Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Womb

Womb Quotes (24 quotes)

All other men, being born of woman, have a navel, by reason of the umbilical vessels inserted into it, which from the placenta carry nourishment to children in the womb of their mothers; but it could not be so with our first parents. It cannot be believed that God gave them navels which would have been altogether useless.
A Treatise of Laws of Nature (1727).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carry (127)  |  Children (200)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Reason (744)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Woman (151)

And part of the soil is called to wash away
In storms and streams shave close and gnaw the rocks.
Besides, whatever the earth feeds and grows
Is restored to earth. And since she surely is
The womb of all things and their common grave,
Earth must dwindle, you see and take on growth again.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 255-60, 166.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Dwindle (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Must (1526)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Soil (86)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Stream (81)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wash (21)  |  Whatever (234)

And therefore though Adam was framed without this part (a navel), as having no other womb than that of his proper principles, yet was not his posterity without the same: for the seminality of his fabric contained the power thereof; and was endued with the science of those parts whose predestinations upon succession it did accomplish.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Adam (7)  |  Contain (68)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Navel (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Science (3879)  |  Succession (77)

But for the persistence of a student of this university in urging upon me his desire to study with me the modern algebra I should never have been led into this investigation; and the new facts and principles which I have discovered in regard to it (important facts, I believe), would, so far as I am concerned, have remained still hidden in the womb of time. In vain I represented to this inquisitive student that he would do better to take up some other subject lying less off the beaten track of study, such as the higher parts of the calculus or elliptic functions, or the theory of substitutions, or I wot not what besides. He stuck with perfect respectfulness, but with invincible pertinacity, to his point. He would have the new algebra (Heaven knows where he had heard about it, for it is almost unknown in this continent), that or nothing. I was obliged to yield, and what was the consequence? In trying to throw light upon an obscure explanation in our text-book, my brain took fire, I plunged with re-quickened zeal into a subject which I had for years abandoned, and found food for thoughts which have engaged my attention for a considerable time past, and will probably occupy all my powers of contemplation advantageously for several months to come.
In Johns Hopkins Commemoration Day Address, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 3, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advantageous (10)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continent (76)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Engage (39)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Food (199)  |  Function (228)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Less (103)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modern (385)  |  Month (88)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Pertinacity (2)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probably (49)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Represent (155)  |  Several (32)  |  Stick (24)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Track (38)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  University (121)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Urge (17)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)  |  Zeal (11)

Defenders of the short-sighted men who in their greed and selfishness will, if permitted, rob our country of half its charm by their reckless extermination of all useful and beautiful wild things sometimes seek to champion them by saying the “the game belongs to the people.” So it does; and not merely to the people now alive, but to the unborn people. The “greatest good for the greatest number” applies to the number within the womb of time, compared to which those now alive form but an insignificant fraction. Our duty to the whole, including the unborn generations, bids us restrain an unprincipled present-day minority from wasting the heritage of these unborn generations. The movement for the conservation of wild life and the larger movement for the conservation of all our natural resources are essentially democratic in spirit, purpose, and method.
'Bird Reserves at the Mouth of the Mississippi', A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open (1920), 300-301.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Belong (162)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Defender (5)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Form (959)  |  Game (101)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Greed (14)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Minority (21)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Present (619)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Seek (213)  |  Short (197)  |  Short-Sighted (4)  |  Sight (132)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)

From the womb of darkness and cocoon of indifference is emerging a form of treatment that will eventually be added to the armamentarium of the alert and concerned physician.
Let's Live (Apr 1976). In Morton Walker and Hitendra H. Shah, Everything You Should Know About Chelation Therapy (1998), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Alert (13)  |  Armamentarium (3)  |  Concern (228)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Form (959)  |  Physician (273)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Will (2355)

How twins are born my discourse will explain thus. The cause is chiefly the nature of the womb in woman. For if it has grown equally on either side of its mouth, and if it opens equally, and also dries equally after menstruation, it can give nourishment, if it conceive the secretion of the man so that it immediately divides into both parts of the womb equally. Now if the seed secreted from both parents be abundant and strong, it can grow in both places, as it masters the nourishment that reaches it. In all other cases twins are not formed. Now when the secretion from both parents is male, of necessity boys are begotten in both places; but when from both it is female, girls are begotten. But when one secretion is female and the other male, whichever masters the other gives the embryo its sex. Twins are like one another for the following reasons. First, the places are alike in which they grow; then they were secreted together; then they grow by the same nourishment, and at birth they reach together the light of day.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Divide (75)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Equally (130)  |  Explain (322)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Girl (37)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Menstruation (3)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Side (233)  |  Strong (174)  |  Together (387)  |  Twin (15)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)

I am the daughter of earth and water, And the nursling of the sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain when with never a stain,
The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams,
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.
The Cloud (1820). In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bare (33)  |  Build (204)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Cenotaph (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Convex (6)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Die (86)  |  Dome (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pore (7)  |  Rain (62)  |  Shore (24)  |  Sky (161)  |  Stain (9)  |  Through (849)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Water (481)  |  Wind (128)

I will paint for [man] not only the visible universe, but all that he can conceive of nature’s immensity in the womb of an atom.
In 'The Misery of Man Without God', Blaise Pascal (1910), Vol. 48, 27, as translated by W.F. Trotter.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Paint (22)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Will (2355)

Judging from our experience upon this planet, such a history, that begins with elementary particles, leads perhaps inevitably toward a strange and moving end: a creature that knows, a science-making animal, that turns back upon the process that generated him and attempts to understand it. Without his like, the universe could be, but not be known, and this is a poor thing. Surely this is a great part of our dignity as men, that we can know, and that through us matter can know itself; that beginning with protons and electrons, out of the womb of time and the vastnesses of space, we can begin to understand; that organized as in us, the hydrogen, the carbon, the nitrogen, the oxygen, those 16-21 elements, the water, the sunlight—all having become us, can begin to understand what they are, and how they came to be.
In 'The Origins of Life', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1964), 52, 609-110.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Electron (93)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moving (11)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Organized (9)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Poor (136)  |  Process (423)  |  Proton (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vastness (15)  |  Water (481)

Macduff was from his mother’s womb Untimely rip’d.
In Macbeth (1606), Act 5, scene 7, line 19-20. Collected in, for example, The Works: Of Shakespear (1726), Vol. 6, 333.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Mother (114)  |  Reproduction (72)

Man … begins life as an ambiguous speck of matter which can in no way be distinguished from the original form of the lowest animal or plant. He next becomes a cell; his life is precisely that of the animalcule. Cells cluster round this primordial cell, and the man is so far advanced that he might be mistaken for an undeveloped oyster; he grows still more, and it is clear that he might even be a fish; he then passes into a stage which is common to all quadrupeds, and next assumes a form which can only belong to quadrupeds of the higher type. At last the hour of birth approaches; coiled within the dark womb he sits, the image of an ape; a caricature of the man that is to be. He is born, and for some time he walks only on all fours; he utters only inarticulate sounds; and even in his boyhood his fondness for climbing trees would seem to be a relic of the old arboreal life.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belong (162)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Cell (138)  |  Climbing (4)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Dark (140)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hour (186)  |  Image (96)  |  Inarticulate (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Plant (294)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Relic (6)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speck (23)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Type (167)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)

Nature takes as much Pains in the Womb for the forming of a Beggar as an Emperor.
No. 3507 in Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs, Wise Sentences and Witty Sayings (1732), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Beggar (5)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Formation (96)  |  Forming (42)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pain (136)

That Mettals, Small Stones, Rocky-Stones, Sulphurs, Salts, and so the whole rank of Minerals, do find their Seeds in the Matrix or Womb of the Waters, which contain the Reasons, Gifts, Knowledges, Progresses, Appointments, Offices, and Durations of the same.
Oriatrike: Or, Physick Refined, trans. John Chandler (1662), 693.
Science quotes on:  |  Appointment (12)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Gift (104)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Office (71)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reason (744)  |  Salt (46)  |  Seed (93)  |  Small (477)  |  Stone (162)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

The Earth obey’d and straight
Op’ning her fertile womb, teem’d at a birth Innumerous living creatures, perfect forms,
Limb’d and full grown.
From 'Paradise Lost', Book 7, collected in Edward Hawkins (ed.), The Poetical Works of John Milton (1824), Vol. 2, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Form (959)  |  Full (66)  |  Grow (238)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obey (40)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Straight (73)

There’s pretty good evidence that we generally don’t truly want good information—but rather information that confirms our prejudices. We may believe intellectually in the clash of opinions, but in practice we like to embed ourselves in the reassuring womb of an echo chamber.
In New York Times (18 Mar 2009).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Clash (8)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Echo (11)  |  Embed (7)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Good (889)  |  Information (166)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Practice (204)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Reassure (7)  |  Truly (116)  |  Want (497)

These are begot in the ventricle of memory, nourished in the womb of pia mater.
Love's Labour's Lost (1595), IV, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Memory (134)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Pia Mater (2)  |  Ventricle (7)

This work should commence with the conception of man, and should describe the nature of the womb, and how the child inhabits it, and in what stage it dwells there, and the manner of its quickening and feeding, and its growth, and what interval there is between one stage of growth and another, and what thing drives it forth from the body of the mother, and for what reason it sometimes emerges from the belly of its mother before the due time.
'Anatomy', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (28)  |  Body (537)  |  Child (307)  |  Conception (154)  |  Describe (128)  |  Due (141)  |  Growth (187)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Premature (20)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Stage (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

Unless you make yourself equal to God, you cannot understand God: for the like is not intelligible save to the like. Make yourself grow to a greatness beyond measure, by a bound free yourself from the body; raise yourself above all time, become Eternity; then you will understand God. Believe that nothing is impossible for you, think yourself immortal and capable of understanding all, all arts, all sciences, the nature of every living being. Mount higher than the highest height; descend lower than the lowest depth. Draw into yourself all sensations of everything created, fire and water, dry and moist, imagining that you are everywhere, on earth, in the sea, in the sky, that you are not yet born, in the maternal womb, adolescent, old, dead, beyond death. If you embrace in your thought all things at once, times, places, substances, qualities, quantities, you may understand God.
Quoted in F. A. Yales, Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition (1964), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Bound (119)  |  Capable (168)  |  Death (388)  |  Depth (94)  |  Descend (47)  |  Draw (137)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Everything (476)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fire (189)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Living (491)  |  Measure (232)  |  Moist (12)  |  Mount (42)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sky (161)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

We cannot conceive how the Foetus is form'd in the Womb, nor as much as how a Plant springs from the Earth we tread on ... And if we are ignorant of the most obvious things about us, and the most considerable within our selves, 'tis then no wonder that we know not the constitution and powers of the creatures, to whom we are such strangers.
Saducismus Triumphatus or Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions (1689),72-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Conceive (98)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Growth (187)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Spring (133)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tread (17)  |  Wonder (236)

We fall from womb to tomb, from one blackness and toward another, remembering little of the one and knowing nothing of the other… except through faith.
Danse Macabre. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 14
Science quotes on:  |  Blackness (4)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fall (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Little (707)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remember (179)  |  Through (849)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Toward (45)

What strange wonder is this? Our prayer to thee was for water,
Earth! What is this that thou now send’st from thy womb in reply?
In the abyss is there life ? Or hidden under the lava
Dwelleth some race now unknown? Does what hath fled e’er return?
Greeks and Romans, oh come! Oh, see the ancient Pompeii
Here is discover’d again,—Hercules’ town is rebuilt!
Beginning lines of poem, 'Pompeii and Herculaneum', in Edgar A. Bowring (trans.), The Poems of Schiller (1875), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flee (8)  |  Greek (107)  |  Herculaneum (4)  |  Hercules (9)  |  Hide (69)  |  Lava (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Pompeii (4)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Race (268)  |  Rebuild (4)  |  Reply (56)  |  Return (124)  |  Roman (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Strange (157)  |  Town (27)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Water (481)  |  Wonder (236)

[Coleridge] selected an instance of what was called the sublime, in DARWIN, who imagined the creation of the universe to have taken place in a moment, by the explosion of a mass of matter in the womb, or centre of space. In one and the same instant of time, suns and planets shot into systems in every direction, and filled and spangled the illimitable void! He asserted this to be an intolerable degradation -referring, as it were, all the beauty and harmony of nature to something like the bursting of a barrel of gunpowder! that spit its combustible materials into a pock-freckled creation!
Report from Lectures (1812). In (1987), Vol. 5, 1, R. A. Foakes (ed.), 401.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Call (769)  |  Creation (327)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Direction (175)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Instant (45)  |  Mass (157)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Planet (356)  |  Select (44)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Void (31)

[The] seminary spirit of minerals hath its proper wombs where it resides, and is like a Prince or Emperour, whose prescripts both Elements and matter must obey; and it is never idle, but always in action, producing and maintaining natural substances, untill they have fulfilled their destiny.
A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters (1669), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Both (493)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Element (310)  |  Idle (33)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obey (40)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reside (25)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Substance (248)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.