Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Asking

Asking Quotes (73 quotes)

Ron Hutcheson, a Knight-Ridder reporter: [Mr. President, what are your] personal views [about the theory of] intelligent design?
President George W. Bush: [Laughing. You're] doing a fine job of dragging me back to the past [days as governor of Texas]. ... Then, I said that, first of all, that decision should be made to local school districts, but I felt like both sides ought to be properly taught...”
Hutcheson: Both sides ought to be properly taught?
President: Yes ... so people can understand what the debate is about.
Hutcheson: So the answer accepts the validity of “intelligent design” as an alternative to evolution?
President: I think that part of education is to expose people to different schools of thought, and I'm not suggesting—you're asking me whether or not people ought to be exposed to different ideas, and the answer is yes.
Hutcheson: So we've got to give these groups—...
President: [interrupting] Very interesting question, Hutch. [Laughter from other reporters]
From conversation with reporters at the White House (1 Aug 2005), as quoted by Matthew Cooper in 'Fanning the Controversy Over “Intelligent Design”', Time (3 Aug 2005). The Time writer stated, “The president has gone farther in questioning the widely-taught theories of evolution and natural selection than any president since Ronald Reagan, who advocated teaching creationism in public schools alongside evolution.” Just a few months later, in the nation's first case on that point, on 20 Dec 2005, “a federal judge [John E. Jones] ruled it was unconstitutional for a Pennsylvania school district to present intelligent design as an alternative in high school biology courses, because it is a religious viewpoint,” as reported by Laurie Goodstein in 'Judge Rejects Teaching Intelligent Design', New York Times (21 Dec 2005). Goodstein also wrote “Judge Jones, a Republican appointed by President Bush, concluded that intelligent design was not science,” and that “the evidence in the trial proved that intelligent design was 'creationism relabeled.' The Supreme Court has already ruled that creationism ... cannot be taught as science in a public school.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Answer (366)  |  Back (390)  |  Both (493)  |  Debate (38)  |  Decision (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  District (9)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Governor (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intelligent Design (5)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Local (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  President (31)  |  Question (621)  |  School (219)  |  Side (233)  |  Teach (277)  |  Texas (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Validity (47)  |  View (488)

Socrates: Very good; let us begin then, Protarchus, by asking whether all this which they call the universe is left to the guidance of unreason and chance medley, or, on the contrary, as our fathers have declared, ordered and governed by a marvellous intelligence and wisdom.
Protarchus: Wide asunder are the two assertions, illustrious Socrates, for that which you were just now saying to me appears to be blasphemy, but the other assertion, that mind orders all things, is worthy of the aspect of the world…
Plato
From 'Philebus', collected in The Dialogues of Plato (1875), Vol. 4, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Begin (260)  |  Blasphemy (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Chance (239)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Declared (24)  |  Father (110)  |  Good (889)  |  Govern (64)  |  Governed (4)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)

A distinguished Princeton physicist on the occasion of my asking how he thought Einstein would have reacted to Bell’s theorem. He said that Einstein would have gone home and thought about it hard for several weeks … He was sure that Einstein would have been very bothered by Bell’s theorem. Then he added: “Anybody who’s not bothered by Bell’s theorem has to have rocks in his head.”
In 'Is the Moon There When Nobody Looks? Reality and the Quantum Theory', Physics Today (Apr 1985), 38-47.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Bell (35)  |  John Stewart Bell, II (4)  |  Bother (7)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Hard (243)  |  Head (81)  |  Home (170)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Rock (161)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thought (953)  |  Week (70)

A good many times I have been present at gatherings of people who, by the standards of the traditional culture, are thought highly educated and who have with considerable gusto been expressing their incredulity at the illiteracy of scientists. Once or twice I have been provoked and have asked the company how many of them could describe the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The response was cold: it was also negative. Yet I was asking something which is about the scientific equivalent of: Have you read a work of Shakespeare's?
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 14-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cold (112)  |  Company (59)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Culture (143)  |  Describe (128)  |  Educated (12)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Good (889)  |  Illiteracy (7)  |  Incredulity (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Negative (63)  |  People (1005)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Response (53)  |  Science Literacy (5)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Something (719)  |  Standard (57)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Work (1351)

A good theoretical physicist today might find it useful to have a wide range of physical viewpoints and mathematical expressions of the same theory (for example, of quantum electrodynamics) available to him. This may be asking too much of one man. Then new students should as a class have this. If every individual student follows the same current fashion in expressing and thinking about electrodynamics or field theory, then the variety of hypotheses being generated to understand strong interactions, say, is limited. Perhaps rightly so, for possibly the chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off-chance that it is in another direction—a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory—who will find it?
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Class (164)  |  Current (118)  |  Direction (175)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Generate (16)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Range (99)  |  Say (984)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Today (314)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unfashionable (2)  |  Useful (250)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

A man may fulfill the object of his existence by asking a question he cannot answer, and attempting a task he cannot achieve.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 121
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Man (2251)  |  Object (422)  |  Question (621)  |  Task (147)

A metaphysician is one who, when you remark that twice two makes four, demands to know what you mean by twice, what by two, what by makes, and what by four. For asking such questions metaphysicians are supported in oriental luxury in the universities, and respected as educated and intelligent men.
A previously unpublished epigram, added in A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Demand (123)  |  Educated (12)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Mean (809)  |  Metaphysician (7)  |  Question (621)  |  Remark (28)  |  Respect (207)  |  Support (147)  |  Supported (2)  |  Twice (17)  |  Two (937)  |  University (121)

A young man once asked [Erasmus Darwin] in, as he thought, an offensive manner, whether he did not find stammering very inconvenient. He answered, 'No, Sir, it gives me time for reflection, and saves me from asking impertinent questions.'
C. Darwin, The Life of Erasmus Darwin (1887), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Erasmus Darwin (40)  |  Find (998)  |  Impertinence (4)  |  Impertinent (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Question (621)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Save (118)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Young (227)

As soon as I hear the phrase “everybody knows,” I start to wonder. I start asking, “Does everybody know this? And how do they know it?”
As quoted in interview about earthquake predictions for magazine article in Joshua Fischman, 'Falling Into the Gap', Discover (Oct 1992), 13, No. 10, 58. The article writer appears to be quoting, but throughout the article has used no double quote marks. The article is also online.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Hear (139)  |  Know (1518)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Soon (186)  |  Start (221)  |  Wonder (236)

But why, it has been asked, did you go there [the Antarctic]? Of what use to civilization can this lifeless continent be? ... [Earlier] expeditions contributed something to the accumulating knowledge of the Antarctic ... that helps us thrust back further the physical and spiritual shadows enfolding our terrestrial existence. Is it not true that one of the strongest and most continuously sustained impulses working in civilization is that which leads to discovery? As long as any part of the world remains obscure, the curiosity of man must draw him there, as the lodestone draws the mariner's needle, until he comprehends its secret.
In 'Hoover Presents Special Medal to Byrd...', New York Times (21 Jun 1930), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Antarctic (6)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Continent (76)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Draw (137)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expedition (8)  |  Going (6)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Physical (508)  |  Remain (349)  |  Secret (194)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Something (719)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Use (766)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

By asking questions and quickly reading some books, [Melvin Calvin] felt comfortable in many fields of endeavor.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Field (364)  |  Question (621)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)

Curiosity that inborn property of man, daughter of ignorance and mother of knowledge when wonder wakens our minds, has the habit, wherever it sees some extraordinary phenomenon of nature, a comet for example, a sun-dog, or a midday star, of asking straightway what it means.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 189, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Comet (54)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Dog (70)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Habit (168)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Midday (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Property (168)  |  See (1081)  |  Star (427)  |  Straightway (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Wonder (236)

During the time that [Karl] Landsteiner gave me an education in the field of imununology, I discovered that he and I were thinking about the serologic problem in very different ways. He would ask, What do these experiments force us to believe about the nature of the world? I would ask, What is the most. simple and general picture of the world that we can formulate that is not ruled by these experiments? I realized that medical and biological investigators were not attacking their problems the same way that theoretical physicists do, the way I had been in the habit of doing.
‘Molecular Disease’, Pfizer Spectrum (1958), 6:9, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Formulation (36)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Karl Landsteiner (8)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realization (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Frequently, I have been asked if an experiment I have planned is pure or applied science; to me it is more important to know if the experiment will yield new and probably enduring knowledge about nature. If it is likely to yield such knowledge, it is, in my opinion, good fundamental research; and this is more important than whether the motivation is purely aesthetic satisfaction on the part of the experimenter on the one hand or the improvement of the stability of a high-power transistor on the other.
Quoted in Richard R. Nelson, 'The Link Between Science and Invention: The Case of the Transistor,' The Rate and Direction of the Inventive Activity (1962). In Daniel S. Greenberg, The Politics of Pure Science (1999), 32, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Ask (411)  |  Enduring (6)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Power (746)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Purely (109)  |  Research (664)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stability (25)  |  Transistor (5)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

Good work is no done by “humble” men. It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking “Is what I do worth while?” and “Am I the right person to do it?” will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve. This is not too difficult: it is harder not to make his subject and himself ridiculous by shutting his eyes too tightly.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duty (68)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Harder (6)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humble (50)  |  Importance (286)  |  Ineffective (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Professor (128)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Right (452)  |  Shut (41)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

His genius was in asking the right questions and seeing explanations that did not readily occur to others. He loved and lived science and was an inspiration to all who came in contact with him.
Co-author with Marilyn Taylor and Robert E. Connick, obituary, 'Melvin Calvin', Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (Dec 2000), 144, No. 4, 457.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Contact (65)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Genius (284)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)

I am above the forest region, amongst grand rocks & such a torrent as you see in Salvator Rosa's paintings vegetation all a scrub of rhodods. with Pines below me as thick & bad to get through as our Fuegian Fagi on the hill tops, & except the towering peaks of P. S. [perpetual snow] that, here shoot up on all hands there is little difference in the mt scenery—here however the blaze of Rhod. flowers and various colored jungle proclaims a differently constituted region in a naturalists eye & twenty species here, to one there, always are asking me the vexed question, where do we come from?
Letter to Charles Darwin (24 Jun 1849). Quoted in The Correspondence of Charles Darwin (1988), Vol. 4, 1847-1850, 242.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Botany (57)  |  Color (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forest (150)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Little (707)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Pine (9)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Question (621)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Snow (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Towering (11)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Vex (9)

I am astonished that in the United States a scientist gets into such trouble because of his scientific beliefs; that your activity in 1957 and 1958 in relation to the petition to the United Nations asking for a bomb-test agreement causes you now to be called before the authorities and ordered to give the names of the scientists who have the same opinions that you have and who have helped you to gather signatures to the petition. I think that I must be dreaming!
Letter to Linus Pauling (23 Jul 1960). As quoted on the Linus Pauling and the International Peace Movement website at scarc.library.oregonstate.edu.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Authority (95)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Dreaming (3)  |  Gather (72)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Nation (193)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Petition (4)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Signature (4)  |  State (491)  |  Test (211)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trouble (107)  |  United Nations (3)

I grew up in love with science, asking the same questions all children ask as they try to codify the world to find out what makes it work. “Who is the smartest person in the world?” and “Where is the tallest mountain in the world?” turned into questions like, “How big is the universe?” and “What is it that makes us alive?”
In Introduction to Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), xix.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Codify (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Learn (629)  |  Love (309)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Person (363)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Smart (26)  |  Tall (11)  |  Try (283)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I have been asked whether I would agree that the tragedy of the scientist is that he is able to bring about great advances in our knowledge, which mankind may then proceed to use for purposes of destruction. My answer is that this is not the tragedy of the scientist; it is the tragedy of mankind.
S. R. Weart and G. W. Sallard (eds.), Leo Szilard: His Version of the Facts (1978), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Use (766)

I have never been disappointed upon asking microorganisms for whatever I wanted.
Quoted in Armin Fietchter, History of Modern Biology (2000), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Never (1087)  |  Want (497)  |  Whatever (234)

Iamblichus in his treatise On the Arithmetic of Nicomachus observes p. 47- “that certain numbers were called amicable by those who assimilated the virtues and elegant habits to numbers.” He adds, “that 284 and 220 are numbers of this kind; for the parts of each are generative of each other according to the nature of friendship, as was shown by Pythagoras. For some one asking him what a friend was, he answered, another I (ετεϑος εγω) which is demonstrated to take place in these numbers.” [“Friendly” thus: Each number is equal to the sum of the factors of the other.]
In Theoretic Arithmetic (1816), 122. (Factors of 284 are 1, 2, 4 ,71 and 142, which give the sum 220. Reciprocally, factors of 220 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11 ,22, 44, 55 and 110, which give the sum 284.) Note: the expression “alter ego” is Latin for “the other I.”
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Addition (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Factor (46)  |  Friend (168)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Generative (2)  |  Habit (168)  |  Kind (557)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Sum (102)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Virtue (109)

If asking politely is useless, take.
Aphorism as given by the fictional character Dezhnev Senior, in Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain (1987), 30.

If the matter is one that can be settled by observation, make the observation yourself. Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Count (105)  |  Device (70)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Proof (287)  |  Settled (34)  |  Simple (406)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tooth (29)

If you look at a tree and think of it as a design assignment, it would be like asking you to make something that makes oxygen, sequesters carbon, fixes nitrogen, distills water, provides habitat for hundreds of species, accrues solar energy’s fuel, makes complex sugars and food, changes colors with the seasons, creates microclimates, and self-replicates.
In audio segment, 'William McDonough: Godfather of Green', WNYC, Studio 360 broadcast on NPR radio (18 Mar 2008) and archived on the station website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accrue (3)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical Engineering (4)  |  Color (137)  |  Complex (188)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Design (195)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fix (25)  |  Food (199)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Look (582)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Season (47)  |  Self (267)  |  Sequester (2)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (401)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tree (246)  |  Water (481)

If you walk along the street you will encounter a number of scientific problems. Of these, about 80 per cent are insoluble, while 19½ per cent are trivial. There is then perhaps half a per cent where skill, persistence, courage, creativity and originality can make a difference. It is always the task of the academic to swim in that half a per cent, asking the questions through which some progress can be made.
'The Making of a Scientist', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, June 1983, 406.
Science quotes on:  |  Courage (69)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Difference (337)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Number (699)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Skill (109)  |  Swim (30)  |  Task (147)  |  Through (849)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Walk (124)  |  Will (2355)

In 1684 Dr Halley came to visit him at Cambridge, after they had been some time together, the Dr asked him what he thought the Curve would be that would be described by the Planets supposing the force of attraction towards the Sun to be reciprocal to the square of their distance from it. Sr Isaac replied immediately that it would be an Ellipsis, the Doctor struck with joy & amazement asked him how he knew it, why saith he I have calculated it, whereupon Dr Halley asked him for his calculation without any farther delay. Sr Isaac looked among his papers but could not find it, but he promised him to renew it, & then to send it him.
[Recollecting Newton's account of the meeting after which Halley prompted Newton to write The Principia. When asking Newton this question, Halley was aware, without revealing it to Newton that Robert Hooke had made this hypothesis of plantary motion a decade earlier.]
Quoted in Richard Westfall, Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton (1980), 403.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Amazement (15)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Curve (49)  |  Decade (59)  |  Delay (20)  |  Distance (161)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Farther (51)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Edmond Halley (9)  |  Robert Hooke (20)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Joy (107)  |  Look (582)  |  Motion (310)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Paper (182)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principia (13)  |  Promise (67)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Question (621)  |  Reciprocal (7)  |  Renew (19)  |  Search (162)  |  Square (70)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Why (491)  |  Write (230)

In an examination those who do not wish to know ask questions of those who cannot tell.
'Some Thoughts on Examinations', inLaughter from a Cloud (1923), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Cannot (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Examination (98)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Question (621)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Wish (212)

In my personal view, a failure to discover unimagined objects and answer unasked questions, once HST functions properly, would indicate a lack of imagination in stocking the Universe on the part of the Deity.
In Hubble Space Telescope flaw: hearing before the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, second session, July 13, 1990 (1990), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Deity (22)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Failure (161)  |  Function (228)  |  Functioning (3)  |  Hubble Space Telescope (9)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Lack (119)  |  Object (422)  |  Personal (67)  |  Question (621)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Stock (7)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)

In my youth I often asked what could be the use and necessity of smelting by putting powdered charcoal at the bottom of the furnace. Nobody could give me any other reason except that the metal and especially lead, could bury itself in the charcoal and so be protected against the action of the bellows which would calcine or dissipate it. Nevertheless it is evident that this does not answer the question. I accordingly examined the operation of a metallurgical furnace and how it was used. In assaying some litharge [lead oxide], I noticed each time a little charcoal fell into the crucible, I always obtained a bit of lead … I do not think up to the present time foundry-men ever surmised that in the operation of founding with charcoal there was something [phlogiston] which became corporeally united with the metal.
Traité de Soufre (1766), 64. French translation published 1766, first published in German in 1718.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bellows (5)  |  Calcination (4)  |  Charcoal (10)  |  Crucible (8)  |  Dissipate (8)  |  Dissipation (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Evident (91)  |  Examination (98)  |  Furnace (12)  |  Lead (384)  |  Litharge (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Metal (84)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Powder (9)  |  Present (619)  |  Protect (58)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Youth (101)

It is not only by the questions we have answered that progress may be measured, but also by those we are still asking. The passionate controversies of one era are viewed as sterile preoccupations by another, for knowledge alters what we seek as well as what we find.
In Freda Adler and Herbert Marcus Adler, Sisters in Crime (1975), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Answer (366)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Era (51)  |  Find (998)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Preoccupation (7)  |  Progress (465)  |  Question (621)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Still (613)  |  View (488)

It was a great step in science when men became convinced that, in order to understand the nature of things, they must begin by asking, not whether a thing is good or bad, noxious or beneficial, but of what kind it is? And how much is there of it? Quality and Quantity were then first recognised as the primary features to be observed in scientific inquiry.
'Address to the Mathematical and Physical Sections of the British Association, Liverpool, 15 Sep 1870', The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890 edition, reprint 2003), Vol. 2, 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Kind (557)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Primary (80)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

It was the method which attracted me [to physics]—the experimental method, which was born with physics, and is now universal in science. It’s asking a question of nature, and listening for the answer from nature … the way in which you’re going about asking the question and detecting the answer. And in my view it’s this kind of method that attracts me.
From 'Asking Nature', collected in Lewis Wolpert and Alison Richards (eds.), Passionate Minds: The Inner World of Scientists (1997), 197.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attract (23)  |  Detect (44)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Kind (557)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Universal (189)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

It would not be difficult to come to an agreement as to what we understand by science. Science is the century-old endeavor to bring together by means of systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as thoroughgoing an association as possible. To put it boldly, it is the attempt at the posterior reconstruction of existence by the process of conceptualization. But when asking myself what religion is I cannot think of the answer so easily. And even after finding an answer which may satisfy me at this particular moment, I still remain convinced that I can never under any circumstances bring together, even to a slight extent, the thoughts of all those who have given this question serious consideration.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Association (46)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Bring (90)  |  Century (310)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easily (35)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extent (139)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moment (253)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceptible (6)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remain (349)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serious (91)  |  Slight (31)  |  Still (613)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Understand (606)  |  World (1774)

It’s the Heisenberg principle. Me asking the question changes the answer.
On caution collecting opinions from advisors to refine decision-making. As quoted in Michael Lewis, 'Obama’s Way', Vanity Fair (Oct 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Change (593)  |  Werner Heisenberg (42)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)

Knowing he [Bob Serber] was going to the [first atom bomb] test, I asked him how he planned to deal with the danger of rattlesnakes. He said, “I’ll take along a bottle of whiskey.” … I ended by asking, “What would you do about those possibilities [of what unknown phenomena might cause a nuclear explosion to propagate in the atmosphere]?” Bob replied, “Take a second bottle of whiskey.”
Edward Teller with Judith L. Shoolery, Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics (2001), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Cause (541)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Explosion (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Test (211)  |  Unknown (182)

Like other departments of philosophy, medicine began with an age of wonder. The accidents of disease and the features of death aroused surprise and stimulated interest, and a beginning was made when man first asked in astonishment, Why should these things be?
In 'The Evolution of Internal Medicine', Modern Medicine: Its Theory and Practice, (1907), Vol. 1, xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Age (499)  |  Ask (411)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Death (388)  |  Department (92)  |  Disease (328)  |  First (1283)  |  Interest (386)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)  |  Wonder (236)

Many psychologists ... thought by turning their attention to their own consciousness to be able to explain what happened when we were thnking. Or they sought to attain the same end by asking another person a question, by means of which certain processes of thought would be excited, and then by questioning the person about the introspection he had made. It is obvious ... that nothing can be discovered in such experiments.
An Introduction to Psychology (1912)
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Discover (553)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Person (363)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Thought (953)

My mother made me a scientist without ever intending to. Every other Jewish mother in Brooklyn would ask her child after school, “So? Did you learn anything today?” But not my mother. … “Izzy,” she would say, “did you ask a good question today?” That difference - asking good questions - made me become a scientist.
In letters column of New York Times (19 Jan 1988) from Donald Sheff, who quoted what his friend, Arthur Sackler, received in answer, upon asking Rabi why he became a scientist.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Become (815)  |  Brooklyn (3)  |  Child (307)  |  Difference (337)  |  Good (889)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mother (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Today (314)

Nobody in the world of policy appears to be asking what is best for society, wild fish or farmed fish. And what sort of farmed fish, anyway? Were this question to be asked, and answered honestly, we might find that our interests lay in prioritizing wild fish and making their ecosystems more productive by leaving them alone enough of the time.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (2008), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appear (118)  |  Ask (411)  |  Best (459)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Enough (340)  |  Farm (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Fish (120)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honestly (10)  |  Interest (386)  |  Leave Alone (2)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Policy (24)  |  Productive (32)  |  Question (621)  |  Society (326)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wild (87)  |  World (1774)

One of Darwin’s reviewers put the alternative strongly by asking “whether we are to believe that man is modified mud or modified monkey”.
In Letter to Thomas S. Spedding (19 May 1863), Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell (1881), Vol. 2, 376. [The mud is a reference to the Bible’s description in Genesis (2:7) that God formed man of the dust of the ground.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Mud (26)

Our scientific work in physics consists in asking questions about nature in the language that we possess and trying to get an answer from experiment by the means at our disposal. In this way quantum theory reminds us, as Bohr has put it, of the old wisdom that when searching for harmony in life one must never forget that in the drama of existence we are ourselves both players and spectators. It is understandable that in our scientific relation to nature our own activity becomes very important when we have to deal with parts of nature into which we can penetrate only by using the most elaborate tools.
The Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Theory (1958). In Steve Adams, Frontiers (2000), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Answer (366)  |  Become (815)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Both (493)  |  Consist (223)  |  Deal (188)  |  Drama (21)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Forget (115)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possess (156)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Work (1351)

Science is not about building a body of known “facts”. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good.
In Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen, The Science of Discworld (2014), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Belief (578)  |  Body (537)  |  Building (156)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Method (505)  |  Question (621)  |  Reality (261)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Whatever (234)

Scientists are supposed to make predictions, probably to prove they are human and can be as mistaken as anyone else. Long-range predictions are better to make because the audience to whom the prediction was made is no longer around to ask questions. The alternative... is to make conflicting predictions, so that one prediction may prove right.
'Fossils—The How and Why of Collecting and Storing', Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington (1969), 82, 597.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Ask (411)  |  Audience (26)  |  Better (486)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)

Scientists like myself merely use their gifts to show up that which already exists, and we look small compared to the artists who create works of beauty out of themselves. If a good fairy came and offered me back my youth, asking me which gifts I would rather have, those to make visible a thing which exists but which no man has ever seen before, or the genius needed to create, in a style of architecture never imagined before, the great Town Hall in which we are dining tonight, I might be tempted to choose the latter.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Artist (90)  |  Back (390)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fairy (9)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gift (104)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Offer (141)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Town Hall (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Visible (84)  |  Work (1351)  |  Youth (101)

Since the measuring device has been constructed by the observer … we have to remember that what we observe is not nature itself but nature exposed to our method of questioning. Our scientific work in physics consists in asking questions about nature in the language that we possess and trying to get an answer from experiment by the means that are at our disposal.
Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1958), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Consist (223)  |  Construct (124)  |  Device (70)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Language (293)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possess (156)  |  Question (621)  |  Remember (179)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Trying (144)  |  Work (1351)

Sometimes I am a little unkind to all my many friends in education … by saying that from the time it learns to talk every child makes a dreadful nuisance of itself by asking “Why?.” To stop this nuisance society has invented a marvellous system called education which, for the majority of people, brings to an end their desire to ask that question. The few failures of this system are known as scientists.
'The Making of a Scientist', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, June 1983, 403.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Call (769)  |  Child (307)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  Education (378)  |  End (590)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Failure (161)  |  Friend (168)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Little (707)  |  Majority (66)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Society (326)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)

That there is no such thing as the scientific method, one might easily discover by asking several scientists to define it. One would find, I am sure, that no two of them would exactly agree. Indeed, no two scientists work and think in just the same ways.
In Science in the Making (1957), 8-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  Ask (411)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discover (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Method (505)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

The art and science of asking questions is the source of all knowledge.
Epigraph, without source citation, in The Art & Science of Assessing General Education Outcomes: A Practical Guide (2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Source (93)

The first rule to proper diet? Ask them what they want and then give it to them. There are few exceptions.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Diet (54)  |  Exception (73)  |  First (1283)  |  Giving (11)  |  Proper (144)  |  Rule (294)  |  Want (497)

The greatest achievements in the science of this [twentieth] century are themselves the sources of more puzzlement than human beings have ever experienced. Indeed, it is likely that the twentieth century will be looked back at as the time when science provided the first close glimpse of the profundity of human ignorance. We have not reached solutions; we have only begun to discover how to ask questions.
In 'On Science and Certainty', Discover Magazine (Oct 1980).
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (36)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Century (310)  |  Discover (553)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Profundity (6)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reaching (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Source (93)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

The mythology of science asserts that with many different scientists all asking their own questions and evaluating the answers independently, whatever personal bias creeps into their individual answers is cancelled out when the large picture is put together. This might conceivably be so if scientists were women and men from all sorts of different cultural and social backgrounds who came to science with very different ideologies and interests. But since, in fact, they have been predominantly university-trained white males from privileged social backgrounds, the bias has been narrow and the product often reveals more about the investigator than about the subject being researched.
'Have Only Men Evolved?' Women Look at Biology Looking At Women, eds. Ruth Hubbard, Mary Sue Henifin, and Barbara Fried (1979).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Assert (66)  |  Background (43)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bias (20)  |  Cancel (3)  |  Creep (15)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Different (577)  |  Evaluate (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Ideology (14)  |  Independently (24)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Large (394)  |  Male (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Often (106)  |  Personal (67)  |  Picture (143)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Product (160)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Sort (49)  |  Subject (521)  |  Together (387)  |  Train (114)  |  University (121)  |  Whatever (234)  |  White (127)  |  Woman (151)

The picture of scientific method drafted by modern philosophy is very different from traditional conceptions. Gone is the ideal of a universe whose course follows strict rules, a predetermined cosmos that unwinds itself like an unwinding clock. Gone is the ideal of the scientist who knows the absolute truth. The happenings of nature are like rolling dice rather than like revolving stars; they are controlled by probability laws, not by causality, and the scientist resembles a gambler more than a prophet. He can tell you only his best posits—he never knows beforehand whether they will come true. He is a better gambler, though, than the man at the green table, because his statistical methods are superior. And his goal is staked higher—the goal of foretelling the rolling dice of the cosmos. If he is asked why he follows his methods, with what title he makes his predictions, he cannot answer that he has an irrefutable knowledge of the future; he can only lay his best bets. But he can prove that they are best bets, that making them is the best he can do—and if a man does his best, what else can you ask of him?
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951, 1973), 248-9. Collected in James Louis Jarrett and Sterling M. McMurrin (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy: A Book of Readings (1954), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Absoluteness (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Best (459)  |  Bet (12)  |  Better (486)  |  Causality (11)  |  Clock (47)  |  Conception (154)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Course (409)  |  Dice (21)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draft (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foretelling (4)  |  Future (429)  |  Gambler (7)  |  Goal (145)  |  Green (63)  |  Happening (58)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Irrefutable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Picture (143)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Prove (250)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Stake (19)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Superior (81)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The prize is such an extraordinary honor. It might seem unfair, however, to reward a person for having so much pleasure over the years, asking the maize plant to solve specific problems and then watching its responses.
Quoted in the New York Times, 11 Oct 1983.
Science quotes on:  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Honor (54)  |  Maize (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Response (53)  |  Reward (68)  |  Solve (130)  |  Specific (95)  |  Year (933)

The stories of Whitney’s love for experimenting are legion. At one time he received a letter asking if insects could live in a vacuum. Whitney took the letter to one of the members of his staff and asked the man if he cared to run an experiment on the subject. The man replied that there was no point in it, since it was well established that life could not exist without a supply of oxygen. Whitney, who was an inveterate student of wild life, replied that on his farm he had seen turtles bury themselves in mud each fall, and, although the mud was covered with ice and snow for months, emerge again in the spring. The man exclaimed, “Oh, you mean hibernation!” Whitney answered, “I don’t know what I mean, but I want to know if bugs can live in a vacuum.”
He proceeded down the hall and broached the subject to another member of the staff. Faced with the same lack of enthusiasm for pursuing the matter further, Whitney tried another illustration. “I’ve been told that you can freeze a goldfish solidly in a cake of ice, where he certainly can’t get much oxygen, and can keep him there for a month or two. But if you thaw him out carefully he seems none the worse for his experience.” The second scientist replied, “Oh, you mean suspended animation.” Whitney once again explained that his interest was not in the terms but in finding an answer to the question.
Finally Whitney returned to his own laboratory and set to work. He placed a fly and a cockroach in a bell jar and removed the air. The two insects promptly keeled over. After approximately two hours, however, when he gradually admitted air again, the cockroach waved its feelers and staggered to its feet. Before long, both the cockroach and the fly were back in action.
'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 357-358.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  Animation (6)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Bell (35)  |  Both (493)  |  Burial (7)  |  Car (71)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Cockroach (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farm (26)  |  Feeler (3)  |  Fly (146)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hibernation (3)  |  Hour (186)  |  Ice (54)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lack (119)  |  Legion (4)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Month (88)  |  Mud (26)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Point (580)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Removal (11)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Snow (37)  |  Spring (133)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supply (93)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Want (497)  |  Willis R. Whitney (17)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)

The task of asking nonliving matter to speak and the responsibility for interpreting its reply is that of physics.
Time: the Familiar Stranger (1987)
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Interpreting (5)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nonliving (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reply (56)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Speak (232)  |  Task (147)

There are no foolish questions and no man becomes a fool until he has stopped asking questions.
Quoted, without citation, in Frank Crane, American Magazine (May 1923), 95, 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Man (2251)  |  Question (621)

There is a story that once, not long after he came to Berlin, Planck forgot which room had been assigned to him for a lecture and stopped at the entrance office of the university to find out. Please tell me, he asked the elderly man in charge, 'In which room does Professor Planck lecture today?' The old man patted him on the shoulder 'Don't go there, young fellow,' he said 'You are much too young to understand the lectures of our learned Professor Planck'.
Anonymous
In Barbara Lovett Cline, Men Who Made a New Physics: Physicists and the Quantum Theory (1987), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Charge (59)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Find (998)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Office (71)  |  Old (481)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Please (65)  |  Professor (128)  |  Room (40)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Story (118)  |  Tell (340)  |  Today (314)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  University (121)  |  Young (227)

There is no question but that man’s heart outperforms all other hearts in existence. (The tortoise’s heart may last longer but it lives nowhere near as intensely.) Why man should be so long-lived is not known, but man, being what he is, is far more interested in asking why he does not live still longer.
In The Human Body: Its Structure and Operation (1963), 321. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 216.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Existence (456)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interest (386)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Lived (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Still (613)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Why (491)

There is one class of mind that loves to lean on rules and definitions, and another that discards them as far as possible. A faddist will generally ask for a definition of faddism, and one who is not a faddist will be impatient of being asked to give one.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Class (164)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discard (29)  |  Fad (10)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Lean (6)  |  Love (309)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rule (294)  |  Will (2355)

To call in the statistician after the experiment is done may be no more than asking him to perform a postmortem examination: he may be able to say what the experiment died of.
Presidential address to the first Indian Statistical Congress, Sankhya, (ca. 1938), 14-.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (695)  |  More (2559)  |  Perform (121)  |  Say (984)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Statistics (155)

Very few people, including authors willing to commit to paper, ever really read primary sources–certainly not in necessary depth and contemplation, and often not at all ... When writers close themselves off to the documents of scholarship, and then rely only on seeing or asking, they become conduits and sieves rather than thinkers. When, on the other hand, you study the great works of predecessors engaged in the same struggle, you enter a dialogue with human history and the rich variety of our own intellectual traditions. You insert yourself, and your own organizing powers, into this history–and you become an active agent, not merely a ‘reporter.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Author (167)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conduit (3)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Document (7)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enter (141)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Insert (3)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Merely (316)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Often (106)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Primary (80)  |  Read (287)  |  Really (78)  |  Rely (11)  |  Reporter (4)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sieve (3)  |  Source (93)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Variety (132)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

We do not ask for what useful purpose the birds do sing, for song is their pleasure since they were created for singing. Similarly, we ought not to ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the heavens ... The diversity of the phenomena of Nature is so great, and the treasures hidden in the heavens so rich, precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment.
From Mysterium Cosmographicum. Quote as translated in Carl Sagan, Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Bird (149)  |  Creation (327)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Precision (68)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Richness (14)  |  Secret (194)  |  Singing (19)  |  Song (37)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Why (491)

We do not ask what hope of gain makes a little bird warble, since we know that it takes delight in singing because it is for that very singing that the bird was made, so there is no need to ask why the human mind undertakes such toil in seeking out these secrets of the heavens. ... And just as other animals, and the human body, are sustained by food and drink, so the very spirit of Man, which is something distinct from Man, is nourished, is increased, and in a sense grows up on this diet of knowledge, and is more like the dead than the living if it is touched by no desire for these things.
Mysterium Cosmographicum. Translated by A. M. Duncan in The Secret of the Universe (1981), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Dead (59)  |  Delight (108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Diet (54)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Food (199)  |  Gain (145)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Increase (210)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Made (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Sense (770)  |  Singing (19)  |  Something (719)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Sustenance (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Toil (25)  |  Touch (141)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Why (491)

We live in an essential and unresolvable tension between our unity with nature and our dangerous uniqueness. Systems that attempt to place and make sense of us by focusing exclusively either on the uniqueness or the unity are doomed to failure. But we must not stop asking and questing because the answers are complex and ambiguous.
In 'Our Natural Place', Hen's Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1994, 2010), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Complex (188)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Doom (32)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Failure (161)  |  Focus (35)  |  Live (628)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Place (177)  |  Quest (39)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stop (80)  |  System (537)  |  Tension (24)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Unity (78)

We make a lot of mistakes in the environmental space. … We don’t do a good-enough job of asking, “What are the fundamentals of telling a good story?” And that is not statistics, it’s usually not science, or at least complex science. It’s people stories. … It’s got to have adventure, it’s got to be funny, it’s got to pull my heart strings, it’s got to have conflict, setting, character. It’s a story. And if it doesn’t have those things, it can be the best-meaning story in the world, and nobody’s going to buy it.
From interview with Dan Conover, 'A Conversation with Philippe Cousteau Jr.', Charleston City Paper (27 Jul 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Best (459)  |  Buy (20)  |  Character (243)  |  Complex (188)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Funny (11)  |  Good (889)  |  Heart (229)  |  Job (82)  |  Lot (151)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Nobody (104)  |  People (1005)  |  Pull (43)  |  Science (3879)  |  Setting (44)  |  Space (500)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Story (118)  |  String (21)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)  |  World (1774)

When I received the Nobel Prize, the only big lump sum of money I have ever seen, I had to do something with it. The easiest way to drop this hot potato was to invest it, to buy shares. I knew that World War II was coming and I was afraid that if I had shares which rise in case of war, I would wish for war. So I asked my agent to buy shares which go down in the event of war. This he did. I lost my money and saved my soul.
In The Crazy Ape (1970), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Ask (411)  |  Buy (20)  |  Case (99)  |  Coming (114)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Drop (76)  |  Ease (35)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hot (60)  |  Invest (18)  |  Loss (110)  |  Lump (4)  |  Money (170)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Potato (10)  |  Rise (166)  |  Save (118)  |  Share (75)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sum (102)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)  |  World War II (8)

When the solution is simple, God is answering. Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Answer (366)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cease (79)  |  Enter (141)  |  Face (212)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Observe (168)  |  Personal (67)  |  Realm (85)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. If what is seen is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively as meaningful, then we are engaged in art.
'What Artistic and Scientific Experience Have in Common', Menschen (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, Helen Dukas, Banesh Hoffmann, Albert Einstein, The Human Side (1981), 37-38. The article was published in a German magazine on modern art, upon a request from the editor, Walter Hasenclever, for a few paragraphs on the idea that there was a close connection between the artistic developments and the scientific results belonging to a given epoch. (The magazine name, and editor's name are given by Ze'ev Rosenkranz, The Einstein Scrapbook (2002), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Admire (18)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cease (79)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Connection (162)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experience (467)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Hope (299)  |  Language (293)  |  Logic (287)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observe (168)  |  Personal (67)  |  Portray (4)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Through (849)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

You cannot ask us to take sides against arithmetic.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ask (411)  |  Side (233)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Taking (9)

[On why are numbers beautiful?] It’s like asking why is Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony beautiful. If you don’t see why, someone can’t tell you. I know numbers are beautiful. If they aren’t beautiful, nothing is.
As quoted in Paul Hoffman, The Man who Loves Only Numbers (1998), 44.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  See (1081)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Tell (340)  |  Why (491)

[Richard P.] Feynman's cryptic remark, “no one is that much smarter ...,” to me, implies something Feynman kept emphasizing: that the key to his achievements was not anything “magical” but the right attitude, the focus on nature's reality, the focus on asking the right questions, the willingness to try (and to discard) unconventional answers, the sensitive ear for phoniness, self-deception, bombast, and conventional but unproven assumptions.
In book review of James Gleick's Genius, 'Complexities of Feynman', Science, 259 (22 Jan 1993), 22
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Answer (366)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Convention (14)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Cryptic (2)  |  Deception (8)  |  Discard (29)  |  Ear (68)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Richard P. Feynman (122)  |  Focus (35)  |  Implication (23)  |  Magic (86)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Question (621)  |  Reality (261)  |  Remark (28)  |  Right (452)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Deception (2)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Something (719)  |  Try (283)  |  Unconventional (4)  |  Unproven (5)  |  Willingness (10)

“But in the binary system,” Dale points out, handing back the squeezable glass, “the alternative to one isn’t minus one, it’s zero. That’s the beauty of it, mechanically.” “O.K. Gotcha. You’re asking me, What’s this minus one? I’ll tell you. It’s a plus one moving backward in time. This is all in the space-time foam, inside the Planck duration, don’t forget. The dust of points gives birth to time, and time gives birth to the dust of points. Elegant, huh? It has to be. It’s blind chance, plus pure math. They’re proving it, every day. Astronomy, particle physics, it’s all coming together. Relax into it, young fella. It feels great. Space-time foam.”
In Roger's Version: A Novel (1986), 304.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Backward (9)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Binary (12)  |  Birth (147)  |  Blind (95)  |  Chance (239)  |  Coming (114)  |  Dust (64)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foam (3)  |  Forget (115)  |  Glass (92)  |  Great (1574)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Minus One (4)  |  Moving (11)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Plus (43)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Space (500)  |  Space-Time (17)  |  System (537)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Young (227)  |  Zero (37)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.