Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Providence

Providence Quotes (6 quotes)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Accurate (21)  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Audience (13)  |  Back (55)  |  Basket (5)  |  Basketball (2)  |  Battle (30)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (3)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cheer (5)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conference (8)  |  Country (121)  |  Court (16)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Curious (24)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (27)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Emotionally (2)  |  Event (97)  |  Exception (33)  |  First (174)  |  Foot (39)  |  Game (45)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardly (12)  |  High (78)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (170)  |  Involve (27)  |  Jump (13)  |  Leave (63)  |  Local (15)  |  Long (95)  |  March (15)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Military (24)  |  Move (58)  |  Murmur (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Net (10)  |  Night (73)  |  Occur (26)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  People (269)  |  Perform (27)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (60)  |  Player (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (3)  |  Promise (27)  |  Respectively (2)  |  Rest (64)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Right (144)  |  Routine (11)  |  Series (38)  |  Set (56)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Start (68)  |  Steadily (4)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Team (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Unusual (13)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (20)  |  Watch (39)  |  Whirl (2)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (214)

If finally, the science should prove that society at a certain time revert to the church and recover its old foundation of absolute faith in a personal providence and a revealed religion, it commits suicide.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Church (30)  |  Commit (17)  |  Faith (131)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Personal (49)  |  Prove (60)  |  Recover (5)  |  Religion (210)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Revert (4)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Society (188)  |  Suicide (16)

Many Species of Animals have been lost out of the World, which Philosophers and Divines are unwilling to admit, esteeming the Destruction of anyone Species a Dismembring of the Universe, and rendring the World imperfect; whereas they think the Divine Providence is especially concerned, and solicitous to secure and preserve the Works of the Creation. And truly so it is, as appears, in that it was so careful to lodge all Land Animals in the Ark at the Time of the general Deluge; and in that, of all Animals recorded in Natural Histories, we cannot say that there hath been anyone Species lost, no not of the most infirm, and most exposed to Injury and Ravine. Moreover, it is likely, that as there neither is nor can be any new Species of Animals produced, all proceeding from Seeds at first created; so Providence, without which one individual Sparrow falls not to the ground, doth in that manner watch over all that are created, that an entire Species shall not be lost or destroyed by any Accident. Now, I say, if these Bodies were sometimes the Shells and Bones of Fish, it will thence follow, that many Species have been lost out of the World... To which I have nothing to reply, but that there may be some of them remaining some where or other in the Seas, though as yet they have not come to my Knowledge. Far though they may have perished, or by some Accident been destroyed out of our Seas, yet the Race of them may be preserved and continued still in others.
John Ray
Three Physico-Theological Discourses (1713), Discourse II, 'Of the General Deluge, in the Days of Noah; its Causes and Effects', 172-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Admission (10)  |  Animal (309)  |  Ark (3)  |  Bone (57)  |  Continuation (17)  |  Creation (211)  |  Deluge (7)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Dismemberment (2)  |  Divine (42)  |  Esteem (8)  |  Fall (89)  |  Fish (85)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Ground (63)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Infirmity (4)  |  Injury (14)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Loss (62)  |  Natural History (44)  |  New (340)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Production (105)  |  Race (76)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Remains (9)  |  Rendering (6)  |  Reply (18)  |  Sea (143)  |  Shell (35)  |  Sparrow (6)  |  Species (181)  |  Unwillingness (3)  |  World (667)

The combination in time and space of all these thoughtful conceptions [of Nature] exhibits not only thought, it shows also premeditation, power, wisdom, greatness, prescience, omniscience, providence. In one word, all these facts in their natural connection proclaim aloud the One God, whom man may know, adore, and love; and Natural History must in good time become the analysis of the thoughts of the Creator of the Universe….
In Essay on Classification (1851), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Adore (2)  |  Analysis (123)  |  Combination (69)  |  Conception (63)  |  Connection (86)  |  Creator (40)  |  Exhibit (12)  |  Fact (609)  |  God (454)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Know (321)  |  Love (164)  |  Natural (128)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Omniscience (3)  |  Power (273)  |  Prescience (2)  |  Proclaim (12)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Show (55)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wisdom (151)

The desire for guidance, love, and support prompts men to form the social or moral conception of God. This is the God of Providence, who protects, disposes, rewards, and punishes; the God who, according to the limits of the believer’s outlook, loves and cherishes the life of the tribe or of the human race, or even or life itself; the comforter in sorrow and unsatisfied longing; he who preserves the souls of the dead. This is the social or moral conception of God.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Believer (8)  |  Cherish (6)  |  Conception (63)  |  Dead (45)  |  Desire (101)  |  Dispose (7)  |  Form (210)  |  God (454)  |  Guidance (12)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Life (917)  |  Limit (86)  |  Long (95)  |  Love (164)  |  Moral (100)  |  Outlook (12)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Prompt (5)  |  Protect (26)  |  Punish (5)  |  Reward (38)  |  Social (93)  |  Sorrow (8)  |  Soul (139)  |  Support (63)  |  Tribe (10)

When Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning-rod, the clergy, both in England and America, with the enthusiastic support of George III, condemned it as an impious attempt to defeat the will of God. For, as all right-thinking people were aware, lightning is sent by God to punish impiety or some other grave sin—the virtuous are never struck by lightning. Therefore if God wants to strike any one, Benjamin Franklin [and his lightning-rod] ought not to defeat His design; indeed, to do so is helping criminals to escape. But God was equal to the occasion, if we are to believe the eminent Dr. Price, one of the leading divines of Boston. Lightning having been rendered ineffectual by the “iron points invented by the sagacious Dr. Franklin,” Massachusetts was shaken by earthquakes, which Dr. Price perceived to be due to God’s wrath at the “iron points.” In a sermon on the subject he said,“In Boston are more erected than elsewhere in New England, and Boston seems to be more dreadfully shaken. Oh! there is no getting out of the mighty hand of God.” Apparently, however, Providence gave up all hope of curing Boston of its wickedness, for, though lightning-rods became more and more common, earthquakes in Massachusetts have remained rare.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Boston (2)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Benjamin Franklin (81)  |  Iron (53)  |  Lightning-Rod (2)  |  Point (72)  |  Punishment (10)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Sin (27)  |  Wickedness (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.