Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Proceeding

Proceeding Quotes (13 quotes)

Mi è impossibile cingere i fianchi di una ragazza con il mio braccio destro e serrare il suo sorriso nella mia mano sinistra, per poi tentare di studiare i due oggetti separatamente. Allo stesso modo, non ci è possibile separare la vita dalla materia vivente, allo scopo di studiare la sola materia vivente e le sue reazioni. Inevitabilmente, studiando la materia vivente e le sue reazioni, studiamo la vita stessa.
It is impossible to encircle the hips of a girl with my right arm and hold her smile in my left hand, then proceed to study the two items separately. Similarly, we can not separate life from living matter, in order to study only living matter and its reactions. Inevitably, studying living matter and its reactions, we study life itself
In The Nature of Life (1948).
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (25)  |  Encircle (2)  |  Girl (20)  |  Hip (3)  |  Hold (92)  |  Impossibility (52)  |  Life (1124)  |  Reaction (61)  |  Smile (19)  |  Study (461)

After having a wash I proceeded to the bar where—believe it or not—there was a white-coated barman who was not only serving drinks but also cigarettes! I hastened forward and rather timidly said ‘Can I have some cigarettes?’
‘What’s your rank?’ was the slightly unexpected reply.
‘I am afraid I haven’t got one,’ I answered.
‘Nonsense—everyone who comes here has a rank.’
‘I’m sorry but I just don’t have one.’
‘Now that puts me in a spot,’ said the barman, ‘for orders about cigarettes in this camp are clear—twenty for officers and ten for other ranks. Tell me what exactly are you?’
Now I really wanted those cigarettes so I drew myself up and said ‘I am the Professor of Chemistry at Manchester University.’
The barman contemplated me for about thirty seconds and then said ‘I’ll give you five.’
Since that day I have had few illusions about the importance of professors!
In A Time to Remember: The Autobiography of a Chemist (1983), 59. This event took place after a visit to the Defence Research Establishment at Porton to observe a demonstration of a new chemical anti-tank weapon (1941).
Science quotes on:  |  Bar (8)  |  Belief (503)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Cigarette (22)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Defence (6)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Drink (36)  |  Illusion (43)  |  Importance (216)  |  Manchester (4)  |  New (483)  |  Officer (8)  |  Order (239)  |  Professor (54)  |  Rank (32)  |  Second (59)  |  Serving (4)  |  Sorry (16)  |  Timid (5)  |  Unexpected (36)  |  University (80)  |  Want (175)  |  Wash (7)

All things on the earth are the result of chemical combination. The operation by which the commingling of molecules and the interchange of atoms take place we can imitate in our laboratories; but in nature they proceed by slow degrees, and, in general, in our hands they are distinguished by suddenness of action. In nature chemical power is distributed over a long period of time, and the process of change is scarcely to be observed. By acts we concentrate chemical force, and expend it in producing a change which occupies but a few hours at most.
In chapter 'Chemical Forces', The Poetry of Science: Or, Studies of the Physical Phenomena of Nature (1848), 235-236. Charles Dicken used this quote, with his own sub-head of 'Relative Importance Of Time To Man And Nature', to conclude his review of the book, published in The Examiner (1848).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (115)  |  Action (184)  |  Atom (280)  |  Change (363)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Combination (91)  |  Concentration (18)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Earth (635)  |  Force (249)  |  Hour (71)  |  Imitate (6)  |  Interchange (4)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Long (172)  |  Molecule (131)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Observed (6)  |  Operation (118)  |  Period (64)  |  Place (174)  |  Power (358)  |  Process (261)  |  Producing (6)  |  Result (376)  |  Slow (55)  |  Suddenness (4)  |  Time (594)

I despise Birth-Control first because it is ... an entirely meaningless word; and is used so as to curry favour even with those who would first recoil from its real meaning. The proceeding these quack doctors recommend does not control any birth. ... But these people know perfectly well that they dare not write the plain word Birth-Prevention, in any one of the hundred places where they write the hypocritical word Birth-Control. They know as well as I do that the very word Birth-Prevention would strike a chill into the public... Therefore they use a conventional and unmeaning word, which may make the quack medicine sound more innocuous. ... A child is the very sign and sacrament of personal freedom. He is a fresh will added to the wills of the world; he is something that his parents have freely chosen to produce ... he is their own creative contribution to creation.
In 'Babies and Distributism', The Well and the Shadows (1935). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 272.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (245)  |  Choice (79)  |  Control (111)  |  Conventional (18)  |  Creation (239)  |  Creativity (70)  |  Doctor (101)  |  Favor (30)  |  Hypocrite (4)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Parent (45)  |  Prevention (30)  |  Quack (15)  |  Real (148)  |  Recoil (6)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Sacrament (2)  |  Word (299)

I had made considerable advance ... in calculations on my favourite numerical lunar theory, when I discovered that, under the heavy pressure of unusual matters (two transits of Venus and some eclipses) I had committed a grievous error in the first stage of giving numerical value to my theory. My spirit in the work was broken, and I have never heartily proceeded with it since.
[Concerning his calculations on the orbital motion of the Moon.]
Private note (29 Sep 1890). In George Biddell Airy and Wilfrid Airy (ed.), Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy (1896), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (162)  |  Broken (12)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Error (275)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Grievous (3)  |  Heartily (3)  |  Lunar (9)  |  Moon (199)  |  Number (276)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Theory (690)

I have been asked whether I would agree that the tragedy of the scientist is that he is able to bring about great advances in our knowledge, which mankind may then proceed to use for purposes of destruction. My answer is that this is not the tragedy of the scientist; it is the tragedy of mankind.
S. R. Weart and G. W. Sallard (eds.), Leo Szilard: His Version of the Facts (1978), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (162)  |  Answer (249)  |  Asking (23)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Question (404)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Tragedy (22)

Mental events proceeding beneath the threshold of consciousness are the substrate upon which all conscious experience depends. To argue that all we need of our mental equipment is that part of which we are conscious is about as helpful as equating the United States with the Senate or England with the Houses of Parliament.
Quoted in 'Anthony (George) Stevens' in Gale, Contemporary Authors Online (2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (23)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Depend (87)  |  England (38)  |  Equating (2)  |  Equipment (29)  |  Event (115)  |  Experience (338)  |  Helpful (15)  |  Mental (78)  |  Need (283)  |  Part (220)  |  Substrate (2)  |  Threshold (7)  |  United States (31)

Philosophy is regarded by many as inseparable from speculation. ... Philosophy has proceeded from speculation to science.
The Rise of Scientific Philosophy (1951), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Science (2043)  |  Speculation (103)

Science has hitherto been proceeding without the guidance of any rational theory of logic, and has certainly made good progress. It is like a computer who is pursuing some method of arithmetical approximation. Even if he occasionally makes mistakes in his ciphering, yet if the process is a good one they will rectify themselves. But then he would approximate much more rapidly if he did not commit these errors; and in my opinion, the time has come when science ought to be provided with a logic. My theory satisfies me; I can see no flaw in it. According to that theory universality, necessity, exactitude, in the absolute sense of these words, are unattainable by us, and do not exist in nature. There is an ideal law to which nature approximates; but to express it would require an endless series of modifications, like the decimals expressing surd. Only when you have asked a question in so crude a shape that continuity is not involved, is a perfectly true answer attainable.
Letter to G. F. Becker, 11 June 1893. Merrill Collection, Library of Congress. Quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History (1966), 231-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Answer (249)  |  Approximation (22)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Attainment (40)  |  Commitment (20)  |  Computer (104)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Decimal (14)  |  Endless (28)  |  Error (275)  |  Exactitude (8)  |  Existence (296)  |  Flaw (10)  |  Good (345)  |  Guidance (20)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Ideal (69)  |  Logic (247)  |  Method (230)  |  Modification (35)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Perfection (88)  |  Progress (362)  |  Provision (16)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Question (404)  |  Rapidity (16)  |  Rationality (15)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sense (315)  |  Series (50)  |  Theory (690)  |  Time (594)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  Truth (914)  |  Universality (12)  |  Word (299)

The progress of synthesis, or the building up of natural materials from their constituent elements, proceeds apace. Even some of the simpler albuminoids, a class of substances of great importance in the life process, have recently been artificially prepared. ... Innumerable entirely new compounds have been produced in the last century. The artificial dye-stuffs, prepared from materials occurring in coal-tar, make the natural colours blush. Saccharin, which is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, is a purely artificial substance. New explosives, drugs, alloys, photographic substances, essences, scents, solvents, and detergents are being poured out in a continuous stream.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Alloy (2)  |  Artificial (32)  |  Blush (3)  |  Building (52)  |  Century (130)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Class (83)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Color (99)  |  Compound (58)  |  Constituent (16)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Detergent (2)  |  Drug (43)  |  Element (162)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Essence (54)  |  Explosive (18)  |  Great (524)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Importance (216)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Last (19)  |  Life (1124)  |  Material (154)  |  Natural (167)  |  New (483)  |  Occurrence (32)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pour (10)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Process (261)  |  Production (115)  |  Progress (362)  |  Purely (28)  |  Recent (29)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Scent (5)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Solvent (5)  |  Stream (40)  |  Substance (85)  |  Sugar (14)  |  Synthesis (43)

The Synthesis consists in assuming the Causes discovered and established as Principles, and by them explaining the Phænomena proceeding from them, and proving the Explanations.
From 'Query 31', Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 380-381.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (283)  |  Discover (196)  |  Established (7)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Principle (285)  |  Prove (108)  |  Synthesis (43)

The trouble is that all the investigators proceeded in exactly the same spirit, the spirit that is of scientific curiosity, and with no possibility of telling whether the issue of their work would prove them to be fiends, or dreamers, or angels.
'The Presidential Address: Part II Science and Warfare', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1938), 18-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (30)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Dreamer (10)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Work (626)

The Vermin only teaze and pinch
Their foes superior by an Inch.
So, Naturalists observe, a Flea
Hath smaller Fleas that on him prey,
And these have smaller Fleas to bite 'em.
And so proceed ad infinitum.
On Poetry: A Rhapsody (1735), lines 339-44.
Science quotes on:  |  Ad Infinitum (3)  |  Back (104)  |  Bite (12)  |  Flea (9)  |  Foe (7)  |  Inch (9)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Observation (445)  |  Pinch (4)  |  Prey (12)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Superior (40)  |  Vermin (3)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.