Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Honor

Honor Quotes (54 quotes)


'Tis certain that a serious attention to the sciences and liberal arts softens and humanizes the temper, and cherishes those fine emotions in which true virtue and honor consist. It rarely, very rarely happens that a man of taste and learning is not, at least, an honest man, whatever frailties may attend him.
Essay XVIII, 'The Sceptic', Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects (1742, New ed. 1767), Vol. 1, 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consist (223)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Happen (274)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Learning (274)  |  Liberal Arts (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serious (91)  |  Taste (90)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Whatever (234)

The Mighty Task is Done

At last the mighty task is done;
Resplendent in the western sun
The Bridge looms mountain high;
Its titan piers grip ocean floor,
Its great steel arms link shore with shore,
Its towers pierce the sky.

On its broad decks in rightful pride,
The world in swift parade shall ride,
Throughout all time to be;
Beneath, fleet ships from every port,
Vast landlocked bay, historic fort,
And dwarfing all the sea.

To north, the Redwood Empires gates;
To south, a happy playground waits,
In Rapturous appeal;
Here nature, free since time began,
Yields to the restless moods of man,
Accepts his bonds of steel.

Launched midst a thousand hopes and fears,
Damned by a thousand hostile sneers,
Yet Neer its course was stayed,
But ask of those who met the foe
Who stood alone when faith was low,
Ask them the price they paid.

Ask of the steel, each strut and wire,
Ask of the searching, purging fire,
That marked their natal hour;
Ask of the mind, the hand, the heart,
Ask of each single, stalwart part,
What gave it force and power.

An Honored cause and nobly fought
And that which they so bravely wrought,
Now glorifies their deed,
No selfish urge shall stain its life,
Nor envy, greed, intrigue, nor strife,
Nor false, ignoble creed.

High overhead its lights shall gleam,
Far, far below lifes restless stream,
Unceasingly shall flow;
For this was spun its lithe fine form,
To fear not war, nor time, nor storm,
For Fate had meant it so.

Written upon completion of the building of the Golden Gate Bridge, May 1937. In Allen Brown, Golden Gate: biography of a Bridge (1965), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bay (5)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Bond (45)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Creed (27)  |  Deck (3)  |  Deed (34)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Envy (15)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flow (83)  |  Foe (9)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fort (2)  |  Free (232)  |  Gate (32)  |  Golden Gate Bridge (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greed (14)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Loom (20)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Parade (3)  |  Playground (6)  |  Poem (96)  |  Power (746)  |  Price (51)  |  Pride (78)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Ride (21)  |  Sea (308)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Ship (62)  |  Shore (24)  |  Single (353)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sneer (9)  |  South (38)  |  Steel (21)  |  Storm (51)  |  Stream (81)  |  Strut (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Task (147)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tower (42)  |  Vast (177)  |  War (225)  |  Western (45)  |  Wire (35)  |  World (1774)  |  Yield (81)

The Redwoods

Here, sown by the Creator's hand,
In serried ranks, the Redwoods stand;
No other clime is honored so,
No other lands their glory know.

The greatest of Earth's living forms,
Tall conquerors that laugh at storms;
Their challenge still unanswered rings,
Through fifty centuries of kings.

The nations that with them were young,
Rich empires, with their forts far-flung,
Lie buried now—their splendor gone;
But these proud monarchs still live on.

So shall they live, when ends our day,
When our crude citadels decay;
For brief the years allotted man,
But infinite perennials' span.

This is their temple, vaulted high,
And here we pause with reverent eye,
With silent tongue and awe-struck soul;
For here we sense life's proper goal;

To be like these, straight, true and fine,
To make our world, like theirs, a shrine;
Sink down, oh traveler, on your knees,
God stands before you in these trees.
In The Record: Volumes 60-61 (1938), 39.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Awe (43)  |  Brief (36)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Citadel (4)  |  Conqueror (8)  |  Creator (91)  |  Crude (31)  |  Decay (53)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Glory (58)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  Greatest (328)  |  High (362)  |  Infinite (231)  |  King (35)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nation (193)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Poem (96)  |  Proper (144)  |  Rank (67)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shrine (8)  |  Sink (37)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sow (11)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Straight (73)  |  Tall (11)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unanswered (8)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

A life that stood out as a gospel of self-forgetting service.
He could have added fortune to fame but caring for neither he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.
The centre of his world was the south where he was born in slavery some 79 years ago and where he did his work as a creative scientist.
Epitaph on tombstone at Tuskegee University Campus Cemetery, Alabama.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Care (186)  |  Caring (6)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Epitaph (19)  |  Fame (50)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Help (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Service (110)  |  Slavery (13)  |  South (38)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

A people that were to honor falsehood, defamation, fraud, and murder would be unable, indeed, to subsist for very long.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Defamation (2)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Long (790)  |  Murder (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Subsist (5)  |  Unable (24)

BRAIN, n. An apparatus with which we think that we think. That which distinguishes the man who is content to be something from the man who wishes to do something. A man of great wealth, or one who has been pitchforked into high station, has commonly such a headful of brain that his neighbors cannot keep their hats on. In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, brain is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  41.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Brain (270)  |  Care (186)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exemption (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Government (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Humour (116)  |  Man (2251)  |  Office (71)  |  Pitchfork (2)  |  Reward (68)  |  Something (719)  |  Station (29)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wealth (94)

Common sense, the half-truths of a deceitful society, is honored as the honest truths of a frank world.
In Social Amnesia (1975), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Deceit (7)  |  Frank (4)  |  Honest (50)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Creation science has not entered the curriculum for a reason so simple and so basic that we often forget to mention it: because it is false, and because good teachers understand why it is false. What could be more destructive of that most fragile yet most precious commodity in our entire intellectual heritage—good teaching—than a bill forcing our honorable teachers to sully their sacred trust by granting equal treatment to a doctrine not only known to be false, but calculated to undermine any general understanding of science as an enterprise?.
In 'The Verdict on Creationism' The Sketical Inquirer (Winter 1987/88), 12, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Bill (14)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Commodity (5)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creation Science (2)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Enter (141)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equal (83)  |  False (100)  |  Forcing (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Fragile (21)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Known (454)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Precious (41)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Trust (66)  |  Undermining (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)

Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.
Aristotle
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Consist (223)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Possess (156)

Every discipline must be honored for reason other than its utility, otherwise it yields no enthusiasm for industry.
For both reasons, I consider mathematics the chief subject for the common school. No more highly honored exercise for the mind can be found; the buoyancy [Spannkraft] which it produces is even greater than that produced by the ancient languages, while its utility is unquestioned.
In 'Mathematischer Lehrplan für Realschulen' Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 167. (Mathematics Curriculum for Secondary Schools). As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Both (493)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Chief (97)  |  Common (436)  |  Consider (416)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Greater (288)  |  Honored (3)  |  Industry (137)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reason (744)  |  School (219)  |  Subject (521)  |  Unquestioned (7)  |  Utility (49)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Yield (81)

I confess that Magic teacheth many superfluous things, and curious prodigies for ostentation; leave them as empty things, yet be not ignorant of their causes. But those things which are for the profit of men—for the turning away of evil events, for the destroying of sorceries, for the curing of diseases, for the exterminating of phantasms, for the preserving of life, honor, or fortune—may be done without offense to God or injury to religion, because they are, as profitable, so necessary.
In De Occulta Philosophia (1533), Vol. 1. Translation by J.F. (1651) reprinted as The Philosophy of Natural Magic (1913), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Confess (42)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curious (91)  |  Disease (328)  |  Empty (80)  |  Event (216)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exterminate (8)  |  Fortune (49)  |  God (757)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Injury (36)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magic (86)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Offense (4)  |  Phantasm (3)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Profit (52)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sorcery (5)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)

I grow daily to honor facts more and more, and theory less and less.
Science quotes on:  |  Daily (87)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Grow (238)  |  More (2559)  |  Theory (970)

I love to read the dedications of old books written in monarchies–for they invariably honor some (usually insignificant) knight or duke with fulsome words of sycophantic insincerity, praising him as the light of the universe (in hopes, no doubt, for a few ducats to support future work); this old practice makes me feel like such an honest and upright man, by comparison, when I put a positive spin, perhaps ever so slightly exaggerated, on a grant proposal.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Dedication (11)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Duke (2)  |  Exaggerate (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Future (429)  |  Grant (73)  |  Honest (50)  |  Hope (299)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Knight (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Old (481)  |  Positive (94)  |  Practice (204)  |  Praise (26)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Read (287)  |  Slightly (3)  |  Spin (26)  |  Support (147)  |  Universe (857)  |  Upright (2)  |  Usually (176)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

I well know what a spendidly great difference there is [between] a man and a bestia when I look at them from a point of view of morality. Man is the animal which the Creator has seen fit to honor with such a magnificent mind and has condescended to adopt as his favorite and for which he has prepared a nobler life; indeed, sent out for its salvation his only son; but all this belongs to another forum; it behooves me like a cobbler to stick to my last, in my own workshop, and as a naturalist to consider man and his body, for I know scarcely one feature by which man can be distinguished from apes, if it be not that all the apes have a gap between their fangs and their other teeth, which will be shown by the results of further investigation.
T. Fredbärj (ed.), Menniskans Cousiner (Valda Avhandlingar av Carl von Linné nr, 21) (1955), 4. Trans. Gunnar Broberg, 'Linnaeus's Classification of Man', in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.), Linnaeus: The Man and his Work (1983), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Beast (55)  |  Behoove (6)  |  Belong (162)  |  Body (537)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creator (91)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Fit (134)  |  Gap (33)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Result (677)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Teeth (43)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Workshop (14)

I wish there was a verb to otter, ottering around in pure play, to honour Otter ludens, which plays in my mind long after I’ve seen one.
In 'Fifty Years On, the Silence of Rachel Carson’s Spring Consumes Us', The Guardian (25 Sep 2012),
Science quotes on:  |  Honour (56)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Otter (2)  |  Play (112)  |  Pure (291)  |  Wish (212)  |  Word (619)

If the God of revelation is most appropriately worshipped in the temple of religion, the God of nature may be equally honored in the temple of science. Even from its lofty minarets the philosopher may summon the faithful to prayer, and the priest and sage exchange altars without the compromise of faith or knowledge.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, Both Ancient and Modern (1891), 507.
Science quotes on:  |  Altar (10)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Faith (203)  |  Faithful (10)  |  God (757)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Priest (28)  |  Religion (361)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Sage (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Summon (10)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Worship (32)

If today you can take a thing like evolution and make it a crime to teach it in the public schools, tomorrow you can make it a crime to teach it in the private schools, and next year you can make it a crime to teach it to the hustings or in the church. At the next session you may ban books and the newspapers. Soon you may set Catholic against Protestant and Protestant against Protestant, and try to foist your own religion upon the minds of men. If you can do one you can do the other. Ignorance and fanaticism are ever busy and need feeding. Always it is feeding and gloating for more. Today it is the public school teachers; tomorrow the private. The next day the preachers and the lecturers, the magazines, the books, the newspapers. After a while, Your Honor, it is the setting of man against man and creed against creed until with flying banners and beating drums we are marching backward to the glorious ages of the sixteenth century when bigots lighted fagots to burn the men who dared to bring any intelligence and enlightenment and culture to the human mind.
Darrow’s concluding remarks before adjournment of the second day of the Scopes Monkey Trial, Dayton, Tennessee (Monday, 13 Jul 1925). In The World's Most Famous Court Trial: Tennessee Evolution Case: a Complete Stenographic Report of the Famous Court Test of the Tennessee Anti-Evolution Act, at Dayton, July 10 to 21, 1925 (1925), Second Day's Proceedings, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Banner (7)  |  Bigot (6)  |  Book (392)  |  Burn (87)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Century (310)  |  Church (56)  |  Creed (27)  |  Crime (38)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drum (8)  |  Education (378)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flying (72)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Religion (361)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Try (283)  |  Year (933)

If you do not rest on the good foundation of nature, you will labour with little honor and less profit.
As quoted in George Clausen, Six Lectures on Painting: Delivered to the Students of the Royal Arts in London, January, 1904 (1906), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Good (889)  |  Labour (98)  |  Little (707)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Profit (52)  |  Rest (280)  |  Will (2355)

In 1944 Erwin Schroedinger, stimulated intellectually by Max Delbruck, published a little book called What is life? It was an inspiration to the first of the molecular biologists, and has been, along with Delbruck himself, credited for directing the research during the next decade that solved the mystery of how 'like begat like.' Max was awarded this Prize in 1969, and rejoicing in it, he also lamented that the work for which he was honored before all the peoples of the world was not something which he felt he could share with more than a handful. Samuel Beckett's contributions to literature, being honored at the same time, seemed to Max somehow universally accessible to anyone. But not his. In his lecture here Max imagined his imprisonment in an ivory tower of science.
'The Polymerase Chain Reaction', Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1993). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1991-1995 (1997), 103.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Award (13)  |  Samuel Beckett (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Credit (20)  |  Decade (59)  |  Max Ludwig Henning Delbrück (8)  |  First (1283)  |  Handful (13)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imprisonment (2)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Ivory Tower (5)  |  Lament (11)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literature (103)  |  Little (707)  |  Molecular Biologist (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Next (236)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  People (1005)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Erwin Schrödinger (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Share (75)  |  Simulation (7)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tower (42)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

In ancient days two aviators procured to themselves wings. Daedalus flew safely through the middle air and was duly honored on his landing. Icarus soared upwards to the sun till the wax melted which bound his wings and his flight ended in fiasco. In weighing their achievements, there is something to be said for Icarus. The classical authorities tell us that he was only “doing a stunt,” but I prefer to think of him as the man who brought to light a serious constructional defect in the flying machines of his day.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (347)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Classical (45)  |  Defect (31)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Fiasco (2)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Icarus (2)  |  Light (607)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melt (16)  |  Serious (91)  |  Soar (23)  |  Something (719)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wax (13)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wing (75)

In this country, science is almost exclusively prosecuted by those engaged in the laborious and exhaustive employment of imparting instruction. Science among us brings comparatively little emolument and is accompanied with but little honor.
In Letter (3 Feb 1873) to the Committee of Arrangements, in Proceedings of the Farewell Banquet to Professor Tyndall (4 Feb 1873), 19. Reprinted as 'On the Importance of the Cultivation of Science', The Popular Science Monthly (1873), Vol. 2, 646.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Country (251)  |  Emolument (2)  |  Employment (32)  |  Exhaustive (2)  |  Imparting (6)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Little (707)  |  Science (3879)

It is good to realize that if love and peace can prevail on Earth, and if we can teach our children to honor nature’s gifts, the joys and beauties of the outdoors will be here forever.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Earth (996)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gift (104)  |  Good (889)  |  Joy (107)  |  Love (309)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outdoors (2)  |  Peace (108)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Realize (147)  |  Teach (277)  |  Will (2355)

It is not easy to imagine how little interested a scientist usually is in the work of any other, with the possible exception of the teacher who backs him or the student who honors him.
Pensées d'un Biologiste (1939). Translated in The Substance of Man (1962), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Ease (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Exception (73)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Interest (386)  |  Little (707)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)

It is true that Fourier had the opinion that the principal end of mathematics was public utility and the explanation of natural phenomena; but a philosopher as he is should have known that the unique end of science is the honor of the human mind and that from this point of view a question of [the theory of] number is as important as a question of the system of the world.
From letter to Legendre, translation as given in F.R. Moulton, 'The Influence of Astronomy on Mathematics', Science (10 Mar 1911), N.S. Vol. 33, No. 845, 359. A different translation begins, “It is true that M. Fourier believed…” on the Karl Jacobi Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  End (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Important (209)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Principal (63)  |  Public (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Unique (67)  |  Utility (49)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

It is true that M. Fourier believed that the main aim of mathematics was public utility and the explanation of natural phenomena; but a philosopher of his ability ought to have known that the sole aim of science is the honour of the human intellect, and that on this ground a problem in numbers is as important as a problem on the system of the world.
In Letter to Legendre, as quoted in an Address by Emile Picard to the Congress of Science and Art, St. Louis (22 Sep 1904), translated in 'Development of Mathematical Analysis', The Mathematical Gazette (Jul 1905), 3, No. 52, 200. A different translation begins, “It is true that Fourier had the opinion…” on the Karl Jacobi Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Aim (165)  |  End (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fourier (5)  |  Ground (217)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Principal (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sole (49)  |  System (537)  |  Title (18)  |  True (212)  |  Utility (49)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

It is worthy the observing, that there is no passion in the mind of man, so weak, but it mates, and masters, the fear of death; and therefore, death is no such terrible enemy, when a man hath so many attendants about him, that can win the combat of him. Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupieth it.
In 'Of Death', Essays (1625, 1883), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspire (13)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Combat (15)  |  Death (388)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Fear (197)  |  Grief (18)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mate (6)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mind Of Man (7)  |  Observe (168)  |  Passion (114)  |  Preoccupy (4)  |  Revenge (10)  |  Slight (31)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Weak (71)  |  Win (52)  |  Worthy (34)

Learning is wealth to the poor, an honor to the rich, an aid to the young, and a support and comfort to the aged.
As cited in Abram N. Coleman (ed.), Proverbial Wisdom: Proverbs, Maxims and Ethical Sentences (1903), 130. Often-seen attribution to John C. Lavater is probably erroneous. Several quote collections of the same era give the quote without citation. In Tryon Edwards, Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 294, this quote is given without citation, followed by a blank line separator, and then an unrelated quote by Lavater. This juxtaposition is likely the source of confusion in attribution.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Poor (136)  |  Rich (62)  |  Support (147)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Young (227)

Leo Szilard’s Ten Commandments:
1. Recognize the connections of things and the laws of conduct of men, so that you may know what you are doing.
2. Let your acts be directed towards a worthy goal, but do not ask if they will reach it; they are to be models and examples, not means to an end.
3. Speak to all men as you do to yourself, with no concern for the effect you make, so that you do not shut them out from your world; lest in isolation the meaning of life slips out of sight and you lose the belief in the perfection of the creation.
4. Do not destroy what you cannot create.
5. Touch no dish, except that you are hungry.
6. Do not covet what you cannot have.
7. Do not lie without need.
8. Honor children. Listen reverently to their words and speak to them with infinite love.
9. Do your work for six years; but in the seventh, go into solitude or among strangers, so that the memory of your friends does not hinder you from being what you have become.
10. Lead your life with a gentle hand and be ready to leave whenever you are called.
Circulated by Mrs. Szilard in July 1964, in a letter to their friends (translated by Dr. Jacob Bronowski). As printed in Robert J. Levine, Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research (1988), 431.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Call (769)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Connection (162)  |  Covet (2)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Example (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hinder (12)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Lose (159)  |  Love (309)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Model (102)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solitude (18)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Let the farmer for evermore be honored in his calling, for they who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God.
In Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations (1891), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Calling (3)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Earth (996)  |  Farmer (32)  |  God (757)  |  Labor (107)  |  People (1005)

No one can take from us the joy of the first becoming aware of something, the so-called discovery. But if we also demand the honor, it can be utterly spoiled for us, for we are usually not the first. What does discovery mean, and who can say that he has discovered this or that? After all it’s pure idiocy to brag about priority; for it’s simply unconscious conceit, not to admit frankly that one is a plagiarist.
Epigraph to Lancelot Law Whyte, The Unconscious before Freud (1960).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Call (769)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Demand (123)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  First (1283)  |  Joy (107)  |  Mean (809)  |  Plagiarism (8)  |  Priority (10)  |  Pure (291)  |  Say (984)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Something (719)  |  Usually (176)

No person was ever honored for what he received; honor has been the reward for what he gave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Give (202)  |  Honored (3)  |  Person (363)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reward (68)

O comfortable allurement, O ravishing perswasion, to deal with a Science, whose subject is so Auncient, so pure, so excellent, so surmounting all creatures... By Numbers propertie ... we may... arise, clime, ascend, and mount up (with Speculative winges) in spirit, to behold in the Glas of creation, the Forme of Formes, the Exemplar Number of all things Numerable... Who can remaine, therefore, unpersuaded, to love, allow, and honor the excellent sciehce of Arithmatike?
John Dee
'Mathematicall Preface', in H. Billingsley, trans. The Elements of Geometry of the most Aunceint Philosopher Euclide of Megara (1570), in J. L. Hellbron, Weighing Imponderables and Other Quantitative Science around 1800 (1993), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Allurement (2)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deal (188)  |  Exemplar (2)  |  Love (309)  |  Mount (42)  |  Number (699)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)

Science distinguishes a Man of Honor from one of those Athletic Brutes whom undeservedly we call Heroes.
Science quotes on:  |  Athletic (4)  |  Brute (28)  |  Call (769)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Hero (42)  |  Man (2251)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Undeserved (3)

Society heaps honors on the unique, creative personality, but not until he has been dead for fifty years.
In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Creative (137)  |  Death (388)  |  Fame (50)  |  Personality (62)  |  Society (326)  |  Unique (67)  |  Year (933)

The great testimony of history shows how often in fact the development of science has emerged in response to technological and even economic needs, and how in the economy of social effort, science, even of the most abstract and recondite kind, pays for itself again and again in providing the basis for radically new technological developments. In fact, most people—when they think of science as a good thing, when they think of it as worthy of encouragement, when they are willing to see their governments spend substance upon it, when they greatly do honor to men who in science have attained some eminence—have in mind that the conditions of their life have been altered just by such technology, of which they may be reluctant to be deprived.
In 'Contemporary World', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1948), 4, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Basis (173)  |  Condition (356)  |  Deprivation (5)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Honour (56)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Pay (43)  |  People (1005)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Providing (5)  |  Radical (25)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Response (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Social (252)  |  Spend (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Willing (44)  |  Worthy (34)

The history of a species, or any natural phenomenon that requires unbroken continuity in a world of trouble, works like a batting streak. All are games of a gambler playing with a limited stake against a house with infinite resources. The gambler must eventually go bust. His aim can only be to stick around as long as possible, to have some fun while he’s at it, and, if he happens to be a moral agent as well, to worry about staying the course with honor.
In Bully for Brontosaurus: Reflections in Natural History (1991), 471-472.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Agent (70)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bust (2)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Course (409)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Fun (38)  |  Gambler (7)  |  Game (101)  |  Happen (274)  |  History (673)  |  House (140)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Long (790)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Possible (552)  |  Require (219)  |  Resource (63)  |  Species (401)  |  Stake (19)  |  Stay (25)  |  Stick (24)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

The honor you have given us goes not to us as a crew, but to ... all Americans, who believed, who persevered with us. What Apollo has begun we hope will spread out in many directions, not just in space, but underneath the seas, and in the cities to tell us unforgettably what we will and must do. There are footprints on the moon. Those footprints belong to each and every one of you, to all mankind. They are there because of the blood, sweat, and tears of millions of people. Those footprints are the symbol of true human spirit.
From his acceptance speech (13 Aug 1969) for the Medal of Freedom presented to him as one of the three astronauts on the first manned moon landing mission. In Leon Wagener, One Giant Leap: Neil Armstrong's Stellar American Journey (2004), 226.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Blood (134)  |  City (78)  |  Crew (9)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Million (114)  |  Moon (237)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ocean (202)  |  People (1005)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Sea (308)  |  Space (500)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spread (83)  |  Spreading (5)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tear (42)  |  Tears (2)  |  Tell (340)  |  True (212)  |  Underneath (4)  |  Will (2355)

The land! That is where our roots are. There is the basis of our physical life. The farther we get away from the land, the greater our insecurity. From the land comes everything that supports life, everything we use for the service of physical life. The land has not collapsed or shrunk in either extent or productivity. It is there waiting to honor all the labor we are willing to invest in it, and able to tide us across any dislocation of economic conditions.
Advice during the Great Depression, placed in an advertisement, 'Henry Ford on Self-Help', Literary Digest (29 Jun 1932), 113, No. 12, 29, and various other magazines.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Condition (356)  |  Depression (24)  |  Dislocation (2)  |  Distance (161)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extent (139)  |  Farther (51)  |  Food Security (6)  |  Greater (288)  |  Insecurity (3)  |  Invest (18)  |  Labor (107)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Physical (508)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Root (120)  |  Service (110)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Support (147)  |  Tide (34)  |  Use (766)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Willing (44)

The man who has grit enough to bring about the afforestation or the irrigation of a country is not less worthy of honor than its conqueror.
As given in David Starr Jordan, War and the Breed: The Relation of War to the Downfall of Nations (1915), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Conqueror (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Enough (340)  |  Irrigation (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Worth (169)

The moral attitudes of a people that is supported by religion need always aim at preserving and promoting the sanity and vitality of the community and its individuals, since otherwise this community is bound to perish. A people that were to honor falsehood, defamation, fraud, and murder would be unable, indeed, to subsist for very long.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Community (104)  |  Defamation (2)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Long (790)  |  Moral (195)  |  Murder (13)  |  Need (290)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  People (1005)  |  Perish (50)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Promote (29)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sanity (9)  |  Subsist (5)  |  Support (147)  |  Unable (24)  |  Vitality (23)

The motive for the study of mathematics is insight into the nature of the universe. Stars and strata, heat and electricity, the laws and processes of becoming and being, incorporate mathematical truths. If language imitates the voice of the Creator, revealing His heart, mathematics discloses His intellect, repeating the story of how things came into being. And Value of Mathematics, appealing as it does to our energy and to our honor, to our desire to know the truth and thereby to live as of right in the household of God, is that it establishes us in larger and larger certainties. As literature develops emotion, understanding, and sympathy, so mathematics develops observation, imagination, and reason.
In A Theory of Motives, Ideals and Values in Education (1907), 406.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Creator (91)  |  Desire (204)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Energy (344)  |  Establish (57)  |  God (757)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Household (8)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Incorporate (9)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Larger (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Literature (103)  |  Live (628)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Right (452)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Story (118)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Study (653)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Voice (52)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what it was in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence that at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective position, motions, and general affects of all these entities at any time in the past or future. Physical astronomy, the branch of knowledge that does the greatest honor to the human mind, gives us an idea, albeit imperfect, of what such an intelligence would be. The simplicity of the law by which the celestial bodies move, and the relations of their masses and distances, permit analysis to follow their motions up to a certain point; and in order to determine the state of the system of these great bodies in past or future centuries, it suffices for the mathematician that their position and their velocity be given by observation for any moment in time. Man owes that advantage to the power of the instrument he employs, and to the small number of relations that it embraces in its calculations. But ignorance of the different causes involved in the production of events, as well as their complexity, taken together with the imperfection of analysis, prevents our reaching the same certainty about the vast majority of phenomena. Thus there are things that are uncertain for us, things more or less probable, and we seek to compensate for the impossibility of knowing them by determining their different degrees of likelihood. So it was that we owe to the weakness of the human mind one of the most delicate and ingenious of mathematical theories, the science of chance or probability.
'Recherches, 1º, sur l'Intégration des Équations Différentielles aux Différences Finies, et sur leur Usage dans la Théorie des Hasards' (1773, published 1776). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 8, 144-5, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Degree (276)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Owe (71)  |  Past (337)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Probability (130)  |  Production (183)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weakness (48)

The privilege is not allowed even to genius in this world to inspect its own elements, and read its own destiny, and it is perhaps well for mankid that it is so. Could we lift the curtain which hides our future lives, and glance hastily at the misfortunes, the vexations, and the disappointments which await us, we should be discouraged from attempting the performance of even of such deeds as are destined eventually to crown us with honor.
In a book of his reminiscenses, Oliver Hampton Smith, years after his first meeting with Morse, described the inventor - who had by then overcome the initial scepticism over his invention, but instead needed to vigorously defend his exclusive right of property in the magnetic telegraph.
Early Indiana Trials and Sketches (1858), 414.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Crown (38)  |  Deed (34)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Element (310)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glance (34)  |  Hastily (7)  |  Hide (69)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Misfortune (12)  |  Samuel F. B. Morse (9)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Performance (48)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Property (168)  |  Read (287)  |  Right (452)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

The prize is such an extraordinary honor. It might seem unfair, however, to reward a person for having so much pleasure over the years, asking the maize plant to solve specific problems and then watching its responses.
Quoted in the New York Times, 11 Oct 1983.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Maize (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Problem (676)  |  Response (53)  |  Reward (68)  |  Solve (130)  |  Specific (95)  |  Year (933)

The school of Plato has advanced the interests of the race as much through geometry as through philosophy. The modern engineer, the navigator, the astronomer, built on the truths which those early Greeks discovered in their purely speculative investigations. And if the poetry, statesmanship, oratory, and philosophy of our day owe much to Plato’s divine Dialogues, our commerce, our manufactures, and our science are equally indebted to his Conic Sections. Later instances may be abundantly quoted, to show that the labors of the mathematician have outlasted those of the statesman, and wrought mightier changes in the condition of the world. Not that we would rank the geometer above the patriot, but we claim that he is worthy of equal honor.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 228.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Build (204)  |  Change (593)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conic Section (8)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divine (112)  |  Early (185)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greek (107)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labor (107)  |  Late (118)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Modern (385)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Owe (71)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Purely (109)  |  Quote (42)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Statesmanship (2)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Worthy (34)

The sole end of science is the honor of the human mind.
From Letter to Legendre, as quoted in an Address by Emile Picard to the Congress of Science and Art, St. Louis (22 Sep 1904), translated in 'Development of Mathematical Analysis', The Mathematical Gazette (Jul 1905), 3, No. 52, 200. The word “sole” is also seen translated as “unique” or “real”. This is part of a longer quote which begins, “It is true that M. Fourier believed that…” on the Karl Jacobi Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  End (590)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Real (149)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sole (49)  |  Unique (67)

There has not been any science so much esteemed and honored as this of mathematics, nor with so much industry and vigilance become the care of great men, and labored in by the potentates of the world, viz. emperors, kings, princes, etc.
In 'On the Usefulness of Mathematics', in Works (1840), Vol. 2, 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Care (186)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Great (1574)  |  Honored (3)  |  Industry (137)  |  King (35)  |  Labor (107)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Potentate (2)  |  Prince (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Vigilance (5)  |  World (1774)

There is a reward structure in science that is very interesting: Our highest honors go to those who disprove the findings of the most revered among us. So Einstein is revered not just because he made so many fundamental contributions to science, but because he found an imperfection in the fundamental contribution of Isaac Newton.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Contribution (89)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Finding (30)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Reward (68)  |  Science (3879)  |  Structure (344)

This is the geologist—this works with the scalpel—and this is a mathematician.
, Gentlemen! to you the first honors always:
Your facts are useful and real—and yet they are not my dwelling;
(I but enter by them to an area of my dwelling.)
In Leaves of Grass (1867), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Real (149)  |  Scalpel (4)  |  Useful (250)  |  Work (1351)

This new knowledge has all to do with honor and country but it has nothing to do directly with defending our country except to help make it worth defending.
Explaining the value of building Fermilab’s first accelerator in testimony to Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy (17 Apr 1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerator (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Country (251)  |  Defending (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Help (105)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Worth (169)

To take those fools in clerical garb seriously is to show them too much honor.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Clerical (2)  |  Fool (116)  |  Garb (6)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Show (346)

Watch the stars, and from them learn. To the Master’s honor all must turn, each in its track, without a sound, forever tracing Newton’s ground.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Forever (103)  |  Ground (217)  |  Learn (629)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Newton (10)  |  Sound (183)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Trace (103)  |  Track (38)  |  Turn (447)  |  Watch (109)

We must draw our standards from the natural world. … We must honor with the humility of the wise the bounds of that natural world and the mystery which lies beyond them, admitting that there is something in the order of being which evidently exceeds all our competence.
In speech 'Politics and Conscience' written upon receiving an honorary degree from the University of Toulouse, delivered by Tom Stoppard because Havel was forbidden to travel abroad. First published in Czech, collected in The Natural World as Political Problem: Essays on Modern Man (1984). As translated by Erazim Kohák and Roger Scruton in Salisbury Review (Jan 1985), No. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bound (119)  |  Competence (11)  |  Draw (137)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Exceed (9)  |  Humility (28)  |  Lie (364)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Order (632)  |  Something (719)  |  Standard (57)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)

[Audubon’s works are] the most splendid monuments which art has erected in honor of ornithology.
Introduction by Jas. Grant Wilson's to John James Audubon and Lucy Audubon (editor), The Life of John James Audubon: the Naturalist (1869), iv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  John James Audubon (9)  |  Erect (6)  |  Honour (56)  |  Monument (45)  |  Most (1731)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.