgets
Its balmy nature; virulent and thin
It grows; and now, but that a thousand gates
Are open to its flight, it would destroy
The parts it cherish' d and repair'd before.
Besides, the flexible and tender tubes
Melt in the mildest, most nectareous tide
That ripening Nature rolls; as in the stream
Its crumbling banks; but what the vital force
Of plastic fluids hourly batters down,
That very force, those plastic particles
Rebuild: so mutable the state of man.
For this the watchful appetite was given,
Daily with fresh materials to repair
This unavoidable expense of life,
This necessary waste of flesh and blood.
Hence the concoctive powers, with various art,
Subdue the cruder aliments to chyle;
The chyle to blood; the foamy purple tide
To liquors, which through finer arteries
To different parts their winding course pursue;
To try new changes, and new forms put on,
Or for the public, or some private use.
The Art of Preserving Health (1744), book 2, I. 12-23, p.15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Appetite (17)  |  Art (657)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Gate (32)  |  Generous (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Particle (194)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Stream (81)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Toil (25)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)  |  Warm (69)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Winding (8)

The clouds roll on.
Silent as sleepwalkers the clouds
keep coming from infinity
bank behind bank
and line after line,
and change colors on the earth.
As translated in Rolf Jacobsen and ‎Roger Greenwald (ed., trans.), 'The Clouds', North in the World: Selected Poems of Rolf Jacobsen, A Bilingual Edition (1985, 2002), 9, from 'Earth and Iron' (1933). Collected in the original Norwegian edition (1999).
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (31)  |  Behind (137)  |  Change (593)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Coming (114)  |  Earth (996)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sleepwalker (2)

The Earth Speaks, clearly, distinctly, and, in many of the realms of Nature, loudly, to William Jennings Bryan, but he fails to hear a single sound. The earth speaks from the remotest periods in its wonderful life history in the Archaeozoic Age, when it reveals only a few tissues of its primitive plants. Fifty million years ago it begins to speak as “the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creatures that hath life.” In successive eons of time the various kinds of animals leave their remains in the rocks which compose the deeper layers of the earth, and when the rocks are laid bare by wind, frost, and storm we find wondrous lines of ascent invariably following the principles of creative evolution, whereby the simpler and more lowly forms always precede the higher and more specialized forms.
The earth speaks not of a succession of distinct creations but of a continuous ascent, in which, as the millions of years roll by, increasing perfection of structure and beauty of form are found; out of the water-breathing fish arises the air-breathing amphibian; out of the land-living amphibian arises the land-living, air-breathing reptile, these two kinds of creeping things resembling each other closely. The earth speaks loudly and clearly of the ascent of the bird from one kind of reptile and of the mammal from another kind of reptile.
This is not perhaps the way Bryan would have made the animals, but this is the way God made them!
The Earth Speaks to Bryan (1925), 5-6. Osborn wrote this book in response to the Scopes Monkey Trial, where William Jennings Bryan spoke against the theory of evolution. They had previously been engaged in the controversy about the theory for several years. The title refers to a Biblical verse from the Book of Job (12:8), “Speak to the earth and it shall teach thee.”
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Air (347)  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breath (59)  |  Breathing (23)  |  William Jennings Bryan (20)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creature (233)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eon (11)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Fish (120)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Frost (14)  |  God (757)  |  Hear (139)  |  History (673)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Kind (557)  |  Land (115)  |  Layer (40)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Period (198)  |  Plant (294)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Realm (85)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rock (161)  |  Single (353)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Storm (51)  |  Structure (344)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Year (933)

The formation of planets is like a gigantic snowball fight. The balls bounce off, break apart, or stick together, but in the end they are rolled up into one enormous ball, a planet-ball that has gathered up all the snowflakes in the surrounding area.
From Stone to Star: A View of Modern Geology, trans. Deborah Kurmes van Dam (1992), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Break (99)  |  End (590)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Planet (356)  |  Snowball (4)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Together (387)

The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves,—magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude,—asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and florae and faunae melt in air,—the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy,—the manifestations of life, as well as the display of phenomena, are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion to lecture 12 (10 Apr 1862) at the Royal Institution, collected in Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Aggregation (6)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Creation (327)  |  Display (56)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flux (21)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Melting (6)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Music (129)  |  Number (699)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Power (746)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Sun (385)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Wave (107)

The picture of scientific method drafted by modern philosophy is very different from traditional conceptions. Gone is the ideal of a universe whose course follows strict rules, a predetermined cosmos that unwinds itself like an unwinding clock. Gone is the ideal of the scientist who knows the absolute truth. The happenings of nature are like rolling dice rather than like revolving stars; they are controlled by probability laws, not by causality, and the scientist resembles a gambler more than a prophet. He can tell you only his best posits—he never knows beforehand whether they will come true. He is a better gambler, though, than the man at the green table, because his statistical methods are superior. And his goal is staked higher—the goal of foretelling the rolling dice of the cosmos. If he is asked why he follows his methods, with what title he makes his predictions, he cannot answer that he has an irrefutable knowledge of the future; he can only lay his best bets. But he can prove that they are best bets, that making them is the best he can do—and if a man does his best, what else can you ask of him?
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951, 1973), 248-9. Collected in James Louis Jarrett and Sterling M. McMurrin (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy: A Book of Readings (1954), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Absoluteness (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Best (459)  |  Bet (12)  |  Better (486)  |  Causality (11)  |  Clock (47)  |  Conception (154)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Course (409)  |  Dice (21)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draft (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foretelling (4)  |  Future (429)  |  Gambler (7)  |  Goal (145)  |  Green (63)  |  Happening (58)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Irrefutable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Picture (143)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Prove (250)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Stake (19)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Superior (81)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

There rolls the deep where grew the tree.
O earth, what changes hast thou seen!
There where the long street roars, hath been
The stillness of the central sea.
The hills are shadows, and they flow
From form to form, and nothing stands;
They melt like mist, the solid lands,
Like clouds they shape themselves and go.
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), canto 123. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Deep (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Hill (20)  |  Land (115)  |  Long (790)  |  Melting (6)  |  Mist (14)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shape (72)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Street (23)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)

This beast is best felt. Shake, rattle, and roll. We are thrown left and right against our straps in spasmodic little jerks. It is steering like crazy, like a nervous lady driving a wide car down a narrow alley, and I just hope it knows where it’s going, because for the first ten seconds we are perilously close to that umbilical tower.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Alley (2)  |  Beast (55)  |  Best (459)  |  Car (71)  |  Close (69)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Down (456)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Hope (299)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lady (11)  |  Leave (130)  |  Little (707)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Rattle (2)  |  Right (452)  |  Second (62)  |  Shake (41)  |  Spasmodic (2)  |  Steer (4)  |  Strap (3)  |  Throw (43)  |  Tower (42)  |  Wide (96)

This whole theory of electrostatics constitutes a group of abstract ideas and general propositions, formulated in the clear and precise language of geometry and algebra, and connected with one another by the rules of strict logic. This whole fully satisfies the reason of a French physicist and his taste for clarity, simplicity and order. The same does not hold for the Englishman. These abstract notions of material points, force, line of force, and equipotential surface do not satisfy his need to imagine concrete, material, visible, and tangible things. 'So long as we cling to this mode of representation,' says an English physicist, 'we cannot form a mental representation of the phenomena which are really happening.' It is to satisfy the need that he goes and creates a model.
The French or German physicist conceives, in the space separating two conductors, abstract lines of force having no thickness or real existence; the English physicist materializes these lines and thickens them to the dimensions of a tube which he will fill with vulcanised rubber. In place of a family of lines of ideal forces, conceivable only by reason, he will have a bundle of elastic strings, visible and tangible, firmly glued at both ends to the surfaces of the two conductors, and, when stretched, trying both to contact and to expand. When the two conductors approach each other, he sees the elastic strings drawing closer together; then he sees each of them bunch up and grow large. Such is the famous model of electrostatic action imagined by Faraday and admired as a work of genius by Maxwell and the whole English school.
The employment of similar mechanical models, recalling by certain more or less rough analogies the particular features of the theory being expounded, is a regular feature of the English treatises on physics. Here is a book* [by Oliver Lodge] intended to expound the modern theories of electricity and to expound a new theory. In it are nothing but strings which move around pulleys, which roll around drums, which go through pearl beads, which carry weights; and tubes which pump water while others swell and contract; toothed wheels which are geared to one another and engage hooks. We thought we were entering the tranquil and neatly ordered abode of reason, but we find ourselves in a factory.
*Footnote: O. Lodge, Les Théories Modernes (Modern Views on Electricity) (1889), 16.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Approach (108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contact (65)  |  Create (235)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drum (8)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Engage (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Factory (20)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  German (36)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happening (58)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Materialize (2)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mental (177)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Representation (53)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

To Nature nothing can be added; from Nature nothing can be taken away; the sum of her energies is constant, and the utmost man can do in the pursuit of physical truth, or in the applications of physical knowledge, is to shift the constituents of the never-varying total. The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves; magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude; asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and floras and faunas melt in air: the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy—the manifestations of life as well as the display of phenomena—are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion of Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Season of 1862 (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Age (499)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Application (242)  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creation (327)  |  Display (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flux (21)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Melt (16)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Music (129)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Same (157)  |  Shift (44)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Sum (102)  |  Sun (385)  |  Take Away (5)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Total (94)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wave (107)

Unlike any creature that lived before, humans have become a geophysical force, swiftly changing the atmosphere and climate as well as the composition of the world’s fauna and flora. … Darwin’s dice have rolled badly for Earth.
In 'Is Humanity Suicidal?', In Search of Nature (1996), 184.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bad (180)  |  Badly (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Composition (84)  |  Creature (233)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Dice (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Flora (9)  |  Force (487)  |  Geophysical (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  World (1774)

When Galileo caused balls, the weights of which he had himself previously determined, to roll down an inclined plane; when Torricelli made the air carry a weight which he had calculated beforehand to be equal to that of a definite volume of water; or in more recent times, when Stahl changed metal into lime, and lime back into metal, by withdrawing something and then restoring it, a light broke upon all students of nature. They learned that reason has insight only into that which it produces after a plan of its own, and that it must not allow itself to be kept, as it were, in nature's leading-strings, but must itself show the way with principles of judgement based upon fixed laws, constraining nature to give answer to questions of reason's own determining. Accidental observations, made in obedience to no previously thought-out plan, can never be made to yield a necessary law, which alone reason is concerned to discover.
Critique of Pure Reason (1781), trans. Norman Kemp Smith (1929), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Back (390)  |  Ball (62)  |  Carry (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Definite (110)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Down (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Insight (102)  |  Judgement (7)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plan (117)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recent (77)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Student (300)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Evangelista Torricelli (5)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Yield (81)

When the greatest of American logicians, speaking of the powers that constitute the born geometrician, had named Conception, Imagination, and Generalization, he paused. Thereupon from one of the audience there came the challenge, “What of reason?” The instant response, not less just than brilliant, was: “Ratiocination—that is but the smooth pavement on which the chariot rolls.”
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Audience (26)  |  Bear (159)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Conception (154)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Instant (45)  |  Less (103)  |  Logician (17)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Pause (6)  |  Pavement (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Response (53)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)

Words are to the Anthropologist what rolled pebbles are to the Geologist—Battered relics of past ages often containing within them indelible records capable of intelligible interpretion—and when we see what amount of change 2000 years has been able to produce in the languages of Greece & Italy or 1000 in those of Germany, France & Spain we naturally begin to ask how long a period must have lapsed since the Chinese, the Hebrew, the Delaware & the Malesass had a point in common with the German & Italian & each other.—Time! Time! Time!—we must not impugn the Scripture Chronology, but we must interpret it in accordance with whatever shall appear on fair enquiry to be the truth for there cannot be two truths. And really there is scope enough: for the lives of the Patriarchs may as reasonably be extended to 5000 or 50000 years apiece as the days of Creation to as many thousand millions of years.
Letter to Charles Lyell, 20 Feb 1836, In Walter F. Cannon, 'The Impact of Uniformitarianism', Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 1961, 105, 308.
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of The Earth (12)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Begin (260)  |  Capable (168)  |  Change (593)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Common (436)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enough (340)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Extend (128)  |  Geologist (75)  |  German (36)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Impugn (2)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Italian (12)  |  Language (293)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Patriarch (4)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Period (198)  |  Point (580)  |  Record (154)  |  Scope (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

You must learn to talk clearly. The jargon of scientific terminology which rolls off your tongues is mental garbage
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Clarity (47)  |  Garbage (8)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Talk (100)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Tongue (43)

[1665-06-07] ...This day, much against my will, I did in Drury Lane see two or three houses marked with a red cross upon the doors, and 'Lord have mercy upon us' writ there - which was a sad sight to me, being the first of that kind that to my remembrance I ever saw. It put me into an ill conception of myself and my smell, so that I was forced to buy some roll-tobacco to smell to and chaw - which took away the apprehension.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (7 Jun 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conception (154)  |  Door (93)  |  First (1283)  |  House (140)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lord (93)  |  Marked (55)  |  Myself (212)  |  Plague (41)  |  Remembrance (5)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Smell (27)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.