Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Thrust

Thrust Quotes (12 quotes)

The Devil: Reformers … will thrust you first into religion, where you will sprinkle water on babies to save their souls from me ; then it will drive you from religion into science, where you will snatch the babies from the water sprinkling and inoculate them with disease to save them from catching it accidentally.
In Man and Superman: A Comedy and a Philosophy (1903), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Baby (28)  |  Devil (31)  |  Disease (332)  |  First (1284)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Reformer (5)  |  Religion (363)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Religion (311)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Soul (227)  |  Vaccination (6)  |  Water (482)  |  Will (2354)

Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (67)  |  Afraid (21)  |  Bear (160)  |  Great (1575)  |  Greatness (54)

But why, it has been asked, did you go there [the Antarctic]? Of what use to civilization can this lifeless continent be? ... [Earlier] expeditions contributed something to the accumulating knowledge of the Antarctic ... that helps us thrust back further the physical and spiritual shadows enfolding our terrestrial existence. Is it not true that one of the strongest and most continuously sustained impulses working in civilization is that which leads to discovery? As long as any part of the world remains obscure, the curiosity of man must draw him there, as the lodestone draws the mariner's needle, until he comprehends its secret.
In 'Hoover Presents Special Medal to Byrd...', New York Times (21 Jun 1930), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Antarctic (6)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (74)  |  Back (391)  |  Civilization (206)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Continent (76)  |  Contribution (88)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discovery (786)  |  Draw (137)  |  Existence (460)  |  Expedition (8)  |  Going (6)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Lead (385)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Long (789)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Most (1729)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Physical (508)  |  Remain (349)  |  Secret (196)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Something (719)  |  Spiritual (92)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Use (766)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1778)

Gradually, … the aspect of science as knowledge is being thrust into the background by the aspect of science as the power of manipulating nature. It is because science gives us the power of manipulating nature that it has more social importance than art. Science as the pursuit of truth is the equal, but not the superior, of art. Science as a technique, though it may have little intrinsic value, has a practical importance to which art cannot aspire.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Background (43)  |  Being (1278)  |  Equal (84)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Importance (288)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Little (708)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Power (748)  |  Practical (200)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3880)  |  Science And Art (186)  |  Social (252)  |  Superior (82)  |  Technique (80)  |  Technology (261)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Value (368)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Alone (312)  |  Apron (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calcination (4)  |  Charcoal (10)  |  Chatter (3)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coagulation (5)  |  Coal (58)  |  Cure (122)  |  Dagger (3)  |  Day And Night (3)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Extraction (9)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Glove (4)  |  Gold (98)  |  Golden (45)  |  Gorgeous (2)  |  Gossip (8)  |  Hand (143)  |  Help (106)  |  Hide (69)  |  Know (1519)  |  Laboratory (197)  |  Learning (274)  |  Leather (4)  |  Little (708)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patience (56)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Praise (26)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Recreation (21)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ring (16)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Satin (2)  |  Seek (213)  |  Separation (57)  |  Show (346)  |  Sick (81)  |  Side (232)  |  Silk (13)  |  Silver (47)  |  Smith (3)  |  Solution (269)  |  Soot (9)  |  Step (231)  |  Tend (124)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Velvet (4)  |  White (127)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Word (625)  |  Work (1352)

In my intercourse with mankind, I have always found those who would thrust theory into practical matters to be, at bottom, men of no judgement and pure quacks.
Quoted in James Kip Finch, Engineering Classics of James Kip Finch.
Science quotes on:  |  Engineering (176)  |  Mankind (340)  |  Matter (801)  |  Practical (200)  |  Pure (292)  |  Quack (18)  |  Theory (972)

It is not enough to say that we cannot know or judge because all the information is not in. The process of gathering knowledge does not lead to knowing. A child's world spreads only a little beyond his understanding while that of a great scientist thrusts outward immeasurably. An answer is invariably the parent of a great family of new questions. So we draw worlds and fit them like tracings against the world about us, and crumple them when we find they do not fit and draw new ones.
In John Steinbeck and Edward Flanders Ricketts, Sea of Cortez: a Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research (1941), 165-66.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4107)  |  Answer (366)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Child (309)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Enough (341)  |  Family (95)  |  Find (999)  |  Fit (134)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Great (1575)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Information (166)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1519)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Lead (385)  |  Little (708)  |  New (1218)  |  Outward (7)  |  Parent (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (622)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific Method (176)  |  Scientist (826)  |  Spread (83)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Understanding (514)  |  World (1778)

Science is, I believe, nothing but trained and organised common-sense, differing from the latter only as a veteran may differ from a raw recruit; and its methods differ from those of common-sense only so far as the guardsman's cut and thrust differ from the manner in which a savage wields his club.
Lecture at St. Martin's Hall (22 Jul 1854), printed as On the Educational Value of the Natural History Sciences (1854), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Cut (114)  |  Differ (85)  |  Method (506)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Raw (28)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sense (770)  |  Train (114)

So the horns of the stag are sharp to offend his adversary, but are branched for the purpose of parrying or receiving the thrusts of horns similar to his own, and have therefore been formed for the purpose of combating other stags for the exclusive possession of the females; who are observed, like the ladies in the times of chivalry, to attend to the car of the victor... The final cause of this contest amongst the males seems to be, that the strongest and most active animal should propagate the species, which should thence become improved.
Zoonomia (1794), Vol. 1, 507.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attend (65)  |  Become (815)  |  Branch (150)  |  Car (71)  |  Cause (542)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Female (50)  |  Final (119)  |  Form (961)  |  Horn (18)  |  Most (1729)  |  Observed (149)  |  Offend (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possession (65)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Species (402)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Time (1877)

Thurst [thrust] out nature with a croche [crook], yet woll she styll runne back agayne.
From Proverbs or Adagies out of Erasmus (1539), 44, given with other English variants, in George Latimer Apperson and Martin H. Manser, The Concise Dictionary of English Etymology (1993, 2006), 158. The dictionary also gives the original sentiment expressed by Horace: “Naturam expelles furca, tamen usque recurret” in Epistles, i, 10, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Again (3)  |  Back (391)  |  Crook (2)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Run (174)

To arrive at the simplest truth, as Newton knew and practiced, requires years of contemplation. Not activity Not reasoning. Not calculating. Not busy behaviour of any kind. Not reading. Not talking. Not making an effort. Not thinking. Simply bearing in mind what it is one needs to know. And yet those with the courage to tread this path to real discovery are not only offered practically no guidance on how to do so, they are actively discouraged and have to set about it in secret, pretending meanwhile to be diligently engaged in the frantic diversions and to conform with the deadening personal opinions which are continually being thrust upon them.
In 'Appendix 1', The Laws of Form (1969), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Actively (3)  |  Activity (210)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Conform (13)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continual (43)  |  Courage (71)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discovery (786)  |  Diversion (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engage (39)  |  Frantic (2)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1519)  |  Making (300)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (335)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (145)  |  Personal (67)  |  Practically (10)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Read (288)  |  Reading (133)  |  Real (149)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Secret (196)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simply (53)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (415)  |  Tread (17)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Year (932)

’Tis evident, that as common Air when reduc’d to half Its wonted extent, obtained near about twice as forcible a Spring as it had before; so this thus- comprest Air being further thrust into half this narrow room, obtained thereby a Spring about as strong again as that It last had, and consequently four times as strong as that of the common Air. And there is no cause to doubt, that If we had been here furnisht with a greater quantity of Quicksilver and a very long Tube, we might by a further compression of the included Air have made It counter-balance “the pressure” of a far taller and heavier Cylinder of Mercury. For no man perhaps yet knows how near to an infinite compression the Air may be capable of, If the compressing force be competently increast.
A Defense of the Doctrine Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air (1662), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (349)  |  Balance (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (542)  |  Common (436)  |  Compression (6)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Doubt (305)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extent (139)  |  Force (488)  |  Greater (288)  |  Infinite (233)  |  Know (1519)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (789)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quicksilver (7)  |  Spring (133)  |  Strong (174)  |  Time (1877)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.