Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Embrace

Embrace Quotes (46 quotes)

... the besetting danger is not so much of embracing falsehood for truth, as of mistaking a part of the truth for the whole.
'Coleridge', essay in Dissertations and Discussions: Political, Philosophical, and Historical (1864), Vol. 2, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Beset (2)  |  Danger (115)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Part (222)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)

Copernicus, who rightly did condemn
This eldest systeme, form’d a wiser scheme;
In which he leaves the Sun at Rest, and rolls
The Orb Terrestial on its proper Poles;
Which makes the Night and Day by this Career,
And by its slow and crooked Course the Year.
The famous Dane, who oft the Modern guides,
To Earth and Sun their Provinces divides:
The Earth's Rotation makes the Night and Day,
The Sun revolving through th'Eccliptic Way
Effects the various seasons of the Year,
Which in their Turn for happy Ends appear.
This Scheme or that, which pleases best, embrace,
Still we the Fountain of their Motion trace.
Kepler asserts these Wonders may be done
By the Magnetic Vertue of the Sun,
Which he, to gain his End, thinks fit to place
Full in the Center of that mighty Space,
Which does the Spheres, where Planets roll, include,
And leaves him with Attractive Force endu'd.
The Sun, thus seated, by Mechanic Laws,
The Earth, and every distant Planet draws;
By which Attraction all the Planets found
Within his reach, are turn'd in Ether round.
In Creation: A Philosophical Poem in Seven Books (1712), book 2, l. 430-53, p.78-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Best (459)  |  Career (75)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Course (409)  |  Divide (75)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fit (134)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gain (145)  |  Guide (97)  |  Happy (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Modern (385)  |  Motion (310)  |  Orb (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Please (65)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pole (46)  |  Proper (144)  |  Province (35)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Season (47)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Year (933)

L’Astronomie est utile, parce qu’elle nous élève au-dessus de nous-mêmes; elle est utile, parce qu’elle est grande; elle est utile, parce qu’elle est belle… C’est elle qui nous montre combien l’homme est petit par le corps et combien il est grand par l’esprit, puisque cette immensité éclatante où son corps n’est qu’un point obscur, son intelligence peut l’embrasser tout entière et en goûter la silencieuse harmonie.
Astronomy is useful because it raises us above ourselves; it is useful because it is grand[; it is useful because it is beautiful]… It shows us how small is man’s body, how great his mind, since his intelligence can embrace the whole of this dazzling immensity, where his body is only an obscure point, and enjoy its silent harmony.
In La Valeur de la Science (1904), 276, translated by George Bruce Halsted, in The Value of Science (1907), 84. Webmaster added the meaning of “elle est utile, parce qu’elle est belle,” in brackets, which was absent in Halsted’s translation.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Body (537)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Grand (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Point (580)  |  Raising (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Silent (29)  |  Small (477)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)

Naturae vero rerum vis atque maiestas in omnibus momentis fide caret si quis modo partes eius ac non totam conplectatur animo.
The power and majesty of the nature of the universe at every turn lacks credence if one’s mind embraces parts of it only and not the whole.
In Pliny: Natural History (1947), Vol. 2, Book 7, 511, as translated by H. Rackham
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Lack (119)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Part (222)  |  Power (746)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Circle (110)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Creature (233)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Desire (204)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Free (232)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Inner (71)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Optical (11)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (363)  |  Personal (67)  |  Prison (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Security (47)  |  Separate (143)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Strive (46)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Widen (10)

America has never been united by blood or birth or soil. We are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests and teach us what it means to be citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every citizen must uphold them. And every immigrant, by embracing these ideals, makes our country more, not less, American.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  American (46)  |  Background (43)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (147)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bound (119)  |  Child (307)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Country (251)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Interest (386)  |  Less (103)  |  Lift (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Principle (507)  |  Soil (86)  |  Teach (277)  |  United (14)

At Gabriel College there was a very holy object on the high altar of the Oratory, covered with a black velvet cloth... At the height of the invocation the Intercessor lifted the cloth to reveal in the dimness a glass dome inside which there was something too distant to see, until he pulled a string attached to a shutter above, letting a ray of sunlight through to strike the dome exactly. Then it became clear: a little thing like a weathervane, with four sails black on one side and white on the other, began to whirl around as the light struck it. It illustrated a moral lesson, the Intercessor explained, for the black of ignorance fled from the light, whereas the wisdom of white rushed to embrace it.
[Alluding to Crookes's radiometer.]
Northern Lights (2001), 149.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Altar (10)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Black (42)  |  College (66)  |  Sir William Crookes (9)  |  Dome (8)  |  Explain (322)  |  Glass (92)  |  High (362)  |  Holy (34)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Lift (55)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Moral (195)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pull (43)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Sail (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Side (233)  |  Something (719)  |  Strike (68)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Whirl (8)  |  White (127)  |  Wisdom (221)

At quite uncertain times and places,
The atoms left their heavenly path,
And by fortuitous embraces,
Engendered all that being hath.
And though they seem to cling together,
And form 'associations' here,
Yet, soon or late, they burst their tether,
And through the depths of space career.
From 'Molecular Evolution', Nature, 8, 1873. In Lewis Campbell and William Garnett, The Life of James Clerk Maxwell (1882), 637.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bond (45)  |  Burst (39)  |  Career (75)  |  Depth (94)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Late (118)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Path (144)  |  Poem (96)  |  Soon (186)  |  Space (500)  |  Tether (2)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Uncertain (44)

Between the lowest and the highest degree of spiritual and corporal perfection, there is an almost infinite number of intermediate degrees. The succession of degrees comprises the Universal Chain. It unites all beings, ties together all worlds, embraces all the spheres. One SINGLE BEING is outside this chain, and this is HE who made it.
Contemplation de la nature (1764), Vol. I, 27. Trans. Stephen Jay Gould, Ontogeny and Phylogeny (1977), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Degree (276)  |  God (757)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Outside (141)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Single (353)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Succession (77)  |  Tie (38)  |  Together (387)  |  Unite (42)  |  Universal (189)  |  World (1774)

Cat-Ideas and Mouse-Ideas. We can never get rid of mouse-ideas completely, they keep turning up again and again, and nibble, nibble—no matter how often we drive them off. The best way to keep them down is to have a few good strong cat-ideas which will embrace them and ensure their not reappearing till they do so in another shape.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Cat (47)  |  Completely (135)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nibble (2)  |  Strong (174)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Embrace those sciences which give to retired life usefulness, ornament or amusement.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in The Works of Thomas Jefferson (2010), Vol. 10, 423.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Life (1795)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Usefulness (86)

For the environmentalists, The Space Option is the ultimate environmental solution. For the Cornucopians, it is the technological fix that they are relying on. For the hard core space community, the obvious by-product would be the eventual exploration and settlement of the solar system. For most of humanity however, the ultimate benefit is having a realistic hope in a future with possibilities.... If our species does not soon embrace this unique opportunity with sufficient commitment, it may miss its one and only chance to do so. Humanity could soon be overwhelmed by one or more of the many challenges it now faces. The window of opportunity is closing as fast as the population is increasing. Our future will be either a Space Age or a Stone Age.
Arthur Woods and Marco Bernasconi
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Benefit (114)  |  By-Product (7)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Chance (239)  |  Close (69)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Community (104)  |  Core (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Environmentalist (5)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Face (212)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fix (25)  |  Future (429)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Increase (210)  |  Miss (51)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Option (9)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Population (110)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Product (160)  |  Realistic (6)  |  Rely (11)  |  Settlement (3)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soon (186)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Age (3)  |  Species (401)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stone Age (12)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  System (537)  |  Technological (61)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unique (67)  |  Will (2355)  |  Window (58)

Given for one instant an intelligence which could comprehend all the forces by which nature is animated and the respective situation of the beings which compose it—an intelligence sufficiently vast to submit these data to analysis, it would embrace in the same formula the movements of the greatest bodies in the universe and those of the lightest atom; to it nothing would be uncertain, and the future as the past would be present to its eyes.
Introduction to Oeuvres vol. VII, Theorie Analytique de Probabilites (1812-1820). As translated by Frederick Wilson Truscott and Frederick Lincoln Emory in A Philosophical Essay on Probabilities (1902), 4. [LaPlace is here expressing his belief in causal determinism.] From the original French, “Une intelligence qui, pour un instant donné, connaîtrait toutes les forces dont la nature est animée, et la situation respective des êtres qui la composent, si d’ailleurs elle était assez vaste pour soumettre ces données a l’analyse, embrasserait dans la même formula les mouvements des plus grand corps de l’univers et ceux du plus léger atome: rien ne serait incertain pour elle, et l’avenir comme le passé serait présent à ses yeux.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Data (156)  |  Eye (419)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  Future (429)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Instant (45)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Situation (113)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)

Humans are not by nature the fact-driven, rational beings we like to think we are. We get the facts wrong more often than we think we do. And we do so in predictable ways: we engage in wishful thinking. We embrace information that supports our beliefs and reject evidence that challenges them. Our minds tend to take shortcuts, which require some effort to avoid … [and] more often than most of us would imagine, the human mind operates in ways that defy logic.
As co-author with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, in unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation (2007), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Defy (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engage (39)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Information (166)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reject (63)  |  Require (219)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Support (147)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wishful (6)  |  Wrong (234)

I believe in intuition and inspiration. Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, giving birth to evolution. It is, strictly speaking, a real factor in scientific research.
Cosmic Religion: With Other Opinions and Aphorisms (1931), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Factor (46)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  More (2559)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  World (1774)

If we view mathematical speculations with reference to their use, it appears that they should be divided into two classes. To the first belong those which furnish some marked advantage either to common life or to some art, and the value of such is usually determined by the magnitude of this advantage. The other class embraces those speculations which, though offering no direct advantage, are nevertheless valuable in that they extend the boundaries of analysis and increase our resources and skill. Now since many investigations, from which great advantage may be expected, must be abandoned solely because of the imperfection of analysis, no small value should be assigned to those speculations which promise to enlarge the field of anaylsis.
In Novi Comm. Petr., Vol. 4, Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Art (657)  |  Assign (13)  |  Belong (162)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Determine (144)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Increase (210)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reference (33)  |  Resource (63)  |  Skill (109)  |  Small (477)  |  Solely (9)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)

If you see an antimatter version of yourself running towards you, think twice before embracing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Antimatter (3)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Twice (17)  |  Version (7)

It is easy to make out three areas where scientists will be concentrating their efforts in the coming decades. One is in physics, where leading theorists are striving, with the help of experimentalists, to devise a single mathematical theory that embraces all the basic phenomena of matter and energy. The other two are in biology. Biologists—and the rest of us too—would like to know how the brain works and how a single cell, the fertilized egg cell, develops into an entire organism
Article 'The View From Mars', in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences: Research Facilities of the Future (1994), 735, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cell (138)  |  Coming (114)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Decade (59)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devise (14)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Egg (69)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entire (47)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Fertilized (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Strive (46)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

It is probable that the scheme of physics will be enlarged so as to embrace the behaviour of living organisms under the influence of life and mind. Biology and psychology are not alien sciences; their operations are not solely mechanical, nor can they be formulated by physics as it is today; but they belong to a physical universe, and their mode of action ought to be capable of being formulated in terms of an enlarged physics in the future, in which the ether will take a predominant place. On the other hand it may be thought that those entities cannot be brought to book so easily, and that they will always elude our ken. If so, there will be a dualism in the universe, which posterity will find staggering, but that will not alter the facts.
In Past Years: an Autobiography (1932), 350. Quoted in book review, Waldehar Kaempfert, 'Sir Oliver Lodge Stands by the Old Physics', New York Times (21 Feb 1932), BR5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Alien (34)  |  Alter (62)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Biology (216)  |  Book (392)  |  Capable (168)  |  Dualism (4)  |  Elude (10)  |  Eluding (2)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Future (429)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Predominance (3)  |  Probability (130)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Staggering (2)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Man embraces in his makeup all the natural orders; he’s a squid, a mollusk, a sucker and a buzzard; sometimes he’s a cerebrate.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Buzzard (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mollusk (6)  |  Natural (796)  |  Order (632)  |  Role (86)  |  Squid (3)  |  Sucker (2)

May we not assure ourselves that whatever woman’s thought and study shall embrace will thereby receive a new inspiration, that she will save science from materialism, and art from a gross realism; that the ‘eternal womanly shall lead upward and onward’?
As quoted in The Fair Women, ch. 16, by Jeanne Madeline Weimann (1981).From a paper published in Art and Handicraft in the Woman's Building, a book sponsored by the Board of Lady Managers of the Commission that planned the 1893 World's Columbian Expositio
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Assure (15)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Gross (7)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Lead (384)  |  Materialism (11)  |  New (1216)  |  Onward (6)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Realism (7)  |  Receive (114)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Thereby (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Upward (43)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)

Men are not going to embrace eugenics. They are going to embrace the first likely, trim-figured girl with limpid eyes and flashing teeth who comes along, in spite of the fact that her germ plasm is probably reeking with hypertension, cancer, haemophilia, colour blindness, hay fever, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Blindness (11)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Color (137)  |  Epilepsy (3)  |  Eugenics (6)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fever (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Flash (49)  |  Germ (53)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hay (6)  |  Hay Fever (2)  |  Lateral (3)  |  Likely (34)  |  Limpid (3)  |  Plasm (3)  |  Probably (49)  |  Spite (55)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tooth (29)

Nature clasps all her creatures in a universal embrace; there is not one of them which she has not plainly furnished with all means necessary to the conservation of its being.
The Essays of Michel de Montaigne, Book 2, Chapter 12, 'Apology for Raymond Sebond', trans. M. A. Screech (1991), 509.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Creature (233)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Universal (189)

No despot ever flung forth his legions to die in foreign conquest, no privilege-ruled nation ever erupted across its borders, to lock in death embrace with another, but behind them loomed the driving power of a population too large for its boundaries and its natural resources.
In 'Woman's Error and Her Debt', The Birth Control Review (Aug 1921), 5, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Death (388)  |  Despot (2)  |  Driving (28)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Large (394)  |  Legion (4)  |  Loom (20)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Population (110)  |  Power (746)  |  Privilege (39)

Now do you not see that the eye embraces the beauty of the whole world? It counsels and corrects all the arts of mankind... it is the prince of mathematics, and the sciences founded on it are absolutely certain. It has measured the distances and sizes of the stars it has discovered the elements and their location... it has given birth to architecture and to perspective and to the divine art of painting.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  All (4108)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Birth (147)  |  Certain (550)  |  Correct (86)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distance (161)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Eye (419)  |  Founded (20)  |  Give (202)  |  Location (15)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Painting (44)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Prince (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Size (60)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Science embraces the facts and debates opinion; religion embraces opinion and debates the facts.
In The Well-Spoken Thesaurus (2011), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Debate (38)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)

Science has now been for a long time—and to an ever-increasing extent—a collective enterprise. Actually, new results are always, in fact, the work of specific individuals; but, save perhaps for rare exceptions, the value of any result depends on such a complex set of interrelations with past discoveries and possible future researches that even the mind of the inventor cannot embrace the whole.
In Oppression and Liberty (1955, 1958), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Collective (24)  |  Complex (188)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exception (73)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Future (429)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interrelation (8)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rare (89)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Specific (95)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Science is the best idea humans have ever had. The more people who embrace that idea, the better.
Bill Nye
In interview with Brian Anthony Hernandez, 'Bill Nye: “When Rush Limbaugh Says I'm Not a Scientist, I'm Charmed”' (31 May 2013) on mashable.com web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3879)

Science is the outcome of being prepared to live without certainty and therefore a mark of maturity. It embraces doubt and loose ends.
Quoted in interview by Tim Adams, 'This much I know: A.C. Grayling', The Observer (4 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Doubt (304)  |  End (590)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Loose End (3)  |  Mark (43)  |  Maturity (14)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Without (13)

The day dawned grey and dreary
The sky made of silver
While the first snowflakes
Began to fall.
A lone bird chirped
In a tree bare of its leaves.
Standing on a lonely road
I stood watching as the world
Started changing.
And I embraced the winter
With memories of summer’s warmth
Still in my heart.
And soon the snowflakes
Began to dance about me
And I twirled around and around
As everything
Turned into a winter wonderland.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bare (33)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bird (149)  |  Change (593)  |  Dance (32)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Dreary (5)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  Grey (10)  |  Heart (229)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lone (2)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Memory (134)  |  Road (64)  |  Silver (46)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Summer (54)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turn (447)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Watch (109)  |  Winter (44)  |  World (1774)

The fundamental essence of science, which I think we've lost in our education system, is poking something with a stick and seeing what happens. Embrace that process of inquiry.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (378)  |  Essence (82)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Lose (159)  |  Poke (5)  |  Process (423)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Something (719)  |  Stick (24)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)

The mathematical giant [Gauss], who from his lofty heights embraces in one view the stars and the abysses …
Kurzer Grundriss eines Versuchs (1851), 44. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Giant (67)  |  Height (32)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  View (488)

The pleasures of the palate deal with us like Egyptian thieves who strangle those whom they embrace.
In Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Gluttony (6)  |  Palate (3)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Strangle (3)  |  Thief (6)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what it was in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence that at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective position, motions, and general affects of all these entities at any time in the past or future. Physical astronomy, the branch of knowledge that does the greatest honor to the human mind, gives us an idea, albeit imperfect, of what such an intelligence would be. The simplicity of the law by which the celestial bodies move, and the relations of their masses and distances, permit analysis to follow their motions up to a certain point; and in order to determine the state of the system of these great bodies in past or future centuries, it suffices for the mathematician that their position and their velocity be given by observation for any moment in time. Man owes that advantage to the power of the instrument he employs, and to the small number of relations that it embraces in its calculations. But ignorance of the different causes involved in the production of events, as well as their complexity, taken together with the imperfection of analysis, prevents our reaching the same certainty about the vast majority of phenomena. Thus there are things that are uncertain for us, things more or less probable, and we seek to compensate for the impossibility of knowing them by determining their different degrees of likelihood. So it was that we owe to the weakness of the human mind one of the most delicate and ingenious of mathematical theories, the science of chance or probability.
'Recherches, 1º, sur l'Intégration des Équations Différentielles aux Différences Finies, et sur leur Usage dans la Théorie des Hasards' (1773, published 1776). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 8, 144-5, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Degree (276)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Owe (71)  |  Past (337)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Probability (130)  |  Production (183)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weakness (48)

This relation logical implication is probably the most rigorous and powerful of all the intellectual enterprises of man. From a properly selected set of the vast number of prepositional functions a set can be selected from which an infinitude of prepositional functions can be implied. In this sense all postulational thinking is mathematics. It can be shown that doctrines in the sciences, natural and social, in history, in jurisprudence and in ethics are constructed on the postulational thinking scheme and to that extent are mathematical. Together the proper enterprise of Science and the enterprise of Mathematics embrace the whole knowledge-seeking activity of mankind, whereby “knowledge” is meant the kind of knowledge that admits of being made articulate in the form of propositions.
In Mathematics as a Culture Clue: And Other Essays (1947), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Articulate (7)  |  Being (1278)  |  Construct (124)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Extent (139)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  History (673)  |  Imply (17)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Number (699)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Select (44)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)

Those who intend to practise Midwifery, ought first of all to make themselves masters of anatomy, and acquire a competent knowledge in surgery and physic; because of their connections with the obstetric art, if not always, at least in many cases. He ought to take the best opportunities he can find of being well instructed; and of practising under a master, before he attempts to deliver by himself. ... He should also embrace every occasion of being present at real labours, ... he will assist the poor as well as the rich, behaving always with charity and compassion.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 440-441.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Art (657)  |  Assist (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Behave (17)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Charity (11)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Competent (20)  |  Connection (162)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Himself (461)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Intend (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Master (178)  |  Obstetrics (3)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Physic (517)  |  Poor (136)  |  Practise (7)  |  Practising (2)  |  Present (619)  |  Rich (62)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2355)

To a body of infinite size there can be ascribed neither center nor boundary ... Just as we regard ourselves as at the center of that universally equidistant circle, which is the great horizon and the limit of our own encircling ethereal region, so doubtless the inhabitants of the moon believe themselves to be at the center (of a great horizon) that embraces this earth, the sun, and the stars, and is the boundary of the radii of their own horizon. Thus the earth no more than any other world is at the center; moreover no points constitute determined celestial poles for our earth, just as she herself is not a definite and determined pole to any other point of the ether, or of the world-space; and the same is true for all other bodies. From various points of view these may all be regarded either as centers, or as points on the circumference, as poles, or zeniths and so forth. Thus the earth is not in the center of the universe; it is central only to our own surrounding space.
Irving Louis Horowitz, The Renaissance Philosophy of Giordano Bruno (1952), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Central (80)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circumference (23)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Definite (110)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ether (35)  |  Ethereal (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Limit (280)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Point (580)  |  Pole (46)  |  Regard (305)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

To us … the only acceptable point of view appears to be the one that recognizes both sides of reality—the quantitative and the qualitative, the physical and the psychical—as compatible with each other, and can embrace them simultaneously … It would be most satisfactory of all if physis and psyche (i.e., matter and mind) could be seen as complementary aspects of the same reality.
From Lecture at the Psychological Club of Zurich (1948), 'The Influence of Archetypal Ideas on the Scientific Theories of Kepler', collected in Writings on Physics and Philosophy (1994), 260, as translated by Robert Schlapp.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (13)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Both (493)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Psyche (9)  |  Qualitative (14)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Side (233)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  View (488)

Tragically isolated, imprisoned in his own “self,” man has made a desperate effort to “leap beyond his shadow,” to embrace the external world. From this effort was born science….
In Einstein and the Universe; A Popular Exposition of the Famous Theory (1922), 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Born (33)  |  Desperate (5)  |  Effort (227)  |  External (57)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Leap (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Tragic (17)  |  World (1774)

Unless you make yourself equal to God, you cannot understand God: for the like is not intelligible save to the like. Make yourself grow to a greatness beyond measure, by a bound free yourself from the body; raise yourself above all time, become Eternity; then you will understand God. Believe that nothing is impossible for you, think yourself immortal and capable of understanding all, all arts, all sciences, the nature of every living being. Mount higher than the highest height; descend lower than the lowest depth. Draw into yourself all sensations of everything created, fire and water, dry and moist, imagining that you are everywhere, on earth, in the sea, in the sky, that you are not yet born, in the maternal womb, adolescent, old, dead, beyond death. If you embrace in your thought all things at once, times, places, substances, qualities, quantities, you may understand God.
Quoted in F. A. Yales, Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition (1964), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Bound (119)  |  Capable (168)  |  Death (388)  |  Depth (94)  |  Descend (47)  |  Draw (137)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Everything (476)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fire (189)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Living (491)  |  Measure (232)  |  Moist (12)  |  Mount (42)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sky (161)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Womb (24)

We come no nearer the infinitude of the creative power of God, if we enclose the space of its revelation within a sphere described with the radius of the Milky Way, than if we were to limit it to a ball an inch in diameter. All that is finite, whatever has limits and a definite relation to unity, is equally far removed from the infinite... Eternity is not sufficient to embrace the manifestations of the Supreme Being, if it is not combined with the infinitude of space.
'Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens' (1755), part 2, ch.7. In W. Hastie (ed. and trans.), Kant's Cosmogony: As in his Essay on the Retardation of the Rotation of the Earth and his Natural History and Theory of the Heavens (1900), 139-40.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Definite (110)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Equally (130)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Finite (59)  |  God (757)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Limit (280)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Power (746)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Supreme Being (8)  |  Unity (78)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

We should therefore, with grace and optimism, embrace NOMA’s tough-minded demand: Acknowledge the personal character of these human struggles about morals and meanings, and stop looking for definite answers in nature’s construction. But many people cannot bear to surrender nature as a ‘transitional object’–a baby’s warm blanket for our adult comfort. But when we do (for we must) , nature can finally emerge in her true form: not as a distorted mirror of our needs, but as our most fascinating comp anion. Only then can we unite the patches built by our separate magisteria into a beautiful and coherent quilt called wisdom.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Adult (19)  |  Anion (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Baby (28)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Coherent (13)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Construction (112)  |  Definite (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distort (22)  |  Do (1908)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Finally (26)  |  Form (959)  |  Grace (31)  |  Human (1468)  |  Looking (189)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Patch (8)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  Separate (143)  |  Stop (80)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transitional (2)  |  True (212)  |  Unite (42)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wisdom (221)

We think the heavens enjoy their spherical
Their round proportion, embracing all;
But yet their various and perplexed course,
Observed in divers ages, doth enforce
Men to find out so many eccentric parts,
Such diverse downright lines, such overthwarts,
As disproportion that pure form.
From poem, 'An Anatomy of the World: The First Anniversary', lines 251-257, as collected in The Poems of John Donne (1896), Vol. 2, 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Course (409)  |  Disproportion (3)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Enforce (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Line (91)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (291)  |  Round (26)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Think (1086)  |  Various (200)

What is laid down, ordered, factual, is never enough to embrace the whole truth: life always spills over the rim of every cup.
As quoted, without source, in Philip J. Davis and Reuben Hersh, The Mathematical Experience (1981, 2012), xxv.
Science quotes on:  |  Cup (7)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Factual (8)  |  Laid (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordered (2)  |  Rim (5)  |  Spill (2)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)

With the extension of mathematical knowledge will it not finally become impossible for the single investigator to embrace all departments of this knowledge? In answer let me point out how thoroughly it is ingrained in mathematical science that every real advance goes hand in hand with the invention of sharper tools and simpler methods which, at the same time, assist in understanding earlier theories and in casting aside some more complicated developments.
In 'Mathematical Problems', Lecture at the International Congress of Mathematics, Paris, (8 Aug 1900). Translated by Dr. Maby Winton Newson in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (1902), 8, 479. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 94-95. It is reprinted in Jeremy Gray, The Hilbert Challenge (2000), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Assist (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Branch (150)  |  Cast (66)  |  Casting (10)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Department (92)  |  Development (422)  |  Early (185)  |  Easily (35)  |  Extension (59)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Hand In Hand (4)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Individual (404)  |  Ingrained (5)  |  Invention (369)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Let (61)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Out (8)  |  Possible (552)  |  Real (149)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simpler (8)  |  Single (353)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

[Theory is] an explanation that has been confirmed to such a degree, by observation and experiment, that knowledgeable experts accept it as fact. That's what scientists mean when they talk about a theory: not a dreamy and unreliable speculation, but an explanatory statement that fits the evidence. They embrace such an explanation confidently but provisionally - taking it as their best available view of reality, at least unil some severely conflicting data or some better explanation might come along."
'Was Darwin Wrong?', National Geographic (Nov 2004), 206, 4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Available (78)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Data (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expert (65)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fit (134)  |  Mean (809)  |  Observation (555)  |  Reality (261)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statement (142)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.