Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Elude

Elude Quotes (10 quotes)

Although the ocean’s surface seems at first to be completely homogeneous, after half a month we began to differentiate various seas and even different parts of oceans by their characteristic shades. We were astonished to discover that, during an flight, you have to learn anew not only to look, but also to see. At first the finest nuances of color elude you, but gradually your vision sharpens and your color perception becomes richer, and the planet spreads out before you with all its indescribable beauty.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Color (137)  |  Completely (135)  |  Different (577)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Half (56)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Indescribable (2)  |  Learn (629)  |  Look (582)  |  Month (88)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Part (222)  |  Perception (97)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rich (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Shade (31)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Spread (83)  |  Surface (209)  |  Various (200)  |  Vision (123)

Available energy is energy which we can direct into any desired channel. Dissipated energy is energy which we cannot lay hold of and direct at pleasure, such as the energy of the confused agitation of molecules which we call heat. Now, confusion, like the correlative term order, is not a property of material things in themselves, but only in relation to the mind which perceives them. A memorandum-book does not, provided it is neatly written, appear confused to an illiterate person, or to the owner who understands it thoroughly, but to any other person able to read it appears to be inextricably confused. Similarly the notion of dissipated energy could not occur to a being who could not turn any of the energies of nature to his own account, or to one who could trace the motion of every molecule and seize it at the right moment. It is only to a being in the intermediate stage, who can lay hold of some forms of energy while others elude his grasp, that energy appears to be passing inevitably from the available to the dissipated state.
'Diffusion', Encyclopaedia Britannica (1878). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 646.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Agitation (9)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissipate (8)  |  Energy (344)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Illiterate (6)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Moment (253)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passing (76)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Property (168)  |  Read (287)  |  Right (452)  |  Stage (143)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)

But in nothing are swifts more singular than in their early retreat. They retire, as to the main body of them, by the tenth of August, and sometimes a few days sooner: and every straggler invariably withdraws by the twentieth, while their congeners, all of them, stay till the beginning of October; many of them all through that month, and some occasionally to the beginning of November. This early retreat is mysterious and wonderful, since that time is often the sweetest season in the year. But, what is more extraordinary, they begin to retire still earlier in the most southerly parts of Andalusia, where they can be no ways influenced by any defect of heat; or, as one might suppose, defect of food. Are they regulated in their motions with us by failure of food, or by a propensity to moulting, or by a disposition to rest after so rapid a life, or by what? This is one of those incidents in natural history that not only baffles our searches, but almost eludes our guesses!
In Letter to Daines Barrington, (28 Sep 1774), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Body (537)  |  Defect (31)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Early (185)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Failure (161)  |  Food (199)  |  Heat (174)  |  History (673)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Life (1795)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nothing (966)  |  November (2)  |  October (4)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Season (47)  |  Singular (23)  |  Still (613)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Swift (12)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Build (204)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consist (223)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Dead (59)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extend (128)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ineffable (4)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Memory (134)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Moment (253)  |  Personality (62)  |  Physical (508)  |  Probability (130)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Soft (29)  |  Someday (14)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Will (2355)

I could clearly see that the blood is divided and flows through tortuous vessels and that it is not poured out into spaces, but is always driven through tubules and distributed by the manifold bendings of the vessels... [F]rom the simplicity Nature employs in all her works, we may conclude... that the network I once believed to be nervous [that is, sinewy] is really a vessel intermingled with the vesicles and sinuses and carrying the mass of blood to them or away from them... though these elude even the keenest sight because of their small size... From these considerations it is highly probable that the question about the mutual union and anastomosis of the vessels can be solved; for if Nature once circulates the blood within vessels and combines their ends in a network, it is probable that they are joined by anastomosis at other times too.
'The Return to Bologna 1659-1662', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 194-5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blood (134)  |  Capillary (4)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Combine (57)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Divided (50)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Flow (83)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Network (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Union (51)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Work (1351)

It is probable that the scheme of physics will be enlarged so as to embrace the behaviour of living organisms under the influence of life and mind. Biology and psychology are not alien sciences; their operations are not solely mechanical, nor can they be formulated by physics as it is today; but they belong to a physical universe, and their mode of action ought to be capable of being formulated in terms of an enlarged physics in the future, in which the ether will take a predominant place. On the other hand it may be thought that those entities cannot be brought to book so easily, and that they will always elude our ken. If so, there will be a dualism in the universe, which posterity will find staggering, but that will not alter the facts.
In Past Years: an Autobiography (1932), 350. Quoted in book review, Waldehar Kaempfert, 'Sir Oliver Lodge Stands by the Old Physics', New York Times (21 Feb 1932), BR5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Alien (34)  |  Alter (62)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Biology (216)  |  Book (392)  |  Capable (168)  |  Dualism (4)  |  Eluding (2)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Future (429)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Predominance (3)  |  Probability (130)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Staggering (2)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Motion with respect to the universal ocean of aether eludes us. We say, “Let V be the velocity of a body through the aether”, and form the various electromagnetic equations in which V is scattered liberally. Then we insert the observed values, and try to eliminate everything which is unknown except V. The solution goes on famously; but just as we have got rid of all the other unknowns, behold! V disappears as well, and we are left with the indisputable but irritating conclusion —
0 = 0
This is a favourite device that mathematical equations resort to, when we propound stupid questions.
From Gifford Lecture, Edinburgh, (1927), 'Relativity', collected in The Nature of the Physical World (1928), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Aether (13)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Device (70)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Equation (132)  |  Everything (476)  |  Form (959)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observed (149)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Respect (207)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Through (849)  |  Try (283)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Various (200)  |  Velocity (48)

My main thesis will be that in the study of the intermediate processes of metabolism we have to deal not with complex substances which elude ordinary chemical methods, but with the simple substances undergoing comprehensible reactions... I intend also to emphasise the fact that it is not alone with the separation and identification of products from the animal that our present studies deal; but with their reactions in the body; with the dynamic side of biochemical phenomena.
'The Dynamic Side of Biochemistry', Address (11 Sep 1913) in Report on the 83rd Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1914), 653.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complex (188)  |  Deal (188)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Identification (16)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Metabolism (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Separation (57)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Will (2355)

The study of mathematics is apt to commence in disappointment. The important applications of the science, the theoretical interest of its ideas, and the logical rigour of its methods all generate the expectation of a speedy introduction to processes of interest. We are told that by its aid the stars are weighed and the billions of molecules in a drop of water are counted. Yet, like the ghost of Hamlet's father, this great science eludes the efforts of our mental weapons to grasp it.
Opening to An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Billion (95)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Count (105)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Drop (76)  |  Effort (227)  |  Eluding (2)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Father (110)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Grasping (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Process (423)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speedy (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Water (481)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Weigh (49)

The study of mathematics is apt to commence in disappointment. … We are told that by its aid the stars are weighed and the billions of molecules in a drop of water are counted. Yet, like the ghost of Hamlet's father, this greatest science eludes the efforts of our mental weapons to grasp it.
Opening of Chap 1, in An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apt (9)  |  Billion (95)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Count (105)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Drop (76)  |  Effort (227)  |  Father (110)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Study (653)  |  Water (481)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weighing (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.